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Letters to the Editor

Has Harbor’s government chaos led to poor safety decisions?

Next week hundreds of boats will be floating on Newport Harbor enjoying the 111th Christmas Boat Parade.

Mega-yachts, sail boats, speed boats, paddle boards, tiny kayaks and Duffy boats will attempt to safely navigate the chaos.

The Harbor will look like the 405 at rush hour.

Almost as chaotic as the Christmas Boat Parade is the gaggle of a dozen government agencies that regulate the Harbor. 

Two years ago Councilman Duffy Duffield worked with the local Boy Scouts to have LED lights placed on the harbor buoys. It made the Harbor safer and the Scouts did it for free.

Letters to the editor buoy

Click on photo for a larger image

Courtesy of David Ellis

Within months, one of the gaggle of government agencies removed the LED lights because they didn’t have the “proper permits.”

Last February I requested the city’s help to find out what happened to the lights – and hopefully replace them. Nothing has happened in ten months. 

This is a small issue that underscores the need for our city to take control of the Harbor from the multiple bureaucracies that regulate it.

Let’s turn on the lights!

David Ellis

Newport Beach 

Rising sea level needs our attention

There have been two articles this last week in the LA Times (one an editorial) that talk about an existential threat to coastal cities – that of the rising sea level. Experts predict that in the next decade the sea level will rise by six inches.

Local coastal governments need to be working with the state and the California Coastal Commission to determine strategies for addressing this urgent problem. While California is a leader in reducing emissions of greenhouse gasses, it is totally unprepared for the rising sea.

 In Newport Beach, the time, energy and expense the city spends on problematic coastal developments could be better used to face this urgent issue.

Lynn Lorenz

Newport Beac