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Get out and explore Buck Gully this spring and summer 

Taking a hike in the Buck Gully Reserve, which connects Corona del Mar and Newport Coast, is the perfect opportunity to enjoy the upcoming warmer weather. Explore this 300-acre, natural habitat on foot, with three hikes led by the Irvine Ranch Conservancy staff.

Get out Buck Gully waterfall

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Photos by Emily Spain

The stream is running, making for a memorable late afternoon/early evening hike

–Buck Gully Upper Loop Evening Hikes: Explore the richness of Buck Gully Reserve as you hike during the beautiful early evening hours on Tuesdays, July 5 and Aug. 9 as well as Saturday, Sept. 10 from 3-5:30 p.m. The stream is running, and the rich plant and animal life are enjoying the cool, shady canyon making for an evening hike in a natural oasis amid the suburban surroundings. Walk along San Joaquin Hills Road, which overlooks Buck Gully for the first mile, then drop down into the canyon on the Bobcat Trail, looping back through the upper end of the gully along the Buck Gully Trail. This activity is conducted at a walking pace, approximately 3 miles per hour. The distance is 4 miles; duration, 2.5 hours with moderate difficulty. This hike is open to those 8 years and older. This hike is free, but registration is required. Staging area is the Newport Coast Community Center at 6401 San Joaquin Hills Road. Register at www.letsgooutside.org.

Get out Buck Gully bridge

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Several bridges provide unique vantages and viewing platforms

–Buck Gully Loop Hikes: Come and explore the entire Buck Gully Reserve trail system on Tuesdays, July 19 and Sept. 6, as well as Saturday, Aug. 13 from 8-11:30 a.m. Beginning from the OASIS Senior Center, you’ll hike up through the almost three-mile length of the canyon, then along San Joaquin Hills Road for about a mile, stopping at Canyon Watch Park, where you will take in the panoramic view of the reserve and the Pacific coastline before descending back into the canyon along the Bobcat Trail. This hike is 6 miles; duration, 3.5 hours with high-moderate difficulty and conducted at a walking pace, approximately three miles per hour. It is geared to those 12+ years of age. This hike is free, but registration is required. Meet at the OASIS Senior Center auxiliary lot at 5th and Marguerite in Corona del Mar Register at www.letsgooutside.org.

Get out Buck Gully views

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Enjoy panoramic views as you take in the canyon’s natural beauty

–Bridges of Buck Gully Hikes: Buck Gully is a natural, coastal canyon which opened up to the public in 2012 with the installation of four bridges to allow for safe public access. Discover the bridges on Tuesdays, June 21, Aug. 23 and Sept. 20, as well as Saturday, July 9 and from 8-11:30 a.m. These bridges facilitate exploration of the Buck Gully Reserve, and also provide unique vantages and viewing platforms from which to pause and observe the abundant life in and around the stream. The guided program starts with a short walk from the OASIS Senior Center to the beginning of the Buck Gully trail, offering a visually dramatic entrance into this special canyon. Open to those 12 years and older. Conducted at a walking pace at approximately 3 miles per hour. Distance is 5 miles; duration is 3.5 hours with moderate difficulty. This hike is free, but registration is required. Meet at the OASIS Senior Center auxiliary lot at 5th and Marguerite in Corona del Mar. Register at www.letsgooutside.org.


Balboa Classical Concert scheduled for June 21

The next Balboa Island Classical Concert will be on held on Tuesday, June 21 from 7-8 p.m. at St. John Vianney’s Chapel, located at 314 Marine Ave., Balboa Island. Featured is the energetic and immensely popular Elixir Piano Trio performing a wonderful program. 

Balboa Classical Concert Elixir

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The Elixir Piano Trio performs on June 21 as part of the Balboa Island Concert Series

The Elixir Piano Trio was founded in 2004 and has performed all over the world, focusing on both a traditional and modern repertoire. The trio consists of pianist, Lucy Nargizyan; violinist, Samvel Chilingarian and cellist, Fang Fang Xu. Nargizyan and Chilingarian have combined their love of music along with teaching at East Los Angeles College. All three have earned their doctoral degrees in their instrument and are highly gifted musicians. 

Doors open at 6:30 p.m. Tickets are $15 per person and may be purchased at Balboa Island Museum Newport Beach, located at 210B Marine Ave., Balboa Island, or online at www.balboaislandnb.org.


OCMA to present monumental, commissioned sculpture by Sanford Biggers at October 8 opening

The Orange County Museum of Art (OCMA) announced plans to present a monumental outdoor sculpture by artist Sanford Biggers when the museum opens on October 8 at its new home on the campus of Segerstrom Center for the Arts. The 24-foot-wide, 16-foot-tall multimedia sculpture, Of many waters…(2022), has been commissioned for the Sculpture Terrace of OCMA’s new building, designed by Morphosis under the direction of Pritzker Prize-winning architect Thom Mayne and Partner-in-Charge Brandon Welling and will remain on view through February 5, 2023. The artist will be honored at the museum’s Opening Gala on October 1. 

 According to Heidi Zuckerman, CEO and Director of OCMA, “I’ve been lucky enough to work with Sanford Biggers starting early on in his career, having curated his first museum solo exhibition, Psychic Windows, at the UC Berkley Art Museum and Pacific Film Archive in 2002 and I continue to admire his poignant work. Curating his large-scale sculpture to welcome visitors to OCMA’s stunning new space has been incredibly meaningful for me and I can’t wait to share his work with the public and to honor Sanford at the Gala to kick off our opening celebrations.”

“I’m absolutely thrilled to be honored by OCMA this year, and excited to collaborate with the OCMA community in the unveiling of my latest monumental sculpture Of many waters…which combines my interest in classical sculpture and American quilt making,” said Biggers.

OCMA opening sculpture

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Courtesy of OCMA

A rendering of OCMA’s “Of many waters…(2002)” outdoor sculpture

 Of many waters…, is a site-responsive, interactive public artwork that will activate the open space of the museum’s upper terrace. The work depicts a form that combines an archetype of a European reclining male figure with a 19th century Baule double-face mask made from metal sequins. Biggers patchworks two distinct bodies of work – the artist’s ongoing Chimera and Shimmer series – into a new form that the artist considers “objects for a future ethnography,” encouraging historical objects to be studied, researched and continuously reconsidered. In addition to the complex networks of historical references that course through this work, the artist traces connections to antiquity, non-Western cultures and traditions, including Buddhism’s sacred geometry. 

 The Opening Gala is chaired by Jennifer Segerstrom and co-chaired by Lisa Merage alongside the Gala Executive Committee and Gala Ambassador Committee members. The second annual gala held at the new site will have guests celebrating in style with a suggested dress of “Utopian Black Tie” and welcome back Master Sommelier Jay Fletcher and DJ Dylan Regan with catering this year provided by Untitled Events. OCMA’s Opening Gala is presented by lead sponsor South Coast Plaza.

This year’s gala will kick off a weeklong roster of events leading up to OCMA’s public opening in its new home. Proceeds from OCMA’s Opening Gala will benefit the museum at the time of its grand opening including funding innovative exhibitions, building on OCMA’s noted collection and enabling educational programming. In 2021, the first annual gala at the new site, Art Sense, sold out and raised $1 million for the museum and its operations, significantly increasing past gala net revenue.

In addition to the installation of Biggers’ work, OCMA will open with the return of the California Biennial, an exploration of the richness of the state’s expansive and diverse creative communities. Fred Eversley: Reflecting Back (the World) will elaborate on a groundbreaking 1978 exhibition of his work at OCMA (then known as the Newport Harbor Art Museum), examining five decades of Eversley’s career and the technical innovation employed in his work with cast polyester resin, the crux of his practice. Peter Walker: Minimalist Landscape focuses on the work of the highly regarded landscape architect, most recognized for co-designing the National 9/11 Memorial and his history of collaboration with the Segerstrom Family since the 1970s and design for the Segerstrom Center for the Arts. 13 Women will feature the work of female artists from the museum’s collection, curated by Heidi Zuckerman, to honor the 13 women who founded the Balboa Pavilion Gallery, OCMA’s predecessor institution, 60 years ago.

For more information on OCMA, visit https://ocma.art.


Tony Award® winner “Hadestown” comes to Segerstrom Hall, August 9-21

Hadestown, the winner of eight 2019 Tony Awards® including Best New Musical and the 2020 Grammy® Award for Best Musical Theater Album, will come to Segerstrom Hall at Segerstrom Center for the Arts, August 9-21. 

Hadestown is the most honored show of the 2018-2019 Broadway season. In addition to the show’s eight Tony Awards®, it has been honored with four Drama Desk Awards, six Outer Critics Circle Awards, including Outstanding New Broadway Musical and the Drama League Award for Outstanding Production of a Musical. 

Tony Award Winner Hadestown cast

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Photo by Matthew Murphy

Workers Chorus in the Original Broadway Cast of “Hadestown”

The acclaimed new musical is by celebrated singer-songwriter and Tony Award® winner Anaïs Mitchell and developed with innovative director and Tony Award® winner Rachel Chavkin. Hadestown marks the first time in over a decade that a woman has been the solo author of a musical: writing the music, lyrics, and book and is the fourth time in Broadway history a woman has accomplished this creative feat.

The North American touring production of Hadestown in Costa Mesa will star Morgan Siobhan Green as Eurydice, Chibueze Ihuoma as Orpheus, Tony Award® winner Levi Kreis as Hermes, Kimberly Marable as Persephone and Olivier Award® nominee Kevyn Morrow as Hades.

Following two intertwining love stories – that of young dreamers Orpheus and Eurydice, and that of King Hades and his wife Persephone – Hadestown invites audiences on a hell-raising journey to the underworld and back. Mitchell’s beguiling melodies and Chavkin’s poetic imagination pit industry against nature, doubt against faith and fear against love. Performed by a vibrant ensemble of actors, dancers and singers, Hadestown delivers a deeply resonant and defiantly hopeful theatrical experience.

Tickets, starting at $28, are available online at www.scfta.org, at the Box Office at 600 Town Center Drive in Costa Mesa, or by calling 714.556.2787. For inquiries about group ticket discounts for 10 or more, call the Group Services offices at 714.755.0236.

Segerstrom Hall at Segerstrom Center for the Arts is located at 600 Town Center Drive, Costa Mesa.


Fair Game

By TOM JOHNSON

The kids of Newport Beach once again head to summer Junior Guards

TOM MARCHAs sure as the wildebeest migrate from Tanzania’s Serengeti Desert to Masai Mara in Kenya…the caribou, from the U.S. border to the Tuk Peninsula, north of the Arctic Circle…salmon, which leave their feeding grounds far out in the ocean to travel hundreds of miles up through inland freshwater streams to spawn…monarch butterflies that find their way from the farthest parts of North America all the way down to California and into Mexico…or the Gray Whale that travels some 12,000 miles annually in a round-trip migration from the Arctic to the Baja lagoons…today, our greatest LOCAL migration begins.

Yes, adorned in their signature red swimsuits and trunks, many aboard bicycles, the great migration of this year’s Newport Beach Junior Lifeguards begins as kids ages 9-15 get their turn to experience what so many before them have done for the past 38 years in Newport Beach (begun in 1984).

Now, Monday through Thursday, 9 a.m. to noon for the morning session, and 1-4 p.m. for the afternoon session, the Junior Guards will not only fill our beach and ocean around the Balboa Pier, but also our crosswalks and sidewalks in their efforts to arrive to the Peninsula and home safely. It’s incumbent on all of us as automobile drivers to slow down, exude a little patience and make sure we also do our part in that effort.

In case you don’t know what the participants learn and/or experience in JG, it’s a “seven-week ocean-based program focused on building ocean swimming skills, physical fitness, beach safety awareness and learning the role of ocean lifeguards...all while having an amazing time at the beach!”

For many, it’s simply their rite of passage. Enjoy!

• • •

Several weeks ago, Newport Beach City Manager Grace Leung shared news that the California Coastal Commission unanimously approved a proposal to allow the City of Newport Beach to install a floating trash collection system. The “trash wheel” would be installed on the banks of San Diego Creek and designed to prevent thousands of tons of trash from finding its way down into the Upper Newport Bay and, eventually, to the ocean.

The wheel is modeled after one being used in Baltimore’s harbor. The system would utilize two booms, a water wheel and conveyer belt, capturing and removing the trash that comes downstream and deposit it into nearby containers on the riverbank.

The wheel would be “sustainably powered by solar panels and the movement of water,” and installed on the north bank, between the Jamboree Road and MacArthur Boulevard bridges.

Fair Game Trash collecting water wheel rendering

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Courtesy of City of Newport Beach/CCC

A rendering of the trash-collecting water wheel proposed for San Diego Creek, near Upper Newport Bay

According to Leung, “The City was awarded a $2.2 million grant from the Ocean Protection Council and Orange County Transit Authority (Measure M) to fund permitting, engineering and building.”

And now, following the Coastal Commission’s approval, the city will seek additional approvals with the hope of undertaking the project beginning in January 2023.

Recently, some negative comments concerning the water wheel were circulating on local social media sites, criticizing the trash wheel project by saying that “it’s already been tried with the Hamilton Water Rake…and is a complete waste of money.” 

The Hamilton Water Rake, for those who don’t know, was a device designed by former Newport Beach Citizen of the Year Bill Hamilton, the former owner of The Cannery, back in the early 1990s. It was designed to move around the bay picking up trash that had already made its way into the harbor, much of it from upstream.

The trash wheel and the water rake are not even close in comparison. The wheel prevents trash from entering, while the rake in its day picked up that trash once it made its way there.

Still, Stu News went to the source and asked former mayor and current city councilmember Duffy Duffield about this new “wheel”:

“OMG…I can’t believe anyone would argue against this device. Picking up the trash BEFORE it reaches the upper bay is the most logical and least expensive method by light years. 

“BTW, when a Styrofoam or plastic cup ends up on the reed grass in the upper bay there is virtually no way to remove it. It has to disintegrate over time which takes forever.

“You can’t walk on the reed grass or drive a boat on it, or near it. There’s 500 acres of reed grass out there. Well, maybe not 500 acres of reed grass but that’s the total area that makes up the reserve. Trust me, it’s a bunch, just take a look out there and you’ll agree. 

“The San Diego Creek runs by several cities – Lake Forest, Santa Ana, Irvine, Tustin, Laguna Woods and Orange. They all dump their “dry water flow” every day into the creek via storm drains. Dry water flow is constant all year long. Funny they call it what they call it, right? This is the water from washing cars, watering lawns and landscape, etc. 

“The device (water wheel) will automatically break away in a large storm event so that it won’t be overwhelmed. It will be put back in place immediately after the storm event. Same thing happens to the one in Baltimore Harbor. 

“So, yes there is no way to capture 100% of the trash in the San Diego Creek, but by filtering out the trash 90% of the time we limit the trash going in by several tons each year. 

“The best news is we received a grant from the state to pay for more than half of it. I got the money four years ago! Permitting and engineering issues slowed the process considerably. But as you know government works like that.

“Makes me crazy. 

“The newly opened trash separator in the Delhi Channel built by the Army Corps acts like a water wheel. It is located next to the golf course at the end of the airport runway. This is great timing because there are only two channels of water that make it to the upper bay and soon both will have trash separation methods in place. 

“In the future, I’m told, there will be laws to force cities upstream from us to block 100% of the trash that flows into storm drains and storm basins. Heavy fines have been considered to force the issue. Screens will be installed at every storm drain in each city forcing them to “clean out” the trash and haul it away. Cities don’t want to do this because it requires money whereas today, they have no obligation to clean their storm drains or storm channels. 

“So, eventually (maybe) the two flowing creeks we have now won’t have a spec of trash and when that happens, we won’t need the water wheel. I think that is wishful thinking but knowing California maybe it will happen. Not in my lifetime but…”

Duffy

• • •

Speaking of trash, the Orange County Coastkeepers, Assemblymember Cottie Petrie-Norris and State Senator Dave Min, joined with 78 volunteers Saturday for a clean-up of the Santa Ana River-Delhi Channel.

We’re told that in just two hours, the group removed more than 2,500 pounds of debris from the waterway, preventing it from impacting the Upper Newport Bay.

“It makes me so happy when I see people really care about our community. Thank you to the amazing volunteers who made this River Channel Cleanup a huge success,” said Assemblywoman Cottie Petrie-Norris (D-Irvine).

“Keeping river channels clean and trash-free is vital to protecting our local wetlands and estuaries, especially here at the edge of Newport Back Bay,” said Senator Dave Min (D-Irvine). 

Orange County waterways collect trash from inland communities via the county’s rivers and storm drains. If not intercepted, the pollution impacts our oceans and shorelines. Community cleanups are one of the best ways for the public to help prevent this debris from polluting the sea and harming marine wildlife.

• • •

So, Sunday was the perfect Father’s Day, spending it with my daughter, Ashley. We headed down to the 15th Annual Father’s Day Car Show at the Balboa Bay Resort and followed that up with lunch overlooking the bay at the A & O Restaurant/Bar

First, the collection of cars was great and the crowd, which filled the Resort’s south parking lot, was more than appreciative. 

If you didn’t go, here are some of the entries you missed:

Best Classic Car, 1955 Mercedes 300SL, Gary Jabara

Most Colorful Award, 1955 Chevrolet Delray, Bob Lienau

BBC Governor Award, 1962 Fiat Jolly, Bill McCullough

BBC Governor Award, 2022 Ford GT, Chadwick Manista

BBC Governor Award, 1958 Mercedes 300 SN, Nick & Ruth Clemmons

Best Luxury Car, 1962, Bentley, Continental S2 Coupe, Jerry & Eric Barto

Best Muscle Car, 1968 Ford Mustang McQueen, Vance Vlasek

Dad’s Pick, 1968 Ford Bronco, Alfredo Dreyfus Sr.

Best British Car, 1970 MG MGB, Amanda Walker

Fast & Furious, 2022 Superlite LMP Hypercar, Don Davis

Favorite Car in Show, 1959 Volkswagen Shorty Bus, Bill Stellmacher

Fair Game VW shorty bus

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Photo by Ashley Johnson

Voted the Favorite Car in Show, this “Shorty” 1959 Volkswagen Bus drew everyone’s attention


A place to celebrate hope: Celebration Plaza at Lennar Foundation Cancer City at City of Hope Orange County

June is National Cancer Survivors Month, and City of Hope is offering a glimpse of the special place on their 11-acre Irvine campus where survivors, their family and others can come together to celebrate hope.

Celebration Plaza is a welcoming circular courtyard offering shaded seating areas set amidst gracefully landscaped trees and planters.

A place to celebrate Celebration Plaza

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Photos courtesy of City of Hope Orange County

Celebration Plaza (rendering) is part of City of Hope’s transformational approach to researching, treating and healing cancer

Located steps from the entrance to Lennar Foundation Cancer Center, the plaza is part of City of Hope’s transformational approach to researching, treating and healing cancer.

City of Hope understands the vital importance of taking care of patients as whole people and that healing, mind, soul and spirit is just as important as the world-renowned expertise, lifesaving treatments and pioneering research that heal the body.

In furtherance of that belief, the cancer center is intentionally designed, from the interior to the exterior, to promote healing and wellness not only for patients but their family and friends as well. Visitors can take a break from sitting with their loved one during treatment – infusion therapy can take several hours per visit – and walk the plaza, enjoy the sunshine, place a message of hope on the wishing tree and admire the healing garden first planted by patients and community through a generous donation made by Lowe’s.

Cancer survivors are living with, through and beyond their disease. People with cancer have much to be hopeful for, said Edward S. Kim, M.D., M.B.A., Physician-in-Chief, City of Hope Orange County.

“Cancer survival is at an all-time high,” Dr. Kim said. “Yes, having cancer is challenging, but you can survive and thrive. Many of my patients tell me they have been inspired to start whole new careers and vocations or reconnect with family members after experiencing cancer. There is hope for the future. Remaining positive is everything.”

A place to celebrate plaza

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The plaza is a welcoming circular courtyard offering shaded seating areas set amidst gracefully landscaped trees and planters

Lennar Foundation Cancer Center at City of Hope Orange County is more than a building. It is a place where lives will be saved and survivors and their families will be kept together.

When it opens this year, this NCI-designated comprehensive cancer center will bring many innovative cancer services never before available in the region. Patients will have access to more than 400 physicians and 1,000 researchers and scientists who only focus on cancer, 1,000 clinical trials, nationally recognized supportive care services and groundbreaking integrative medicine programs.

The future is hope and it’s unfolding in Orange County. Visit www.cityofhope.org/OC to learn more. To make an appointment at any of the four City of Hope Orange County locations, click here, or call:

Newport Beach Fashion Island: 949.763.2204

Newport Beach Lido: 949.999.1400

Irvine Sand Canyon: 949.333.7580

Huntington Beach: 714.252.9415


Newport Beach Junior Lifeguards hit the beach today

Newport Beach Junior guards group

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Newport Beach Junior guards ocean

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Newport Beach Junior guards kickoff

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Photos courtesy of NBJG

Newport Beach Junior Lifeguards hit the beach today, Tuesday, June 21, officially the first day of summer. Youngsters ages 9-15 will be filling our ocean, beach and shoreline near Balboa Pier – easy to spot with their red swimsuits/trunks as they begin the seven-week ocean-based program focused on building ocean swimming skills, physical fitness, beach safety awareness and learning the role of ocean lifeguards, while having lots of fun in the process. Pictured are the NBJGs from the 2021 program.


Newport Beach – A Look Back

Photo series courtesy of Balboa Island Museum Newport Beach

Newport Beach A. Look Back 300 block of Marine Ave., 1937.JPG NEW

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300 block of Marine Avenue, 1937

Balboa Island Museum Newport Beach and the Museum Store are located at 210 B Marine Ave., Balboa Island. They are open Monday through Thursday from 10 a.m.-5 p.m. and Friday through Sunday from 10 a.m.-6 p.m. Free general admission on all days. Two-hour parking is available on Marine Avenue. For more information, call 949.675.3952, visit www.balboaislandmuseum.org or email This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it..


Solitude at Crystal Cove

Solitude at Crystal Cove

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Photo by Joel Goldstein

The state or situation of being alone


Upgrade plans in the development for Sherman Library & Gardens

By AMY SENK

Like many home-improvement plans, the idea behind updating and refurbishing Sherman Library & Gardens started with a single, simple goal.

“I just wanted to put a new entrance on Coast Highway,” Scott LaFleur, executive director of Sherman Library & Gardens, told Corona del Mar Residents Association members on Thursday.

Moving the entrance to the front, instead of its current location from the back parking lot, between Dahlia and Fernleaf avenues, seemed straightforward enough back in 2017. But as garden and library officials and board members discussed it, they realized the 56-year-old center needed some fundamental upgrades as well as some improvements to keep up with growth. Electrical work so coffee pots wouldn’t blow fuses when you plugged them in, new pipes so toilets could handle toilet paper. “We’re 56 years old, not much has been done and we’re starting to feel it,” LaFleur said.

Problems went beyond the basics of plumbing and power. Education, he told the group, is a foundational priority.

“Yet we have no dedicated classroom or space for education,” he said. “Additional facilities will not only allow us to expand our on-campus programs, but will also allow us to expand capacity for outreach, taking curriculum and expertise to children and families who may not have the opportunity to come to us.”

Upgrade plans Scott LeFleur

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Photos by Amy Senk

Scott LaFleur, executive director of Sherman Library & Gardens, where an update and refurbishing is in the planning stages

In 2020, they hired their first-ever education director (LeFleur had to split his office in half to make room for hers) and then the first-ever garden educator. Last year, they held 186 horticulture, art or wellness classes for 3,256 participants; 29 lectures for 1,350 participants; training and outreach events for 1,501 participants; plus other events that drew 3,107 participants.

“We started our habitat explorer field trip program in January 2022 and we have had 21 schools visit with more than 600 students served,” he said. “The habitat explorer program is open to all schools, and we provide scholarships and bus subsidies for those schools that need assistance. We hope to expand this program to 69 visits and more than 3,000 kids next year.”

Last year, he said, the garden had 76,855 visitors and the library had 4,103.

He vowed the plans would keep the adobe, which founder Arnold D. Haskell purchased (along with the surrounding property) back in the 1950s, to use as an office. “It’s very much beloved, and it will absolutely stay.”

LaFleur said they’ve hired architects and are working on plans, which he hopes to be able to share next year. They’re taking their time on the front end, and he’s been reluctant to give too many details at this stage. He told me the same thing in 2019 when I asked about plans that I’d heard being discussed.

“The single directive is, ‘Don’t ruin this place,’” he said. “We just want to get it right.”

He also gave updates on the popular 608 Dahlia restaurant, run by Executive Chef Jessica Roy.

Upgrade plans LeFleur at podium

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LaFleur addressing the Corona del Mar Residents Association members

Late Night Thursdays, he said, will have lawn games and beer, wine and special drinks along with a limited light menu until 6 p.m. – reservations are suggested but not required. And on Sundays, lunch hours will be extended to 3 p.m. Picnicking in the gardens on Sundays after 4 p.m. is allowed.

The meeting also provided an update from City Councilmember Will O’Neill, about city finances, and from Lt. Brad Miller, Area 4 commander for the Newport Beach Police Department. Shoplifting and pickpockets are up, Lt. Miller said, and he advised not to leave a purse hanging over the back of a chair in a restaurant, or in a shopping cart if you walk away.

~~~~~~~~

Amy Senk has lived in Corona del Mar for 20+ years and was publisher of Corona del Mar Today, an online newspaper that ran daily for seven years. Senk, a graduate of the University of Missouri School of Journalism, is involved in the Corona del Mar Residents Association. She and her husband have two children attending college at the University of Missouri and Duke University. She is a regular contributor to Stu News Newport.


School Notes

District promotes Jeff Trader to one Assistant Superintendent role and goes out to hire Socorro Shiels for another

Newport-Mesa Unified School District (NMUSD) has named Jeff Trader as the Assistant Superintendent, Chief Business Official; and Socorro Shiels as the Assistant Superintendent of Achievement, Innovation and Continuous Improvement.

Trader has been promoted to assistant superintendent. In his 25 years with NMUSD, Trader has served as manager, director, administrative director and chief financial officer. He is also a certified chief business official by the California Association of School Business Officials.

As chief financial officer, Trader has been responsible for the oversight of the district’s financial operations, which include accounting, budgeting, payroll, purchasing, property and liability and attendance accounting. One of Trader’s most gratifying accomplishments as CFO was taking advantage of a favorable interest rate environment to restructure the district’s general obligation bond debt, which saved the taxpayers more than $153 million.

Trader has been lauded for clearly and effectively communicating the district’s financial vision and ensuring the district remains financially stable. As assistant superintendent, chief business official, his role will expand to include oversight for all business services departments including information technology, fiscal, risk, purchasing and warehouse, facilities planning development and design, maintenance and operations and transportation.

“Under his leadership, the business services division has become more efficient and customer-service focused, resulting in better support for all departments and school sites,” said Superintendent Dr. Wesley Smith. “He is a focused professional who is known for always finding a way to make things work.” 

Shiels joins NMUSD and will be responsible for implementing and managing an improvement model aligned to the district’s priorities. She will develop, coordinate and direct a plan that not only supports the district’s vision while promoting inclusion for all, but also responds to the diversity of students, staff and the community, and craft a comprehensive strategy that enables district leaders to continuously improve district programs and outcomes. Through the use of evaluative findings, including student data, she and her team will address gaps in achievement, access, opportunities and wellness. 

Known as a service-oriented leader, Shiels has extensive management and educational leadership experience. Prior to serving as the diversity, inclusion, and equal employment officer for the City of Santa Rosa, she was the superintendent of the Sonoma Valley Unified School District, developing a systemic strategic plan to address student academic success, community engagement and system cohesion. As the director of education at the California Collaborative for Educational Excellence, Shiels led a large-scale statewide movement of continuous improvement with county offices of education and local school districts. She built community support for public education while superintendent of the Santa Rosa City School District, as evidenced by the passage of two school district facility and technology bonds totaling $229 million for elementary and secondary schools.

In her 30-year career, Shiels has served in leadership positions with multiple school districts and county offices of education, and has taught at the University of California, Davis; the University of San Francisco and California State University, Sacramento.

She received her master’s degree in educational leadership from California State University, East Bay and her bachelor’s degree in Spanish from Bowdoin College. 

Shiels will join NMUSD on July 1.


Library Foundation submits lecture hall plans to city for plan check

The Newport Beach Public Library Lecture Hall Project has passed another major hurdle, with the submittal of architectural plans to the City of Newport Beach for a plan check, the review of code compliance for the proposed design.

The Lecture Hall will be nearly 10,000 square feet, with tiered seating for 299 guests. Located next to the Central Library in a freestanding building, the improvements will also include an expanded courtyard for pre- and post-events, and a reconfiguration of the library parking lot. 

Library Foundation submits outside

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Courtesy of the Newport Beach Public Library Foundation

The outside rendering of the planned lecture hall

The city joined with the Newport Beach Public Library Foundation in the quest for a Lecture Hall at the behest of the Board of Library Trustees which oversees the operation of the library system. 

The dream has been long in development but is getting closer to reality. In July 2019, after several presentations to the City Council demonstrating the need and demand for an improved facility to host authors, prominent speakers and city and community gatherings, the city formed the Library Lecture Hall Design Committee. The committee is chaired by Jill Johnson-Tucker, with Councilmember Diane Dixon, Chair of the Foundation Board Karen H. Clark, Library Trustee Janet Ray and EVP/The Related Companies Matthew Witte.

The Design Committee was tasked with evaluating potential architects for the project. After reviewing submittals from eight prominent firms, and conducting multiple interviews, the committee recommended local architect Robert Coffee who also designed the OASIS Senior Center. Over the course of more than a dozen public meetings, the committee provided guidance to Coffee in the development of concept plans acceptable to the committee and to the City Council. The plans for the Lecture Hall are expected to go to bid in Fall 2022.

Library Foundation submits inside

Courtesy of the Newport Beach Public Library Foundation

The inside rendering of the planned lecture hall

The project will be funded through both public and private sources. Pursuant to an agreement between the city and the foundation, the city will be contributing half and the foundation will fundraise for the remainder. A capital campaign will be launched by the foundation in the near future.


Mosaicist Irina Charny leads walking tour

Mosaicist butterfly

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Courtesy of Sherman Library & Gardens

Mosaicist Irina Charny gave a walking tour of her summer art exhibit “Inspired by Nature” to Sherman Library & Gardens’ garden ambassadors and docents last week. The exhibit opens today on the first day of summer and runs through September 21. Sherman Library & Gardens is located at Pacific Coast Highway, Corona del Mar. For more information, visit www.thesherman.org.


Phase VII of Civic Center sculptures to be unveiled in Saturday ceremony

This Saturday, June 25, the next wave of sculptures will be introduced in a ceremony at the Newport Beach Civic Center and the adjoining park. A dedication ceremony will kick things off in the City Council Chambers from 1-1:30 p.m.

Ten new sculptures, all selected by a public vote, will be introduced as Phase VII of the sculpture exhibition. They were all reviewed and approved by the City Council at a February meeting.

Phase VII of Civic Center sculptures collage of 10

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Courtesy of Newport Beach Cultural Arts 

A snippet of each of the new sculptures that will be introduced at the June 25 unveiling ceremony

The day will include not only the dedication ceremony but also children’s activities, music and light refreshments. Attendees will be encouraged to walk through the park and experience each of the new additions.

Those sculptures selected will now be on loan to the City of Newport Beach for two years. Sculptors, whose artworks were chosen, receive a small honorarium. The city was responsible for installing the art, while artists are responsible for the maintenance and repair of their work. 

The outdoor exhibition attracts an audience of all ages, including schoolchildren, the local community, and visitors from Southern California and beyond. 

The names of the Phase VII sculptures are:

Eve by Joe Forrest Sackett, Albuquerque, NM

Pathway Parabola by Greg Mueller, Lutsen Mountain, MN

Where Have All The Birds Gone? by Marguerite Elliot, Fairfax, CA

Pluma Sculptura, a.k.a. “The Feather” by Kirk Seese, Lutherville-Timonium, MD

To The Moon by Alex G, Vista, CA

Prey by Mr. & Mrs. Ferguson, Alameda, CA

Archeology of the Everyday by Tyler Burton, Palm Springs, CA

A Novel Idea by Craig Gray, Key West, FL

David by Miggy Buck, New York, NY

Cross-Section by Tim DeShong, Caratunk, ME

Newport Beach Civic Center is located at 100 Civic Center Drive, Newport Beach. The park is free to tour.


Regattas and Races…

Regattas and Races.jpg 6.21

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Photo by Bronny Daniels | Joysailing.com

NHYC 

2022 Twilights – June Series

June 16

Finn (3 races, 0 discard)

1 Michael Downing, NHYC, Total 7

2 Phil Ramming, NHYC, Total 7

3 Robert Kinney, NHYC, Total 9

4 Paul Marshall, NHYC, Total 11

5 Bob Martin, MBYC, Total 11

6 Sail #147, NHYC, Total 18

7 Brad Dwan, NHYC, Total 20

8 David Wood, NHYC, Total 20

Harbor 20 A (6 races, 1 discard)

1 Menninger/Deermount, NHYC, Total 18, Net 12

2 Thompson/Conzelman, NHYC/BCYC/LIYC, Total 23, Net 16

3 Bose/Elliot, BCYC, Total 43, Net 32

4 Camerini/Detwiler, UCISA, Total 41, Net 32

5 Killian/Newman, NHYC, Total 44, Net 34

6 Kurt Weiss, NHYC, Total 46, Net 37

7 G. Thorne/K. Thorne, BYC, Total 53, Net 43

8 N. Madigan/M. Madigan, NHYC, Total 43, Net 32

9 Thompson/Kraus, NHYC, Total 41, Net 32

10 Hause/Wells, NHYC, Total 44, Net 34

11 Bob Yates, NHYC, Total 46, Net 37

12 Ed Kimball, NHYC, Total 53, Net 43

13 Peter Kinney, NHYC, Total 63, Net 52

14 Noring/Foy, SBYC, Total 63, Net 52

Harbor 20 B (6 races, 1 discard)

1 C. Bailey/J. Bailey, NHYC, Total 23, Net 16

2 Fischbacher/Hurlimann, BSSB, Total 26, Net 17

3 Mat. McKinlay/Mad. McKinlay, NHYC, Total 30, Net 23

4 Drayton/Benter, NHYC, Total 32, Net 24

5 Buddy Richley, NHYC, Total 33, Net 26

6 P. Haynes/D. Haynes, BCYC, Total 33, Net 26

7 Watanabe/Sutherland, UCISA, Total 38, Net 27

8 Bob McDonald, NHYC, Total 39, Net 28

9 Sail #207, n/a, Total 39, Net 30

10 Thomas Corkett, NHYC, Total 43, Net 33

11 Chris Hill, BCYC/Oasis, Total 47, Net 35

12 Chan/Logan, NHYC, Total 45, Net 35

13 G. Kelly/D. Kelly, NHYC, Total 52, Net 40

Harbor 20 C (5 races, 1 discard)

1 Atkins/Killian, LIYC, Total 9, Net 6

2 K. Fuller/C. Fuller, NHYC, Total 12, Net 9

3 Cook/Morgan, NHYC, Total 15, Net 11

4 Bradley/Russell, NHYC, Total 15, Net 11

5 Sail #109, n/a, Total 15, Net 12

6 Jonathan Hibma, NHYC, Total 18, Net 14

Lehman 12 (6 races, 1 discard)

1 Jake LaDow, NHYC, Total 17, Net 10

2 Smith/Beek, NHYC, Total 33, Net 23

3 Andrew Person, NHYC, Total 34, Net 25

4 Alex Curtiss, NHYC, Total 37, Net 25

5 Michael Dahl, NHYC, Total 39, Net 30

6 Will LaDow, NHYC, Total 41, Net 32

7 Scott Mais, NHYC, Total 45, Net 33

8 Michael Ramming, NHYC, Total 48, Net 33

9 Pete Stemler, NHYC, Total 42, Net 33

10 Randall Hause, NHYC, Total 44, Net 35

11 Sail #275, NHYC, Total 53, Net 38

12 Reid Wiley, NHYC, Total 51, Net 39

13 Clark/Olmstead, NHYC, Total 51, Net 41

14 Tyler Macdonald, NHYC, Total 55, Net 42

15 Jeff Aschieris, NHYC, Total 62, Net 49

16 Ayres 3/DeYoung, NHYC, Total 68, Net 53

BYC 

2022 Beercans – Lager (June) Series

June 16

Race #2 – PHRF 1 (4.5 miles)

1 It’s Ok, Andrews 49.9, Purcell/Rose

   Elapsed 0:37:32, Corrected 0:41:08

2 Coquille, Farr 40, Wes Selby, BYC

   Elapsed 0:49:48, Corrected 0:49:21

Race #2 – PHRF 2 (4.5 miles)

1 Amante, Choate 48, Richley Family, LIYC/NHYC 

   Elapsed 0:56:12, Corrected 0:53:30

2 Heartbeat 4, J124, Charles Brewer, NHYC 

   Elapsed 1:02:23, Corrected 0:59:28

3 Baraka, J120, Janet Mostafa, BYC 

   Elapsed 1:04:30, Corrected 1:01:35

4 Dani Girl, J120, Campbell/Martin, BYC/CRA

   Elapsed 1:11:06, Corrected 1:08:11

Race #2 – PHRF 3 (4.5 miles)

1 Problem Child, n/a, Dan Rossen, BCYC

   Elapsed 1:05:15, Corrected 1:00:41

2 Cha Cha Cha, C&C40, Larry Walker, LIYC/CYCA

   Elapsed 1:08:41, Corrected 1:01:29

3 XLR8, Bene 36.7, Gabriel Nistor, BCYC 

   Elapsed 1:07:37, Corrected 1:01:33

4 Radical Departure, Bene25, Rosene Family, BYC

   Elapsed 1:13:25, Corrected 1:04:52

5 Gator, Frers38, Daniel Moore, SSC 

   Elapsed 1:15:31, Corrected 1:09:40

6 Cal 40, Cal 40, Vince Valdes, NHYC 

   Elapsed 1:21:39, Corrected 1:13:06

7 Buena Vista, RS21, Berkeley Green, ALYC 

   Elapsed 1:29:46, Corrected 1:21:13

Race #2– PHRF 4 (3.8 miles)

1 Silk, Harbor 25, John Hanscom, SSYC 

   Elapsed 1:11:08, Corrected 1:00:18

2 Gem, Santana 20, Cooper/Whitaker, BYC 

   Elapsed 1:19:38, Corrected 1:05:34

3 Daydream, Pearson, Rich Fischbeck, BYC 

   Elapsed 1:19:56, Corrected 1:07:46

News relating to racing in or around Newport Harbor should be forwarded to Tom Johnson at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it..


The Week in Review

A weekly newsletter from City Manager Grace L. Leung

City Manager's Updates Grace Leung

Click on photo for a larger image

Courtesy of City of Newport Beach

Newport Beach City Manager Grace Leung

Community Members:

To provide additional information to the community on the city’s ongoing efforts to combat homelessness, we have created the homeless data dashboard, a quick reference guide available on the web, updated monthly.

The dashboard contains year-to-date information on the number of individuals served, the number of nights homeless individuals have been sheltered, outreach contacts made, placements secured for permanent housing and the workforce reentry projects completed through our partnership with Trellis International. Monthly data includes a recent count of homeless individuals (conducted once a month), the average number of shelter beds filled, outreach contacts, shelter placements, transports conducted by our field teams, first aid provided and case numbers. The dashboard is rounded out by fiscal year-to-date budget information, including all homeless-related expenses, and good giving donations and expenditures. 

Further down the web page you will see charts of monthly homeless counts going back several months, and updates from our contractors City Net, a social services agency and Be Well, which provides mobile mental health services for residents, visitors and homeless individuals. 

The homeless data dashboard will be updated in the middle of each month at this page with information from the prior month’s activities. 

While we will continue to give weekly updates in this newsletter, the data dashboard will provide additional context on the work being done by City staff and contractors to address the challenges presented by homelessness in our community. 

City Manager, Grace K. Leung

L Street Park Renovations Add Improvements, Preserve Century-Old Cork Oak Trees

Renovations were recently completed at L Street Park, at 327 L St. in the Peninsula Point neighborhood, to help preserve 100-year-old Cork Oak trees that comprise the largest grouping of Cork Oaks west of the Mississippi River.

Staff from the city’s Public Works Department observed that the Cork Oak trees were showing signs of stress and worked with contractor West Coast Arborists to evaluate them and develop recommendations to help alleviate the stress.

Based on the contractor’s recommendation, City staff removed grass from directly around the oaks and reconfigured the irrigation system, using drip irrigation to avoid directly watering the tree trunks. A grass area between the tree clusters was preserved and improved with new sod, as the park is used by many dog owners in the neighborhood. 

In addition, staff installed new plants and large boulders, along with a new concrete pad for a park bench, a new trash receptacle at the east end and a park sign at the west end. 

Charges for Additional Trash Carts, Non-Containerized Waste to Begin July 1

The City of Newport Beach recently implemented an expanded recycling program to help meet state mandates related to organics recycling. As part of the expanded program, residential households are allocated a set amount of free solid waste material collection provided in a combination of black trash carts, blue recycling carts and green organics carts at no charge. Residents can review and select their household’s combination of allowed free refuse and recycling carts through CR&R’s website or by contacting This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

As of July 1, additional fees will be charged for extra carts, at the rate of $6.09 a month for black trash carts, $3.41 a month for blue recycling carts and $4.11 a month for a green organics recycling cart. Billing will be done on a quarterly basis.

Also beginning July 1, residents will be charged for any waste that is in not placed within the provided collection carts, including waste left on the sidewalk or street, or on top of the cart (which will require the truck operator to get out and manually collect the waste material). Any residential waste placed on the curb, street, or on top of a waste container will prompt a $2.47 fee for each instance after the first warning. This fee does not apply to scheduled bulky item pickups.

If you would like to return extra carts, or request extra carts, contact CR&R Customer Service at 949.667.4158 or email This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.. You can manage all your waste and recycling services through a Web-Pak account at https://oss.crrinc.com.

2021 Drinking Water Quality Report Now Online

The city’s Utilities Department has prepared the annual drinking water quality report for the 2021 calendar year. This annual report was recently mailed to all Newport Beach water customers and is available on the city’s website

The city vigilantly safeguards Newport Beach’s water supply, 77% of which comes from groundwater, along with 23% from the Colorado River. As in years past, the water delivered to residential homes and commercial businesses meets the quality standards required by federal and state regulatory agencies. For information about the report or water quality information in general, contact the Utilities Department at 949.644.3011.

Community Development Activity Update

The latest Community Development Department Activity Report is now available. The report compiles operational statistics to illustrate the volume of business activity that the department handles on a quarterly basis.

Monthly Treasury Report Details City Investments

The May 2022 Treasury Report is now available on the city’s website

As of May, the City’s investment portfolio totaled $382.1 million when measured at amortized cost. The current market value of the city’s portfolio of $374.9 million incorporates price fluctuations due to the changing interest rate environment that are typically irrelevant since the city typically holds its securities to maturity and receives the full principal value at that time.

The city’s liquidity portfolio is sized to meet the city’s cash flow needs over the next 12 months. Approximately $64.8 million, or 17% of the portfolio, was invested in liquid investments available for day-to-day operating expenses and the costs associated with ongoing construction projects. An additional $34.0 million, 9% of the overall portfolio, was invested in a portfolio of securities with targeted short-term maturities, which earns a higher yield than the city’s more liquid investments. The city utilizes these investments with targeted maturities to meet cash flow needs at times when the balance of more liquid investments declines due to the seasonality of revenue receipts throughout the year.

Be Well Mobile Crisis Response Update

The Be Well mobile crisis response team is now operating in Newport Beach 12 hours a day, seven days a week to respond to mental and behavioral health crises. The mobile unit is staffed with mental health specialists and EMTs, and works closely with the city’s police and fire departments.

This week the Be Well team: 

–Transported three people to crisis stabilization units for care.

–Transported one person to the Costa Mesa Bridge Shelter for intake.

–Transported one person to the sobering station at the Be Well campus.

–Transported six people to services, shelter intakes and appointments.

–Conducted 23 outreach interactions with residents and people experiencing homelessness.

Homelessness Update

The City of Newport Beach provides a comprehensive response to address homelessness through a coordinated effort by city staff, contractors, partner agencies and nonprofit groups.

This week the city’s homeless outreach and response teams: 

–Continued to shelter people. Eighteen people who had been experiencing homelessness in Newport Beach are now sheltered in the Costa Mesa Bridge Shelter.

–Assisted a woman and her minor child fleeing a domestic violence situation by enrolling them into services and referring them to a family shelter. 

–Enrolled one person into services and completed a housing assessment.

–Completed housing paperwork for a client matched to a housing voucher.

–Sheltered an older adult in a motel while they await placement with an Emergency Housing Voucher.

To donate to those experiencing homelessness in Newport Beach, visit our Good Giving Program web page.

This Week’s Events

Saturday, June 25

Sculpture Exhibition Phase VII Grand Opening Celebration

Civic Center Park

100 Civic Center Drive – 1-4 p.m.

Dedication Ceremony in Council Chambers, 1-1:30 p.m.
Children’s Activities, Music and Light Refreshments!

See the Full Schedule

Editor’s Note: City Manager’s Updates was received Friday, June 17 and is subject to editing so the information is current.


ENC to hold 50th anniversary gala

The Environmental Nature Center (ENC) is celebrating five decades of connecting the community to nature with a gala on Saturday, June 4. Funds raised will assist the ENC in continuing to provide transformative experiences at the Environmental Nature Center, ENC Nature Preschool and Tucker Wildlife Sanctuary.

ENC to hold lanterns

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Courtesy of ENC

ENC’s 50th anniversary gala invites guests to dine and dance under the stars

Guests will start the evening with cocktails, hors d’oeuvres and live music on the ENC patio. Trail-friendly shoes are encouraged so that guests can enjoy trailside experiences as they make their way through the Nature Center to the ENC Nature Preschool where they will dine under the stars. After-dinner guests can participate in an exciting live auction, and then conclude the evening by dancing to live music performed by the All Star Trio.

“2022 marks our 50th anniversary and we’re taking this opportunity to reflect and plan for the next 50 years,” said Bo Glover, executive director of the Environmental Nature Center. “We have an ambitious vision for our future, specifically focusing on equitable access to our campuses and our programs and expanding our influence as role models in sustainability. We look forward to celebrating this landmark with our community and look forward to continuing our legacy of environmental education for generations to come.”

For more information and to purchase tickets, visit www.encenter.org.

Environmental Nature Center is located at 1601 E. 16th St., Newport Beach.


Balboa Bay Resort to hold 15th Annual Father’s Day Car Show

Balboa Bay Resort is holding their 15th Annual Father’s Day Car Show on Sunday, June 19 from 11 a.m.-2 p.m.

Balboa Bay Resort entrance

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Courtesy of Balboa Bay Resort

Celebrate Dad at Balboa Bay Resort on Father’s Day with a fine collection of cars, great music and fun for the entire family

Celebrate Dads this Father’s Day with a fine collection of cars, great music and fun for the entire family at Balboa Bay Resort. The annual show will take place at the upper resort parking deck and will display an impressive array of classic, rare and custom cars with fresh BBQ, cocktails and additional concessions available for purchase. Tickets are not necessary for attendees as the car show is complimentary on behalf of the resort.

Balboa Bay Resort is located at 1221 W. Coast Highway, Newport Beach.


Join the Great Plein Air Art Experience

Celebrate more than 100 years of plein air art at Crystal Cove State Park. Come spend a relaxing day capturing the beauty of Crystal Cove on canvas with the guidance of a Crystal Cove plein air artist.

Join the Great Plein artists

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Courtesy of Crystal Cove Conservancy

Plein air painting at Crystal Cove

Classes are offered Tuesdays and Thursdays from July 5 through August 30 from 9 a.m.-2 p.m. and are likely to sell out. Register now.

Sessions are held in Cottage #13 (The Beaches Cottage) in Crystal Cove State Park’s Historic District.

The cost is $100 per workshop; $85 for Conservancy Members.

All supplies are provided. Class size is limited to 12 people, ages 18 and up only. www.crystalcove.org.


Heroes Hall begins speakers series Saturday with military experiences of LGBT

Heroes Hall Museum, on the grounds of the OC Fair & Event Center, is beginning a new speaker series, which will run through September on select Saturday mornings. The first one is this Saturday, June 18 from 1-2:30 p.m.

The series will be about the tremendous achievements and challenges that minority service members and other groups have faced while serving in the U.S. armed forces and is hosted in conjunction with the museum’s newest exhibition, Fighting for the Right to Fight: African American Experiences in World War II.

Heroes Hall exhibit 3

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Photos courtesy of OC Fair & Event Center

“Fighting for the Right to Fight: African American Experiences in World War lI” is the newest exhibition at Heroes Hall

Our Service, Our Stories: The LGBT Military Experience is Saturday’s event. In celebration of Pride Month in June, the Fighting for the Right to Fight Speaker Series will feature the documentary film Our Service, Our Stories followed by a panel discussion with lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender (LGBT) military veterans. 

The veterans will share their experiences serving in the U.S. armed forces from the Vietnam era through the conflicts in the Middle East. They will address a variety of topics including the challenges they faced as LGBT service members, the devastating impacts of the Don’t Ask Don’t Tell policy and how to right the wrong. 

Stephanie Wade, a former Marine infantry officer, environmental activist and educator, who currently is the district director and policy advisor to OC Supervisor Katrina Foley, will moderate Saturday’s speakers panel. Wade was one of the first out-trans women to serve on a congressional staff.

Joining Wade will be panelists Bill Anderson, Teri Thompson, Warren Tymony and Jonathan Willett.

Anderson is a gay veteran, who served in the California Army National Guard for 21 years, in a military police unit and later in a light infantry battalion. He kept his sexuality a secret while serving in the military.

Thompson is a lesbian veteran, who served in the U.S. Marine Corps in the 1980s. She faced intense harassment and discrimination due to her sexual orientation.

Tymony is a gay veteran, who served stateside in the U.S. Air Force from 1971-1973 as a fire protection specialist. After experiencing a traumatic experience in the armed forces, he left the military to become a gay and minority rights activist.

Willett served in the U.S. Air Force and was kicked out of the military for being gay. After experiencing homelessness, he eventually received the resources he needed to get back on his feet. Today he provides services to seniors at the Los Angeles LGBT Center.

To RSVP for Saturday’s session, go here. Admission and parking are free.

Heroes Hall exhibit 2

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The “Fighting for the Right to Fight” exhibition illustrates how hopes for securing equality inspired many to enlist in WWll

On Feb. 16, 2022, Heroes Hall Museum opened their new special exhibit called Fighting for the Right to Fight: African American Experiences in World War II. It was produced by The National WWII Museum and includes artifacts, photographs and oral histories to highlight some of the extraordinary achievements and challenges of African Americans during World War II, both overseas and on the Home Front. 

In the years before World War II, African Americans in many parts of the country were treated as second-class citizens. Discriminatory practices were condoned by the government, and African Americans were systematically denied many rights and liberties by laws that kept them in positions of inferiority. Due to the landmark Plessy v. Ferguson Supreme Court decision in 1896, the United States was a nation where “separate but equal” was law in many states. In addition, many military leaders declared African Americans unfit to serve in combat. However, once the war began, thousands rushed to enlist, determined to fight for freedom, while still being denied equality at home.

Heroes Hall exhibit 1

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“Fighting for the Right to Fight” is on display through September 18

On display through September 18, Fighting for the Right to Fight illustrates how hopes for securing equality inspired many to enlist, the discouraging reality of the segregated non-combat roles given to black recruits and the continuing fight for “Double Victory” that laid the groundwork for the modern Civil Rights Movement.


Pet of the Week Dog and Cat print

Stu News Newport is delighted to be working with the Newport Beach Animal Shelter to help get the word out in search of loving homes for pets that deserve a warm, nurturing environment and a place to call “home.

The shelter is delighted to introduce you to an absolutely wonderful husky named Ranger. He came to them after he assisted a young man through a couple of hard days. They were advised that this absolutely endearing, smart, funny, easy-going “gentleman” is approximately 5 years in age. He was found as a stray and even after coming in very thin and dirt-filled, he remained caring and calm. His temperament and personality definitely rank as the best things about him and, as you see, it’s pretty hard to say that his handsome-ness ranks second but, it truly does. Ranger would love a relationship where his person takes him out on a lot of fun adventures. He’ll need a home with a secure yard so he can run in and out and just be his totally silly self. They shelter could go on and on about Ranger, but they’ll let him show you for himself how beautiful he is. 

Pet of the Week Ranger

Courtesy of Newport Beach Animal Shelter

Meet Ranger

When you decide that you can’t stop thinking about Ranger, you are invited to give the shelter a call at 949.718.3454, or reach out to them by email at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.. They will schedule your meet and greet as conveniently as possible. In addition, they have a great new professional photographer that is donating her time to help them get the best out of their pet guests. They invite you to visit Andrea Domjan’s IG page at @andrea_domjan_photography to see all of her fabulous photography that she shares with the world. 

The shelter does require completed application forms for their animals, so simply print one up from their non-profit’s webpage at www.FONBAS.org. After it is completed, you can email it to This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it., and upon review, they’ll call you to schedule an appointment. They truly look forward to speaking with you and thank you for sharing in their joys of being the best pet parents ever.

Newport Beach Animal Shelter adoption fees:

–Adult Dogs - $150

–Puppies - $225

–Adult Cats - $90

–Kittens - $110

–Rabbits - $45

Also, consider becoming a member of an incredible nonprofit that supports the city’s efforts with providing wonderful opportunities to stray, injured, ill and owner-surrendered domestic pets.


SoCal artists’ abstract work is on display at JWA

This past year, John Wayne Airport (JWA) invited artists throughout Southern California to submit original, contemporary paintings for an abstract, non-representational exhibition. The exhibition is located in the Vi Smith Concourse Gallery and is on display now through March 2023.

The Vi Smith Concourse Galley is located on the secure side of the Riley Terminal in Terminal A, across from Gates 2 through 5, and in Terminal C, across from Gates 18 through 21.

So. Cal artists abstrct work blue green

Courtesy of JWA

A work titled “Few Are Chosen” by E.E. Jacks

“With millions of guests traveling through John Wayne Airport each year, the airport provides a unique venue, unlike any other, to feature the creative work of regional artists. The Terminal provides an aesthetic backdrop showcasing these artists while offering a superior guest experience to all who visit the Thomas F. Riley Terminal,” said Charlene Reynolds, airport director.

Artists living in any of the eight Southern California counties of Imperial, Kern, Los Angeles, Orange, Riverside, Santa Barbara, San Bernardino, San Diego, or Ventura were eligible to apply for participation in this exhibition. The JWA Arts Commission selected paintings by 15 different artists representing Southern California. Each arts commissioner brought a unique mindset to the review and selection process, considering imagery, color, perspective and texture.


Explore Upper Newport Bay

OC Parks manages nearly 60,000 acres of parks, historical and coastal facilities and open space for the County of Orange as part of OC Community Resources. For more information, visit www.ocparks.com.

Here in your own backyard, check out these events at Upper Newport Bay Nature Preserve in June to get you exploring the outdoors.

Explore Upper Newport Bay kayaking

Courtesy of Newport Bay Conservancy

Kayaking Upper Newport Bay

Sunspot Spotting: Saturday, June 18. 2020 marked the beginning of a new 11-year solar cycle which will see a dramatic increase in the number of sunspots over the next 4 to 6 years. During this family friendly program, you will learn all about sunspots, their effect on planet earth and how to safely view them. Each family or group in attendance will be given the supplies to make their very own sunspot viewer. You will also use a specially filtered telescope to view sunspots (if any are present and weather conditions are favorable). Minors ages 16 and younger must have legal guardian present at all times. Walk-ins are welcome, but space is limited. Advance registration is encouraged. Takes place 1-3 p.m. Register at www.letsgooutside.org/ocparks/activities.

Family Walk at the Bay: Saturday, June 25. Join an easy, stroller-friendly walk along Upper Newport Bay to enjoy all the sights, sounds and smells of summer. You will stay on the paved Bayview Trail and pause frequently to observe birds, wildflowers and any other wildlife that happens to be present. Minors ages 16 and younger must have legal guardian present at all times. Rain or heat advisory will cancel the event. Walk-ins welcome, but space is limited so registration is suggested. Takes place from 10-11:30 a.m. Register at www.letsgooutside.org/ocparks/activities.

Planetary Alignment Sunrise Hike: Sunday, June 26. Calling all early risers! Join in a pre-dawn walk at Upper Newport Bay Nature Preserve. View the sunrise and be treated to a rare astronomical phenomenon – a planetary alignment. In the pre-dawn sky, you will see Mercury, Venus, Mars, Jupiter and Saturn lined up across the horizon and visible to the naked eye. Coffee and light refreshments will be served. Minors ages 16 and younger must have legal guardian present at all times. Walk-ins are welcome, but space is limited so registration is suggested. Significant cloud cover, rain or heat advisory will cancel the event. Takes place 5-7 a.m. Register at www.letsgooutside.org/ocparks/activities.

Upper Newport Bay is located at 2301 University Drive, Newport Beach.


Balboa Bay 1221 scholars receive $124,000 in grants for educational pursuits

Twenty-four outstanding students from Newport-Mesa Unified School District high schools were honored at a dinner reception at the Balboa Bay Resort on May 31.

Over the past two decades, the Balboa Bay 1221 Scholarships have awarded $1.7 million in grants to deserving local graduates. The scholarships are the largest independently funded awards in Orange County, sponsored by the Balboa Bay Club, its ownership from the Pickup-Martin family and women volunteers of the “1221” Club, named for the iconic Bay Club address on Pacific Coast Highway.

Balboa Bay 1221 scholarship award winners

Click on photo for a larger image

Photos, courtesy of the Balboa Bay Club

Balboa Bay 1221 Scholarship award winners at the Balboa Bay Club

In 2022, a diverse group of high-achieving students from Newport Harbor High School, Corona del Mar High School, Costa Mesa High School and Estancia High School stepped up to the microphone at the awards ceremony sharing dreams of a future in fields from medicine and engineering to education and the arts. Newport Beach Mayor Kevin Muldoon was on hand proclaiming May 31 as Balboa Bay 1221 Scholarship Day in Newport Beach.

Balboa Bay 1221 Governor s scholars

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Governor’s Scholarship winners: (L-R) Emily Park, Jaime Herrera, Lorelei Hobbis and Jewel Rubright

The Balboa Bay 1221 Awards were distributed in four categories: The Pinnacle Scholarship Awards, The BBC Scholarship Awards, The Governor Scholarship Awards and the 1221 Scholarship Awards. Financial grants ranged between $2,000, $5,000 and $10,000. Grants were based on academic excellence, athletic achievement, community service and financial need.

Balboa Bay 1221 Muldoon, Wortmann

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(L-R) Newport Beach Mayor Kevin Muldoon and Balboa Bay Club Governor John Wortmann

The 2022 Balboa Bay 1221 scholars are listed here in order of presentation by category.

–1221 Scholars: Morgan Campbell, Tess Fox, Conrad Oliver, Jimena Ortega, Tara Schroeder, Lily Shandalove, Trent Ku, Paul Brich, Heba Hassan, Ly Duong, Aiden Spallone and Dylan Matian.

–Governor’s Scholars: Jewel Rubright, Lorelei Hobbis, Emily Park and Jaime Herrera.

–Balboa Bay Club Scholars: Eli Weiss, Fallon Rowerdink, Tyler Humphries and Alex Sunday.

–Pinnacle Scholarships: Caroline Glessing, Maxwell Lane, Mason Hunt and Nathan Peters.


Government changes ease travel concerns and requirements, making things easier

By GARY SHERWIN

Last week I had dinner with my friend Joe who rapturously told me of his trip recently to the Galapagos, a dream destination that he and his partner Steve had planned for months down to the detail.

They had a spectacular time sailing on a specially outfitted vessel while encountering large sea turtles and other amazing wildlife. Everything went according to plan until Steve started to feel ill during the last few days of their adventure.

You probably guessed it. He had COVID. Since they were in the process of selling their Mission Viejo house, Joe had to return home and Steve had to stay in Ecuador until he got a negative test which he did a week later. It was a very mild case with few symptoms but that’s a stressful way to end an otherwise great holiday.

If their trip had happened this week, that outcome would have been very different. Last Sunday, the Biden Administration eliminated the testing requirement much to the applause of the U.S. tourism industry, which is still struggling with international arrivals.

Gary Sherwin

Click on photo for a larger image

Courtesy of Visit Newport Beach

Gary Sherwin

The mandate that international air travelers to the U.S. test negative within a day of boarding their flights expired after the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention had determined the rule was no longer necessary. However, they also said they could reinstate it if a troubling new variant emerges.

The policy change is big news in Los Angeles, which has ranked among the top three U.S. destinations for international travelers, who typically stay longer and spend more than domestic visitors. Before the pandemic, a burgeoning middle class in China helped fuel a surge in Chinese tourists in Southern California, who spent an average of about $6,900 per visit, according to the U.S. Travel Association.

As much as domestic travel is experiencing a strong rebound this summer, the tourism industry has still not fully recovered from the pandemic. The lack of international visitors is a major reason why and the testing requirement not only created anxiety with in-bound visitors but also U.S. residents traveling abroad.

Newport Beach relies on the LAX gateway to deliver most of its international visitors. In 2019, Los Angeles County hosted 7.4 million international travelers who spent $11.6 billion that year, about 56% of all tourism spending even though they represented only about 14% of all visitors. In 2020, the number of visitors dropped dramatically and international flights into LAX essentially stopped for a year.

The Biden administration put the testing requirement in 2021 as it moved away from restrictions that banned nonessential travel from several dozen countries – most of Europe, China, Brazil, South Africa, India and Iran. It came in conjunction with a requirement that foreign, nonimmigrant adults traveling to the United States be fully vaccinated, with only limited exceptions.

The initial mandate allowed those who were fully vaccinated to show proof of a negative test within three days of travel, and unvaccinated people had to present a test taken within one day of travel. In November, as the highly transmissible Omicron variant swept across the world, the Biden administration toughened the rules and required all travelers, regardless of vaccination status, to test within a day of travel to the U.S.

Airline and tourism groups have been pressing the administration for months to eliminate the testing requirement, saying it discouraged people from booking international trips. Many other countries have already lifted their testing requirements for fully vaccinated and boosted travelers in a bid to increase tourism. 

So, does that mean we will stuff planes with sick passengers? Remember that domestic flights don’t require vaccinations or testing, and masks are now optional. Most people have made peace with the spread of COVID while traveling and those that remain concerned can still wear masks on planes. The airline industry has continually asserted since the start of the pandemic that with their high-tech air circulation systems, the chance of transmission on a plane are remote.

The announcement last week coincided with IPW, the tourism industry’s premier international trade show in Orlando where U.S. tourism executives meet with their foreign counterparts to bring more visitors to America. Many saw the testing requirement as the biggest impediment to international visitor recovery.

While the share of international visitors to Newport Beach is small, perhaps as much as 16% of all our visitors, they are a critically important part of our economic mix. These visitors tend to stay longer and spend more money than people just coming down here for the weekend. And as our city moves into a more luxury tier with new hotels catering to that segment, international is going to be an even more critical part of our visitor mix.

While this decision by the Administration is welcome, it likely won’t change things in the short term as visitors need time to plan their vacations. We also need the airlines to add more flights to their schedules which is difficult for them to do right now given the severe staff shortages.

It also isn’t going to change things with China which is still grabbling with mass lockdowns and a zero COVID policy that is causing havoc with their economy. China was the shining star in tourism leading up to the pandemic and quickly became the leading source of international visitors to California. That won’t be happening again anytime soon. Between fewer flights from the country and some Cold War-like tensions, that market will take years to recover if it ever does to the same level.

But if you have a trip planned overseas this summer, at least this policy change gives you one less thing to stress over. And given everything these days, I’ll take that deal.

Gary Sherwin is President & CEO of Visit Newport Beach and Newport Beach & Company.


Guest Letter

Hon. Will O’Neill

District 7

Newport Beach City Council

Balancing the budget now and in the future

Guest Letter Will O'Neill

Click on photo for a larger image

Courtesy of Will O’Neill

Will O’Neill

Economic uncertainty has gripped our nation since March 2020. High inflation and plunges in the stock market (and crypto currency) have rattled us all. Throughout it all, our city’s budget has remained resilient and focused on providing core services and infrastructure in both the short- and long-term.

Each year brings its challenges and blessings. Clearly, we saw more challenges than blessings in 2020 when our projected general fund budget plunged from ~$220 million to $199 million. Thanks to quick and intelligent thinking, our city pivoted and enacted a tiered system of cuts depending on the economic toll the shutdowns would cause. Our city weathered the COVID storm better than most thanks to a combination of high reliance on property taxes and a population willing to support local and keep sales taxes here.

Though we saw a rebound last fiscal year, the revenue trend remained below the line at which we would have expected revenues to grow had COVID not existed. That said, we used surpluses to restore cuts and ensure that core infrastructure and services remained prioritized.

After two years of difficult planning, we have reasons to view our coming fiscal year’s projections with renewed optimism. We also have reasons for concern that the dark clouds of potential recession are on the horizon.

First, the optimism. We are projecting the largest budget in our city’s history.  Our general fund revenues are projected to be ~$265 million, which is a 13% increase over last year. That increase is driven in large part by our main three tax sources: property taxes, sales taxes and transient occupancy taxes. 

Property taxes remain remarkably stable for cities thanks to proposition 13.  Brisk turnover and high sales prices have increased our property taxes above anticipated property tax increases. Sales tax and transient occupancy tax revenues have also rebounded. All our core tax revenues have increased without a single tax increase.

Which means that we have the ability to invest in debt reduction, long-term capital improvement projects, and fully fund out reserves for future economic shocks.

We anticipate spending nearly $103 million this coming fiscal year on capital improvement projects. They range from the fun (NB Junior Lifeguard Building) to the important-but-mundane (miles and miles of street repairs). 

Finally, we will be rolling forward an anticipated surplus from our prior fiscal year that may exceed $11 million. We won’t know for sure until the Fall, at which time the City Council should have a better view of how our economy has weathered the next few months.

It is an honor to act as a steward for our collective tax dollars and appreciate the stellar efforts of our City Manager, our Finance Director, our Finance Committee members and our City Council. Most of all, I appreciate our residents for your trust that must be earned daily.

Hon. Will O’Neill is a Newport Beach City Councilmember, Chair of the City’s Finance Committee and served as Mayor in 2020.


(Almost) everything you need to know about boating in our harbor but were afraid to ask

By LEN BOSE

Summer and the sun is out – we really have it made! This last Tuesday evening racing started to feel like summer with warmth in the air. I have been busy at work, which is a good thing, yet I have been slow to get a story out that I have been conceptually developing that involves interviews with four people.

Matt, I have not forgotten about you, next column I promise. This means I have to dig deep and find a story in my bilge for this week.

I only report the good news in my column, so let’s start with the really good news, junior sailing starts this Monday, June 20, and runs through the first week of August. This means that the harbor will be full of sabots Monday through Thursday. 

I instruct my new boat owners to keep their heads out of their boats, which means looking well ahead of yourself. If you notice a large swarm of sailboats grouped together, don’t power through them, select an alternative route and try to stay out of the middle of the swarm. 

If you do have to work your way through the swarm of sabots, look for the red marks in the water around them. Odds are very good these sabot sailors have been instructed to sail around these red marks. 

Almost everything sabots sailing

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Courtesy of Len Bose

Junior sailing begins Monday (June 20), that means sabots with be aplenty

When you approach any crossing vessels, it is always best to aim for a couple of boat lengths behind them or their stern. This will keep you out of trouble most of the time. 

There are rules of the road that most small boat operators have no clue about. The key is to let your intentions be known well ahead of time. Now, the Harbor 20 fleet will be much more difficult to navigate through, because we are all grumpy old sailors whose lives revolve around our race results. 

My point being, if you find yourself surrounded by a sailboat fleet with no way out, just come to a full stop and surrender by holding both your hands in the air. This will indicate to the sailors that you give up and they will soon be out of your way. The key is to notice the swarm well ahead of time and deviate your course. Yes, that means placing your phone back in your pocket, smile, rather than asking the mouthy Harbor 20 sailor why they are in the back of the fleet?

After all that excitement, you probably have to go to the bathroom, so I am going to assume you all know where the next restroom is located? Let’s say you are running out of time and your guest is asking if you have a bucket or empty Coors Light can? Worse yet, your guest just figures to go off the side of the boat.

Here are a couple of alternatives. Download the MyNB app, then hit the Newport Harbor links, this will show you where you are located in the harbor and the closest facility. 

More good news – the city has purchased floating heads. No, that is not the name of a rock group, they are restrooms that the public can use while on the water. These restrooms should arrive before the end of summer and their location will be posted on the app.

The Fourth of July will be upon us soon, so if you can recall these “Len Bose-isms” I mentioned above while on the harbor you might just have a better day. 

Another thing to keep in mind: If you decided to head to the upper bay (I still call it the Back Bay) for the fireworks show, you should recognize how low the tide will be during the show. If you don’t recognize the red and green channel markers’ locations at night (don’t ask me why these markers are not lit up at night), I recommend you take a look at them during the daylight hours. The key is to stay between these markers, this way you won’t go aground in the shallows located in the upper harbor. 

High tide will not occur until 1 a.m. on the 5th and you might have not brought enough provisions or have a big enough bucket if you go aground.

I recommend anchoring in the anchorage just off the east end of Lido, where I’m sure you will find me the night of the 4th in the Duffy. This will allow you to watch all the fireworks displays while staying out of the way of all the traffic coming in and out of the upper bay.

Sea ya.

~~~~~~~~

Len Bose is a yachting enthusiast, yacht broker and harbor columnist for Stu News Newport.


Obituary

Frank P. Jank

June 27, 1933 – June 4, 2022

Obituary Frank P. Jank

Courtesy of Jackie Jank Hilton

Frank P. Jank (pictured with his grandson, Lewis)

Frank P. Jank, 88, of Newport Beach, Calif., passed away, surrounded by his family on June 4, 2022. He was born in 1933 to Frank and Jennie Jank in Bay City, Mich.

After graduating from St. Andrews High School in Saginaw, Frank earned his bachelor’s degree in accounting from Central Michigan University in Mt. Pleasant, Mich. He then served with distinction in the U.S. Navy aboard the USS Rochester with the rank of Lieutenant Commander. After a brief stint in Aspen, Colo. where he married his former wife Mary, they moved out west.

Since then, Frank enjoyed an esteemed career as the proprietor of The Hearthstone in Corona del Mar and Costa Mesa for more than 50 years. His life reflected a dedication to hard work, innovation and a devotion and generosity to all who were in his life.

Frank will be remembered as an engaging, loving and generous father, grandfather, uncle, world traveler, sailor, mentor and friend. He lived his life by his terms until the end. He is preceded in death by his sister Janice and his brothers Paul, Roy and Earl. He is survived by his son, Chris Jank; daughter, Jackie Jank Hilton; son in law, Chris Hilton; grandkids, Lewis and Kate, goddaughter/niece Mary Sue Delrez, and his many nieces and nephews. We are all forever changed by his presence in our lives and are grateful for our time with him.

Services will be held at Pacific View Memorial Park on Wednesday, June 29 at 10 a.m. In lieu of flowers, the family asks for donations to the Salvation Army, or your charity of choice.


Kure It Cancer Research’s Fifth Annual Rivals Cup Golf Tournament was a sell-out

The addition of a “Celebrity Fourth or Fifth” option for this year’s Fifth Annual Kure It Cancer Research’s Rivals Cup Golf Tournament at Pelican Hill Golf Club proved inviting for golfers and prompted a sold-out contingent of 149 golfers.

The celebrities included a bevy of sports figures, along with a comedian and an actress. They included former NFL greats Steve Hauschka, Steve Beuerlein, and Evan Moore, all three now NFL sports analysts; and other former NFL players including Emery Moorehead, Dorsey Levens, Michael Blair, Shane O’Brien and Paul McDonald. Retired basketball player and coach Tyus Edney attended, as well as actors Dawnn Lewis and Flex Alexander, comedian Joe Torry and former hockey star Scottie Upshall.

Kure It Hauschka

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Photos by Reggie Ige

(L-R) Newport Beach resident Steve Hauschka, former NFL player for the Packers, Browns and Seahawks and current NFL analyst with Rivals Cup Co-chair and Newport Beach resident Burton Young

Kure It McDonald

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(L-R) Newport Beach residents Paul McDonald (former NFL quarterback), Andrew McDonald and Alex Orth

Former “Showtime” LA Lakers star Byron Scott was on hand to play golf and meet and greet fans. His autographed basketballs sold well during the silent auction, bringing smiles to many.

Kure It Mears

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Newport Beach residents Michelle and Eric Mear, BYLT CEO/founder and Rivals tournament sponsor

Two hundred guests gathered at the awards reception and dinner at Pelican Golf Pavilion, where the live auction, led by master auctioneer Zack Krone, saw Newport Beach resident, BYLT CEO/Founder and Rivals sponsor Eric Mear win both the Robb Report’s Car of the Year experience, donated by Title Sponsor Lugano Diamonds, as well as The Masters at Augusta five-day, four-night auction item, with rounds of golf included. Dinner with Byron and Cece Scott sold twice at $4,500 each to Newport Beach resident Linda Young and Shannon Curry. Newport Beach resident Wendy Tenebaum grabbed the Local Millionaire item for $4,500, with an Aston Martin from Aston Martin Newport Beach for a weekend, a super-duper Duffy ride and an overnight at Pelican Hill.

Kure It Tenenbaum

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Newport Beach resident Wendy Tenenbaum, winner of the Local Millionaire live auction item for $4,500

Winning 1st prize in the tournament was a group of golfers sponsored by LA Lakers Co-owner and Director of Charitable Services Janie Buss. All were former pro-soccer greats and included Joseph Barton, Joshua Barton and Brian Phillips. Winning Closest to the Pin was NFL great Evan Moore. Joey Moccia from Aston Martin Newport Beach, the tournament’s Car Sponsor, won Longest Drive for Men and Longest Drive for Women went to Jo-E Lopez, vice president of Snyder Langston.

 Kure It 1st Place winners

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(L-R) First place tournament winners who took home the crystal – Joseph Burton, Joshua Burton and Brian Phillips

Joining Newport Beach Rivals Cup Co-chair Burton Young, Course Sponsor and President of Sperry Equities, were Co-chairs Todd Perry, Kure It Board Chair and longtime Kure It supporter Andy Chaffee. Perry thanked the tournament’s many sponsors and announced that Kure It recently approved the funding of $100,000 each to research projects to both the UCLA Jonsson and USC Norris Comprehensive Cancer Centers.

An estimated $300,000 was raised for the cause, in keeping with Kure It Cancer Research’s mission, “Together We Can Eradicate Cancer.”


JWA works with Braille Institute to improve knowledge of working with visually impaired

John Wayne Airport (JWA) recently worked with the Braille Institute of Orange County to provide airport team members with informative, practical information and education about visual impairments, available resources, and how to guide the blind and visually impaired.

With the assistance of the Braille Institute the class, called “Understanding Vision Loss: Human Guide Safety Techniques,” taught techniques designed to help understand visually impaired guests and different ways to offer assistance focused on providing support and service considerate of the individual’s feeling of self-esteem and self-confidence.

JWA works with Braille institute SNN 6.17

Courtesy of JWA

JWA team members participated in visual needs assistance training

“It is essential that we provide consistent training for our employees to assist guests that request additional support when traveling through the airport,” said Rick Francis, interim airport director.

Participants in the training received an overview of the various visual impairments and blindness conditions they could potentially encounter. After watching a video that showcased individuals with visual impairments demonstrate how to approach, engage, communicate and assist individuals, the group put their knowledge to practice. Groups practiced human guide techniques and gained a new perspective when attempting to navigate using a walking stick while closing their eyes.

The class attendees included members from the Orange County Sheriff’s Department, John Wayne Airport Customer Relations Associates and Public Affairs team members.

The Braille Institute is a nonprofit organization whose mission is to positively transform the lives of those with vision loss. They serve more than 37,000 people through various free programs, classes, and services at centers and community outreach locations throughout Southern California. For more information about the Institute, visit https://brailleinstitute.org/.


John Ghoukassian, founder of Bayside Restaurant, honored posthumously

The Ghoukassian Family announced its patriarch, and proprietor/founder of Bayside Restaurant in Newport Beach, John Ghoukassian, was honored posthumously with a Distinguished Citizen Award by the City of Irvine at the City Council meeting held June 14.

John Ghoukassian sitting

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Submitted photo

John Ghoukassian, proprietor and founder of Bayside Restaurant, was honored posthumously

The City Council established the award and the Wall of Recognition located at the Colonel Bill Barber Marine Corps Memorial Park in 2006. 

“Our dad is watching over us right now and we know he is very proud of his Distinguished Citizen award at the Wall of Recognition. He must be smiling at us,” said Karyn Ghoukassian, John’s daughter. “From the bottom of our hearts, we would like to thank the City of Irvine for recognizing John’s accomplishments and for honoring him by placing his name on the Wall of Recognition at the Col. Bill Barber Memorial Park for all to see. We are very grateful on John’s behalf.”


Council adopts budget, praises surplus, warns of upcoming economic downturn

By SARA HALL

City Council adopted the fiscal year 2022-23 budget this week and the discussion focused on the city’s strong return coming out of the COVID-19 pandemic as well as a possible future downturn.

Council voted 6-1 at a meeting on Tuesday (June 14) to approve the $402 million budget. Mayor Kevin Muldoon dissented.

The revised operating budget totals $330.9 million and the capital budget totals $71 million in fiscal year 2022-23, for a total of $402 million. Capital spending of $183.6 million is anticipated over the six years covered by the Capital Improvement Program, subject to change with each future annual budget process. 

The city has a strong budget surplus and record general fund revenues, said Finance Director/Treasurer Scott Catlett. The FY 2022-23 budget is balanced and revenues exceed expenditures, he added. 

City staff provided a detailed presentation at a joint council and Finance Committee meeting on May 24. There haven’t been any major changes since that meeting, but there are some small revisions due to recent labor contract approvals and correcting minor errors and omissions. A few other minor items include addressing fuel cost increases and an MOU contract that were approved by the council after the budget was previously presented.

Overall, councilmembers praised the budget and noted how the city has bounced back from the COVID-19 pandemic. 

Councilmember Will O’Neill, who also chairs the Finance Committee, reflected on the budget they were reviewing two years ago compared to the most recent proposal. 

The city was looking at a $220 million anticipated budget in 2020 when it immediately needed to drop to $199 million “almost overnight,” O’Neill said. Using a tiered system of cuts, “that gave us nightmares and heart palpitations,” the city made it through. And, instead of a continuation of the tiered cutting, there were rollbacks throughout the year. That continued through last fiscal year, when they were still seeing revenue assumptions below the pre-COVID anticipated revenue. 

“This budget, on the other hand, is different. It is – frankly – remarkable where we are and the ability for us to take care of all the short-term issues that have arisen and also start taking care of long-term issues as well,” O’Neill said. “It’s really staggering where we are two years later.”

It’s a good variety of programs and projects, he noted, naming off a number of items in the budget. 

“This is a budget I’m proud of, I think we should all be proud of,” O’Neill said. 

This budget does not spend every anticipated dollar, O’Neill said. It actually continues to ensure the city has a strong contingency reserve and a built-up reserve for the CIP, he added. 

Council adopts budget city hall

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Photo by Sara Hall

City Council adopted a $402 million budget that reflects a strong comeback from the COVID-19 pandemic 

While O’Neill and several of his fellow councilmembers noted the positive financial news, they also warned of inflationary and recession concerns that signal an upcoming slump.

“Being able to talk about that is a big deal. And being able to get to a point where we have a lot more renewed optimism matters,” O’Neill said. “That said, we need to be paying a lot of attention to the fact that there’s a lot of economic indicators that are concerning and we need to remember that that concern hits us because it hits our residents and the visitors that come to our city.”

Several councilmembers echoed his comments. 

“I think we’re probably headed to something, some kind of kerfuffle in the economy,” agreed Councilmember Brad Avery. “I think everybody knows there’s some rumbling going on and that we’ve got to look at it clear-eyed.”

He believes the finance team will handle whatever happens and the city will get through it, Avery said. 

There will be “economic headwinds” that will hit the city, Councilmember Diane Dixon agreed, but they have a solid revenue base.

“I can’t let a budget be passed without saying how grateful we are to live in the city that we are, (and) that we have the property tax revenues that sustain us and will continue to sustain us,” Dixon said. 

Although not everyone on the dais was on board with every item in the budget.

Muldoon explained his opposition to adding new full-time staffing positions as his reasoning for voting no on the budget. 

There are a number of things in the budget he likes and appreciates, but there’s a “philosophical difference” he has with staff regarding full-time positions and adding to that, especially in uncertain economic times. 

“I’m proud of the work that was done to keep reserves high and to pay down the debt, but I cannot support a budget that’s going to increase our staff,” Muldoon said. “And even if we weren’t afraid of a looming recession, I still likely would not support increasing the full-time positions due to the uncertainty of new individuals joining the CalPERS system and their unreliable investment strategies and constant requirement that the city make up the difference.”

Although he didn’t mention specific names, CalPERS announced in February that Nicole Musicco was coming on board as the new chief investment officer. Musicco previously headed up RedBird Capital Partners’ Canadian investment business.

Newport Beach’s FY 2022-23 budget includes 741 full-time positions, an increase of 11 from the prior year (seven of which are conversions of existing part-time positions to full-time). Part-time positions will decrease by a total of 4.13 full-time equivalent positions.

Some of the new full-time positions include: Community services officer in the police department to manage the body worn camera program; addition of one associate civil engineer in the public works department to help facilitate the timely delivery of the city’s increasing level of capital improvement projects; a management fellow was added mid-year in fiscal year 2021-22 for the Management Fellowship Program; and a public works inspector position that is fully offset by reduced contract expenditures.

The budget also includes:

–A stable local revenue base with projected fiscal year 2022-23 property tax revenues growing at an estimated 6.4%.

–A healthy level of reserves that include a general fund contingency reserve of $58.8 million – an amount equal to 25% of the city’s general fund operating budget.

–Continuation of an aggressive pension payment plan with a level dollar payment of $40 million and the intent to allocate an additional $5 million from the fiscal year 2022-23 remaining surplus of revenues over expenditures, which based on current projections will see the city’s unfunded pension liability eliminated in less than 10 years.

–Significant contributions toward pension costs from the city’s employees, with 23% of the budgeted required minimum CalPERS payment being met through employee payroll deductions.

The budget includes increasing the pension CalPERS Unfunded Accrued Liability payment from $40 to $45 million, Catlett explained, resulting in paydown of the liability one year earlier than previously planned. Staff recommended prefunding the typical $5 million end-of-year contribution to the city’s UAL payment from the $7.5 million structural general fund surplus.

Staff also recommended transferring $1 million of the surplus to the Facilities Financial Plan Fund in anticipation of the results of the park facilities study included in the proposed capital improvement program, which is anticipated to identify new facility replacement needs.

Another $1.5 million to be set aside for the Capital Improvement Program to be allocated to future capital projects as part of the fiscal year 2023-24 budget process.

There’s a surplus even after adding program enhancements and increasing the allocations to the city’s various savings programs.

“This is likely an unprecedented situation in the city’s history, certainly in the last 10-20 years,” Catlett wrote in the staff report. “It is a testament to the strength of the city’s tax base and the growth seen in the revenues derived from the city’s strong economic engine.”

~~~~~~~~

Sara Hall covers City Hall and is a regular contributor to Stu News Newport.


School Notes

The Exchange Club of Newport Harbor presents a number of scholarships to local NMUSD students

The Exchange Club of Newport Harbor, the oldest nonprofit service club in Newport Beach, gives more than $63,000 annually to students in the Newport-Mesa Unified School District. The club recently announced the results of several awards programs for these students.

Students were recognized with the “Accepting the Challenge of Excellence Award” by demonstrating the ability to not only overcome obstacles in their lives, but also move forward by making a positive change in their outlook and performance. 

Those recognized at a luncheon were Isabella Maez-Akins, Frances Daly, Silvestre Gonzalez, Valeria Sanchez Lopez, Christopher Navarro, Marco Ruiz and Ashley Stanwick of Back Bay and Monte Vista High Schools; Eric Thompson of Corona del Mar High School; Caitlyn Roum of Costa Mesa High School; Anabelle Pham of Early College High School; Maria Ceja-Ceja of Estancia High School and William Yanez of Newport Harbor High School. 

Each of those students received a $3,000 scholarship for a two- or four-year college or state-recognized technical institution. 

Caitlyn Roum will also receive an additional $2,500 scholarship as the California/Nevada District Exchange Club Winning Female Recipient.

School Notes The Exchange Club students

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Courtesy of NMUSD

The Exchange Club of Newport Harbor presents scholarships to NMUSD students

Also, “What does America mean to you?” was the theme for this year’s Patriotic Art Contest. Thirty-one elementary students created artwork that was judged based on the originality of concept, presentation, patriotism expressed, how the content relates to patriotism, clarity of ideas and total impact. The following fifth grade students from Kaiser Elementary School were recognized at the Exchange Club’s Field of Honor Youth Ceremony and at their school: Maya Baker, first place; Kylie Swegles, second place; Emily Sequeira, third place and James Karjala, honorable mention.

Elementary students from seven NMUSD schools wrote essays on “What Do You Think Makes a Good Citizen?” for the Young Citizenship Essay contest. The following first-place recipients each received a Kindle Fire: fifth grader Chloe Olotu and sixth grader Thalia Hogan of Adams Elementary; fourth grader Estella Nguyen, fifth grader Hibba Afridi and sixth grader Zoe FitzSimmons of Cloud Campus; sixth grader Kahlua Shockley of Lincoln Elementary; sixth grader Tara Sharifzadeh of Newport Coast Elementary; fifth grader Maddi Rassmussen of Sonora Elementary; fourth grader Sebastian Gonzalez, fifth grader Marisol Duffin and sixth grader Christopher Cacho of Victoria Elementary and sixth grader Kit Harrington of Mariners Elementary.

Wesley Foell, also a sixth grader at Mariners, was awarded second-place honors. Harrington was selected to read her essay at the Exchange Club’s Field of Honor Youth Ceremony on May 27.

The Exchange Club’s Youth of the Year Award is presented to one male and one female student from four NMUSD comprehensive high schools. Receiving a plaque and a $3,000 scholarship were Alex Sunday and Francesca Disanto of Corona del Mar High School; Aiden Spallone and Emiko Grun of Costa Mesa High School; Lily Shandalove and Dane Dodge of Estancia High School and Pete York and Maddie Malouf of Newport Harbor High School.


Fair Game

By TOM JOHNSON

Local golfer finds his way all the way to the top of the U.S. Open leaderboard on opening day before falling

TOM MARCHThere’s no question that Stewart Hagestad is an accomplished amateur golfer. One of the best in the country. Stewart plays locally out of Big Canyon Country Club.

His amateur accomplishments in the world of golf are impressive. After playing at USC during his collegiate days, he went on to win the U.S. Mid-Amateur championship twice (2016 & 2021), the Metropolitan Amateur in 2016 and was a member of the gold medal winning 2019 Pan American Games team. He’s also represented the U.S. on the Walker Cup team three times, played in four U.S. Opens, several Masters and 12 U.S. Amateurs.

This week, Stewart is playing in the U.S. Open at The Country Club in Brookline, Massachusetts. He actually drew some major attention early in yesterday’s opening round, birdieing the 5th, 6th and 8th holes, to move to three-under-par and to the top of the leaderboard. 

Unfortunately, a bogey at 9, four more on the back nine and one double brought him in with a 3-over 73. Still, quite an accomplishment to tell the grandkids someday, “I once led the U.S. Open.”

Here’s hoping he’ll make the weekend cut. It would be fun for Newport Beach golf fans to watch.

• • •

The Newport Aquatic Center puts Newport Beach on the map when it comes to rowing. Proof is in the pudding, as they say. 

Last week at the USRowing Youth National Championships at Nathan Benderson Park in Sarasota, Florida, NAC represented in a big way, particularly with the Men’s V8+ where they came in ranked #2 in the country and finished exactly there.

The 8+, just in case you’re not a rowing connoisseur, means the number of rowers (8) plus a coxswain. And, although NAC sent multiple boats in other sizes, the 8+ is considered the “main event,” mainly because it’s the fastest.

The team included Kian Aminian, Kai Blom, Adam Casler, Will Deutchman, Travis O’Neil, Davis Schroeder, Johnny Sherburne, James-Anthony Chavos and Zachary Vorrath.

Fair Game NAC rowing SNN

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Photo by Thomas Hauge

NAC’s Will Deutchman raises his arms in victory after winning the Southwest Regionals and qualifying the team to the Nationals

Several of these members will be off to prestigious collegiate rowing programs in the Fall, including Princeton, UC Berkeley and Duke, but not before joining the U.S. team this summer in Italy, for international competition.

I guess that’s proof in the pudding!

• • •

It’s Miller time…or not! While Tom Miller has been out and about on the campaign trail for the District 1 Newport Beach City Council seat, some of his latest campaign literature has stirred up a little controversy.

A flyer circulating calling Tom a "fiscal conservative” and a “watchdog for your tax dollars,” lists five known names from Newport Beach politics as supporters of him. One is former Mayor Nancy Gardner who said in an email, “I have not endorsed Tom Miller. I have demanded the removal of my name.” The other is Evelyn Hart, who in a voicemail said, “I have not endorsed anyone in the First District.”

This is a reminder that eyes are on all candidates. The expectation is you all need to stay above the fray. Using and/or claiming an endorsement without an approval is NOT acceptable! Period.

Stu News attempted to contact Miller about the issue, but got no response.

• • •

Next Saturday, June 25, will be another fun day in the city. It’s the grand opening celebration for Phase VII of the Sculpture Exhibition in Civic Center Park. It’s the time when new sculptures are added into the park adjacent to city hall.

So, on Saturday, there will be a dedication ceremony in the City Council Chambers from 1-1:30 p.m., followed by a reception, some music, activities for the kids, and, most importantly, a chance to walk through the park to enjoy the new additions.

Many times, on the opening day celebration you can actually meet the artists as you’re walking through the park and discuss their thoughts on their creations.

The day is free to the public. For more info, check out www.newportbeach.ca/gov/culturalarts.

• • •

My friend, Nancy Barfield, just completed the Citizens’ Police Academy through the Newport Beach Police Department. She loved it. One of her final experiences was going on a ride-along.

She hooked up with officer Quinn McKay, 25, who went to Newport Harbor High School and was in the Explorer Police Academy. After college, Quinn returned home to eventually come to work for NBPD.

The evening began with a briefing of officers in a roundtable situation to prepare.

Once out-and-about, Nancy’s ride-along encountered a number of issues, including a vehicle with expired tags, whose driver had 19 service calls in his history; an officer needing backup on a suspicious person who had a robbery in their file from a year ago and “weed” in his vehicle; a transient who locked themselves in a business’s restroom; and a bicyclist with some known mental issues.

Okay, granted it wasn’t taking down some leading criminal or breaking up a major drug cartel, Nancy did say it was fun.

Her biggest concern following the experience was the fear officers must have going up to vehicles with no idea of what they’re getting into.

The next Police Academy comes up in the Fall. If it’s something you would enjoy, pick-up an application at the PD, fill it out and return it to the front desk or send it to This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it..

If you do, you’ll probably see me. I’ve heard too many good things about the program and plan on attending myself.

• • •

My grandmother used to make the best pies, and she lived in a small country town. Whether or not she ever entered one in a county fair, I have no clue. 

That being said, if that’s your thing, or maybe growing flowers and such, the Orange County Fair is still seeking entries to their upcoming competitions. 

In the Culinary Arts category are cookies, bars & brownies, sugar arts & confections, and yeast & quick breads. On the Horticulture end of things are cut flowers, fruits & vegetable and container plants.

There are a bunch of other things, including a wine competition, to enter. For more info, check out https://ocfair.com/competitions.

• • •

When’s the last time you flew out of JWA? If you’re like me, I’m always rushing to the airport and failing to eat. Once I get there, the pickings are slim.

Good news, three new tastes have now opened in the Terminal: Jamba Juice, OC Pizza and Qdoba Mexican Eats®

Most people know Jamba Juice: smoothies, fruits, etc. OC Pizza offers a thin crusted pizza, pastas, salads and more; while Qdoba has tacos, burritos, quesadillas, nachos and salads.

You can contact any of them prior to arriving at the airport and pickup once you’re in the terminal.

• • •

It’s a ways off but on Tuesday, October 18, the Orange County arts community will gather in the Samueli Theater at Segerstrom Center for the Arts in Costa Mesa, to honor its stars at the 22nd Orange County Arts Awards.

The Helena Modjeska Cultural Legacy Award for lifetime contributions to the OC arts community will recognize, among others, the Orange County Museum of Art.

The museum dates back to 1962 when 13 women came together to open what was then called the Balboa Pavilion Gallery. It became the Newport Harbor Art Museum in 1968 and the Orange County Museum of Art in 1997. 

The museum will open their new building on October 8.

• • •

Note: Sherman Library & Gardens is now offering summer hours on Thursdays and Sundays opening 10:30 a.m. until 7 p.m., through September 18. A good stroll through the gardens may do you some good!


Lifeguard patrol

Lifeguard patrol.jpg SNN 6.17

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Photo by Stacia Stabler

Strolling the beach


Take Five: Meet Bryan Cedillo, Balboa Island Ferry Captain

By AMY SENK

The Newport Beach Junior Guards program begins next Tuesday – and for many families, that means regular trips on the Balboa Island Ferry to get to and from the beach. The ferry has been in service since 1919, taking vehicles, cyclists and pedestrians between Balboa Island and the Peninsula every day, a crossing of about 800 feet. I’ve been a fan of the ferry since I’ve lived in Newport Beach, so I caught up with Ferry Captain Bryan Cedillo to find out more. 

Take Five Meet Bryan Cedillo

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Courtesy of Balboa Island Ferry

Balboa Island Ferry Captain Bryan Cedillo

Q: What is your background, and what does your job entail?

A: My background in the maritime industry is, I started at the age of 15 going on local fishing boats out of Davey’s Locker here in Newport Beach, coincidentally just right across the way from the ferry. I started by volunteering every day in the summer, helping out the crew of the fishing boats, cutting bait needed for the trip. Eventually I became a deckhand on the Western Pride, then moving over to the Aggressor where I put six years of hard work towards earning my 100 Ton near coastal captain’s license. My typical day here at the ferry really depends on which shift I am working. If it’s an opening shift, it entails being here 30 to 40 minutes before service to ensure that the ferry is in safe operating order. We follow thorough starting procedures to prepare the boat, including making sure our deckhands have change required for the day. Other shifts, such as the break shift, I essentially hop between the boats to ensure that each crew has their required breaks. While on the boats, our number one concern is passenger safety. Whether it be navigating through the maze of boats in the harbor, or ensuring passengers enter and exit the boat safely. 

Q: How many ferry captains are there and what qualifications must they have?

A: There are about 11 to 13 captains for the ferry, with a wide range of MMC or Captain’s license. We have captains with the minimum required license of a 25-ton inland license to one captain with a 1600 Ton near coastal license, which allows the captain to be able to drive much larger vessels – bigger than the ferry - out of the harbor, otherwise known as the line of demarcation.

Q: Any things you wish that ferry users understood?

A: Some things I wish that ferry users would understand are when using the ferry at night or really early morning, is please turn your headlights off while waiting in line to board. This greatly affects our vision. Another thing is safety is our No. 1 goal, so when we tell you that you cannot squeeze on it is not because we don’t want you aboard, it’s because it would be unsafe, as we can only take so many people per the Coast Guard’s limitations.

Q: Which of the ferries is your personal favorite?

A: For me, my favorite ferry is condition dependent. If there is a lot of wind, my favorite would be the Captain because it is the most throttle responsive. However, on a day where there is no current or wind, the Admiral would be my preferred boat because it is the easiest boat to turn and drive directly into the middle of the slip with very little effort needed.

Q: What would surprise people most about the ferries? 

A: One thing that I believe would surprise most people about the ferry is that even though all the ferries look the exact same, they all drive different and it’s really not as easy as we make it seem most the time!

~~~~~~~~

Amy Senk is a long-time resident of Corona del Mar and a regular contributor to Stu News Newport.


Taking in a sunset

Taking in a sunset.jpg SNN 6.17

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Photo by Stacia Stabler

At daylight’s end


Regattas and Races…

Regattas and Races.jpg 6.17

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Photo by Bronny Daniels | Joysailing.com

BYC 

2022 Twilight Series - June

June 15

Harbor 20A Fleet (7 races, 1 discard)

1 Jim Sears, BYC, Total 14, Net 10

2 G. Thorne/K. Thorne, BYC, Total 14, Net 11

3 Kincaid/Devlin, BCYC, Total 20, Net 16

4 Matt Campbell, BYC, Total 22, Net 18

Harbor 20C Fleet (7 races, 1 discard)

1 Kimme/Carlson, BYC, Total 17, Net 12

2 Ryan Tolsma, BCYC, Total 17, Net 13

3 DeRosa/Page, BYC, Total 25, Net 18

4 Gibson/Verona, BYC, Total 29, Net 23

5 Ukropina/Robertson, BYC, Total 31, Net 24

6 Allen/Brooks, BYC, Total 56, Net 45

7 P. Bretschger/K. Bretschger, BYC, Total 57, Net 46

Thistle Fleet (4 races)

1 Chuck Simmons, BYC, Total 6

2 Larzelere/McDaniel, BYC, Total 6

3 R. Maxwell/M. Maxwell, BYC, Total 12

ILCA Fleet (5 races)

1 Alan Andrews, BYC, Total 6

2 Gator Cook, BYC, Total 12

3 Rob Vandervort, BYC, Total 16

4 Maddie Nichols, BYC, Total 25

5 Siena Nichols, BYC, Total 38

6 Luke Roe, BYC, Total 41

7 Landon Stahl, BYC, Total 45

8 Qi Yan, BYC, Total 48

9 Michael Arrigo, NHYC, Total 49

10 Rich Luttrell, BYC, Total 57

11 Nevin Elliot, BYC/NHYC, Total 59

12 Alexander Bonsager, BYC, Total 64

13 Paloma Arrigo, BYC/NHYC, Total 67

14 Isabella Clark, BYC, Total 69

CFJ/420 Fleet (5 races)

1 Daher/Khanna, BYC, Total 5

Lido 14 A Fleet (2 races)

1 Papadopoulos/Ogier, WSA, Total 2

Lido 14 B Fleet (2 races)

1 Long/Swan, BYC, Total 2

Adult Sabot A Fleet (4 races)

1 Molly Lynch, BYC, Total 5

2 Larry Coon, MBYC, Total 11

3 Susan Jennings, BYC/NHYC, Total 16

4 Dana Fischbeck, NHYC, Total 16

5 Karen Luttrell, BYC, Total 18

6 Karen Stockman, BYC, Total 32

7 Mike Bartell, BYC, Total 34

8 Linda Ungerland, BYC, Total 40

9 Gail Kalscheur, BYC, Total 42

10 Dennis Allison, BYC, Total 43

11 Matt Foreman, BYC, Total 45

Adult Sabot B Fleet (4 races)

1 Carol Harmon, BYC, Total 7

2 Eva Evans, BYC, Total 8

3 Stacy Ware, SSC, Total 13

4 Teresa Power, BYC, Total 18

Junior Sabot Fleet (4 races)

1 Lin Zhou, BYC, Total 11

2 Jack Swartzbaugh, BYC, Total 14

3 Bradley Kosoff, BYC, Total 14

4 Kai Woods, BYC, Total 16

5 Heidi Swartzbaugh, BYC, Total 17

BCYC 

2022 Taco Tuesday Series

June 14

PHRF A (3.9 miles)

1 Destroyer, Jim Baily Family, NHYC

   Elapsed 0:46:06, Corrected 0:42:28

2 Amante, Richley Family, LIYC 

   Elapsed 0:50:33, Corrected 0:47:10

3 Legacy, Bruce Cooper, BCYC 

   Elapsed 0:53:49, Corrected 0:47:39

PHRF B (3.7 miles)

1 Rhythm, Roger Gooding, SBYRC

   Elapsed 0:57:55, Corrected 0:50:57

2 Shadow, Steve Fink, BCYC 

   Elapsed 0:59:28, Corrected 0:51:45

3 Miss Informed, Jeff Tighe, BYC 

   Elapsed 1:04:18, Corrected 0:54:11

4 Horsefeathers, John Fuller, NHYC 

   Elapsed 1:07:31, Corrected 0:57:06

5 Healer, Larry Kliger, BCYC

   Elapsed 1:04:28, Corrected 0:57:11

6 Violetta, Jane Hartley, BCYC 

   Elapsed 1:04:33, Corrected 0:57:46

7 Buena Vista, Berkeley Greene ALYC

   Elapsed 1:12:32, Corrected 1:03:32

PHRF C (3.1 miles)

1 Ventus, Team BCYC, BCYC

   Elapsed 0:48:13, Corrected 0:37:28

2 Halcyon 3, Bob Kafka, BCYC

   Elapsed 0:58:45, Corrected 0:47:23

3 Celia, Jim O’Connor, ALYC

   Elapsed 0:59:04, Corrected 0:47:51

4 Bella Rose, Rose Henigman, ALYC

   Elapsed 1:03:06, Corrected 0:51:44

5 Mystery, Dene Stratton, BCYC

   Elapsed 1:08:26, Corrected 0:55:06

H20A Division (3 races)

1 Shana’s Secret, Thompson/Conzelman, BCYC, Total 4

2 Only Child, L. Bose/J. Bose, BCYC, Total 8

3 Aquavit, Camerini/Kamei, UCISA, Total 10

4 Dart, A. Deermount/H. Deermount, NHYC, Total 10

5 Jubilee, Yates/Kincaid, NHYC, Total 13

H20B Division (3 races)

1 Spirit, D. Haynes/P. Haynes, BCYC, Total 7

2 Tiki, G. Kelly/D. Kelly, NHYC, Total 7

3 Mili’apa, Watanabe/Sutherland, UCISA, Total 8

4 Whatever, Hurliman/Fischbacher, SBYC, Total 8

H20C Division (3 races)

1 Dragon Lady, Sangster/Kimball, LIYC, Total 4

2 Shazam, Alfano/Shinrock, ALYC, Total 7

3 Kalani II, Ibbetson/Thornton, SYA, Total 8

4 Flexi Flyer, Hallo/Stern, NHYC, Total 11

ALYC 

2022 ALYC Sundowner Series

June 13

H20B Division (5 races scored)

1 Ping, Anne Wiese, Total 10

2 Spirit, Debra Haynes, Total 11

3 Jubilee, Patrick Kincaid, Total 15 

4 Emoji, Andrew Tosh, Total 16

5 Summer Dream, Tucker Cheadle, Total 17

H20C Division (5 races scored)

1 Whim, Hubie Laugharn, Total 9

2 FREEDOM, Ralph Simmonds, Total 15T

3 Spiritus, Roger Grable, Total 15T

4 Shazam, Stephen Alfano, Total 16 

5 Chloe, Roy Delis, Total 17

6Tiki, Devon Kelly, Total 21

J22 Division (5 races scored)

1 Jack, Anne Wiese, Total 6

2 Red Stripe, Debra Haynes, Total 10

3 Iconoclast, Patrick Kincaid, Total 18 

4 Jenda, Andrew Tosh, Total 19

5 OCC #6, William Miller, Total 20

6 Marina 5, Derek Matheson, Total 23

PHRF A Division (5 races scored)

1 XLR8, Gabriel Nistor, Total 11

2 Violetta, Jane Hartley, Total 13

3 #29, Michael Darr, Total 17 

4 Stella Maris, Theodore Barry, Total 20

5 Kaisen, David Camerini, Total 22T

6 Healer, Larry Kliger, Total 22T

7 Starfire, Dan O’Sullivan, Total 25

PHRF B Division (5 races scored)

1 Buena Vista, Berkeley Green, Total 10

2 Holokai, Ross McElfresh, Total 12 

3 Painted Lady, Matthew Foreman, Total 17T

4 Stanley’s Cup, Stanley Tutton, Total 17T

5 Hayden’s Havoc, Michael Hayden, Total 18T

6 Hobo Flats, Louis Chappelear, Total 18T

PHRF C Division (5 races scored)

1 Carioca, Bob Wine, Total 5.5

2 CELIA, Jim O’Connor, Total 11

3 Mystery, Any Club Member, Total 19.5 

5 FAIRWIND, Skipper Tim Bercovitz, Total 21

4 Mystery II, Club Member Any, Total 22

6 No Ka Oi, Lori Romano, Total 25

News relating to racing in or around Newport Harbor should be forwarded to Tom Johnson at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it..


Jason T. Smith accepts the role as pastor of St. Andrews Presbyterian Church moving forward 

On Sunday, June 5, Jason T. Smith accepted the call to become Pastor of St. Andrew’s Presbyterian Church here in Newport Beach. 

After an 11-month nationwide search process, the nine-member St. Andrew’s Pastor Nominating Committee (PNC) evaluated well over 100 candidates and unanimously presented Smith to the congregation as their selected candidate. 

After Smith delivered his candidate sermon that Sunday morning, a congregational meeting took place and members of the church overwhelmingly voted in favor of him as their new pastor. Smith succeeds Gary J. Watkins, who has served as Transitional Pastor since Chap Clark’s retirement from St. Andrew’s last fall.

Jason T. Smith sitting pose

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Courtesy of St. Andrews Presbyterian Church

Jason Smith is the new pastor at St. Andrews Presbyterian Church

Smith comes to St. Andrew’s after spending 15 years pastoring the congregation of Forest Hill Church in Charlotte, North Carolina. There, he served as a Life Groups Director, Campus Pastor, and Lead Pastor of Direction, and helped develop two church plants and facilitated the leadership teams for six Forest Hill campuses. 

Regarding the experience Sunday and the call to St. Andrew’s, Smith felt “overwhelmed and overjoyed.” He continued, “Today was amazing. This congregation has been one of the most welcoming, gracious, warm places I’ve ever seen.” 

St. Andrews has a rich, 75-year history. The church campus is located between two neighborhoods, Ensign Intermediate School and Newport Harbor High School.

The Smith family – Jason, Jessica and their three daughters – Savannah, Eden and Charlotte – look forward to building a new life in Southern California. Smith is excited about two things in particular, “I think what I’m most excited about,” he said, “is finding where God has been working through St. Andrew’s in the community. You can see evidence of it, and you can see how poised this church is. Getting to discern that together is beyond exciting to Jessica and me.”

Anticipating a significant change in weather and culture, the second exciting factor for Smith is, “learning how to be a Californian!”

Watkins, Transitional Pastor who served St. Andrews in an interim leadership role, said, “I’m excited for St. Andrew’s. God has called Jason, a man with a pastor’s heart who loves Jesus, with great experience, to lead the church into the future.” 

In a video message sent to the St. Andrew’s congregation and community, Smith said in regard to his start date, “We should be joining you in a couple months, and we’re so looking forward to it. We will be praying for you and ask you to pray for us. We can’t wait to start out this very next chapter with you.”

St. Andrew’s Presbyterian Church is located at 600 St. Andrews Road, Newport Beach. For more information, visit www.sapres.org.


Congratulations graduates!

Newport-Mesa Unified School District (NMUSD) held the majority of their high school graduations last week. Corona del Mar High School and Newport Harbor High School held their graduations on Thursday, June 9 at Davidson Field at 2 p.m. and 5:30 p.m., respectively. Back Bay/Monte Vista High School and Cloud Campus High School graduations took place on Thursday, June 9 at 10 a.m. and 2 p.m., respectively, at St. Andrews Church. 

In addition, Ensign Intermediate and Corona del Mar Middle School held their promotions on Wednesday, June 8 at Newport Harbor High School at 2 p.m. and 4:30 p.m., respectively. The Cloud Campus Middle School Promotion took place on Wednesday, June 8 at St. Andrews Church at 6 p.m.

Congratulations to the high school graduates and students who were promoted – we wish them all well in their future pursuits.

Congratulations graduates CdMHS Davidson Field

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Photos courtesy of NMUSD

CdMHS students in the graduation procession with well-wishers in the bleachers at Davidson Field

Congratulations graduates CdMHS guys

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CdMHS graduating senior guys – “their future’s so bright, they gotta wear shades” 

Congratulations graduates CdMHS gals

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CdMHS gals share camaraderie on graduation day

Congratulations graduates Boulton at goalpost

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NHHS Principal Sean Boulton (center front) poses with some 2022 class graduates

Congratulations graduates NHHS Sailors

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Two NHHS graduating Sailors share a happy moment

Congratulations graduates NHHS Boulton

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Principal Sean Boulton celebrates with a couple of Class of 2022 grads

Congratulations graduates Back Bay

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Back Bay/Monte Vista High School celebrates their 2022 graduation at St. Andrews Church

Congratulations graduates Cloud Campus

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Graduating Phoenixes from Cloud Campus High School with their diplomas

Congratulations graduates Krista Ensign

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NMUSD Board Trustee Krista Weigand (L) and Ensign Intermediate Assistant Principal Bonnie Hinton (R) with an Ensign Seabee at the school promotion

Congratulations graduates CdMMS grads

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CdMMS students at their promotion ceremony 

Congratulations graduates Cloud Campus Onstott

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Cloud Campus Middle School Student Quinn Onstott is congratulated by NMUSD Board Trustee Carol Crane at the promotion ceremony

Congratulations graduates NMUSD board

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(L-R) 2022 NMUSD Board President Michelle Barto, 2022 Board Vice-President Charlene Metoyer, Krista Weigand (Trustee Area 6), John Drake, Assistant Superintendent Elementary Education, Karen Yelsey (Trustee Area 4), Superintendent Dr. Wesley Smith and Kerrie Torres, Assistant Superintendent Secondary Education at the Newport Harbor High School graduation ceremonies


Regattas and Races…

Regattas and Races

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Photo by Bronny Daniels | Joysailing.com

NHYC

2022 Non-Calm Bowl

June 12

Sabot A (3 races, 0 discard)

1 Olivia Norton, NHYC, Total 4, Net 4

2 Kingston Keyoung, BCYC, Total 5, Net 5

3 Zarrin Harvey, BCYC, Total 12, Net 12

Sabot B (3 races, 0 discard)

1 Will Ramsay, NHYC, Total 3, Net 3

2 Preston Decker, BCYC/LIYC, Total 7, Net 7

3 Piercen Giordano, NHYC, Total 8, Net 8

4 Jack Condon, NHYC, Total 15, Net 15

Sabot C1 (3 races, 0 discard)

1 Claire Suplizio, NHYC, Total 5, Net 5

2 Jack Swartzbaugh, BYC, Total 6, Net 6

3 Harper Morgan, NHYC, Total 7, Net 7

4 Cole Silsby, NHYC, Total 15, Net 15

Sabot C2 (3 races, 0 discard)

1 Jack Davis, BYC, Total 3, Net 3

2 Molly Torres, BCYC, Total 7, Net 7

3 Mira Burke-Wilding, BCYC, Total 14, Net 14

4 Donovan Keller, NHYC, Total 16, Net 16

5 Jewel Garcia, BCYC, Total 16, Net 16

6 Campbell Morgan, NHYC, Total 17, Net 17

7 McCall Morgan, NHYC, Total 17, Net 17

8 Liam Benjamin, NHYC, Total 20, Net 20

9 Heidi Swartzbaugh, BYC, Total 25, Net 25

Sabot C3 (3 races, 0 discard)

1 Landon Earlabaugh, BYC, Total 4, Net 4

2 Lin Zhou, BYC, Total 5, Net 5

BYC 

2022 Beercans – Lager (June) Series

June 9

Race #1 – PHRF 1 (4.5 miles)

1 It’s Ok, Andrews 49.9, Purcell/Rose

   Elapsed 0:38:18, Corrected 0:41:54

2 Coquille, Farr 40, Wes Selby, BYC

   Elapsed 0:45:46, Corrected 0:45:19

Race #1 – PHRF 2 (4.5 miles)

1 Amante, Choate 48, Richley Family, LIYC/NHYC 

   Elapsed 0:54:49, Corrected 0:52:07

2 Heartbeat 4, J124, Charles Brewer, NHYC 

   Elapsed 0:57:31, Corrected 0:54:36

3 Dani Girl, J120, Campbell/Martin, BYC/CRA

   Elapsed 0:58:49, Corrected 0:55:54

4 Baraka, J120, Janet Mostafa, BYC 

   Elapsed 1:00:37, Corrected 0:57:42

5 L30 #29, L30, Charles Ullman, BYC 

   Elapsed 1:09:34, Corrected 1:06:39

Race #1 – PHRF 3 (4.5 miles)

1 Crash, Open6.5, Tracey Kenney, BYC

   Elapsed 0:57:39, Corrected 0:50:32

2 XLR8, Bene 36.7, Gabriel Nistor, BCYC 

   Elapsed 0:59:25, Corrected 0:53:21

3 Cha, C&C40, Larry Walker, LIYC/CYCA

   Elapsed 1:01:17, Corrected 0:54:05

4 Violetta, Davidson, Jane Hartley, BCYC 

   Elapsed 1:07:32, Corrected 1:00:20

5 Cal 40, Cal 40, Vince Valdes, NHYC 

    Elapsed 1:10:37, Corrected 1:02:04

6 Espirit de L’eau, Oceanis 41, Richard Holbrook, BYC

    Elapsed 1:25:19, Corrected 1:17:40

Race #1 – PHRF 4 (3.8 miles)

1 Miss Informed, Andrews26, Jeff Tighe, BYC 

   Elapsed 1:02:40, Corrected 0:53:44

2 Gem, Santana 20, Cooper/Whitaker, BYC 

   Elapsed 1:11:30, Corrected 0:55:40

3 Daydream, Pearson, Rich Fischbeck, BYC 

   Elapsed 1:10:48, Corrected 0:58:38

4 Silk, Harbor 25, John Hanscom, SSYC 

   Elapsed 1:15:06, Corrected 1:04:16

5 Delightful, Hunter 33, Alan Schneider, BCYC 

   Elapsed 1:19:45, Corrected 1:09:29

News relating to racing in or around Newport Harbor should be forwarded to Tom Johnson at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it..


Newport Beach Arts Foundation hands out four Lila J. Crespin student scholarships

The Newport Beach Arts Foundation recently handed out four Lila J. Crespin Scholarship Awards to two Corona del Mar High School (CdMHS) art students and two Newport Harbor High School (NHHS) art students. 

Newport Beach Arts Foundation Natland

Courtesy of CdMHS

CdMHS Senior Tabitha Natland

The recipients from CdMHS were Tabitha Natland and Zirou (Lisa) Wang; the recipients from NHHS were Edwin Peterson and Carina Wang. Each student, selected by their art teachers, was awarded $750.

Newport Beach Arts Foundation Peterson

Photos courtesy of NHHS

NHHS Senior Edwin Peterson

Newport Beach Arts Foundation Carina Wang

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NHHS Senior Carina Wang

J. Lila Crespin, Ph.D. was an artist and a teacher. A founding member of the Newport Beach Arts Foundation, she was honored for her arts advocacy by both the City of Newport Beach and the Foundation. One of her principal interests was the encouragement and development of young artists. It was Dr. Crespin’s wish that a scholarship be given to deserving art students in Newport Beach. Thanks to the generous donations made to honor Dr. Crespin, the Newport Beach Arts Foundation was able to honor her memory with the presentation of these scholarships. 

For more information on the Newport Beach Arts Foundation, visit www.newportbeachartsfoundation.org.


The Week in Review

A weekly newsletter from City Manager Grace L. Leung

Grace Leung

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Courtesy of City of Newport Beach

Newport Beach City Manager Grace Leung

Community Members:

To address California’s historic statewide drought, the state recently enacted several new water conservation requirements for residents, businesses and homeowners’ associations. In addition, cities throughout California, including Newport Beach, are being required to take additional steps to save water.

In the coming weeks, the City Council will consider adopting new drought requirements for our residents and businesses as mandated by the governor’s statewide emergency regulation for urban water conservation.

In the meantime, we are asking our residents to reduce water waste and overwatering, especially outdoors. More than 60% of an average household’s water use happens outdoors – and more than one-third of outdoor water is wasted through overwatering and excessive runoff. Please check your property for overwatering and leaks, and adjust your outdoor watering times and schedules.

As a reminder, some water conservation actions are permanently mandated in the Newport Beach municipal code, including: 

–No excessive runoff;

–No washing down of driveways and sidewalks;

–No landscape watering between 9 a.m. and 5 p.m.;

–Leaks must be fixed within three (3) days.

We are committed to timely communication with our Newport Beach community on this topic, and we will keep you updated on the city and state drought response through this newsletter, our website, social media and more. Visit the city’s water quality and conservation webpage, www.watersmartnewport.org/, for resources and information, or call our Utilities Department 949.644.3011.

To conserve and meet the state’s drought mandates, we must all work together to use water wisely.

City Manager, Grace K. Leung

Police to Conduct Active Shooter Response Training at CdM High School

(Yesterday and today) the Newport Beach Police Department (NBPD) will be conducting active shooter response training at CdM High School. Officers will participate in several active shooter scenarios involving role players and simulated weapons. The objective of the training is to increase the effectiveness and coordination of a police response to such an event by putting officers through practical exercises in a realistic environment. The training represents just one part of NBPD’s ongoing efforts to prepare our officers for any emergency situation they may encounter. 

The training was planned and scheduled several months ago to coincide with the start of summer break, when there will be limited activity on the campus. However, in light of recent mass shooting events, including the tragic loss of life in Uvalde, Texas, the city recognizes concerns about the possibility of such an incident happening locally and the ability of law enforcement to respond effectively. Students, parents, teachers, school staff and other members of the public should know that the NBPD stands ready to protect our community. 

During this training, on June 13 and 14, CdM High School will be closed to the public; only authorized individuals will be allowed on the campus.

California Coastal Commission Approves Newport Bay Trash Interceptor Project

On Thursday, June 9, the California Coastal Commission unanimously approved a proposal from the City of Newport Beach to install a floating trash collection system on the banks of San Diego Creek, which will help prevent thousands of tons of trash every year from entering Upper Newport Bay and the ocean. 

The trash interceptor, modeled after Baltimore Harbor’s trash wheel, will be the first of its kind on the West Coast. The system utilizes booms, a water wheel and conveyor belt to collect trash from the river and deposit it into containers on the riverbank for disposal. The trash interceptor is sustainably powered by solar panels and the movement of river water.

The trash interceptor will be located in the San Diego Creek, on the north bank, between the Jamboree Road Bridge and MacArthur Boulevard Bridge. The city was awarded a $2.2 million grant from the Ocean Protection Council and Orange County Transit Authority (Measure M) to fund permitting, engineering and building.

Following the Coastal Commission’s approval, the city will now seek additional regulatory approvals, with a goal of breaking ground in January 2023. 

Register Now for Summer Recreation Programs

Summer is here, and classes and camps for all ages and interests are available. Sign up today for swim lessons, day camps, and specialty camps for the arts, culinary, STEM, sports and more. Visit www.campnewport.com/ to get started!

City Finishes Repair Work on 7 Bridges

The City recently completed a project to address maintenance at seven Newport Beach bridges.

Construction crews repaired more than 300 square feet of concrete spalls and sealed more than 1,000 feet of cracks in bridge columns. In addition, the waterline and sidewalk serving Newport Island was replaced and drainage improvements were made under the Jamboree Road Bridge.

The periodic replacement of failed surface concrete and sealing of cracks prevents the intrusion of seawater and costlier, more extensive repairs.

Ocean Pier Inspection, Maintenance Completed

Biennial inspection and maintenance of the Newport and Balboa piers has been completed.

The construction included repairs to damaged and degraded piles and replacing metal bolts and straps that had corroded in the harsh marine environment. In total the job replaced more than 30 metal pile straps and 300 bolts, repaired numerous piles above and below the waterline, replaced four broken piles and replaced more than 1,000 feet of deteriorated lumber.

Be Well Mobile Crisis Response Update

The Be Well mobile crisis response team is now operating in Newport Beach 12 hours a day, seven days a week to respond to mental and behavioral health crises. The mobile unit is staffed with mental health specialists and EMTs, and works closely with the city’s police and fire departments.

This week the Be Well team: 

–Transported one person to the Costa Mesa Bridge Shelter for intake.

–Transported a person to the sobering station at the Be Well campus.

–Transported five people to services and shelters.

–Conducted 24 outreach interactions with residents and people experiencing homelessness.

Homelessness Update

The City of Newport Beach provides a comprehensive response to address homelessness through a coordinated effort by city staff, contractors, partner agencies and nonprofit groups.

This week the city’s homeless outreach and response teams: 

–Secured permanent housing for two people staying in the Costa Mesa Bridge Shelter. One person had experienced homelessness for five years and the other person for one year. 

–Continue to shelter people: Fifteen (15) people who had been experiencing homelessness in Newport Beach are now sheltered in the Costa Mesa Bridge Shelter.

–Enrolled two people into services and completed housing assessments.

–Completed housing paperwork for a client matched to a housing voucher.

–Submitted a rental application for a shelter guest who secured an apartment.

To donate to those experiencing homelessness in Newport Beach, visit our Good Giving Program web page.

On the Agenda:
City Council Meeting for June 14, 2022

Our next City Council meeting is Tuesday, June 14. Items of interest are highlighted below. The entire agenda and reports can be viewed here

A study session will begin at 4 p.m. Agenda items include: 

–Wildland Fire Mitigation Overview. Newport Beach Fire Department staff will review the department’s ongoing efforts to educate homeowners on fire prevention, including vegetation management, protecting homes and reducing the threat from airborne embers. 

The regular session begins at 5 p.m. Agenda items include: 

–Community Programs and Special Events Grants. The council will consider a staff recommendation to award $55,200 in community programs grants to 12 organizations and $300,000 in special events grants to support 23 events. The proposed recipients include homeless service groups, ocean conservation nonprofits, museums and historical societies, community events such as the Balboa Island Parade, and large signature events such as the Newport Beach Film Festival and Newport Beach Christmas Boat Parade.

–A public hearing on the Fiscal Year 2022-23 Budget. The council will hear public comment before considering adoption of the city’s proposed annual budget and capital improvement program. The recommended budget is balanced with a strong projected surplus of revenues over expenses. The budget enhances funding for building replacement and maintenance and increases the speed of the city’s paydown of unfunded liabilities. The total operating budget is expected to be $331 million, with a record additional $71 million in funding for capital projects. 

See the Full Agenda

This Week’s Events

Tuesday, June 14

City Council Meeting

City Council Chambers

100 Civic Center Drive – 4 p.m.

Thursday, June 16

Zoning Administrator Meeting

Zoom – 10 a.m.

See the Full Schedule

Editor’s Note: City Manager’s Updates was received Friday, June 10 and is subject to editing so the information is current.


Trash-collecting water wheel moves forward, state commissioners urge city to do more to stop litter at its source

By SARA HALL

A statewide agency last week approved an innovative floating, trash-collecting water wheel project for the San Diego Creek as it enters Upper Newport Bay. 

At the same time, officials emphasized their strong encouragement for the City of Newport Beach to step up and do more in terms of limiting usage of single-use plastic and Styrofoam and stopping a big contributor to the trash problem at the source.

The California Coastal Commission voted 11-0 on Thursday (June 9) to approve the city’s application to install a 14-foot, 707-square-foot floating trash interceptor, including two booms extending the 150-foot creek width, a mounted rake system, 8-foot-wide conveyor belt, two 216-cubic-foot dumpsters and 768-total-cubic yards of grading to construct a permanent, landside service road. 

A key message during the discussion, from CCC staff, commissioners and public speakers, was that the city needs to do more in terms of preventing trash in the first place. Commenters urged officials to adopt ordinances banning single-use plastic and Styrofoam. Many also mentioned that upstream cities need to do more in this effort as well, but emphasized that Newport should lead the way. 

It’s an interesting project, but there are concerns, noted Commissioner Linda Escalante, who asked several questions about capacity, energy consumption and environmental impact. The problem needs to be eliminated at the source, she said. 

“I understand that this is a whole watershed problem, the trash starts flowing down,” Escalante said. “(But Newport Beach) are the stewards of the coast and definitely need to lead on this.”

It’s not something that will negatively impact NB, she noted. 

“On the other hand, it will make Newport Beach a leader taking care of the environment,” she said.

It’s a great project, agreed Commission Vice Chair Caryl Hart. There is an “absolute need – historically and currently – for a single-use plastics ban in Newport Beach,” she added. 

Noting the California Recycling and Plastic Pollution Reduction Act initiative on the November ballot at the state level, Hart and several other commissioners encouraged the council to endorse it, in addition to enacting their own ordinance. 

Karl Schwing, the CCC deputy director for the San Diego Coast and South Coast, Orange County, said the trash wheel is an important project for the city to implement in order to address the significant trash problem in the area. 

The special conditions staff included require the city to report back to the CCC about their own efforts addressing the source of the problem, but they didn’t specifically request that the city adopt an ordinance, he noted. 

“We didn’t see that this particular permit gave us that ability to do,” Schwing said. “That is something that the city does need to consider doing, we’ve been urging them to do so in our readings with them and writing to the council and will continue to do so. But we don’t see this permit as the vehicle to that.”

Trash collecting water wheel rendering

Click on photo for a larger image

Courtesy of City of Newport Beach/CCC

A rendering of the trash-collecting water wheel proposed for San Diego Creek, near Upper Newport Bay

The trash wheel will help officials quantify the amount of trash floating downstream, which will, in turn, help convince city officials along the waterway to enact ordinances to stop the litter at the source, said Assistant City Engineer Bob Stein.

That’s really a sticking point, he emphasized. Newport Beach and other cities along the watershed think they’re doing a great job stopping that trash, but none of these cities have instituted ordinances like what coastal commissioners and public speakers were recommending, Stein said. 

“I think these are great ideas,” he said. “But right now, we don’t have the votes – in any city. So now we’re going to provide the hard evidence that we can present to each of these cities and say, ‘Look, you’ve got to clean it up.’ Because right now the City of Newport Beach is paying for that cleanup.” 

It’s a regional problem and the trash wheel will be a regional icon for trash reduction measures, he added.

Most of the 150-square-mile watershed is drained by San Diego Creek, Stein said, so most of the trash floats downstream and winds up in Newport Bay. The difficulty is the trash ends up in the reeds and the sensitive preserve areas, so trash has to be removed by hand, he explained. 

“We are very interested in getting rid of that trash,” Stein said. “But there is a certain reluctance by our upstream neighbors to enforce more clearly defined trash reduction measures. So this project, as I said, is going to allow us to show them the amount of trash that’s remaining, that they haven’t captured, and then help them to see where we need to reduce sources, where we need to actually have better enforcement mechanisms to reduce the trash.”

This is the proper step forward, he added. 

“Orange County may not be the most progressive county in the state, so it’s important for us to recognize that reality,” Stein said. “(City and county officials) have a certain reluctance on enforcing new ordinances because they’re not sure, ‘Well do we need to make these changes? It’s an imposition on businesses and restaurants.’ And, quite frankly, we don’t have any data to show what the results of those ordinances would be. So, we’re going to be able to actually quantify that trash.”

Commissioner Mike Wilson thanked Stein for his blunt answers regarding the politics of the issue. It’s noteworthy to just say it out loud, he said. 

 “Normally, people would want us to clean up our messes and not even create these messes (in the first place),” Wilson said. “The responsibility really does lie with the decision-makers in those watersheds and the community members within those watersheds to push their decision-makers to get there.”

He called the project “classic tailpipe engineering.” Although it’s a dated analogy, he explained it’s like putting a filter on a tailpipe to catch the pollution the engine is creating. It’s time to re-think the solution, he added.

Trash collecting water wheel Baltimore wheel

Click on photo for a larger image

Courtesy of Healthy Harbor

Baltimore’s Mr. Trash Wheel

Stein noted that Newport’s water wheel will be similar to Baltimore’s Mr. Trash Wheel, which has its own social media and has a worldwide following.

The creek will turn the water wheel, which in turn powers the conveyer belt. Trash is emptied into a floating container and transferred to shore via an elevated fixed rail system (instead of by boat like Baltimore’s trash wheel). A garbage truck will access the landside facility and remove the trash.

The project will be funded with a $1.7 million grant from the California Ocean Protection Council, a $500,000 grant from Orange County Transportation Agency and a city contribution of about $500,000. This should run the system for 20-25 years, Stein said. 

It will be installed in San Diego Creek, just upstream of Upper Newport Bay.

San Diego Creek is a 16-mile-long waterway that sends hundreds of tons of trash from surrounding urban development into the ecological reserve and other downstream waters each year, said CCC Coastal Program Analyst Chloe Seifert. The project is anticipated to reduce the volume of trash entering downstream coastal waters by an estimated 80%, although she also recognized that it won’t directly help reduce how much trash enters the waterway in the first place.

“The project will be an effective method of trash capture, but will not limit trash production or litter at its source,” Seifert said. “The city could further reduce the volume of trash entering community waterways…by restricting the provision of single-use plastic and Styrofoam products in Newport Beach.”

The city indicated that the project would not detract from the council’s progress in passing restrictions on single-use waste, she said. While policy implementation is necessary to reduce point-source pollution, but would not entirely resolve the issue of trash which flows down the creek from other cities, she noted. 

Curtailing waste production is more effective than attempting to collect these products from coastal waterways, according to the CCC staff report. 

“Commission staff have discussed the importance of such proactive measures with the city and issued a comment letter requesting that the City Council pass these pollution restrictions prior to the date of the subject hearing, but the Commission has not received a written commitment from the city,” the report reads.

Environmental advocates have encouraged the City of Newport Beach to restrict single-use plastic and Styrofoam products in the city, consistent with actions taken by many other coastal cities, but the city has not yet taken action, Seifert explained.

Hoiyin Ip, local resident and co-chair of the Sierra Club’s California Zero Waste Committee, urged the Coastal Commission to delay granting the permit until the city adopted certain ordinances: The foodware ordinance and purchasing policy recommended by Ocean Protection Council’s Statewide Microplastics Strategy; Ban smoking citywide and retail sale of tobacco products; Ban single-use plastic foodware in open space: beaches, parks and harbor; Ban single-use plastic carryout bags and require 10-cent bag fee for all retailers; Ban the sale of sale, distribution and use of balloons.

The city has been aware for several years about various plastic bans adopted by other jurisdictions and heard locals asking for something similar, Ip said. 

“Trash capture with the finger pointing upstream will not reduce trash,” she said. 

In 2017, Ip became a member of the City of Newport Beach’s plastic subcommittee. Since then, it’s become clear that the city is willing to spend other people’s tax dollars on trash capture, but not willing to reduce trash at the source, Ip wrote in a letter to the CCC.

They finally got five plastic reduction ordinances drafted in 2019, but no action has been taken. 

Dana Point Ocean Water Quality Subcommittee member Bill Lane echoed her frustration and placed the blame at the feet of local politicians.

“Reducing single-use plastic production and consumption is politically risky, so instead of plastic reduction, Orange County governments are proactive with clean-ups and trash capture,” he said. 

This could lead to a slippery slope of other local jurisdictions attempting to clean up the mess instead of stopping it from happening.

“Once Newport Beach puts the trash interceptor into the San Diego Creek, Dana Point will be encouraged to put one in the San Juan Creek, using millions of other people’s tax dollars to capture the plastics we should not have produced in the first place,” Lane said. “Now, don’t get me wrong, trash capture is a good thing; however, we feel Newport Beach – with all of its visibility and influence – should show proof of action on plastic reduction from the source, before the interceptor permit is awarded. If others are encouraged to follow Newport’s example, we will continue to treat the symptom and not the disease. An ounce of prevention is worth a pound of cure.”

Although not all public speakers wanted to delay the project. 

Newport Beach resident and chair of the NB chapter of Surfrider Foundation Michelle Giron said the chapter supports the project, which will help with restoration of the wetlands area. 

“We have taken part in clean-ups in the Upper Newport Bay and we understand the extent of plastic pollution and other trash in San Diego Creek and Upper Newport Bay,” she said. “We understand that the interceptor will not solve the whole problem of plastic pollution in our watershed.”

But trash entering the creek comes from Newport Beach and upstream cities, she pointed out. Thus, local cities, not just Newport, need to address sources of plastic pollution, Giron said. 

Overall, although more needs to be done, coastal commissioners thought the trash wheel was a good step in the right direction.

“You brought a lot of creativity to this and I do hope that it becomes a model for other communities,” said Chair Donne Brownsey. 

There are many other cities with trash problems that clog nature preserves, waterways, and beaches, she pointed out and it’s an issue that impacts people on a wider scale.

“Our trash problem is totally out of scope to the way people live their lives and we really have to get our arms around this,” Brownsey said. 

It’s a “difficult and overwhelming problem,” she said. This project might be a good model for others, she noted, and a good tool to help convince city leaders to adopt ordinances limiting single-use plastic and Styrofoam as well as other trash.

“I hope that, in the state of California, people will look at this project and look at your efforts to make it as energy-neutral as possible while doing the important work to get this garbage and all this plastic and Styrofoam litter, and so forth, out of our environment,” Brownsey said to the city officials presenting the project. “I hope that you’re able to effectuate one of your goals, which is to show the city councilmembers the importance of addressing this at the source.” 

~~~~~~~~

Sara Hall covers City Hall and is a regular contributor to Stu News Newport.


Fair Game

By TOM JOHNSON

With the election behind us, summer on the horizon, it’s time for some golf

TOM MARCHWho says golf isn’t a contact sport? Certainly not me!

Let me take you back. Almost four years ago I had open heart surgery to replace a mitral valve. No fun. Of course, I went to Hoag and Dr. Aiden Rainey, who did a masterful job. 

When he put everything back together, after splitting my chest open, he wired it closed. That’s standard operating procedure, so to speak. Over time, scar tissue forms on the breastbone and makes things even more solid. 

Fast forward to six months ago. I’m playing golf with some buddies at Arroyo Trabuco in Mission Viejo. On the second hole, my playing partner takes our cart slightly off course to get his ball and the cart’s computer system shuts down as a safety precaution.

He jumps out, and I decide to back it up and head to my ball. So, with one butt-cheek on the driver’s seat and one-butt cheek hanging out, I push with my left foot to get out of the restricted area. Once I’m clear and the computer re-engages, I pop the cart into forward and step on the gas. Everything’s good, right. Nope, not being all the way in the cart and then hitting a slight undulation I fly out of the cart and hit the ground. HARD! I think I even bounced.

Next thing I know I’m getting assistance off the course.

Of course, my friends, concerned with my health and well-being, continue on and play the rest of their round. Oh, they did say, “good-bye” and “hope you feel better,” first.

So, I head home in pain.

Several days, or maybe a week later, I feel multiple things poking outward into my chest adding some discomfort. I call my favorite cardiologist, Rick Haskell, and go in to get the damage checked. The news, the wires from my previous open-heart surgery have all broken.

Dr. Haskell says it shouldn’t be a problem because after three years of healing, he says the scar tissue should continue to hold things together if I can deal with the poking issue.

Well, because of my impacted health due to a previous kidney transplant, for which I take drugs to knock out my immune system, the scar-tissue doesn’t hold.

I found that out in the middle of one night, when I wake up while sleeping on my side and realize that my breastplates are crossed. As I role to my back, the breastbone slides and pops back into place. 

I think to myself, “that can’t be good.”

So, back to Hoag and in to see Dr. Timothy Lee, the new cardiovascular surgeon on the block. He opens me up, wires my chest back together and adds a plate in the middle of my breast plate to just make certain everything is solid.

He’s good!

Then, it’s a wait time. And, of course, no golf!

Well, this weekend that wait time finally expired. So, I moseyed out to Arroyo Trabuco, the original scene of the crime, bought a small bucket of balls and tried out the old chest.

The good news is that it’s solid. The bad news is my golf game still stinks. It seems like two people occupy my brain. One shot is great…and then two shots are terrible…there’s no in-between. 

Still, it’s good to be back. With summer dead ahead, golf is on the calendar again. All I need to do is purchase a helmet to make sure I’m safe driving the cart.

• • •

Speaking of golf…the difference here being good golf. 

The U.S. Open Championship tees off this Thursday, June 16, at The Country Club in Brookline, Massachusetts. Newport Beach will be represented.

Amateur Stewart Hagestad, who plays locally out of Big Canyon Country Club, has earned his fourth U.S. Open start by virtue of claiming the 2021 U.S. Mid-Amateur at Sankaty Head Golf Club on Nantucket Island.

Stewart previously played in the U.S. Opens at Erin Hills (2017), Shinnecock Hills Golf Club (2018) and Pebble Beach Golf Links (2019). He has yet to make the weekend in his four previous starts, but maybe this is the year. 

• • •

Question of the week from Doug Forde: What about all of those political signs that fill our communities prior to Election Day? When do they need to be taken down, and by whom?

I checked in with Newport Beach City PIO John Pope to find the answers.

The state requires candidates to remove all of their signs within 10 days of the election…that would be this Friday. Signs on public property can be removed at any time and Public Works staff has been removing signs throughout the election season. Political signs on private residential property can stay up year-round as long as they are compliant with size and quantity restrictions in the city zoning code. 

• • •

School’s out for summer, but there’s a story we’ve been remiss in not telling. Last month, some 40 students participated in the Newport-Mesa Unified School District’s 5th Annual Robotics Competition hosted by Costa Mesa High School. These students spent hours inside and outside of their engineering and computing pathways and clubs to build and code VEX robots.

Fair Game SNN kids building robotics

Courtesy of NMUSD

NMUSD students prepare robots for competition 

Then, teams of up to four students faced off against one another in a VEX competition game, dubbed “Tipping Point,” featuring two teams in each round competing to score points with a 12-foot-by-12-foot square.

Teams included those from Ensign Intermediate and Newport Harbor High School. In fact, the Tournament Champion was Taur’s Team, captained by Ryan Taur from Newport Harbor; while the Gabe and Gia Team of Gabriel Golamco and Gia Ancone, also from NHHS, was a tournament finalist. 

Taur’s Team also won Best Robot Design.

• • •

One of my personal favorites is Newport-Mesa Unified School District Principal Dr. Jake Haley, who most recently has been heading up Costa Mesa High School.

And, although no formal announcement has come out, I’m hearing that Jake will be Corona del Mar High School’s new principal this fall. I like it!

Haley is a personable guy who seems to connect with boosters, teachers, students and the community alike.

TeWinkle Middle School Principal Dipali Potnis was just announced as the new principal at Costa Mesa High School, proving that Jake is certainly on the move.

• • •

The Newport Beach Chamber of Commerce is hosting their June 2022 Sunset Networking Mixer at the Helmsman Ale House on Thursday, June 23 from 5:30-7:30 p.m. The Helmsman Ale House is located at 2920 Newport Blvd.

The mixer offers a no-host bar, raffle prizes and complimentary hors d’oeuvres and is free to chamber members and $35 for guests. It’s a good chance to “discover new business relationships while enjoying a great atmosphere.”

Helmsman Ale House is a craft beer microbrewery and restaurant – the only craft beer brewery in Newport Beach, brewing daily within their 15-barrel exhibition brewhouse.

• • •

As of last night’s update, here’s where the local races from last Tuesday’s Primary Election stand:

U.S. Representative 47th District 

*Katie Porter (D) – 69,256, 51.30%

*Scott Baugh (R) – 41,845, 31.00%

Amy Phan West (R) – 11,360, 8.41%

Brian Burley (R) – 9,883, 7.32%

Errol Webber (R) – 2,661, 1.97%

State Senator 36th District

#Janet Nguyen (R) – 98,136, 57.41%

Kim Carr (D) – 72,812, 42.59%

State Assembly 72nd District

*Judie Mancuso (D) – 48,648, 43.48%

*Diane Dixon (R) – 47,585, 42.53%

Benjamin Yu (R) – 15,641, 13.98%

OC Supervisor 5th District

*Katrina Foley – 52,573, 42.06%

*Patricia “Pat” Bates – 28,006, 22.41%

Diane Harkey – 22,938, 18.35%

Kevin Muldoon – 21,481, 17.19%

B – Newport Beach/Direct Election of Mayor

No – 12,367, 59.23%

Yes – 8,514, 40.77%

(* Advance to November Election Day)

(# Wins seat outright)

(Total estimated ballots left to process: 133,109.)


They’ve gone home

They've gone home.jpg SNN 6.14

Click on photo for a larger image

Photo by Stacia Stabler

After a busy day at Tower 32, most of the beachgoers have packed up the coolers, folded the blankets and headed home


Top of the heap

Top of the heap SNN 6.14

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Photo by Stan Sievers (Instagam @stansievers)

Surfer LJ Joseph O’Leary catches the last of the waves for the day


Pets of the Week Dog and Cat print

Stu News Newport is delighted to be working with the Newport Beach Animal Shelter to help get the word out in search of loving homes for pets that deserve a warm, nurturing environment and a place to call “home.

The shelter would like to introduce you to their newest, approximately 9-week-old sisters, Maxine and Mara. They are DARLING. They have the time of their life running around and would enjoy a loving home where they can have loads of kitten fun. If you’ve been waiting for kitten season to begin, it’s here, and they’re working diligently to provide you with an opportunity to adopt the most beloved furry family members.

Pets of the Week Maxine and Mara

Courtesy of Newport Beach Animal Shelter

Meet Maxine and Mara

If you’ve been waiting for sweet kittens, please feel free to contact the Newport Beach Animal Shelter at 949.718.3454, or through email at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. to find out more about Maxine and Mara.

The shelter does require completed application forms for their animals, so simply print one up from their non-profit’s webpage at www.FONBAS.org. After it is completed, you can email it to This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it., and upon review, they’ll call you to schedule an appointment. They truly look forward to speaking with you and thank you for sharing in their joys of being the best pet parents ever.

Newport Beach Animal Shelter adoption fees:

–Adult Dogs - $150

–Puppies - $225

–Adult Cats - $90

–Kittens - $110

–Rabbits - $45

Also, consider becoming a member of an incredible nonprofit that supports the city’s efforts with providing wonderful opportunities to stray, injured, ill and owner-surrendered domestic pets.


Now’s the time to book your summer reading program with the library

The Summer Reading Program at the Newport Beach Public Library (NBPL) kicks off on Saturday, June 11 and runs through July 30. This year’s theme is “Read Beyond the Beaten Path,” with programs tailored for kids, teens and adults.

Why summer reading? For kids, it helps to prevent summer slide – the loss of academic skills over the course of summer vacation. For teens, it’s an opportunity to get ahead on high school reading, as well as escape to a world of mystery, suspense and adventure. And for adults, it provides an ideal reason to catch up on the reading they’ve been hoping to get to all year long.

“The Summer Reading Program is a great time to make reading a priority,” said Debbie Walker, youth services coordinator. “Perfect for all ages, it’s simply fun and smart.”

Now's the time

Click on photo for a larger image

Courtesy of NBPL

The NBPL Summer Reading Program kicks off June 11

Sign-ups for summer reading are on the library’s website at www.newportbeachlibrary.org and open on June 11. Crafts, prizes, book recommendations and more can be found on the library’s website and on Beanstack, the library’s online reading tracker. 

The Newport Beach Public Library is the cultural heart of the community, serving more than one million patrons each year. They are an essential provider of books, information and technology, through the Central Library and three branches: Mariners, Balboa and Corona del Mar. The library is a place for reading, researching, studying, meeting friends, enjoying cultural arts programs, attending lectures, community meetings, writing workshops, book clubs, children’s programs and much more. Library services are available both in person and online at www.newportbeachlibrary.org.

Funding for the Summer Reading Program is generously donated by the Friends of the Library.


Explore Upper Newport Bay

OC Parks manages nearly 60,000 acres of parks, historical and coastal facilities and open space for the County of Orange as part of OC Community Resources. For more information, visit www.ocparks.com.

Here in your own backyard, check out these events at Upper Newport Bay Nature Preserve in June to get you exploring the outdoors.

Explore Upper Newport Bay kayaking

Courtesy of Newport Bay Conservancy

Kayaking Upper Newport Bay

Summer Birding Basics: Saturday, June 11. Upper Newport Bay is known for being one of the best bird watching spots in Orange County! This introductory workshop and walk will teach the basics of bird watching and identification to prepare bird enthusiasts to fully enjoy coastal bird watching. All are welcome and loaner binoculars will be available. Minors ages 16 and younger must have legal guardian present at all times. Walk-ins are welcome, but space is limited. Pre-registration is encouraged. Rain or heat advisory will cancel the event. Takes place 8-10 a.m. Register at www.letsgooutside.org/ocparks/activities.

Sunspot Spotting: Saturday, June 18. 2020 marked the beginning of a new 11-year solar cycle which will see a dramatic increase in the number of sunspots over the next 4 to 6 years. During this family friendly program, you will learn all about sunspots, their effect on planet earth and how to safely view them. Each family or group in attendance will be given the supplies to make their very own sunspot viewer. You will also use a specially filtered telescope to view sunspots (if any are present and weather conditions are favorable). Minors ages 16 and younger must have legal guardian present at all times. Walk-ins are welcome, but space is limited. Advance registration is encouraged. Takes place 1-3 p.m. Register at www.letsgooutside.org/ocparks/activities.

Family Walk at the Bay: Saturday, June 25. Join an easy, stroller-friendly walk along Upper Newport Bay to enjoy all the sights, sounds and smells of summer. You will stay on the paved Bayview Trail and pause frequently to observe birds, wildflowers and any other wildlife that happens to be present. Minors ages 16 and younger must have legal guardian present at all times. Rain or heat advisory will cancel the event. Walk-ins welcome, but space is limited so registration is suggested. Takes place from 10-11:30 a.m. Register at www.letsgooutside.org/ocparks/activities.

Planetary Alignment Sunrise Hike: Sunday, June 26. Calling all early risers! Join in a pre-dawn walk at Upper Newport Bay Nature Preserve. View the sunrise and be treated to a rare astronomical phenomenon – a planetary alignment. In the pre-dawn sky, you will see Mercury, Venus, Mars, Jupiter and Saturn lined up across the horizon and visible to the naked eye. Coffee and light refreshments will be served. Minors ages 16 and younger must have legal guardian present at all times. Walk-ins are welcome, but space is limited so registration is suggested. Significant cloud cover, rain or heat advisory will cancel the event. Takes place 5-7 a.m. Register at www.letsgooutside.org/ocparks/activities.

Upper Newport Bay is located at 2301 University Drive, Newport Beach.


School Notes

AVID program participation leads one NHHS senior to receive generous four-year scholarship

This year, more than 1,100 students participated in AVID programs throughout our local schools. AVID, which stands for Advancement Via Individual Determination, has a 30-year history in the Newport-Mesa Unified School District (NMUSD) benefitting students who have as a result obtained scholarships and achieved great success in college and beyond.

The AVID classroom environment is collaborative and has a familial feel. Students work together to problem solve, learn how to articulate what they do not understand and seek out resources they need to be successful. Students find solutions as a group which motivates them to engage in the learning process. Note-taking, studying, and organizing assignments are all skills that are taught and repeatedly practiced. 

AVID supplements student instruction, with tutoring services, motivational activities, and specialized academic and life skill development focused on college readiness. 

Students take personality tests, value surveys and interest inventories – all tests with no wrong answers. These assessments give the students valuable insight about who they are and how they best learn. Students also have opportunities to reflect on the knowledge gained and write compelling and persuasive personal statements throughout their AVID journey, as they learn new information, grow and change. 

Some students in AVID also complete a career-focused senior capstone project throughout their four years in high school. This project helps students refine their educational focus repeatedly over the duration of their high school experience – allowing them to sample multiple career pathways along the way. 

School Notes Yaritza Ortiz

Courtesy of NMUSD

Newport Harbor High School student, Yaritza Ortiz, was selected as an Angels Scholar

One testament of AVID’s success is the multiple NMUSD students that have been awarded scholarships from the Angels Foundation in previous years. This year, one AVID program student from Newport Harbor High School, Yaritza Ortiz, was selected as an Angels Scholar and awarded a generous four-year scholarship. 

Ortiz followed in the footsteps of her older siblings by participating in AVID. She attends NHHS, and as a first-generation college student, she was unsure where to begin when considering college. Ortiz’ AVID teacher encouraged her to take risks and enroll in AP courses – something she would not have done on her own. 

She serves as president of Latinos Unidos, one of the largest clubs on campus, is a mentor, leader, and works to inspire her peers to make the campus more welcoming and inclusive. 

“AVID always pushed me to my limit because my teachers recognized my abilities – even when I did not,” said Ortiz. 

She will attend the University of San Diego studying psychology. Her goal is to one day work as a counselor in juvenile detention centers to provide students with a second chance to create a better future for themselves.


Travel industry anything but close to being on cruise control

By GARY SHERWIN

For the last few weeks, I’ve boasted about our rosy Newport Beach summer visitor forecast, which I see continuing, but let’s be clear: All is not normal in the global tourism world right now.

Specifically, if you are flying anywhere and especially if you are planning to take a cruise anytime soon…beware. All is not carefree.

The airline industry’s schedules are still bedeviled and the Memorial Day Weekend was a nightmare for many flyers with hundreds of flight cancellations, sometimes at the last minute. Airlines continue to blame weather and employees out sick with COVID.

However, the other travel segment not getting much notice for their disruptions is the cruise industry. Probably no other part of the travel industry was more devastated with bad publicity during the pandemic than cruise lines. Just remember the Diamond Princess that was stranded in Japan in 2020 and unable to dock because 700 passengers were sick and seven others died. Video sent from guests had them couped up in their cabins and being fed box meals by staff in hazmat suits.

Gary Sherwin

Click on photo for a larger image

Courtesy of Visit Newport Beach

Gary Sherwin

While many hotels and resorts continued to operate in a limited capacity during COVID, the entire cruise industry was shut down for more than a year and millions of dollars of cancellation fees were refunded.

Last year, when restrictions were largely lifted, guests flocked back and reservations soared as loyal cruisers came back with a vengeance.

Unfortunately, it wasn’t back to normal as far as the cruise lines were concerned. In addition to COVID outbreaks on many ships, several lines are suffering from crew shortages and are now limiting capacity and in some cases canceling reservations of some passengers. In other cases, some cruise lines are closing restaurants on ships since they don’t have the manpower to staff them.

In fact, three cruise brands have reported suffering from serious crew shortages, but the reasons the lines cite couldn’t be more different. Norwegian, Carnival and Cunard Cruise Lines’ recent moves are likely examples of a broader industry staffing issue that could impact service on many ships this summer and into fall.

Norwegian Cruise Line has been forced to limit passenger capacity on its United States-based Pride of America ship, which reentered service in April and sails exclusively around the Hawaiian Islands. 

The company said the ship is currently sailing with fewer than 500 crew but usually operates with more than 900, which has prompted the line to cut back on the number of cruisers it allows on each of the vessel’s voyages to allow for the level of service customers expect. Bookings for the ship are closed until at least November, and scheduled departures until that time are booked at only slightly more than half full – between 1,100 and 1,200 passengers on a ship that maxes out at 2,186.

And recently Cunard capped passenger capacity on an undisclosed number of Alaska and Europe itineraries into early July, meaning some passengers already booked on those sailings aboard Queen Elizabeth and Queen Victoria will be notified that their bookings have been canceled.

Cunard blames COVID-related flight issues, which have delayed or prevented some crew members from reaching their designated vessels. “The wider impact of COVID-19 is affecting hospitality in general and disrupting airlines, and as such, this is impacting the number of crew members we are able to get to our ships,” Cunard said in a statement. “We are therefore limiting the number of guests sailing on Queen Elizabeth and Queen Victoria as we build crew numbers back up. Unfortunately, this means that we need to cancel several existing bookings.

“We expect the wider impact of COVID on the hospitality industry and disruption to airlines to be relatively short term.”

However, there is also some online chatter about large COVID outbreaks on some luxury Cunard ships among passengers who are forced to quarantine which doesn’t sound fun after you have laid out thousands of dollars for a trip of a lifetime.

Meanwhile Carnival said late last month that it will temporarily close two popular restaurants across its fleet. The Chef’s Table – which offers a semiprivate, multicourse, chef-led dining experience with a hefty price tag – and the extra-fee Italian restaurant Cucina Del Capitano will be shuttered through at least June 30 on all vessels and is used as an overflow eatery for the main dining room.

The cause, according to a statement from Carnival, is related to difficulty procuring crew visas.

“Our rapid and successful restart has required us to bring back thousands of crew members in a very short time, which has increased the number of resources needed for government officials to process the large number of visa applications and slowed down our ability to fully staff some of our functions, including our culinary team,” Carnival said.

Frankly, I think the cruise lines are having difficulty, like many in the travel industry, of simply attracting enough employees to work on ships much less getting them onboard.

Our family loves cruising and over the years we have gone on some delightful adventures. In fact, we have a big cruise in Europe planned for late summer with six of us. While all this recent news is certainly worrisome, we are staying the course for now.

Even so, I hedged my bets and bought trip insurance. These days, it’s the best bet you can make when traveling since at the very least it buys you a little piece of mind in these unpredictable times.

All this craziness and the soaring costs are the main reasons most people will just drive to their summer vacation this year to places like Newport Beach and avoid the hassle of delayed planes and canceled cruises. 

It’s not pretty and disappointing to many but unfortunately the staffing challenges in the travel industry right now seems to be Newport Beach’s gain.

Gary Sherwin is President & CEO of Visit Newport Beach and Newport Beach & Company.


You Must Remember This: William Bartholomae

By NANCY GARDNER

William Bartholomae was one of our more interesting and notorious residents. My father said he was called Black Bart, but doesn’t say where the nickname came from. Bartholomae started as an oilfield roughneck. He bought some land and hit oil, bought some more land and hit gold – he had the Midas touch and made a considerable fortune before moving to Newport Beach and building a 20-plus room mansion on the peninsula.

In addition to his skill at making money, he was an adept sailor, at least part of the time, competing in the mixed 6 meters at the 1936 Berlin Olympics. This must have given him false confidence because on September 20, 1939, when the big chubasco came through, he was out on the ocean on his 140-foot yacht, the Paragon, with 16 guests and a skipper. As the weather kicked up, he decided to go home, but when they got close to the harbor mouth and the skipper saw the huge swells charging down the harbor he told Bartholomae it would be safer to wait out the storm where they were, rather than try to navigate what had become a perilous harbor mouth. This advice didn’t settle well with Bartholomae. He wanted to go home and home he would go, harbor challenges or not. He took over the helm, sailed into the harbor mouth and shortly thereafter crashed into the west jetty, totaling the boat. Fortunately, his passengers were saved from drowning. They were also saved from a particularly tedious task Bartholomae demanded of his yachting guests. It seems Bartholomae had something of a clean fetish. He was famous for the pristine nature of such normally unpristine things like oil fields. Domestically, he had his houseman wash the outside of his house every day. This clean fetish carried over to his boat, at least before it crashed. On a normal cruise, according to my father, when the boat was brought back to the dock, the guests weren’t allowed to leave until they scrubbed down both the yacht and the dock. After such an experience I imagine most people declined the next invitation to go for a sail.

Men like Bartholomae probably aren’t destined to go quietly off into the sunset and he certainly didn’t. In 1964, he met a rather gruesome death. He was living in his mansion with his brother and his brother’s wife Carmen. (He and his wife had gone through an unpleasant divorce some time before.) Also with them at the time was Carmen’s sister Minola visiting from Spain to help her sister through childbirth and the period immediately after. Minola had about three words of English which would prove to be fatal to Bartholomae. A week or so after childbirth, a still weak Carmen was in the kitchen slicing mushrooms (details!) when she collapsed. Bartholomae rushed in, picked up the knife to get it out of the way and was leaning over to render service when Minola came in. Seeing him leaning over her sister with a knife in his hand, she thought the worst. If she had spoken English, she might have first asked what was going on. Instead, she leapt to protect her sister, grabbing the knife and stabbing Bartholomae to death.  She was charged with manslaughter, but eventually was found innocent. The house where this all took place has since been rebuilt, but it would be interesting to know if the current residents are aware of what took place all those years ago.

As for the Bartholomae family, reality show viewers may be familiar with his daughter, Sarajane. She and her daughters starred in Alaska Gold Diggers which tracked their efforts to resuscitate the Bartholomae gold mines. Others might have known her earlier, because she was Miss Newport Beach and Miss Aloha of Orange County (queen of the OC Fair), or because she married the baseball player, Mickey Hartling.

To tie this up in a bow, I’ve met Hartling quite a few times as he’s a friend of my former son-in-law Greg Washer. I knew he had played baseball for the Dodgers, that he was now in real estate, but I had no idea of his connection with the Bartholomaes. If I should run into him again, I will be sure to ask him if he ever learned the origin of the nickname Black Bart.

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Nancy Gardner, former Mayor of Newport Beach, longtime resident and daughter of Judge Robert Gardner, is a regular contributor to Stu News Newport.


Take Five: Meet Gail Wirtz Costello, co-founder of ArtBoxCDM and Artistic Healings

By AMY SENK

Recently a reader sent an email suggesting that we connect with Gail Wirtz Costello, a Corona del Mar artist who co-founded ArtBoxCDM, located in a studio on East Coast Highway across from Sherman Library & Gardens, where she bonds with member artists from around the world. I recognized her from seeing her by the beach, painting en plein air, but I never knew that Costello, with 40 years’ experience as an art therapist, also co-founded Artistic Healings, a program that is working to connect Hoag Hospital cancer patients with hands-on art projects. I caught up with her to learn more.

Take Five Gail Wirtz Costello

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Photos courtesy of Gail Wirtz Costello

Gail Wirtz Costello

Q: How did you become ensconced in the world of art and art therapy?

A: Quite honestly, I I grew up at a time when many women, especially in Chicago, lost their identity to the man they married. At least that is the way I perceived it. Let’s just say I had an itch. I had something inside, which I kept seeing thought my art. The journey as I remember, started in college art school. I had something to say, and it came out in my art, So the journey began. Luckily, growing up in a family of five, my family supported me whatever I needed to do, wherever I needed to go. My art guided me towards a career of expressing myself and helping others do the same. It took a lot of education and pioneering. I became a leader in the field of art therapy. I taught masters-level art therapy and worked hard in my profession and with my family. Then at age 45, my life as I knew it stopped. Cancer entered the playing field. It played a huge role. It would change not only the direction of my life, but for others as well. Again, my mission continued. My art shot me in the direction I needed to go. I asked God to help and I found the answers I needed in my art. I found peace. Doing art involved using a different part of my brain where negativity wasn’t invited. I found peace here. I explored afterlife and saw there was a place we go after we pass away. Heaven became real. The fear of Jim [her late husband] dying went away. It became okay to live in the moment. My life was shattered: two children, a sick husband and a career that wouldn’t stop. I lived this life for 12 years, Jim fighting every day for his life. Jim died in 2012. 

Q: Why did you move west and how did your art journey continue?

A: After a long hard road in Chicago, I moved to Scottsdale, and I took a break for helping others and continued a lifelong pursuit in competitive horseback riding. A few years later, I approached Mayo Clinic about my art therapy idea. Let’s just say it didn’t work out. I was willing to fund the program, but our philosophies didn’t match. By 2018, I was living in Newport Beach fulltime. I approached Hoag Hospital. They were easy to work with and we started “Art For The Soul,” later to be named Artistic Healings.

Take Five Gail Wirtz Costello

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Doing what Gail Wirtz Costello loves to do – paint

Q: Did you do this alone?

A: Absolutely not. Hoag Hospital and Justin Cohen of Little Buddy Films are part of the growing team and as we expand our offerings. Hoag has been amazing in accepting me as a donor, professional and someone who has experienced life with cancer. I have worked side by side with them for four years developing the program they called Art For The Soul. My career, as well as my experiences as a mother and a wife of a cancer patient, have given me empathy for others facing the same or similar journey. My skills as a professional, artist and having some financial freedom, allowed us to develop the program into a non-profit called Artistic Healings. Artists I know work from the inside out. We needed someone with a vision to help us communicate with the outside world. Justin Cohen is that person – young and talented. Justin and I work closely together, filming art groups with community members who have experienced illness. These people communicate their feelings while they make an art project. Justin, a filmmaker from Los Angeles (littlebuddyfilms.com), helped us create our unique art video format, grow our mission and become a not-for-profit organization. There are many people in the community who want to volunteer and give some time making art in the videos or putting together art kits. The not-for-profit emphasizes that Artistic Healings is not a moneymaking venture, but one to help people suffering.

Q: Do you think Artistic Healings is successful and have you done any studies to measure the program’s success?

A: After we created the first video, Hoag sent out an evaluation to the patients who participated in the program. They found and measured the responses completed by the patients. The responses were significant enough to show that indeed, those who participated, showed positive change in their mood and enjoyment level. Most importantly, more than 90 percent of respondents said they would like to do additional art videos. This was all the reassurance we needed to continue with the program.

Q: Where are you now? 

A: The ArtboxCDM, home of independent artists and Artistic Healings, lives in a 600-square-foot rental space in the 2700 block of Pacific Coast Highway across from Sherman Gardens. Several days a week, artists (which I call the United Nations), meet to share art and stories about their politics and their lives. Housed at the ArtboxCDM, is Tanya from Ukraine, Rachael from Israel, Lynne Kaplin (my partner and co-founder) from South Africa, Lillia from Russia, Lindy from Austria, and, of course, me from the U.S. If life has taught me anything, it is that everything changes. I use my art to help me live in the moment and enjoy every day. Look us up, as we offer workshops monthly. I also ride my horse daily, love CdM and Marc, my significant other, and I live a great life giving back and enjoying our community. 

Editor’s Note: For more information, visit www.Artistichealings.com and www.ArtboxCDM.com.

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Amy Senk is a long-time resident of Corona del Mar and a regular contributor to Stu News Newport.


Officials “Speak Up” about electric bikes

By SARA HALL

A community forum this week covered a sometimes-contentious topic gaining speed around the world: Electric bicycles.

Community group Speak Up Newport hosted a meeting Wednesday (June 8) that tackled the issue and featured presenters from the city, local police and a top retailer. About 80 people attended the meeting, held in the community room at the civic center, and even more watched the live stream on local TV or Zoom.

The meeting was moderated by avid cyclist, traffic consultant and former councilmember Tony Petros.

There are a lot of benefits to e-bikes, Petros noted, including access to this form of recreation to those who would otherwise not be able to ride a bike. They’ve also improved commuter cycling, he added. But there are also a number of concerns and issues, Petros pointed out. Many e-bikes can travel at speeds of passenger cars and some e-bike users, particularly younger riders, aren’t adequately trained, he said.

“We all have experienced an electric bike whizzing through an intersection without any attempt to slow or stop,” Petros commented. “What can be done to make this a safe alternative for everyone on the roadway?”

This isn’t just a Newport Beach problem, said keynote speaker City Principal Civil Engineer Brad Sommers, it’s a worldwide issue. They are involved at the regional, state and national levels.

“This is an all hands-on deck sort of situation,” Sommers said.

It involves political leaders, safety focused groups, retailers, parents, school districts and the wider community, he noted.

Other benefits include increased mobility and reduced traffic and parking congestion, Sommers said.

The business is taking off around the world, noted another speaker at the meeting, Don DiCostanzo, CEO/founder of Pedego Electric Bikes and a Corona del Mar High School alum. Sales have skyrocketed the last few years across the globe.

“The world is going to electric bikes,” he said. “We have to figure out a way we can co-exist in society.”

He gave an example of the introduction and growing popularity from acoustic to electric guitars.

“The world is going electric, whether it’s cars or bikes (or guitars), so we have to accept it and try to figure out how we’re going to deal with it,” DiCostanzo said.

Officials speak up about electric bikes and beach

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Photo by Lana Johnson

A group of bikes parked near the beach

In 2014, DiCostanzo worked with bicycle manufacturers and local political leaders on legislation defining and clarifying the different classes of electric bicycles. It became effective in 2016.

California vehicle code defines an electric bicycle as a bike equipped with fully operable pedals and an electric motor of less than 750 watts, explained the third speaker on the panel, Newport Beach Police Department Traffic Lieutenant Eric Little.

“Electric bikes are allowed anywhere that bicycles are allowed as long as they meet the requirements of a low-speed electric bicycle,” he said. 

Class 1 e-bikes have electric pedal-assistance, but no throttle. Class 2 e-bikes do have throttle control. Some people can’t continuously pedal as required with class 1 e-bikes, so the throttle helps them power the bicycle, DiCostanzo explained. 

Class 1 and 2 of electric bikes are governed at a maximum motor-assisted speed of 20 mph, he noted. Class 3 e-bikes (pedal-assist operated, but no throttle) tops out at 28 mph. Those are designed to be on the road, they don’t belong on the bike path at that speed, DiCostanzo said. 

“These are maximum speeds, that’s the most they can go,” DiCostanzo emphasized. 

Most of the riders in the older generation don’t ride them that fast for fear of injury if they take a tumble, he commented, but kids don’t often realize how badly an accident can hurt at that speed.

They had to negotiate on the regulations to get the legislation passed, DiCostanzo noted. He argued that the minimum age should be set at 16 and helmets required for all ages.

“Unfortunately, I didn’t get my way,” he said, noting that compromises were required in order to get it passed. “Today, I regret the fact that I tolerated the fact that under 16 could ride them.”

Currently, helmets are required for ages 17 and under on class 1 and 2 e-bikes and for all ages on class 3 e-bikes. There’s no minimum age to ride class 1 and 2 e-bikes, but class 3 riders must be at least 16 years old.

Class 3 e-bikes are not allowed on the boardwalk, Little confirmed. 

There are several key regulatory differences from an electric bicycle compared to a “motorized bicycle,” which is defined as a gas or electric powered bike without pedals or that can go more than 30 mph, Little explained. Motorized bikes must be registered and insured, and the rider must have a motorcycle license, he said. 

Many of the motorized bikes they see out on the streets are either being sold as electric bikes or are being modified and people are riding them like e-bikes, Little said. 

“As a parent, be cognizant of what you’re buying for your children,” he cautioned.

When he started in the industry, DiCostanzo thought baby boomers would be their top customer. They spent their time and energy marketing to that generation, he noted. 

They soon realized the younger generation might be interested, but didn’t expect the proliferation of unexperienced kids riding e-bikes that’s occurred in recent years, he said. 

The main issues are safety and not understanding the rules of the road, DiCostanzo said. He emphasized education and outreach, mentioning the Smart Cycling Program, which trains both adults and kids. 

“I can vouch for that program,” said Sommers, who is also an avid cyclist and a certified instructor for the Smart Cycling Program.

Officials speak up about electric bikes share the road CdM

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Photo by Amy Senk

Motorists and bicyclists sharing the road in the middle of Corona del Mar 

It’s important to learn the rules and how to properly operate e-bikes, all three speakers agreed. Collisions can cause serious injury or even be fatal.

In 2021, there were 126 bicycle collisions. There are typically more during the summer months, Little said. In the past few years, it’s fluctuated between 85 and 118. So far in 2022, there have been 41 collisions.

“We did have a couple of low years, but 126 collisions is not an astronomical amount based on the number of bikes…that are out in the public,” he said. 

These are reported traffic collisions, Little emphasized, meaning when the police are actually called to come out and take a report.

“I’m sure that they happen more frequently than what’s reported to us,” he said. 

The numbers also aren’t specific to e-bikes, he noted. The reports don’t include explicit checkboxes for electric or manual bikes so they are unable to identify that exact data.

The primary reasons for collisions are speed, right of way violations and running red lights. 

“Very often those violations are occurring from the bicycle rider,” Little noted. 

The collisions occur throughout the city, with many along Coast Highway and on the Balboa Peninsula where there are naturally more bicycle riders.

In 2021, there were 11 reported collisions on the boardwalk. Of those, 10 reported minor injuries (for example, complaint of pain or abrasions) and one loss of consciousness.

In 2022 year to date, there has been one reported collision on the boardwalk. It was a non-injury hit-and-run involving a bicycle and pedestrian and the bicyclist was suspected of being under the influence of alcohol, Little explained. 

Little also mentioned the Boardwalk Ambassadors, who aren’t NBPD officers, but patrol the boardwalk and piers on weekends, holidays and busy summer days to improve compliance with safety rules, among other tasks. People typically obey the rules of the road when they see a police presence, so the ambassadors give NBPD a greater ability to make contacts, Little explained. The pilot program kicked off in early 2021.

“They are a great supplemental resource for us down on the Peninsula,” he said. 

For the first three months of 2022, the ambassadors made 632 contacts for speeding bikes (400 of those were e-bikes). They tell the riders to slow down and are typically seeing voluntary compliance, Little noted. 

The police department focuses on both education and enforcement, Little said. For several years, NBPD motorcycle officers have been hosting presentations for students and staff at local schools and community members at neighborhood events. It’s important to reach kids at a young age, Little said, so they learn the rules of the road early on.

They are also planning to focus on future publicized e-bike enforcement operations, he added. 

The shared use paths are where some of the issues arise, considering the speed differences in the variety of users, Sommers noted. The city’s bicycle infrastructure also includes bike lanes, on-street bike routes and wide sidewalks meant to allow cycling.

Their goal is safe and efficient movement throughout the city of Newport Beach, for multiple types of users, including cyclists, he said. 

The critical document is the Bicycle Master Plan, which was developed in 2014. It reviewed bike usage in the city at the time and provided a 20-year vision of where they wanted it to go, Sommers explained. It also looked at the policies and network of routes. 

Currently, Newport Beach has about 100 miles of bicycle routes and pathways. The vision of the Bicycle Master Plan is to extend that up to 170 miles, Sommers noted. 

“It’s quite a distance,” particularly considering the size of the city, he said.

Officials speak up about electric bikes and beach

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Photo by Sara Hall

A shared path near Castaways Park uses signs, ground markings and rumble strips to guide users

The tactics to help guide people on how to use the facilities include signage, ground markings and innovative engineering, Sommers said. 

For signage, there are guidelines from the state and federal government that regulate color, size, shape, language and placement, he explained. Although there is some flexibility, he added, so they can work around to get the message across in the way they want. For example, the regulatory signs on the boardwalk limit speed to 8 mph. Cyclists riding faster than that are actually breaking the law in the city’s municipal code, Sommers explained. 

The markings on the ground are also regulated by state and federal agencies, but they are also used locally to project how the city wants facilities to be used and can reinforce those guidelines, he said. 

“It seems like we have a very limited toolbox, and it is a bit, but we’re trying to work outside of that because we know that not everybody pays attention to signs and we know that the markings are often disregarded,” Sommers said. “The challenge is to be more innovative, more progressive with what we can do.”

Some examples of innovative engineering include: Green paint to designate specific bike lanes, creating a preferred path for cyclists and creating awareness for motorists; rumble bumps to slow cyclists down but not adversely impact pedestrians or joggers; and radar speed feedback signs adapted for areas where speeding bikes are a concern.

They are also looking to neighboring cities and watching what they do, like widening or separate paths, Sommers said. 

Moving forward, the department is dedicated to finding more innovative ways to help, he added. 

Petros, who was a proponent of the Bicycle Master Plan when he was on City Council, said city staff understands the limitations under the law and does a good job of coming up with innovative solutions.

“They are doing everything they can within their bag of tricks to make our roadways safe for all users,” Petros said. 

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Sara Hall covers City Hall and is a regular contributor to Stu News Newport.


Fair Game

By TOM JOHNSON

Election Day is over but the counting is far from complete

TOM MARCHPrimary Election Day is in the rear-view mirror and, to me, that’s a good thing. Let the healing begin. Where do things stand on races? Well, there are a lot of ballots still in need of processing. A lot. So, now we’re in the waiting game.

Here’s what I mean: According to OC Vote/Registrar of Voters, ballots processed in Orange County after election day totaled just 48,945, leaving an estimated 219,130 still uncounted. Again, that’s throughout OC.

That means race results can still change!

Here’s what’s been counted as of yesterday: 48,945 vote-by-mail ballots out of a total of 79,764. Ballots dropped at Drop Boxes totaled 35,275 and none of those have been processed and that was before another 59,000 turned up. Vote-by-mail ballots returned to Vote Centers totaled 68,180 and, again, none have been counted. And, another estimated 24,491 ballots were received after Election Day that also have not been processed.

So, as you might imagine, many races still fall in that “too early to call category.”

The big local race, Measure B, the potential City Charter update that would allow for direct election of the Newport Beach mayor has been trending around 58-59% voting against the Measure.

Yesterday morning, the No on B camp had this to say in a statement: “We appreciate that Newport Beach voters took the time to understand the complexities of Measure B and have defeated this flawed proposal. Measure B would have undermined term limits and created the most powerful mayor in California. Residents recognized that it is never a good idea to give that much power to one person.

“The No on Measure B committee raised $155,000 from 190 donors, planted 2,000 signs on residents’ lawns, hand delivered 20,000 flyers and distributed 5,000 personally written notes. We mobilized our hundreds of supporters to tell their friends and neighbors about the dangers of Measure B and our former mayors and city leaders lent their names to our educational flyers and emails.

“Together we were able to defeat the elected mayor proposal. Our sincere thanks to everyone who worked to protect our city. We are pleased that the voters have made the right choice.”

The Yes on B side has declined to comment up to this point.

Someone reminded me of a Newport Beach City Council race in recent years that seemed to have Tim Stoaks winning over Marshall Duffield, with still a number of ballots uncounted. As the counting continued to trickle in over the coming days, the margin closed…and closed…resulting in a Duffield 36-vote victory in the end.

So, does anyone remember the old adage, “Don’t count your chickens before they hatch?”

It’s situations like these where that needs to be remembered.

As of June 9:

Yes on Measure B, 6,920 votes, 40.84%

No on Measure B, 10,025 votes, 59.16%

Other interesting races in OC that touch Newport Beach included the Judie Mancuso/Diane Dixon/Benjamin Yu 72nd Assembly contest. Mancuso early in the evening on Election Day came out strong, but Dixon now has closed the gap convincingly to within a couple of percentage points. One has to figure that most of the Yu vote will also eventually transfer to Dixon come November, making her the one to beat.

Dixon said Wednesday, “I am grateful to the voters of the 72nd Assembly District who have shown me their confidence and support. We continue to run an aggressive campaign to pick up this Assembly seat for the Republicans and fight the failed leadership of the Sacramento Democrats who have created record-breaking inflation and skyrocketing crime.” 

Mancuso, on the other hand, said, “I am thankful to the voters in Assembly District 72 who put their confidence in me during this primary election. Over the next several months I look forward to listening to and talking with the voters of the district. Now is not the time for political games, and I know the voters of the 72nd district share my priorities to protect our environment, defend women’s rights, and get guns off our streets and out of our schools. I look forward to a spirited debate with Councilwoman Dixon and to hear why she believes the same agenda Orange County voters rejected two years ago would be appealing in 2022.”

As of June 9:

Judie Mancuso (D), 37,310 votes, 44.12%

Diane Dixon (R), 35,467 votes, 41.94%

Benjamin Yu (R), 11,796 votes, 13.95%

The (non-partisan) race for Orange County Board of Supervisor in the 5th District pitted Katrina Foley, an acknowledged Democrat, against three Republicans, Pat Bates, Diane Harkey and Newport Beach Mayor Kevin Muldoon

Although Foley has a wide vote margin at press time, she’s only at 41.58% of the ballots cast, again showing a potential strong advantage to the Republican side come November.

As of June 9:

Katrina Foley, 40,049 votes, 41.58%

Pat Bates, 22,042 votes, 22.88%

Diane Harkey, 17,717 votes, 18.39%

Kevin Muldoon, 16,512 votes, 17.14%

The U.S. Representative for the 47th District shows Democrat Katie Porter with 51.44% of the vote over her closest challenger who is Republican Scott Baugh at 30.91%.

Porter has lots of money behind her…lots ($18,701,221 as of May 18), while Baugh always seems to exude a certain negative image even being a party leader in the past. His cash on hand totals $1,086,878 at the same cutoff date. 

So, you can see the disparity.

As of June 9:

Katie Porter (D), 51,221 votes, 51.44%

Scott Baugh (R), 30,780 votes, 30.91%

Amy Phan West (R), 8,165 votes, 8.20%

Brian Burley (R), 7,445 votes, 7.48%

Errol Webber (R), 1,962 votes, 1.97%

And finally, Republican Janet Nguyen looks to have easily defeated Huntington Beach Democrat Kim Carr.

As of June 9:

Janet Nguyen (R), 70,042 votes, 57.07%

Kim Carr (D), 54,193 votes, 42.93%

• • •

Next Tuesday, June 14, is Flag Day. Supervisor Foley will honor military personnel, firefighters, police officers, medical personnel, and other first responders on the 247th birthday of the United States Army. The celebration is co-hosted by the Exchange Club of Newport Harbor and will take place at 4 p.m. on the historic Old Orange County Courthouse Lawn in Santa Ana.

As just an aside, Newport Beach Police Dispatcher Jessica Roberts will sing the National Anthem at the festivities.

• • •

Several issues ago I mentioned a petition circulating on Change.org taking the Newport-Mesa Unified School District Board to task for “non-age-appropriate books” finding their way on to library shelves in the school district.

I received this update yesterday from a District spokesperson. The apparent inappropriate books were acknowledged by the District as being found in Wilson Elementary in Costa Mesa. That library was subsequently shut down for an investigation which resulted in the books in question being tracked back to one school employee. That employee is no longer with the District.

A Guest Letter appears elsewhere in Stu News today taking umbrage with my recent comments on the subject. The group writing the letter is advocating a formal committee to review books and other materials moving forward.

• • •

Assemblymember Cottie Petrie-Norris and State Senator Dave Min will be joining forces for a channel clean-up day on Saturday, June 18 from 9 a.m.-12 noon at the Santa Ana-Delhi Channel entrance.

They are inviting the community to join in to “prevent hundreds of pounds of plastic and trash from ending up in our beautiful coastal waters.”

Those interested should meet at the southwest corner of Irvine Ave. and Mesa Drive in Costa Mesa.

For more info or to RSVP, visit https://a74.asmdc.org.

• • •

Speaking of Senator Min, he will be hosting a Zoom meeting this morning from 10-11 a.m. specifically designed to offer tips on how to protect yourself from scams. 

Seniors are the highest targeted group for scams relating to home repair, identity theft and mail theft. Senator Min is hosting what is supposed to be an informative seminar with experts who will brief you on the best ways to protect yourself. The seminar is made for seniors but will be helpful for everyone.

To join, log in to https://casen.zoom.us/j/85760097955.

• • •

Irrelevant Week introduced the details for their upcoming week honoring San Francisco 49er’s 262nd and last pick on the recent NFL draft. That, of course, is Iowa State quarterback Brock Purdy.

IW will run June 20-24, kicking off with the Lowsman Banquet on Monday, June 20. ESPN sports radio personality and voice of Lakers’ radio John Ireland will emcee the event.

Another highlight of that evening will be the honoring of restaurateur Ron Salisbury who will receive the Paul Salata Award, “Hero Beyond The Hashmarks.”

For info on the remainder of the week, including info on tickets for the banquet, go to www.mrirrelevant.org.


“Inspired by Nature” summer art exhibition at Sherman Library & Gardens

The public is invited to experience “Inspired by Nature,” Sherman Library & Gardens’ summer art exhibit. More than 45 original mosaics by internationally renowned mosaicist Irina Charny will be artfully displayed throughout the Gardens. 

“Irina’s love of botanicals and nature informs her work, making her the perfect choice for this year’s summer art exhibit. Guests will especially enjoy posing for pics in front of enormous mosaic butterfly wings Charny created exclusively for Sherman Library & Gardens,” said Executive Director Scott LaFleur. 

Mosaics are mesmerizing to look at. They have an exotic vibe that takes viewers on a faraway journey. Colors and patterns come together like a kaleidoscope. Because of the time and effort that goes into each design, mosaic artwork could be considered a hybrid of painting and sculpture, a blend of decorative, functional and fine art. Mosaics are easy to make, but challenging to master – a reason the art form deserves more attention and better appreciation. Self-taught since childhood, today Charny is one of Southern California’s leading mosaic artists. 

 Inspired by Nature mosaics

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Courtesy of Sherman Library & Gardens

“Inspired by Nature” will feature mosaics by artist Irina Charny

“As a child growing up in the grey drabness of the Soviet Union in the ‘60s, I was drawn to color. I collected bright treasures – red or orange bits of a broken taillight, pieces of green glass washed smooth by the sea, chips of blue plate found on the way to school. I could spend hours arranging them into pictures but since they were too precious to fix permanently in that form, I’d sweep them up into a box to be rearranged next time. Now I have an almost infinite variety of materials available to me, but I still approach each mosaic with that same excitement and joy,” said Charny, who resides in Irvine with her husband Ben and her dog Ziggy.

Her work graces hospitals, schools and homes. “I have always been inspired by nature – the shapes, the colors, the patterns, the infinite variety of flora and fauna. It is an honor to see my humble imitations in a beautiful setting like Sherman Library and Gardens,” she added. 

“Inspired by Nature” will be on display June 21 through September 21 and is free with garden admission. Guests attending Sherman Library & Gardens’ Summer Garden Party fundraiser on Saturday, August 27 will have an opportunity to meet Charny in person. 

The mosaics on display are available for purchase with proceeds supporting Sherman Library & Gardens. Charny’s complete works can be found on her website at www.icmosaics.com.

Sherman Library & Gardens is located at 2647 E. Coast Highway, Corona del Mar, California. For more information, visit www.thesherman.org, or call 949.673.2261.


Human Options raises more than $500,000 at Serious Fun Gala

Orange County-based nonprofit dedicated to ending the cycle of relationship violence, hosted their 2022 Serious Fun Gala on May 21 at the Balboa Bay Resort, after two years of hosting the event virtually. The night was a celebration of 40 years of service and advocacy by Human Options – complete with “an evening in Spain” theme. More than 300 community leaders, donors and honorees came together to celebrate the success that Human Options has seen through its four decades of work – including a $750,000 grant recently awarded by the OC Health Care Agency aimed at supporting stable housing and wrap around services for domestic violence survivors.

Human Options Doka

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Photos courtesy of Human Options

(L-R) Celina Doka, board chair from Newport Beach with Maricela Rios-Faust, CEO, Human Options

 Attendees raised an impressive $530,000 which will be put toward Human Options’ programs and services, including emergency shelter and transitional housing programs, legal advocacy, therapy and counseling, elder abuse prevention and more.

 In honor of the organization’s 40th anniversary, the event celebrated all past DOVE award recipients, which recognizes individuals or corporations who have made significant contributions to domestic violence prevention programs since 1996. The night was an acknowledgement and appreciation of their commitment to ensuring that every person in Orange County lives free from fear.

Human Options Sonenshine

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Kerri Sonenshine, vice president, Far West Services with Danny Sonenshine of Newport Beach 

“We’re extremely honored that our work over the past 40 years has made an impact on this community and the people we serve. We wouldn’t be able to provide such essential services to survivors of relationship violence without our generous donors,” said Maricela Rios-Faust, CEO. “Our supporters have been a significant part of our mission of ending the cycle of domestic violence since our organization’s inception.”

 At the event, a survivor served by Human Options shared her experience with relationship violence and how she overcame her circumstance and transitioned into a permanent home. She was presented with a keychain with the Human Options heart logo to put her new housekey on, as a reminder of her strength and bravery.

Human Options ving statues

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Living statues celebrating the gala-themed evening in Spain

At the event, guests were transported across the Atlantic for a night of Spanish-inspired fun and fare. A live silent auction was held to raise money towards services for survivors of relationship violence. 

For more information about Human Options, visit www.humanoptions.org.


Barrel of fun

Barrel of fun surfer.jpg SNN 6.10

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Photo by Stan Sievers (Instagam @stansievers

The art of surfing barrels on a beautiful day


Marina Park light

Marina Park lights.png SNN 6.10

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Photo by Kevin Pellon (Instagram @socalsnapz)

A harborside beacon


CdM Scenic 5K provided a day of family, fun and fitness

The highly anticipated Corona del Mar Scenic 5K, presented by the Corona del Mar Chamber of Commerce and Casey Kesher as presenting sponsor, filled the streets of picturesque Corona del Mar on Saturday, June 4.

“Our successful event attracted 1,140 registered participants, in addition to our vendor exhibitors and spectators,” said Linda Leonhard, Chamber of Commerce president.

CdM Scenic 5K Linda and Casey

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Courtesy of CdM Chamber of Commerce

CdM Chamber of Commerce President Linda Leonhard with Presenting Sponsor Casey Lesher

Races included the Men’s 5K, Women’s 5K, 2-Mile Youth Race, 2 Mile Fun Walk and the ever-popular 1K Kid’s Dolphin Dash.

CdM Scenic 5K fastest

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Courtesy of CdM Chamber of Commerce

Fastest Overall was 28-year-old Nick Taubenheim, who ran the Men’s 5K in 16.09 minutes with a pace of 5:12 minute mile

CdM Scenic 5K oldest

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Oldest participant was 88-year-old Richard Ardis, a CdM resident who ran the 5K

CdM Scenic 5K dolphin dash

Photo by Amy Senk

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Youngsters take off in the 1K Kids’ Dolphin Dash

Immediately following the race at the finish line, participants were treated to delicious food offerings from local restaurants, visited with the unique exhibiting vendors and enjoyed a social awards ceremony. 

For more information, visit www.cdmchamber.com.


Congratulations to Sage Hill School Class of 2022

Congratulatons to Sage Hill Class of 2022

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Photo by Ultimate Exposures

Sage Hill School held their Graduation Ceremony on Friday, June 3 in Wilkins Town Square, their first at this location since 2019. The students assembled in the Peter V. Ueberroth Gymnasium prior to commencement. Congratulations to the Class of 2022! For more information, visit www.sagehillschool.org.


Newport Beach – A Look Back

Photo series courtesy of Balboa Island Museum Newport Beach

Newport Beach A Look Back 127 Amethyst Ave

127 Amethyst Ave., circa 1940s

Balboa Island Museum Newport Beach and the Museum Store are located at 210 B Marine Ave., Balboa Island. They are open Monday through Thursday from 10 a.m.-5 p.m. and Friday through Sunday from 10 a.m.-6 p.m. Free general admission on all days. Two-hour parking is available on Marine Avenue. For more information, call 949.675.3952, visit www.balboaislandmuseum.org or email This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it..


Paddington Bear pays a visit to the Balboa Island Museum Newport Beach

Paddington Bear has arrived at the Balboa Island Museum Newport Beach! His exhibit highlights a collection of Paddington Bear memorabilia and is certain to bring a smile to young and old alike.

The story of one of the world’s most beloved bears began on Christmas Eve 1956, when Michael Bond, creator of Paddington Bear, spotted a teddy bear in a shop near Paddington Station in London and bought it as a gift for his wife. This little bear provided Bond with the inspiration to write a story, and in 10 short days the first book, A Bear Called Paddington, was written.

Paddington Bear closeup

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Courtesy of Balboa Island Museum Newport Beach

Come celebrate Paddington Bear Day at the museum on June 25

On Saturday, June 25, bring the whole family to the museum for “Paddington Bear Day.” Join this fun-filled event as one of your favorite bears is honored. There will be photo opportunities and refreshments, too.

Call the museum for more information at 949. 675.3952. Hours are 10 a.m.-5 p.m. weekdays and 10 a.m.-6 p.m. weekends.

Balboa Island Museum Newport Beach is located at 210B Marine Ave., Balboa Island. For more information, visit www.balboaislandmuseum.org.


Does your kid have talent? This might be the show for you

The Place to Play, a non-profit organization that creates family friendly venues for arts events, has a Kid’s Talent Show planned in the Marina Park Community Center on Friday, June 17 from 6-8 p.m. They need performers!

Kids interested in performing should send their applications to This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it..

Tickets for the event are on sale for $25, with free admission for children under 10.

Does your kid have talent Violinist

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Courtesy of The Place to Play

A young violinist performs

The Place to Play has had several successful events since its founding, including a prior classic music and ballet event, a previous children’s talent show and a recent tango performance and mixer at the end of May at OASIS Senior Center.

For more information, go to www.ThePlaceToPlay.org.


Flag Day celebration at American Legion

On Tuesday, June 14 from 12-5 p.m., the Sons of the American Legion, Post 291 are hosting a Flag Day celebration at Veterans Park next to the American Legion - Newport Harbor Squadron 291, located at 215 15th St., Newport Beach.

Flag day kids in wagon

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Submitted photo

These youngsters enjoyed the American Legion Flag Day celebration last year

Come enjoy free hotdogs, soda and water, live music by the New Originals, face painting, rock painting and a jump house. Giveaways for kids include coloring books, flags and patriotic pins. There will be a raffle for a kid’s bicycle and skateboard.

Flag Day is a celebration of the American flag that occurs each year on the anniversary of the flag’s official adoption, June 14. This event is intended to educate children on the history and symbolism of the American flag and the patriotism behind it.


Regattas and Races…

Regattas snd Races

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Photo by Bronny Daniels | Joysailing.com

BYC 

2022 Twilight Series - June

June 8

Harbor 20A Fleet (3 races, 0 discard)

1 G. Thorne/K. Thorne, BYC, Total 5, Net 5

2 Kincaid/Devlin, BCYC, Total 7, Net 7

3 Jim Sears, BYC, Total 9, Net 9

4 Matt Campbell, BYC, Total 9, Net 9

Harbor 20C Fleet (3 races, 0 discard)

1 n/a, n/a, Total 8, Net 8

2 Kimme/Carlson, BYC, Total 10, Net 10

3 DeRosa/Page, BYC, Total 11, Net 11

4 Allen/Brooks, BYC, Total 12, Net 12

5 P. Bretschger/K. Bretschger, BYC, Total 13, Net 13

6 Gibson/Verona, BYC, Total 13, Net 13

7 Ukropina/Robertson, BYC, Total 17, Net 17

Thistle Fleet (2 races)

1 Larzelere/McDaniel, BYC, Total 3

2 Chuck Simmons, BYC, Total 3

3 R. Maxwell/M. Maxwell, BYC, Total 6

ILCA Fleet (3 races)

1 Alan Andrews, BYC, Total 4

2 Gator Cook, BYC, Total 6

3 Maddie Nichols, BYC, Total 10

4 Rob Vandervort, BYC, Total 11

5 Rich Luttrell, BYC, Total 21

6 Siena Nichols, BYC, Total 21

7 Nevin Elliot, BYC/NHYC, Total 23

8 Landon Stahl, BYC, Total 26

9 Alexander Bonsager, BYC, Total 28

10 Luke Roe, BYC, Total 31

11 Qi Yan, BYC, Total 33

12 Isabella Clark, BYC, Total 33

13 Michael Arrigo, NHYC, Total 41

CFJ/420 Fleet (3 races)

1 Daher/Khanna, BYC, Total 3

Lido 14 A Fleet (2 races)

1 Papadopoulos/Ogier, WSA, Total 2

Lido 14 B Fleet (2 races)

1 Long/Swan, BYC, Total 2

Adult Sabot A Fleet (2 races)

1 Molly Lynch, BYC, Total 2

2 Susan Jennings, BYC/NHYC, Total 7

3 Dana Fischbeck, NHYC, Total 7

4 Larry Coon, MBYC, Total 7

5 Karen Luttrell, BYC, Total 7

6 Linda Ungerland, BYC, Total 12

7 Gail Kalscheur, BYC, Total 14

8 Karen Stockman, BYC, Total 17

9 Matt Foreman, BYC, Total 17

Adult Sabot B Fleet (2 races)

1 Eva Evans, BYC, Total 3

2 Teresa Power, BYC, Total 4

3 Carol Harmon, BYC, Total 5

4 Stacy Ware, SSC, Total 8

Junior Sabot Fleet (2 races)

1 Bradley Kosoff, BYC, Total 2

2 Heidi Swartzbaugh, BYC, Total 5

3 Lin Zhou, BYC, Total 5

BCYC 

2022 Taco Tuesday Series

June 7

PHRF A (3.9 miles)

1 Amante, Richley Family, LIYC 

   Elapsed 0:48:28, Corrected 0:45:05

2 Legacy, Bruce Cooper, BCYC 

   Elapsed 0:54:11, Corrected 0:48:01

3 XLR8, Gabriel Nistor, BCYC 

   Elapsed 0:54:29, Corrected 0:48:18

4 Table 9, Tyler Wolk, BYC

   Elapsed 0:57:11, Corrected 0:52:50

PHRF B (3.4 miles)

1 Shadow, Steve Fink, BCYC 

   Elapsed 0:43:29, Corrected 0:36:24

2 Horsefeathers, John Fuller, NHYC 

   Elapsed 0:49:30, Corrected 0:39:55

3 Miss Informed, Jeff Tighe, BYC 

   Elapsed 0:50:46, Corrected 0:41:28

4 Rhythm, Roger Gooding, SBYRC

   Elapsed 0:49:02, Corrected 0:42:38

5 Violetta, Jane Hartley, BCYC 

   Elapsed 0:49:41, Corrected 0:43:27

6 Healer, Larry Kliger, BCYC

   Elapsed 0:52:12, Corrected 0:45:31

7 Lickity Split, Andrew Whittingham, WSAOC 

   Elapsed 0:55:02, Corrected 0:47:33

PHRF C (2.5 miles)

1 Halcyon 3, Bob Kafka, BCYC

   Elapsed 0:39:22, Corrected 0:30:12

2 Celia, Jim O’Connor, ALYC

   Elapsed 0:39:45, Corrected 0:30:43

H20A Division (3 races)

1 Shana’s Secret, Thompson/Conzelman, BCYC, Total 5

2 Jubilee, Yates/Kincaid, NHYC, Total 8

3 Only Child, L. Bose/J. Bose, BCYC, Total 8

4 Summer Dream, Cheadle/Schupak, BYC, Total 9

5 Dragon Lady, Sangster/Kimball, LIYC, Total 15

6 Adrenaline, Noring/Foy, SYC, Total 15

7 Aquavit, Camerini/Kamei, UCISA, Total 15

H20B Division (3 races)

1 Spirit, D. Haynes/P. Haynes, BCYC, Total 7

2 Tiki, G. Kelly/D. Kelly, NHYC, Total 7

3 Mili’apa, Watanabe/Sutherland, UCISA, Total 8

4 Whatever, Hurliman/Fischbacher, SBYC, Total 9

5 Rhapsody in Blue, C. Killian/P. Killian, BYC, Total 15

6 Scott Barnes, Scott Barnes, ALYC, Total 15

H20C Division (3 races)

1 Dragon Lady, Sangster/Kimball, LIYC, Total 4

2 Rascal II, Mary Bacon, BCYC, Total 5

3 Kalani II, Ibbetson/Thornton, SYA, Total 9

4 Aquanesia, Wyatt/Hall, BYC, Total 9

5 Shazam, Alfano/Shinrock, ALYC, Total 9

6 Adrenaline, Noring/Foy, SYC, Total 9

ALYC 

2022 ALYC Sundowner Series

June 6

H20B Division (4 races)

1 Spirit, Debra Haynes, Total 8

2 Ping, Anne Wiese, Total 9

3 Jubilee, Patrick Kincaid, Total 11 

4 Summer Dream, Tucker Cheadle, Total 12

5 Emoji, Andrew Tosh, Total 14

H20C Division (4 races)

1 Whim, Hubie Laugharn, Total 7

2 FREEDOM, Ralph Simmonds, Total 9

4 Spiritus, Roger Grable, Total 12T

3 Shazam, Stephen Alfano, Total 12T 

5 Chloe, Roy Delis, Total 16

J22 Division (4 races)

1 Jack, Anne Wiese, Total 5

2 Red Stripe, Debra Haynes, Total 8

3 Iconoclast, Patrick Kincaid, Total 14 

4 Jenda, Andrew Tosh, Total 16

5 Marina 5, Derek Matheson, Total 17

PHRF A Division (4 races)

1 XLR8, Gabriel Nistor, Total 9

2 Violetta, Jane Hartley, Total 10

3 #29, Michael Darr, Total 12 

4 Stella Maris, Theodore Barry, Total 16

5 Healer, Larry Kliger, Total 17

6 Starfire, Dan O’Sullivan, Total 20

PHRF B Division (4 races)

1 Kaisen, David Camerini, Total 8

3 Holokai, Ross McElfresh, Total 11T 

2 Buena Vista, Berkeley Green, Total 11T

4 HAYDEN’S HAVOC, Michael Hayden, Total 15T

5 Stanley’s Cup, Stanley Tutton, Total 15T

6 Hobo Flats, Louis Chappelear, Total 18

7 Painted Lady, Matthew Foreman, Total 19

PHRF C Division (4 races)

1 Carioca, Bob Wine, Total 4.5

2 CELIA, Jim O’Connor, Total 9

3 Mystery, Any Club Member, Total 14.5 

4 Mystery II, Club Member Any, Total 17

5 FAIRWIND, Skipper Tim Bercovitz, Total 18

6 No Ka Oi, Lori Romano, Total 21

News relating to racing in or around Newport Harbor should be forwarded to Tom Johnson at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it..


Balboa Island Museum Newport Beach to hold book signing, speaker event

Balboa Island Museum Newport Beach is holding a book signing and speaker event with author Jim Kempton, who penned Women on Waves. The program takes place on Thursday, June 9 at 6 p.m.

Balboa Island Museum Kempton

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Photos courtesy of the Balboa Island Museum of Newport Beach

Jim Kempton

To purchase tickets, which are $20 per person, go here.

Balboa Island Museum Newport Beach is located at 210B Marine Ave., Balboa Island. For more information, call 949.675.3952. www.balboaislandmuseum.org

Balboa Island Museum Kempton book

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Kempton will be signing his book, “Women on Waves”


Electric bikes, are they a good thing or a troubling thing?

Electric bikes are controversial in and around Newport Beach for safety concerns. Still, like them or not, electric bicycles are ubiquitous in the city. Their relatively low cost, ease of use and portability make for convenient transportation for young and old alike. But how do we get electric bicycle riders to peacefully coexist with pedestrians on our boardwalk, sidewalks and trails as well as with motor vehicles on our roadways? 

Speak Up Newport, the community forum for Newport Beach, is the organizer of the event and will help search for those answers. The meeting, in-person and simulcast on Zoom, takes place Wednesday, June 8 from 6-7 p.m. in the Civic Center Community Room (100 Civic Center Drive). The meeting begins with a reception at 5:15 p.m., followed by the program from 6-7 p.m.

The speakers include Don DiCostanzo, from Pedego Electric Bikes, Brad Sommers, a principal civil engineer in traffic engineering at the City’s Public Works Department and Eric Little, a traffic lieutenant in the Newport Beach Police Department. They will discuss the issues and provide insight on how we can address some of the challenges. Those issues include e-bike safety, education and enforcement.

 Electric bikes DiCostanzo

Photos courtesy of Speak Up Newport

Don DiCostanzo, CEO and founder, Pedego Electric Bikes

Electric bikes Sommers

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Brad Sommers, Newport Beach Public Works principal civil engineer traffic engineering

Electric bikes Sommers

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NBPD Lieutenant Eric Little

The meeting is free and the public is invited. Registration for the live event is not required. If you decide to participate through Zoom, you must register here.


Good Morning CdM! to feature Orange County Sheriff-Coroner Don Barnes

The Corona del Mar Chamber of Commerce will present their Good Morning Corona del Mar monthly meeting on Thursday, June 9 from 8-9:30 a.m. at the Bahia Corinthian Yacht Club, so please note the new starting time.

The free meeting, featuring complimentary coffee and pastries, will feature Don Barnes, Sheriff-Coroner, Orange County Sheriff’s Department, who will discuss, “The Fentanyl Crisis, School Safety, Crime Trends and Homelessness in Orange County.”

Good Morning CdM Don Barnes

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Courtesy of the CdM Chamber of Commerce

Orange County Sheriff-Coroner Don Barnes

The gathering will also present updates from the local legislative office representatives, including Newport Beach City Councilmember Joy Brenner, District 6; Assemblywoman Cottie Petrie-Norris, District 74; Congresswoman Michelle Steel, District 48 and Orange County Supervisor Lisa Bartlett, District 5.

The meeting with complimentary coffee/pastry is open to the public and free of charge. There is no RSVP required to attend. 

The Bahia Corinthian Yacht Club is located at 1601 Bayside Drive, Corona del Mar.


Pacific Symphony presents All-Beethoven weekend

With three nights of Beethoven (June 9-11), Pacific Symphony presents “Beethoven’s Piano Concertos” – a weekend-long extravaganza belatedly celebrating the beloved composer’s 250th birthday. Originally scheduled for March 2020, the beginning of the pandemic necessitated rescheduling. Boasting a different Beethoven-only program every night, the weekend features all five of the composer’s piano concertos, performed by the spectacular guest pianist Alexander Romanovsky.

Pacific Symphony Romanovsky

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©Daniil Rabovsky

Guest pianist Alexander Romanovsky

The three-day celebration starts off with Beethoven’s First and Fourth Piano Concertos along with Overture to Egmont (June 9). Continuing with Romanovsky’s performances of the Second and Third Piano Concertos, Friday night also welcomes Concertmaster Dennis Kim as soloist for Romance No. 1 and Romance No. 2 both written for violin and orchestra (June 10). Saturday night’s grand finale opens the concert hall doors to Beethoven’s lighthearted Symphony No. 8 before the orchestra and Romanovsky tackle the monumental “Emperor” concerto together (June 11).

Pacific Symphony St.Clair

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Courtesy of Pacific Symphony

Pacific Symphony Conductor Carl St.Clair

“Beethoven’s Piano Concertos” takes place Thursday-Saturday, June 9-11, at 8 p.m. in the Renée and Henry Segerstrom Concert Hall. Tickets start at $23. Doors open at 6:45 p.m. and a preview talk with Dr. Jacob Sustaita begins at 7 p.m.

The matinee performance on Sunday, June 12 at 3 p.m. opens with Beethoven’s Egmont Overture of Beethoven’s “Emperor” Concerto featuring Romanovsky. These concerts are part of the Symphony’s 2021-22 Hal and Jeanette Segerstrom Family Foundation Classical Series.

The Ukrainian born pianist Romanovsky was described by Carlo Maria Giulini as “extraordinarily gifted.” Romanovsky is a riveting, distinct and subtle performer with an utterly engaging voice. At the age of 17, he won first prize at the prestigious Busoni Competition in Italy. The New York Times praised his artistry as “special, not just an extraordinary technician with a flair for color and fantasy, but also a sensitive musician and lucid interpreter.” Romanovsky regularly performs with major orchestras throughout Europe, Asia and the Americas. In 2007, he was invited to give a concert at the Papal Residence in the presence of Pope Benedict XVI in celebration of the 110th Anniversary of Pope Paul VI’s birth.

Pacific Symphony Kim

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Photo by NaYoung Lee

Pacific Symphony Concertmaster Dennis Kim

Kim is the concertmaster of Pacific Symphony. He has spent more than a decade leading orchestras in the U.S., Europe and Asia. Most recently, he was concertmaster of the Buffalo Philharmonic Orchestra in New York. He was first appointed concertmaster of the Tucson Symphony Orchestra at the age of 22. He then served as the youngest concertmaster in the history of the Hong Kong Philharmonic Orchestra, before going on to lead the Seoul Philharmonic Orchestra and the Tampere Philharmonic Orchestra in Finland. As guest concertmaster, Kim has performed on four continents. After making his solo debut at the age of 14 with the Toronto Philharmonic Orchestra, Kim has gone on to perform as a soloist with many of the most important orchestras in China and Korea. 

For more information, visit www.pacificsymphony.org.


City debuts new wildland fire engine

The Newport Beach Fire Department (NBFD) has introduced a new fire engine with improved off-road capabilities designed to battle wildland fires. The new apparatus was showcased to the community on Saturday, June 4 at Newport Coast Fire Station 8, where the engine will be housed. 

The wildland fire engine will be primarily utilized for the protection of the Newport Coast area and deployed to assist neighboring agencies as needed. 

city debuts fire engine

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Courtesy of NBPL

The new NBFD wildland fire engine is unveiled

“This specialized piece of equipment will improve our wildland firefighting capabilities by allowing our firefighters to navigate challenging terrain and off-road areas that are inaccessible to standard engines,” said NBFD Chief Jeff Boyles. 

However, Boyles noted, it does not replace the need for strong prevention efforts to reduce and mitigate the ongoing threat of urban wildfires. 

“We start with educating homeowners on fuel reduction and how to protect their properties, and we will use code enforcement as necessary. Everyone has a role to play in keeping our communities safe.” 

Built by Pierce Manufacturing, the NBFD’s new engine has a shorter wheelbase and four-wheel drive capabilities to allow for better maneuverability, off-road versatility and higher ground clearance. The engine can pump water while moving, allowing for rapid water application in more remote areas. Similar to larger engines, it carries 500 gallons of water, hose, ladders and other firefighting equipment. 

The city set out to design and purchase the engine in 2019, but with COVID-related supply chain issues, construction took nearly two years. NBFD crews are undergoing additional training before the new engine is placed into service.


Orange County Chapter of Childhelp nets $500,000+ at Rich Saul Memorial Golf Classic

The Orange County Chapter of Childhelp netted more than $500,000 at the 40th Annual Childhelp Rich Saul Memorial Golf Classic at the Monarch Beach Golf Links in Dana Point on Thursday, May 12. This marked the 10th anniversary the tournament has been named in Rich Saul’s honor. Co-Chairs Debra Violette and Cathie Caporaso and tournament coordinator Eileen Saul, a resident of Newport Beach and widow of Rich Saul, worked together to help make this a sold-out event.

The Orange County Chapter Eileen Saul

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Courtesy of Rich Saul Memorial Golf Classic

(L-R) Childhelp National Chair Patti Edwards, Rosale Puleo, event chairs Eileen Saul and Cathie Caporaso

This event has raised nearly $6 million in the past 15 years since the inception of the Corporate Sponsor Committee, which consists of prominent community leaders. Additional guests joined the golfers for dinner with a silent and live auction after the tournament.

For more information on Childhelp, visit www.childhelp.org/chapters/orange-county-chapter.


When the world goes crazy, baseball helps

By AMY SENK

I came back from a hectic two weeks of graduation travel and was looking forward to getting back to work, digging for stories, asking questions, learning answers, writing columns.

Today is election day, and beginning tonight, there will be lots of story fodder as results come in, but those will have to wait. I have other sources of news, however, including my friend Ron Yeo, who sent me some troubling photos of decapitated birds on the beach at Big Corona.

Surely that would be a story fit for a column…except it wasn’t because I couldn’t get to the bottom of it. Maybe the birds were part of a religious ceremony; I’ve heard reports that the birds were found near burned-down candles and that this has happened before. Apparently such ceremonies are constitutionally protected activities. But the police spokesman said while they find the birds about five or six times a year, there is no evidence that the birds are directly related to religious ceremonies.

“Unfortunately, there is not much information to provide on the topic,” she emailed. Not what any journalist wants to hear.

Then I started thinking about the Corona del Mar High School graduation, which will take place June 9 at Newport Harbor High School’s Davidson Field.

Why not at CdM?

I asked a few friends with kids graduating this year, and they didn’t know. They didn’t seem angry, but they said they would prefer to have it at CdM.

The last CdMHS campus graduation was in 2018. I remembered that in 2019, the fields had just broken ground on a big renovation project, so the Class of ’19 graduated at the UCI Bren Event Center in Irvine. In 2020, we watched graduation from home while under pandemic lockdown.

In 2021, the Bren Event Center was closed due to COVID, said Principal Joshua Hill.

“We transitioned over to Davidson Field at Newport Harbor High School as it was one of the few locations large enough to accommodate our commencement ceremony including the spacing requirements on short notice and since it is the location for our home football games,” he said in an email.

Everything went well, and the Bren Center was not available this year, so they decided to stick with Davidson Field. In the future, graduation could move back to CdMHS, he said.

Others I spoke to seem to think that enough time has passed since graduation was held there, that students and families don’t expect it anymore.

I was glad to get to the bottom of something, but it felt like a small victory in the scheme of things. There is so much in the world lately that is overwhelming – fires, inflation, mass shootings. Try to escape by planning a trip? Airfares will dampen that enthusiasm fast. If you watch the news, you will be sad. Talk politics with a friend? Nope.

For me, what’s helped is that we’ve made this summer our summer of baseball. We have a television streaming service that lets us watch almost all MLB games, often with the option of watching our hometown feeds. That means there are lots of games with different hours to choose from, and we’ve enjoyed catching up with the Mets (my husband, and boo) and the Cardinals (birds on a bat!).

Baseball is more soothing than a lot of music, with enough of a plot to make you want to keep watching, but not so much of a plot that you can’t talk or make dinner at the same time. It’s relaxing and meditative, it harkens back to simpler times, memories of games watched with loved ones long gone – my dad telling me about this amazing rookie, Albert Pujols. Spring training memories, road trips to Cooperstown and the Field of Dreams. Specific games. Game Six of the 2002 World Series. Watching David Eckstein get a walk off a grand slam in old Busch Stadium and a year later, him winning another World Series in St. Louis.

I recently spent an hour having coffee with my friend Leonard Bernard, whom I refer to as CdM’s unofficial poet in residence who lives in what he calls a treehouse and swims at least once a day in the Pacific Ocean, for the past 500 days in a row. We met for coffee at Rose’s Bakery and Café, and we talked about his cat, his writing projects and our mutual fondness – rediscovered in a big way this year – for baseball.

When the World goes Bernard

Photo by Amy Senk

Leonard Bernard, CdM’s unofficial poet in residence

He told me about his younger brother, who was a pitcher in the minor leagues in the 1980s, and how he’d been an Angels fan since the late ‘90s.

These days, one of his current projects is producing the Shohei Rap for Angels player Shohei Ohtani.

Bernard said he wrote the song in one sitting at the beach after the words came to him on a walk down the path from Inspiration Point to Big Corona.

“It sort of spilled out of me,” he said. “There’s some Japanese in it, there are some images that capture his smile and his attitude…He’s an icon. I admire what he’s doing, what he’s done.”

A friend is helping him record it, he said, and when they complete a demo, probably in a month or so, they hope to get it to the Angels, so Ohtani can hear it.

We talked about how we’re both longtime fans of baseball, and he told me about his baseball poetry and a screenplay he’s written called “Baseball Carol” about a kid who can throw 100 mph until a catastrophically bad pitch leaves him unable to deliver strikes. He told me about the Angels players he sees working out at the beach, sometimes with their dogs. 

I haven’t talked about baseball like this for years, the anecdotes and memories spilling out. An hour’s respite from the grim, tense world. No hidden landmines of red-blue politics, not even red-blue jersey politics. Dodgers-Giants and Red Sox-Yankees rivalries seem very manageable compared to what we’re used to navigating.

When the World goes Bernard notebook

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Photo by Amy Senk

Leonard Bernard with his poetry notebook

Poet Walt Whitman famously praised baseball, even allegedly saying that the game “will repair our losses and be a blessing to us.”

Pick a team and give it a chance. I recommend the Cardinals.

~~~~~~~~

Amy Senk has lived in Corona del Mar for 20+ years and was publisher of Corona del Mar Today, an online newspaper that ran daily for seven years. Senk, a graduate of the University of Missouri School of Journalism, is involved in the Corona del Mar Residents Association. She and her husband have two children. Her son recently graduated with a Master of Arts from the School of Journalism from her alma mater and her daughter is attending Duke University. She is a regular contributor to Stu News Newport.


Passenger airline traffic at JWA finally exceeds 2019 numbers, as some normalcy returns

Airline passenger traffic at John Wayne Airport (JWA) increased in April 2022 as compared to April 2021. In April 2022, the airport served 958,826 passengers, an increase of 93.5% when compared with the April 2021 passenger traffic count of 495,592. 

The April 2022 numbers compared to 25,313 passengers in April 2020, shows an increase of 3,687.9%, and a 6.6% increase when compared to the 899,186 passengers in April 2019.

Commercial aircraft operations in April 2022 of 7,825 increased 44.7% and commuter aircraft operations of 468 increased 13.3% when comparing with April 2021 levels.

Passenger airline traffic aircraft

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Courtesy of JWA

Those numbers compared to 2020 levels of commercial aircraft operations reflected an increase of 375.4% and commuter aircraft operations increased 310.5%; and compared to 2019 levels there was an increase of 2.9% and commuter aircraft operations increased 18.2%. 

Total aircraft operations decreased in April 2022 as compared with the same month in 2021. In April 2022, there were 25,729 total aircraft operations (take-offs and landings), a 4.0% decrease compared to 26,798 total aircraft operations in April 2021.

Those numbers compared to April 2020 of 13,085, total aircraft operations increased 96.6% and to April 2019 of 26,922, total aircraft operations decreased 4.4%. 

General aviation activity of 17,378 accounted for 67.5% of the total aircraft operations during April 2022 and decreased 17.0% compared with April 2021.

Yet, compared to April 2020 general aviation activity of 11,306, which accounted for 86.4% of total aircraft operations, operations increased 53.7% and to April 2019, general aviation activity of 18,850, which accounted for 70.0% of total aircraft operations, operations decreased 7.8%. 

The top three airlines in April 2022 based on passenger count were Southwest Airlines (354,430), United Airlines (159,861) and American Airlines (156,876).


Sherman Library & Gardens held installation luncheon to announce new Volunteer Association Board

Sherman Libray & Gardens Volunteer Association

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Courtesy of the Sherman Library & Gardens

Sherman Library & Gardens recently held its installation announcing the new Volunteer Association Board of Directors and Committee Chairs for 2022/2023. Incoming board of directors: Janet Lester, president; Karen Noonan, vice president; Jean Gray, secretary and Judie Appleby, treasurer. Pictured are the incoming board of directors with committee chairs.


The Week in Review

A weekly newsletter from City Manager Grace L. Leung

Grace Leung

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Courtesy of City of Newport Beach

Newport Beach City Manager Grace Leung

Community Members:

If you’ve been on the Balboa Peninsula lately you may have noticed that construction of the new Fire Station No. 2, at Newport Boulevard and 28th Street, is nearing completion. After 18 months of construction, we are now in the home stretch with a projected completion date of mid-June. 

The new fire station is a significant city infrastructure project that will help maintain and improve our emergency response capabilities for the local community. 

The new station, at 2807 Newport Blvd., will replace the station at 475 32nd St., which is nearly 70 years old and no longer meets the operational needs of the Newport Beach Fire Department. The new building, equipped with the latest technology to assist in response times and upgrades such as a decontamination area, will help our firefighters better serve our community for decades to come. 

We are planning a ribbon-cutting event and open house later this month and I will update our community once the details are finalized. 

City Manager, Grace K. Leung

April Treasury Report on City Investments Now Available for Public Review

The April 2022 Treasury Report is now available on the city’s website. 

As of April, the city’s investment portfolio totaled $379.2 million (when measured at amortized cost). The current market value of the city’s $371 million portfolio incorporates price fluctuations due to the changing interest rate environment that are generally irrelevant, since the city typically holds its securities to maturity and receives the full principal value at that time.

The city’s liquidity portfolio is sized to meet the city’s cash flow needs over the next 12 months.  Approximately $62.6 million or 17% of the portfolio was invested in liquid investments available for day-to-day operating expenses and the costs associated with ongoing construction projects. An additional $34 million, 9% of the overall portfolio, was invested in a portfolio of securities with targeted short-term maturities, which is designed to meet cash flow needs over the next 12 months while earning a higher yield than the city’s more liquid investments.

The city’s short-term portfolio is utilized to invest the maximum amount of funds not anticipated to be needed for cash flow needs in the near term. The short-term portfolio amounted to $274.2 million as of April 30, or 72% of the overall portfolio. The income-return for the most recent 12-month period was 1.27%, while the current yield at cost on the portfolio is 1.20% with a weighted average effective maturity of 1.77 years.

An additional $8.4 million is invested in the city’s bond fund portfolio, which is utilized to invest cash on hand related to various outstanding debt issuances. 

Swimming Lessons and Adult Lap Swim Available this Summer at Bergeson Aquatic Center

It’s time to break out the sunscreen and hit the pool! Summer officially kicks off at the Marian Bergeson Aquatic Center on June 13 with a full lineup of group and private swim lessons (starting as young as 3 months) and extended lap swim hours for adults. Swimming is an essential life skill for people of all ages, especially in an aquatic community like Newport Beach.

Register your little ones now to build their swimming skills and learn the importance of water safety. Drowning prevention starts with proper education and adult supervision. Remember to always keep an undistracted eye on the water while you’re enjoying your time at the pools or beaches this summer. A full list of swim lesson offerings and pool hours can be found here

Be Well Mobile Crisis Response Update

The Be Well mobile crisis response team is now operating in Newport Beach 12 hours a day, seven days a week to respond to mental and behavioral health crises. The mobile unit is staffed with mental health specialists and EMTs, and works closely with the city’s police and fire departments.

This week the Be Well team: 

–Transported one person to the Costa Mesa Bridge Shelter for intake.

–Transported a minor to a crisis stabilization unit for treatment.

–Transported a person to the sobering station at the Be Well campus.

–Transported nine people to services, shelter intakes and appointments.

–Conducted 23 outreach interactions with residents and people experiencing homelessness.

Homelessness Update

The City of Newport Beach provides a comprehensive response to address homelessness through a coordinated effort by city staff, contractors, partner agencies and nonprofit groups.

This week the city’s homeless outreach and response teams: 

–Continue to shelter people. Seventeen people who had been experiencing homelessness in Newport Beach are now sheltered in the Costa Mesa Bridge Shelter.

–Enrolled two people into services and completed housing assessments.

–Completed housing paperwork for two clients.

To donate to those experiencing homelessness in Newport Beach, visit our Good Giving Program web page.

This Week’s Events

Tuesday, June 7

Parks, Beaches & Recreation Commission

City Council Chambers

100 Civic Center Drive – 5 p.m.

Wednesday, June 8

Harbor Commission Meeting

City Council Chambers

100 Civic Center Drive – 5 p.m.

Thursday, June 9

City Arts Commission Meeting

Central Library

1000 Avocado Ave. – 5 p.m.

Planning Commission Meeting

City Council Chambers

100 Civic Center Drive – 6:30 p.m.

See the Full Schedule

Editor’s Note: City Manager’s Updates was received Friday, June 3 and is subject to editing so the information is current.


Regattas and Races…

Regattas and Races.jpg 6.7

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Photo by Bronny Daniels | Joysailing.com

NHYC 

Bettina Bents Memorial Regatta

June 4

Harbor 20 A (8 races, 1 discard)

1 Smith/Hampton/Ramming, Total 16, Net 12

2 McDowell/Wiley/Spangler, Total 24, Net 20

3 Barnard/Kinney, Total 26, Net 21

4 Malikowski/Stuart/Hill, Total 28, Net 22

5 Kraus/Blackman/Carroll, Total 29, Net 24

6 Jacobsen/Horton/Bashaw, Total 47, Net 40

7 Macdonald/Johnson, Total 54, Net 47

Harbor 20 B (8 races, 1 discard)

1 Kovacevic/Hall, Total 13, Net 10

2 Fuller-Drever/C. Fuller/Kap. Fuller/Kar. Fuller, Total 15, Net 12

3 Kelly/Southerland, Total 20, Net 17

BYC 

2022 Beercans – Ale (May) Series

June 2

Race #4 – PHRF 1 (4.5 miles)

1 Coquille, Farr 40, Wes Selby, BYC

   Elapsed 0:43:10, Corrected 0:42:43

2 It’s Ok, Andrews 49.9, Purcell/Rose

   Elapsed 0:39;24, Corrected 0:43:00

3 Rossa, DK46, Jared Gargano, BYC

   Elapsed 0:46:21, Corrected 0:47:02

Series Total (4 Races)

1 Rossa 2–1–2–3 Total 8

2 Coquille 4–4–1–1 Total 10

3 It’s Ok 1–4–4–2 Total 11

Race #4 – PHRF 2 (4.5 miles)

1 Amante, Choate 48, Richley Family, LIYC/NHYC 

   Elapsed 0:49:16, Corrected 0:46:34

2 Heartbeat 4, J124, Charles Brewer, NHYC 

   Elapsed 0:52:12, Corrected 0:49:17

3 Baraka, J120, Janet Mostafa, BYC 

   Elapsed 0:54:12, Corrected 0:51:17

4 Dani Girl, J120, Campbell/Martin, BYC/CRA

   Elapsed 0:56:32, Corrected 0:53:57

5 L30 #29, L30, Charles Ullman, BYC 

   Elapsed 0:58:40, Corrected 0:55:45

Series Total (4 Races)

1 Amante 1–2–2–1 Total 6

2 Heartbeat 4 2–1–3–2 Total 8

3 Baraka 3–3–4–3 Total 13

4 Dani Girl 7–4–5–4 Total 20

5 Table 9 7–7–1–7 Total 22

6 L30 #29 4–7–6–5 Total 22

Race #4 – PHRF 3 (4.5 miles)

1 XLR8, Bene 36.7, Gabriel Nistor, BCYC 

   Elapsed 0:59:06, Corrected 0:53:02

2 Cal 40, Cal 40, Vince Valdes, NHYC 

   Elapsed 1:02:26, Corrected 0:53:53

3 Violetta, Davidson, Jane Hartley, BCYC 

   Elapsed 1:01:20, Corrected 0:54:08

4 Buena Vista, RS21, Berkeley Green, ALYC

   Elapsed 1:04:36, Corrected 0:56:03

5 Espirit de L’eau, Oceanis 41, Richard Holbrook, BYC

   OCS

Series Total (4 Races)

1 XLR8 3–3–1–1 Total 8

2 Cal 40 2–1–3–2 Total 8

3 Violetta 1–2–2–3 Total 8

4 Buena Vista 5–4–4–4 Total 17

5 Ralphie 4–9–9–9 Total 31

Race #4 – PHRF 4 (3.8 miles)

1 Tui, Ericson 32, Brian Boyle, SSYC 

   Elapsed 1:01:38, Corrected 0:52:08

Series Total (4 Races)

1 Daydream 7–1–1–7 Total 16

2 Silk 1–2–7–7 Total 17

3 Tui 7–7–7–1 Total 22

News relating to racing in or around Newport Harbor should be forwarded to Tom Johnson at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it..


Balboa Island Parade lights up Marine Avenue with fanfare, music and fun 

On Sunday, June 5, the 27th Annual Balboa Island Parade made for a memorable fun-filled day, with hundreds of spectators lining Marine Avenue as they cheered on local, the USC Trojan and the U.S. Marine Corps marching bands, high school cheer and drill teams, NBPD, NBFD and Lifeguard personnel, locals in decorative Mokes and on floats, children on bikes, Island dogs, miniature horses, vintage cars, Keystone Kops, local dignitaries, community organizations and more! This year’s theme was “Island Rodeo – Boots, Chaps and Cowboy Hats,” so many participants and paradegoers were dressed up in Western finery.

Balboa Island Parade Grand Marshal

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Photo by Matt Leonetti

Grand Marshal Shirley Pepys riding in a Rolls Royce convertible

Balboa Island Parade Doggie Walk Bags

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Photo by Lana Johnson

Chris Crosson and his Doggie Walk Bags inflatable float

Balboa Island Parade USC Band members

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Photo by Lana Johnson

The Spirit of Troy has played for presidents, a pope and countless football fans…why not the Balboa Island Parade

Balboa Island Parade Kate with monkey

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Photo by Vicki Johnson

Five-year-old Kate Dell, resplendent in her Western garb, befriends a monkey riding horseback

Balboa Island Parade The Fabulous Nomads

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Photo by Lana Johnson

Orange County’s longest running surf band rocking a trailer

Balboa Island Parade U.S. Army Corps

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Photo by Lana Johnson

The U.S. Army Corps jeep entry, complete with mounted machine gun

Balboa Island Parade John Visel riding

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Photo by Vicki Johnson

Trikke riding John Visel (left) joins another cyclist at they enter the parade route with the Balboa Island Bridge in the distance

Balboa Island Parade NHHS Band

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Photo by Lana Johnson

Newport Harbor High School Band members warm up before joining the parade line

Balboa Island Parade Adopt Me Dog Adoptions

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Photo by Lana Johnson

This colorful bunch is promoting puppy love from Adopt Me Dog Adoptions

Balboa Island Parade Stu News in parade

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Photo by Marie Case

Stu News Publisher Tom Johnson drives his blue T-Bird down Marine Avenue with Editor Lana Johnson throwing candy and waving an American flag


O Captain! My Captain!

O Captain! My Captain!

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Photo by Kevin Pellon (Instagram @socalsnapz)

A beautiful day to ride on one of the three Balboa Island ferries…this one, the Captain. The other two are the Commodore and the Admiral.


Someone has to do this job!

Someone has to do this job

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Photo by Kevin Pellon (Instagram @socalsnapz)

A couple of Newport Beach’s finest out keeping the beaches safe


Fair Game

By TOM JOHNSON

Newport Beach Police to take over CdM High School next week for training exercises

TOM MARCHNext Monday and Tuesday, June 13-14, there’s going to be something going on over at Corona del Mar High School that’s probably going to draw people’s attention. Just remember, no matter how concerned you might become if you see it, just don’t call the Newport Beach Police.

Here’s why, they’re the ones involved. You see, our own NBPD will be doing an extended school shooting training exercise. Officers will be participating in various active shooting scenarios involving role players and simulated weapons. So, you most likely won’t, but you could see someone running around with a weapon drawn. Relax, there’s no trouble. Remember, I said, “SIMULATED WEAPONS.”

According to a statement from the NBPD, “The main objective of the training is to increase the effectiveness and coordination of a police response to such an event by putting officers through practical exercises in a realistic environment. This training, which was planned and scheduled many months in advance to coincide at a time when there will be limited activity on the campus, represents just one part of NBPD’s ongoing efforts to prepare our officers for any emergency situation they may encounter.”

I remind you, it’s a good thing. Let’s all hope though that it’s an exercise that will never actually have to employ here in a serious situation.

A message was distributed to Eastbluff community residents that surround the CdM campus advising them of these planned activities, with the hope of preventing any calls into the NBPD Dispatch or 911 regarding the training. They reminded those nearby that they will see numerous patrol vehicles staged in the CdMHS administrative parking lot and that the training will include the use of non-lethal training rifles, non-lethal training pistols and non-lethal simunitions.

As we look across our nation and read, sometimes almost on a daily basis of senseless acts, including the recent Texas school shooting, students, parents, teachers, school staff and other members of the public should know that our NBPD stands ready to protect our community.

During the exercise, the school campus will obviously be closed to the public. 

• • •

I woke up Saturday morning to a number of people calling with concerns about a video that was circulating on social media depicting various “fictional” mayors from Orange County and showing them in a negative light that ends with the author of Measure B being riddled with bullets, a la The Godfather.

The video was the third in a series of three produced by Good Morning Newport, a “local source of news, updates and commentary.” 

And although it was taken down before I could actually view it, others expressed their concerns to me.

Debbie Marheine Montgomery wrote saying, “I am beyond disgusted and alarmed with the news regarding the video depicting the murder of Will O’Neill. I hope you are as well and publicly call out the losers affiliated with this very serious and horrible video.”

Or this from Catherine O’Hara, “We cannot allow this reprehensible and dangerous behavior in our community. Shameful that current and former NB councilmembers and others are threatening the life of Will O’Neill over his support for Measure B.”

The video was reportedly “blindly” posted onto the No on Measure B website by their paid consultant around 5:30 a.m., and subsequently removed two hours later around 7:30 a.m.

Newport Beach City Councilman Will O’Neill, the main face behind the Yes on Measure B side, took personal issue with the video accusing the makers of targeting him.

Alex Crawford, the host of Good Morning Newport and the actor performing all five characters in the video, made the following statement after it was removed from social media: 

“The video posted this morning by Good Morning Newport, starring myself playing five fictional characters, was in no way, shape or form intending to depict real people or real Newport Beach Mayors. Statements saying that it was advocating for violence depicting real violence towards real people…anything to that nature…those statements are false. The skit was political satire loosely based on actual Orange County political corruption. It was inspired by the 1972 film The Godfather. Again, satire, fictional characters, played by me…no actual threats were intended towards anyone. If you saw the video, you would certainly deduce that.”

O’Neill accused the No on Measure B (No Power Grab) camp of paying for the production of the video.

However, spokespeople for No on Measure B vehemently denied paying for the second or third video, after agreeing to pay for production of a first one, when it was produced. 

Crawford confirmed that statement.

Then, hours later I was able to view a private copy of the video. First let me say that any and all gun violence is an absolute no-no in today’s society and rightfully so. However, the video was almost sophomoric in its depiction of the shooting. 

Still, at the end of the day, regardless of who did what, we can and should all agree that the video was in poor taste. Fictional or not, gun use showing that type of violence, especially attached to a local issue, is simply not where we need to be as a community.

However, I also admonish the Yes of B side for continuing to parade a screenshot of the video, complete with blood-filled bullet holes, around on social media hours after it was taken down in an attempt to potentially sway voters. That, too, was wrong.

And, as I was always told when I was a kid, two wrongs don’t make a right.

Today, fortunately the campaign for Measure B ends. It couldn’t come soon enough. Tomorrow, or the next day, one side will acknowledge winning and one will lose. Then, we can begin moving ahead toward the November elections. We not only need to do better, but we also need to expect better…period!

I urge all local candidates to commit to respectable campaigns.

• • •

The men’s and women’s rowing teams from Newport Aquatic Center (NAC) are headed to the 2022 Youth National Championships this week. The US Rowing Youth National Championships take place June 9-12, at Nathan Benderson Park in Sarasota, FL

The regatta will feature more than 2,000 rowers racing for medals in up to 43 events.

One event that NAC is expected to do extremely well in is the men’s 8+ where they are currently ranked #2 in the country.

Just how good are they? Several of the NAC seniors will be headed to prestigious college rowing programs next year, including Princeton, UC Berkeley and Duke, to name a few. 

In addition, several of the men’s and women’s athletes from NAC have been invited to attend the US Rowing Selection Camp, which will provide an opportunity for NAC rowers to become part of the US team this summer in Italy against international competition.

Exciting times!

• • •

Whether you ride an electric bike or just avoid them in the little Ralphs parking lot riding out of control like I do, you should be interested in the Speak Up Newport presentation tomorrow night (Wednesday), June 8, titled The Electric Bike Controversy: Some Call for a Ban, Others Boost Them. The presentation takes place in the Civic Center Community Room with a 5:15 p.m. reception, followed by the program at 6 p.m.

The panel of speakers include NBPD Traffic Lt. Eric Little, City of Newport Beach Public Works Department Traffic Engineer Brad Sommers and Pedego Electric Bikes Founder & CEO Don DiCostanzo

The program is free and open to all residents. It’ll also be available on Zoom, but attendees must register at www.speakupnewport.com/ebikes/ to participate.

As with all things that Speak Up does, it should be worthwhile.

• • •

Jason T. Smith preached this past Sunday morning as the potential new Lead Pastor and Head of Staff for St. Andrew’s Presbyterian Church.

According to a regular attending parishioner, Smith was “preaching and then a vote of the congregation would follow to approve his hiring.”

Stu News received confirmation that Smith was in fact approved and that a formal announcement would follow.

Smith was strongly endorsed for his ability to connect with parishioners and for his speaking abilities from associates at the church he’s most recently led.

He grew up in Louisiana and moved to Charlotte, NC for college. Smith and his wife of 18 years, Jessica, have three daughters, Savannah (17), Eden (15) and Charlotte (7).

He most recently has been Lead Pastor of Direction at Forest Hills Church in Charlotte. His education includes college at Winthrop University in Rockhill, SC, and then he later attended the Gordon–Conwell Theological Seminary also in Charlotte.


Get out and explore Buck Gully this spring and summer 

Taking a hike in the Buck Gully Reserve, which connects Corona del Mar and Newport Coast, is the perfect opportunity to enjoy the upcoming warmer weather. Explore this 300-acre, natural habitat on foot, with three hikes led by the Irvine Ranch Conservancy staff.

Get out Buck Gully waterfall

Click on photo for a larger image

Photos by Emily Spain

The stream is running, making for a memorable late afternoon/early evening hike

–Buck Gully Upper Loop Evening Hikes: Explore the richness of Buck Gully Reserve as you hike during the beautiful early evening hours on Saturdays, June 11 and Sept. 10, as well as Tuesdays, July 5 and Aug. 9 from 3-5:30 p.m. The stream is running, and the rich plant and animal life are enjoying the cool, shady canyon making for an evening hike in a natural oasis amid the suburban surroundings. Walk along San Joaquin Hills Road, which overlooks Buck Gully for the first mile, then drop down into the canyon on the Bobcat Trail, looping back through the upper end of the gully along the Buck Gully Trail. This activity is conducted at a walking pace, approximately 3 miles per hour. The distance is 4 miles; duration, 2.5 hours with moderate difficulty. This hike is open to those 8 years and older. This hike is free, but registration is required. Staging area is the Newport Coast Community Center at 6401 San Joaquin Hills Road. Register at www.letsgooutside.org.

Get out Buck Gully bridge

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Several bridges provide unique vantages and viewing platforms

–Buck Gully Loop Hikes: Come and explore the entire Buck Gully Reserve trail system on Tuesdays, June 7, July 19 and Sept. 6, as well as Saturday, Aug. 13 from 8-11:30 a.m. Beginning from the OASIS Senior Center, you’ll hike up through the almost three-mile length of the canyon, then along San Joaquin Hills Road for about a mile, stopping at Canyon Watch Park, where you will take in the panoramic view of the reserve and the Pacific coastline before descending back into the canyon along the Bobcat Trail. This hike is 6 miles; duration, 3.5 hours with high-moderate difficulty and conducted at a walking pace, approximately three miles per hour. It is geared to those 12+ years of age. This hike is free, but registration is required. Meet at the OASIS Senior Center auxiliary lot at 5th and Marguerite in Corona del Mar Register at www.letsgooutside.org.

Get out Buck Gully views

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Enjoy panoramic views as you take in the canyon’s natural beauty

–Bridges of Buck Gully Hikes: Buck Gully is a natural, coastal canyon which opened up to the public in 2012 with the installation of four bridges to allow for safe public access. Discover the bridges on Tuesdays, June 21, Aug. 23 and Sept. 20, as well as Saturday, July 9 and from 8-11:30 a.m. These bridges facilitate exploration of the Buck Gully Reserve, and also provide unique vantages and viewing platforms from which to pause and observe the abundant life in and around the stream. The guided program starts with a short walk from the OASIS Senior Center to the beginning of the Buck Gully trail, offering a visually dramatic entrance into this special canyon. Open to those 12 years and older. Conducted at a walking pace at approximately 3 miles per hour. Distance is 5 miles; duration is 3.5 hours with moderate difficulty. This hike is free, but registration is required. Meet at the OASIS Senior Center auxiliary lot at 5th and Marguerite in Corona del Mar. Register at www.letsgooutside.org.


Take Five: Meet Justin Morouse, NBPD’s Area 3 Commander

By AMY SENK

The Newport Beach Police Department (NBPD) divides the city into four “areas,” each with a lieutenant area commander. Area 3 includes Eastbluff, Bonita Canyon, Big Canyon, Newport Center, Harbor Cove, Bayside Village, Island Lagoon, Park Newport, Promontory Point and Balboa Island and covers everything from Fashion Island and the Civic Center to Corona del Mar High School, along with several golf and tennis clubs and the Newport Beach Police Department. The Area 3 commander, Lt. Justin Morouse, began his career with the City of Brea and joined the NBPD in July 2012. He was promoted to the rank of sergeant in 2016 and attained his current rank of lieutenant in July 2021, when he became the Area 3 commander. I caught up with him to learn more.

Take Five Justin Morouse

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Courtesy of NBPD

NBPD Lieutenant Justin Morouse

Q: What made you want to become a police officer and when did you know you were destined for a law enforcement career?

A: I first decided on a career in law enforcement while enrolled in a Criminal Justice course in college. The professor, a retired police chief, offered his students extra credit if they were to go on a ride-along and write a paper about the experience. I was able to go on a ride-along with the Fullerton Police Department, which was my first real exposure to police work. I had a great time on the ride-along which prompted me to volunteer as a Police Explorer with the Laguna Beach Police Department. As a Police Explorer I was able to go on additional ride-alongs which afforded me a greater appreciation and understanding of the profession. 

Q: Area 3 has Fashion Island. How does that influence police efforts there and are crimes like shoplifting more common there?

A: While Fashion Island is a major retail hub located within the six-plus square miles that comprise Area 3, I don’t believe it has much of an impact on the way our officers police Area 3 as a whole. Our officers are trained to monitor crime trends within their assigned areas and to develop their patrol strategies in a manner that will best address those issues which may be impacting the residents and retailers within their assigned areas. I would say that shoplifting is more common in Area 3 compared to other areas within the city, particularly in recent months.

Q: Does CdMHS present any unique police issues? When my kids were there, parking in neighborhoods was a huge concern.

A: Like most schools, CdMHS does impact traffic and parking in the surrounding areas. In terms of police-specific issues, we are fortunate to have a great group of School Resource Officers who handle most of the issues that arise in and around the CdMHS. The SROs’ relationships with the Newport-Mesa Unified School District and their specialized training in handling school-related issues allows our Area 3 officers to focus their efforts on other issues that may be affecting Area 3.

Q: What would be the single biggest thing that residents could do to help police in your area?

A: I think the best thing residents can do to help our officers is to remain vigilant, lock doors and windows (vehicle, residential and retail), and report suspicious individuals and vehicles. No one knows their own neighborhood or business center better than the individuals who live or work in those areas on a daily basis.

Q: Anything else you’d like to add?

A: As the Area 3 Commander, I am very grateful for the hard work of the officers assigned to Area 3 as well as the support we receive from our local residents and business owners. Our community support and engagement are an essential component to our success as a police department. Thank you! 

~~~~~~~~

Amy Senk is a long-time resident of Corona del Mar and a regular contributor to Stu News Newport.


Regattas and Races…

Regattas and Races 6.3

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Photo by Bronny Daniels | Joysailing.com

BYC 

2022 Twilight Series - May

June 1

Harbor 20 A Fleet (11 races, 2 discards)

1 Kincaid/Devlin, BCYC, Total 26, Net 16

2 Matt Campbell, BYC, Total 26, Net 18

3 Ed Kimball, ALYC, Total 39, Net 27

4 Jim Sears, BYC, Total 37, Net 28

5 G. Thome/K. Thome, BYC, Total 53, Net 41

Harbor 20 C Fleet (11 races, 2 discards)

1 Allen/Brooks, BYC, Total 19, Net 13

2 Kimme/Carlson, BYC, Total 26, Net 19

3 Grable/Verona, BYC, Total 44, Net 30

4 P. Bretschger/K. Bretschger, BYC, Total 60, Net 46

5 Jeff Linden, BYC, Total 63, Net 49

6 Wyatt/Bennett, BYC, Total 65, Net 51

Thistle Fleet (4 races)

1 Chuck Simmons, BYC, Total 6

2 Larzelere/McDaniel, BYC, Total 6

3 R. Maxwell/M. Maxwell, BYC, Total 12

ILCA Fleet (8 races, 2 discards)

1 Alan Andrews, BYC, Total 45, Net 15

2 Michael Arrigo, NHYC, Total 48, Net 18

3 Jeff Linden, BYC, Total 54, Net 24

4 Qi Yan, BYC, Total 66, Net 36

5 Nevin Elliot, BYC/NHYC, Total 60, Net 36

6 Rich Luttrell, BYC, Total 69, Net 39

7 Rob Vandervort, BYC, Total 77, Net 47

8 Brett Hemphill, BYC, Total 78, Net 48

9 Siena Nichols, BYC, Total 79, Net 49

10 Alexander Bonsager, BYC, Total 80, Net 50

11 Martin Bonsager, BYC, Total 81, Net 51

12 Gator Cook, BYC, Total 96, Net 66

13 Luke Roe, BYC, Total 109, Net 79

14 Paloma Arrigo, BYC/NHYC, Total 112, Net 82

CFJ/420 Fleet (2 races)

1 Daher/Khanna, BYC, Total 2

Lido 14 A Fleet (8 races, 2 discards)

1 Don Long, BYC, Total 12, Net 8

2 Papadopoulos/Ogier, WSA, Total 20, Net 12

3 McRae/Gorski, ABYC, Total 32, Net 24

Lido 14 B Fleet (8 races, 2 discards)

1 Long/Swan, BYC, Total 13, Net 9

2 Lange/Mulcaire, ALYC, Total 21, Net 13

3 Boudreaux/Aldaco, BYC, Total 26, Net 18

Adult Sabot A Fleet (6 races)

1 Molly Lynch, BYC, Total 11

2 Susan Jennings, BYC/NHYC, Total 22

3 Karen Luttrell, BYC, Total 25

4 Matt Foreman, BYC, Total 44

5 Dana Fischbeck, NHYC, Total 45

6 Scott Finkboner, MBYC, Total 46

7 Dennis Allison, BYC, Total 48

8 Karen Stockman, BYC, Total 53

9 Linda Ungerland, BYC, Total 55

10 Bob Reilly, BYC, Total 61

11 Mike Bartell, BYC, Total 62

12 Larry Coon, MBYC, Total 63

13 Gail Kalscheur, BYC, Total 74

Adult Sabot B Fleet (6 races)

1 Carol Harmon, BYC, Total 16

2 Eva Evans, BYC, Total 18

3 Stacy Ware, SSC, Total 22

4 Teresa Power, BYC, Total 24

5 Debbie Meany, BYC, Total 30

6 Sandra Lindsey, BYC, Total 30

Junior Sabot Fleet (4 races)

1 Lin Zhou, BYC, Total 7

2 Bradley Kosoff, BYC, Total 10

3 Heidi Swartzbaugh, BYC, Total 11

BCYC 

2022 Taco Tuesday Series

May 31

PHRF A (3.9 miles)

1 Destroyer, Jim Bailey Family, NHYC 

   Elapsed 0:53:58, Corrected 0:50:20

2 Amante, Richley Family, LIYC

   Elapsed 0:54:59, Corrected 0:51:36

3 Legacy, Bruce Cooper, BCYC 

   Elapsed 1:01:46, Corrected 0:55:36

4 XLR8, Gabriel Nistor, BCYC 

   Elapsed 1:03:08, Corrected 0:56:58

5 Le Refuge, Mark Jensen, BCYC

   Elapsed 1:24:09, Corrected 1:18:22

PHRF B (3.3 miles)

1 Rhythm, Roger Gooding, SBYRC

   Elapsed 0:55:58, Corrected 0:49:45

2 Horsefeathers, John Fuller, NHYC 

   Elapsed 1:00:21, Corrected 0:51:03

3 Violetta, Jane Hartley, BCYC 

   Elapsed 0:58:01, Corrected 0:51:58

4 Shadow, Steve Fink, BCYC 

   Elapsed 0:59:28, Corrected 0:52:35

5 Lickity Split, Andrew Whittingham, WSAOC

   Elapsed 1:03:31, Corrected 0:56:15

6 Buena Vista, Berkeley Greene, ALYC 

   Elapsed 1:08:27, Corrected 1:00:25

7 Healer, Larry Kliger, BCYC

   Elapsed 1:09:22, Corrected 1:02:53

PHRF C (2.6 miles)

1 Ventus, Team BCYC, BCYC 

   Elapsed 0:45:09, Corrected 0:36:08

2 Halcyon 3, Bob Kafka, BCYC

   Elapsed 0:51:37, Corrected 0:42:05

3 Celia, Jim O’Connor, ALYC

   Elapsed 0:51:52, Corrected 0:42:28

H20A Division (3 races)

1 Aquavit, Camerini/Kemei, UCISA, Total 7

2 Shana’s Secret, Thompson/Conzelman, BCYC, Total 7

3 Summer Dream, Cheadle/Schupak, BYC, Total 9

4 Only Child, L. Bose/J. Bose, BCYC, Total 9

5 Jubilee, Yates/Kincaid, NHYC, Total 14

6 Dragon Lady, Ed Kimball, LIYC, Total 17

H20B Division (3 races)

1 Spirit, D. Haynes/P. Haynes, BCYC, Total 4

2 Mili’apa, Watanabe/Sutherland, UCISA, Total 6

3 Whatever, Hurliman/Fischbacher, SBYC, Total 8

4 Sail 102, C. Killian/P. Killian, BYC, Total 12

5 Scott Barnes, Scott Barnes, ALYC, Total 12

H20C Division (3 races)

1 No Name, Wyatt/Hall, BYC, Total 3

2 Dragon Lady, Sangster/Kimball, LIYC, Total 6

3 Kalani II, Ibbetson/Thornton, SYA, Total 6

4 Rascal II, Mary Bacon, BCYC, Total 6

5 Shazam, Alfano/Shinrock, ALYC, Total 6

News relating to racing in or around Newport Harbor should be forwarded to Tom Johnson at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it..


Footprints in the sand

Footprints in the sand.jpg SNN 6.3

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Photo by Chris Crosson (Instagram @sandcastlekit)

Marking up replenished sand on Balboa Island beach


Pearls Newport Beach holds grand opening on the Island

Pearls Newport Beach celebrated their Grand Opening Party on May 13 at their new boutique located on Marine Avenue, Balboa Island. Owners Lauri and Marc Wax hosted a festive cocktail party which was attended by friends, family and locals from near and far.

Pearls Marc and Lauri

Photos courtesy of Lauri Wax

Pearls owners, Marc and Lauri Wax

Royal Hen generously hosted the appetizers and wine was provided by Argaux. A percentage of sales from Pearls’ weekend opening and Maureen Madigan’s paintings was donated to Circle 1000 supporting Hoag Family Cancer Institute.

Pearls Lauri and Cynthia

(R-R) Lauri Wax and Cynthia Shafer, owner of Royal Hen

Pearls Arden

Arden Gilfillan, owner of Argaux

Pearls Lauri, Tom, Cindy

(L-R) Lauri Wax with Tom and Cindy Houston enjoying the Grand Opening

Pearls Elita, Lauri, Kelly

(L-R) Elita Balfour, Lauri Wax and Kelly Rouse

Pearls Jill

Jill Aschieris

“I opened Pearls in the heart of San Marino’s Mission Village six years ago with the goal of providing unique and quality collections that complement a lady’s lifestyle,” said Lauri. “From the beginning, I planned to open a second store in my hometown of Newport Beach. I knew the long-time connection between the San Marino and Newport Beach communities and their surrounding areas were stronger than ever. I was thrilled to find the perfect location for Pearls’ second home on Balboa Island because it’s sentimental me. I spent my teen years sailing with her dad, eating Balboa Bars and walking the Island. My husband Marc and I have been truly overwhelmed by the warm welcome we’ve received, and are excited to be locals again!”

Pearls Jenny, Tracy, Missy

(L-R) Jenny Shelton, Tracy Bowie and Missy Barnes

Pearls Joan, Ann

(L-R) Joan Clawson and Ann Turnbull

Stop by Pearls boutique to say hello to Lauri and Marc Wax and wish them a warm welcome.

Pearls is located at 332 Marine Avenue, Ste. A, Balboa Island. For more information, visit www.pearlsltd.com.


Explore Upper Newport Bay

OC Parks manages nearly 60,000 acres of parks, historical and coastal facilities and open space for the County of Orange as part of OC Community Resources. For more information, visit www.ocparks.com.

Here in your own backyard, check out these events at Upper Newport Bay Nature Preserve in June to get you exploring the outdoors.

Explore Upper Newport Bay kayaking

Courtesy of Newport Bay Conservancy

Kayaking Upper Newport Bay

National Trails Day Restoration: Saturday, June 4. Every year on the first Saturday in June, the American Hiking Society calls all public lands users together for a day of service in support of outdoor spaces we hold dear. This year, OC Parks will answer that call with a family-friendly habitat restoration project at Upper Newport Bay. Activities will include watering native plants and removing invasive weeds. Gloves, drinking water and tools will be provided. Minors ages 16 and younger must have legal guardian present at all times. Walk-ins are welcome, but space is limited so registration is suggested. Takes place from 10 a.m.-12 p.m. Register at www.letsgooutside.org/ocparks/activities.

Summer Birding Basics: Saturday, June 11. Upper Newport Bay is known for being one of the best bird watching spots in Orange County! This introductory workshop and walk will teach the basics of bird watching and identification to prepare bird enthusiasts to fully enjoy coastal bird watching. All are welcome and loaner binoculars will be available. Minors ages 16 and younger must have legal guardian present at all times. Walk-ins are welcome, but space is limited. Pre-registration is encouraged. Rain or heat advisory will cancel the event. Takes place 8-10 a.m. Register at www.letsgooutside.org/ocparks/activities.

Sunspot Spotting: Saturday, June 18. 2020 marked the beginning of a new 11-year solar cycle which will see a dramatic increase in the number of sunspots over the next 4 to 6 years. During this family friendly program, you will learn all about sunspots, their effect on planet earth and how to safely view them. Each family or group in attendance will be given the supplies to make their very own sunspot viewer. You will also use a specially filtered telescope to view sunspots (if any are present and weather conditions are favorable). Minors ages 16 and younger must have legal guardian present at all times. Walk-ins are welcome, but space is limited. Advance registration is encouraged. Takes place 1-3 p.m. Register at www.letsgooutside.org/ocparks/activities.

Family Walk at the Bay: Saturday, June 25. Join an easy, stroller-friendly walk along Upper Newport Bay to enjoy all the sights, sounds and smells of summer. You will stay on the paved Bayview Trail and pause frequently to observe birds, wildflowers and any other wildlife that happens to be present. Minors ages 16 and younger must have legal guardian present at all times. Rain or heat advisory will cancel the event. Walk-ins welcome, but space is limited so registration is suggested. Takes place from 10-11:30 a.m. Register at www.letsgooutside.org/ocparks/activities.

Planetary Alignment Sunrise Hike: Sunday, June 26. Calling all early risers! Join in a pre-dawn walk at Upper Newport Bay Nature Preserve. View the sunrise and be treated to a rare astronomical phenomenon – a planetary alignment. In the pre-dawn sky, you will see Mercury, Venus, Mars, Jupiter and Saturn lined up across the horizon and visible to the naked eye. Coffee and light refreshments will be served. Minors ages 16 and younger must have legal guardian present at all times. Walk-ins are welcome, but space is limited so registration is suggested. Significant cloud cover, rain or heat advisory will cancel the event. Takes place 5-7 a.m. Register at www.letsgooutside.org/ocparks/activities.

Upper Newport Bay is located at 2301 University Drive, Newport Beach.


Dressed in festive red, white and blue, more than 300 attended the Memorial Day BBQ at Balboa Island Park

More than 300 people attended the Memorial Day BBQ at Balboa Island Park on Monday, May 30. The biggest turn out yet, included local veterans (many with ties to Balboa Island), family and friends. Bill Stewart was the official chair and Dennis Bress served as master of ceremonies. Bress’s wife, Summer, sang the “Star-Spangled Banner.” Photographs of the veterans were displayed in front of the Carroll Beek Center.

Dressed in festive red Memorial Day

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Photo by Renee Pepys Lowe

Memorial Day celebration at Balboa Island Park

Tiffany Pepys Hoey, Bill Stewart and Dennis Bress were instrumental in organizing the event; Renee Pepys Lowe served as the unofficial photographer and Pepys Hoey, Laurie Sloan and Sue Sibley ran the raffle. 

Dressed in festive Veterans

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Photo by Renee Pepys Lowe

Local veterans’ photos were on display at the Carroll Beek Center

Dressed in festive Tiffany, Laurie, Sue

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Photo by Renee Pepys Lowe

(L-R) Tiffany Pepys Lowe, Laurie Sloan and Sue Sibley display their American spirit as they run the raffle

The crowd got into the patriotic spirit, dressed in their favorite red, white and blue attire. Attendees enjoyed an afternoon of games, raffles, and festive food to include burgers, hot dogs, Spam, chips, ice cream, lemonade and coffee.

Dressed in festive Paula and Sandy

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Photo by Renee Pepys Lowe

(L-R) Balboa Island Museum of Newport Beach President Paula Castanon and Ranier show their stars and stripes

Dressed in festive Dennis Bress

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Photo by Renee Pepys Lowe

Balboa Island Museum of Newport Beach board member Dennis Bress served as master of ceremonies

Dressed in festive Skip and Bing

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Photo by Renee Pepys Lowe

(L-R) Skip Taft and Air Force Veteran Bing Girling

Dressed in festive Dottie, Kathy, Kristy

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Photo by Renee Pepys Lowe

(L-R) Dottie Siemon, Kathy Fritz, and Kristy Henstreet enjoy the BBQ fare

Dressed in festive Margaret and Bill

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Photo by Renee Pepys Lowe

Margaret and WWll Veteran Bill Hoofe

Dressed in festive Cindy and Tom

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Photo by Renee Pepys Lowe

(L-R) Cindy and Tom Houston

Dressed in festive Renee and Tiffany

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Submitted photo

(L-R) Renee Pepys Lowe and Tiffany Pepys Hoey

Dressed in festive cookies

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Photo by Renee Pepys Lowe

Yummy peanut butter cookies from Cookies by Christine

A special thanks goes to the day’s sponsors: Balboa Island Museum of Newport Beach, Balboa Island Improvement Association, Louis and Gladyce Foster Family Foundation, Rusty’s Chips, 501 Park Avenue Bistro, Huskins and IEEI.


CdM Scenic 5K on June 4, walk-in registration and packet pickup today

The much-awaited Corona del Mar Scenic 5K will wind through the streets of picturesque Corona del Mar on Saturday, June 4.

Today (June 3), pre-event walk-in registration and packet pick up takes place at the CdM Community Youth Center located at 3000 Fifth Ave., Corona del Mar (near Grant Howald Park) from 10 a.m.-7 p.m. Also, if you have already registered and would like to save time on event day, pick-up your race packet including your race bib, T-shirt & runner’s swag bag today.

CdM Scenic 5K runners on bridge

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Photos courtesy of CdM Chamber of Commerce

CdM Scenic 5K runners crossing Goldenrod Bridge

Registration and packet pick up-up opens at 6 a.m. on race day (June 4) at the start-line and will remain open until race start. Also, online registration will remain open as well. 

The roads will be closed for all vehicles by 7 a.m. Free parking is provided at Big Corona del Mar parking lot, or you can park outside of the course boundaries and walk in.

Race times:

–6 a.m. Event Day Registration Begins

–7:25 a.m. Warm-up stretch

–7:55 a.m. Men’s 5K Race

–8:20 a.m. Women’s 5K Race

–8:45 a.m. 2-Mile Youth Race

–8:50 a.m. 2 Mile Fun Walk

–9 a.m. 1K Kid’s Dolphin Dash

CdM Scenic 5K future racers

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Future racers

Immediately following your race at the finish line, you will be provided with amazing food from local restaurants, a walk through the unique exhibiting vendors and enjoy a social awards ceremony. Restaurant Row is open to participants only. No dogs are allowed in Restaurant Row.

For more information, visit www.cdmchamber.com. For a race map, go here.


2022 John Wayne Grit Series comes to Newport Coast, June 4

The 2022 John Wayne Grit Series gives trail runners the opportunity to run through rugged Western landscapes and iconic movie sets where John Wayne once sauntered, all while raising valuable funds for cancer research and treatment. First held in 2019 in California and Colorado, the Grit Series for 2022 now features four different runs across the West and seeks to raise money and awareness for the John Wayne Cancer Foundation’s continued efforts to beat cancer at every turn.

Tomorrow (Saturday, June 4), the John Wayne Grit Series comes to Newport Coast with the 50K (7 a.m.), 25K (7:30 a.m.) and 5K (at 8:30 a.m.) courses, providing participants the chance to get dusty on the dirt roads and single-track trails in Crystal Cove State Park. Runners will test their endurance on the challenging climb out of El Moro Canyon and be rewarded with spectacular views of the Pacific Ocean and Catalina Island. Parking is available inside Crystal Cove State Park for $15.

2022 John Wayne Grit Series start

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Photos courtesy of the John Wayne Grit Series

The start/finish line at the 2021 John Wayne Grit Series in Newport Coast

Registration for runners closed on Wednesday, June 1, but there are other ways to participate.

–Participants can commit to fundraise in lieu of running to make an even bigger impact in the fight against cancer.

–Fundraisers can earn rewards like a John Wayne Grit Series trucker hat, John Wayne Grit Series Patagonia Nano Puff Jacket and even the opportunity to name a research grant.

–Additional rewards are presented to the top fundraisers for each event.

For participating runners, each event is timed and will feature podium prizes and medals for the fastest runners, so come cheer your favorite runners on!

2022 John Wayne Grit Series runners

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Two trail runners at the 2021 John Wayne Grit Series in Newport Coast

To more on the Newport Coast Grit Series and to donate, go to https://johnwayne.org/pages/newport-coast-2022-new.

The Grit Series began in Pioneertown, CA. on May 7. The next stops after Newport Coast are the Ridgeway, CO. half marathon and 5K on August 27 and the Lone Pine, CA. half marathon and 10K on October 15. The series culminates with a 5K at the Fort Worth, TX. Stockyards on November 12.

To learn more and sign up for future Grit Series races, visit www.johnwayne.org/jwgs.

John Wayne believed in searching for a cure for cancer. A survivor of lung cancer who ultimately succumbed to stomach cancer in 1979, the Duke was adamant about helping all people fight cancer. This cancer organization that was founded in his honor is a true, lasting legacy of which Wayne would be proud.

Editor’s Note: June is National Cancer Survivors’ Month. Runners at the Grit Series who are survivors are presented a special bandana to run in, to make sure they receive the proper support and celebration.


Fair Game

By TOM JOHNSON

Petition unfairly calls school board into question concerning age-appropriate books

TOM MARCHThere’s a petition circulating on Change.org challenging the members of the Newport-Mesa Board of Education as to why non-age-appropriate books have made their way onto library shelves in our local schools.

The petition specifically cites these books, Flamer by Mike Curato, Leah on the Offbeat by Molly Ostertag and The Girl from the Sea by Becky Albertalli.

It also calls for the following action: “that the NMUSD Board of Trustees create and appoint an Ad Hoc Library Book Review Committee consisting of a representative sampling of parents, community members, teachers and two NMUSD trustees to establish clear parameters for new library books, whether donated or purchased, and the removal of age-inappropriate books currently on the shelves.”

Is it a problem that we should be concerned about, or does our District have their arms around the issue?

I believe the latter is the case.

I went to NMUSD Board Chair Michelle Barto who added this: “While the petition is well-meaning, I feel it is unnecessary and here is why – the book that was found at Wilson Elementary is not part of our approved curriculum and is not deemed age-appropriate, particularly as even the author rates it as appropriate for age 14+. The library at Wilson was immediately closed when it was brought to our attention. We began an investigation at that site, worked with parents at the school and informed them of next steps.

“Additionally, our circulation catalog district-wide was searched for additional copies of the book and none were found. Principals have physically reviewed our elementary libraries and have found no additional copies. 

“As books come in at the end of the school year, district staff are taking the opportunity to review books for age-appropriate content.

“We are also reviewing our internal processes for how books are ordered and if there are things to correct and improve, the district will do so. 

“With my own kids in the district, it is particularly important that high-quality and age-appropriate content be provided. In this case and as we have mentioned at our most recent board meetings, we are taking steps to ensure that and will be able to share the results of our investigation with the public when complete, at future meetings.”

Kudos to Barto and the board for being on the ball and so forthcoming. Did a rogue issue occur? Yes. But the District seems to be on it. 

It’s further disappointing seeing that some of the comments related to the petition attack the “appointed leaders” with comments such as they’re “making decisions without the best interests of our children at heart.” 

To me, nothing could be further from the truth. Our school board is comprised of a wonderful mix of trustees who seem to be making every effort to better our district…daily!

• • •

As summer is unofficially underway with Memorial Day weekend in the rearview mirror, the Newport Beach Police Department has been conducting Boardwalk Safety Enforcement Operations

Police could recently be seen issuing citations following enforcement stops and educating passers-by on the no-nos regarding e-bikes, electric scooters and skateboards on the boardwalk. 

The penalty for doing so is one-year in the slammer! Just kidding, but now that I have your attention, just don’t do it!

• • •

Here’s something fun, the Newport Beach Fire Department is showing off one of their new toys tomorrow, June 4. What they have is a new fire engine “designed with improved off-road capabilities to battle woodland wildfires.”

The fire engine is different in size and maneuverability than NBFD’s other fire engines. The City set out to design and purchase the engine in 2019, but with COVID-related supply chain issues, construction took nearly two years. NBFD crews are undergoing additional training before the new engine is placed into service.

The community can join the unveiling at 1:30 p.m. at the Newport Coast Fire Station 8, located at 6502 Ridge Park Road.

• • •

Tuesday is Primary Election Day. It’s important. We’ve talked in this space repeatedly about Measure B, the potential local city charter change that would allow for a directly elected mayor. And whether you’ve agreed with our position or disagreed, it’s important for everyone to cast their ballot. That’s what makes America great.

Here’s where you can go if you haven’t voted: the Newport Beach Civic Center (100 Civic Center Drive), Coastline College (1515 Monrovia Ave.), Marina Park Community Center (1600 W. Balboa Blvd.), the Newport Coast Community Center (6401 San Joaquin Hills Road), OASIS Senior Center (801 Narcissus Ave.) and St. Mark Presbyterian Church (2200 San Joaquin Hills Road).

This weekend through Monday they’ll be open from 8 a.m.-8 p.m. and Tuesday hours are 7 a.m.-8 p.m.

You may also drop off ballots at drop locations in Bob Henry Park, at the Newport Beach Central Library, OASIS Senior Center and on the sidewalk at the corner of Avon St. & Riverside Ave.

• • •

The 2022 OC Fair is just a month-and-a-half away, July 15-August 14. They will continue to limit attendance capacity.

So, you may be interested that advance tickets are now available. The Fair will be open Wednesday through Sunday, 11 a.m.-11 p.m. on weekdays (Wednesdays & Thursdays), and 11 a.m. to midnight on the weekends (Friday through Sunday).

And don’t kid yourself, some days will sell out.

Also available now are the unlimited ride wristbands (https://ocfair.com/oc-fair/things-to-do/carnival/) for $44 presale through July 14, then $49 throughout the Fair run.

Admission tickets are the same as recent years at $12 weekdays and $14 weekends. Tickets for seniors 60+ and kids 6-12 are $7. Tickets must be purchased in advance online for specific days. The OC Fair will absorb the transaction fees.

Parking is $10 for cars and motorcycles and $20 for buses and limos.

Tickets are also on sale for OC Fair shows at Pacific Amphitheatre, The Hangar and Action Sports Arena. For more information or tickets, visit https://ocfair.com.

• • •

The Newport Beach Historical Society is currently looking for “new volunteer board members with a passion for local history and nonprofit experience in bookkeeping, education, marketing and events. Time commitment requires attendance of monthly meetings and miscellaneous planning activities depending on your role.”

If interested, contact NBHS President Bernie Svalstad at 949.232.7373, or email This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it..

• • •

The Newport Beach Chamber of Commerce’s June WAKE UP! Newport was postponed for the month of June and will resume in July.

 The Chamber does have a Meet and Mingle scheduled for women in business on Tuesday, June 14 from 6-8 p.m. at OLEA. Chamber members are $10 and non-members are $20. Appetizers are included and it’s a no host bar.

To make a reservation, go to www.newportbeach.com.

• • •

Gosh, so much going on this weekend. The CdM 5K (race day begins at 6 a.m. with registration and the first race goes off at 7:55 a.m.) on Saturday…the Balboa Island Parade on Sunday (bridge closes at 10:45 a.m., parade begins at 11…and, even the Fuchsia Show & Sale at Sherman Library & Gardens on both Saturday and Sunday, 10:30 a.m. to 4 p.m.

Summer is here! Get out there and enjoy yourself.


Field of Honor remembrances

Each year, Exchange Club of Newport Harbor (ECNH) presents the Field of Honor recognizing the service of men and women of the American military forces and first responders. The field consists of 1,776 large American flags proudly displayed along the pathways of Castaways Park, Dover Drive and 16th Street in Newport Beach, overlooking Newport Back Bay, Newport Harbor and the Pacific Ocean.

Flags may be dedicated in honor of those who have served in any branch of the American military either currently or in the past, in peacetime or in times of combat. They have been honored to have flags dedicated to soldiers as far back as the American Revolutionary War and most periods since. First responder dedications include police, fire, paramedics, lifeguards and medical personnel. The name of the honoree is attached to a ribbon and placed on the flagpole along with any photos or other memorabilia that the donor who dedicated the flag wishes to add.

Field of Honor remembrances flags on path

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Photo by Ken Dufour

1776 American Flags line the paths and stand stalwart through Castaways Park

The flags are on display, rain or shine, for 11 days from May 20 through May 30, encompassing both Armed Forces Day and Memorial Day. At the end of the event, dedicated flags may be claimed by the donors to proudly display at their home or business. A Certificate of Authenticity is presented with each dedicated flag.

All net proceeds from the event are distributed to organizations focused on the prevention of child abuse and those providing financial assistance to our military personnel, first responders and their families, in addition to scholarships awarded to college-bound students.

Field of Honor remembrances statue

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Courtesy of ECHN

The U.S. Marine statue in Castaways Park, where each year after the 1776 flags are erected, is adorned with flowers and American flags

There were many remembrances during the 13th Annual Field of Honor, culminating with the Memorial Day Patriotic Program on Monday, May 30.

Field of Honor remembrances fifth graders

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Fifth graders gather at Castaways Park for the Americanism program

On Friday, May 27, the ECNH presented an Americanism program to more than 800 Newport-Mesa Unified School District (NMUSD) fifth graders, who enjoyed an hour in the Castaways Park “classroom” among the Field of Honor’s 1776 American flags. NMUSD Superintendent Dr. Wesley Smith gave an enthusiastic talk. The youngsters witnessed a Newport Beach Police Department K9 demonstration along with the dog handlers, which the students particularly enjoyed.

Field of Honor remembrances Colonel

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Photo by Naomi Romeo

100-year-old retired Air Force Col. Joe McCracken is surprised that his flag, dedicated by his daughter, Gail, was in the No. 1 position at the Exchange Club of Newport Harbor’s 13th Annual Field of Honor

Col. Joe McCracken, Retired, U.S. Air Force, was a special guest at the Memorial Day Patriotic Program on Monday, May 30, visiting the flag dedicated to him by his daughter, Gail. McCracken lives in Midway City and just turned 100 last month. He was surprised and happy that “his” flag was in the No. 1 position at the Field of Honor. He quipped, “Will I have a negative number next year?”

Field of Honor remembrances flags harbor

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Photo by Ken Dufour

American Flags at Castaways Park with Newport Harbor in the background

The Memorial Day Ceremony began in the morning with a walk down the pathways of Castaways Park and then musical entertainment by the Fabulous Nomads prior to the ceremony beginning. Jerry Nininger served as master of ceremonies. He bought the flag display idea to Newport Beach 14 years ago. He along with the Exchange Club and Laura Detweiler with the City of Newport Beach, explored six city sites and determined Castaways Park was the perfect setting for the Field of Honor.

Field of Honor remembrances Nomads

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The Fabulous Nomads, a popular local band, provided live music before the program to the delight of the audience of more than 1,000

Field of Honor remembrances Nininger

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Jerry Nininger served as master of ceremonies

Following the Invocation by Pastor Paul Hegele, Newport Beach Lutheran Church, there was the Presentation of Colors, Pledge of Allegiance by former City Manager Homer Bludau and our national anthem, led by Bill Edwards of Balboa Island.

Field of Honor remembrances DAR

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The Sons of the American Revolution (SAR) provided color and pomp 

Field of Honor remembrances Color Guard

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2022 U.S. Marine Corps Color Guard

Next came the Presentation of the Military Flags, a keynote by Retired Marine Paul Garcia, past president of the 1st Battalion 1st Marines, Camp Pendleton. The moving Flag Folding Ceremony was performed by the U.S. Marine Corps Color Guard. This somber and precise ceremony of folding our American flag, usually occurs after a veteran’s burial. (That folded flag is then presented to the next of kin of the deceased veteran) Each fold has a special meaning. A commentary of what each fold signifies as the folds were performed was shared with attendees. 

Field of Honor Remembrances flag folding

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The somber and precise Flag Folding Ceremony

There was acknowledgement of local and county dignitaries in attendance along with special guests, Marina Medinksa and Max Ostafi. These two recent refugees from Ukraine escaped with just the clothes on their back, arrived in Mexico, crossed the border and came to Newport Beach. The ECNH learned of their plight and gave them $1,000 for clothes, rent and food. They were surprised, grateful and tearful. According to Ken Dufour with the ECNH, “They could not express these emotions because they don’t speak English. However, the crowd understood the emotion and celebrated with a standing ovation while tears flowed from among the crowd.”

The ECNH would like to extend a special thank you to the City of Newport Beach and all the event sponsors who contributed to making the Field of Honor a time of respect, honor, recognition and appreciation.

For more information on the Exchange Club of Newport Harbor, visit www.exchangeclubofnewportharbor.com.


Stars and Stripes stand tall

Stars and Strips stand tall SNN 6.3

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Photo by Kevin Pellon (Instagram @socalsnapz)

Flags unfurl above Balboa Pier


Summer kicks off at Newport Dunes this Memorial Day Weekend

Newport Dunes Waterfront Resort has announced the summer opening of the Inflatable Water Park and more family-friendly outdoor experiences beginning Memorial Day weekend, May 27-30. 

“We’ve been a destination of year-round outdoor recreation and family fun for more than 60 years,” said Phil Ravenna, general manager of Newport Dunes Waterfront Resort & Marina. “We’re thrilled to welcome campers and the community to spend beautiful SoCal summer days at our picturesque beachfront location to create life-long memories.”

On Saturday, May 28 from 12-6 p.m., experience live DJ entertainment and a musical performance by David Rosales & His Band of Scoundrels at Pavilion C. Sip, snack and dance the day away while taking in the bay views and enjoying the entertainment with a selection of local food trucks and a full bar of libations available for purchase. An acoustic guitarist and DJ yo-b1 will be performing on the Moe B’s Munchies patio. Reserved parking for the event is $35 per car. 

Summer kicks off water park

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Photos courtesy of Newport Dunes Waterfront Resort

Newport Dunes’ Inflatable Water Park

Jump into summer at Newport Dunes’ Inflatable Water Park, home to more than 15 oversized inflatables including a 17-foot slide, two trampolines, two climbable icebergs, monkey bars, bouncers and slides. Fun for adults and children alike, the inflatables are recommended for children older than 5 years. The Inflatable Water Park will be open from 10 a.m.-6 p.m. during the holiday weekend and daily through Labor Day weekend. All water sports activities can be booked online.

Summer Kicks off radiant rides

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Radiant Rides, a light-up SUP experience at Newport Dunes

The resort’s popular Radiant Rides, a light-up SUP experience, will also resume on weekends by reservation request beginning Friday, May 27. For groups of six to 15 people, Radiant Rides offers guests the unique opportunity to tour the calm waters of the Back Bay after sunset on illuminated stand up paddleboards that set the water beneath aglow with colorful neon light.

Explore Newport’s Back Bay during the day with activities including kayaks, stand up paddleboards, pedal boats and new 21-foot electric Duffy boats. Moe B’s Watersports summer rental hours are from 10 a.m.-6 p.m. daily beginning May 27. 

For the ultimate shoreside VIP experience, Newport Dunes offers private beach cabanas for daily rentals. Relax under a breezy, shaded area between dips in the calm waters of the waveless lagoon. Overnight guests can also enjoy poolside cabanas in the remodeled pool complex with heated pools and spas.

Newport Dunes Movies on the Beach also resumes after sunset every Friday and Saturday evening beginning May 27. Overnight guests and the public are invited to bring their beach chairs and blankets to relax and enjoy movies on the sand under the stars.