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531 confirmed cases of COVID-19 in Newport Beach to date

Numbers released by the OC Health Care Agency yesterday, July 9, reflect that there have been 531 confirmed cases of COVID-19 in Newport Beach to date, resulting in the deaths of three Newport Beach residents. This represents an increase of 37 cases yesterday and 284 cases since June 26.

The County reported 1,284 additional confirmed cases of COVID-19 in OC yesterday, following 1,333 cases reported on Wednesday, 1,010 cases reported on Tuesday, and 1,028 cases reported on Monday.

Sadly, the County reports that 402 people have died due to COVID-19, including 27 deaths received yesterday.

According to the County, OC is experiencing “elevated disease transmission,” “increasing hospitalization,” and “limited hospital capacity” – with a 9.6 percent increase in the three-day average of hospitalized patients. The County reports a total of 21,517 cumulative cases to date.

The County reports that 691 individuals are currently hospitalized with COVID-19 (includes ICU); 236 are in ICU.

Santa Ana has had 4,102 confirmed cases to date, a net increase of 172 cases yesterday, and 114 deaths. Anaheim has had 3,829 confirmed cases to date, a net increase of 191 cases yesterday, and 94 deaths. Huntington Beach has had 1,063 confirmed cases to date, a net increase of 70 cases yesterday, and 41 deaths. Costa Mesa has had 648 confirmed cases to date, a net increase of 36 cases yesterday, and three deaths. Irvine has had 694 confirmed cases to date, a net increase of 46 cases yesterday, and five deaths. Laguna Beach has had 86 confirmed cases to date, an increase of four cases yesterday, and “less than five deaths” to date.

The age group with the most confirmed cases is 25-34 years old, accounting for 4,931 of the total confirmed cases in the County to date. 

The County estimates 9,452 “recovered cases” according to its data criteria.

For questions about the data presented by the County, call (714) 834-2000 or email This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it..

To view the data dashboard, click here.

Numbers are updated daily by Stu News Newport and reported on our social media pages @StuNewsNewport.

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COVID-19: County reports 1,284 additional cases, 26 new deaths

OC Health Care Agency reported 1,284 additional confirmed cases of COVID-19 in the County yesterday, July 9, following 1,333 cases reported on Wednesday, 1,010 cases reported on Tuesday, and 1,028 cases reported on Monday.

Sadly, the County reports that 402 people have died due to COVID-19, including 26 deaths received yesterday. There have been three deaths of Newport Beach residents, including one death received yesterday.

According to the County, OC is experiencing “elevated disease transmission,” “increasing hospitalization,” and “limited hospital capacity” – with a 9.6 percent increase in the three-day average of hospitalized patients. The County reports a total of 21,517 cumulative cases to date.

The County reports that 691 individuals are currently hospitalized with COVID-19 (includes ICU); 236 are in ICU.

Newport Beach has had 531 confirmed cases to date, a net increase of 37 cases yesterday and 284 cases since June 26, a per capita rate of 6.091 cases per thousand residents.

Santa Ana has had 4,102 confirmed cases to date, a net increase of 172 cases yesterday, and 114 deaths. Anaheim has had 3,829 confirmed cases to date, a net increase of 191 cases yesterday, and 94 deaths. Huntington Beach has had 1,063 confirmed cases to date, a net increase of 70 cases yesterday, and 41 deaths. Costa Mesa has had 648 confirmed cases to date, a net increase of 36 cases yesterday, and three deaths. Irvine has had 694 confirmed cases to date, a net increase of 46 cases yesterday, and five deaths. Laguna Beach has had 86 confirmed cases to date, an increase of four cases yesterday, and “less than five deaths” to date.

The age group with the most confirmed cases is 25-34 years old, accounting for 4,931 of the total confirmed cases in the County to date. 

The County estimates 9,452 “recovered cases” according to its data criteria.

For questions about the data presented by the County, call (714) 834-2000 or email This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it..

To view the data dashboard, click here.

Numbers are updated daily by Stu News Newport and reported on our social media pages @StuNewsNewport.

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Courtesy of OC Health Care Agency

Orange County COVID-19 case data as of July 9, as reported by the County; click here to visit page that is updated daily


494 confirmed cases of COVID-19 in Newport Beach to date

Numbers released by the OC Health Care Agency today, July 8, reflect that there have been 494 confirmed cases of COVID-19 in Newport Beach to date, resulting in the deaths of two Newport Beach residents. This represents an increase of 43 cases today and 247 cases since June 26.

The County reported 1,333 additional cases of COVID-19 in OC today, following 1,010 cases reported yesterday, 1,028 cases reported on Monday, and 663 cases on Sunday.

Sadly, the County reports that 376 people have died due to COVID-19, including seven deaths received today.

According to the County, OC is experiencing “elevated disease transmission,” “increasing hospitalization,” and “limited hospital capacity” – with a 9.4 percent increase in the three-day average of hospitalized patients. The County reports a total of 20,225 cumulative cases to date.

The County reports that 679 individuals are currently hospitalized with COVID-19 (includes ICU); 234 are in ICU.

Santa Ana has had 3,930 confirmed cases to date, a net increase of 219 cases today, and 101 deaths. Anaheim has had 3,638 confirmed cases to date, a net increase of 213 cases today, and 91 deaths. Huntington Beach has had 993 confirmed cases to date, a net increase of 72 cases today, and 40 deaths. Costa Mesa has had 612 confirmed cases to date, a net increase of 58 cases today, and three deaths. Irvine has had 648 confirmed cases to date, a net increase of 55 cases today, and five deaths. Laguna Beach has had 82 confirmed cases to date, an increase of four cases today.

The age group with the most confirmed cases is 25-34 years old, accounting for 4,605 of the total confirmed cases in the County to date. 

The County estimates 9,174 “recovered cases” according to its data criteria.

For questions about the data presented by the County, call (714) 834-2000 or email This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it..

To view the data dashboard, click here.

Numbers are updated daily by Stu News Newport and reported on our social media pages @StuNewsNewport.

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COVID-19: County reports 1,333 additional cases, “increasing hospitalization”

OC Health Care Agency reported 1,333 additional cases of COVID-19 in the County today, July 8, following 1,010 cases reported yesterday, 1,028 cases reported on Monday, and 663 cases on Sunday.

Sadly, the County reports that 376 people have died due to COVID-19, including seven deaths received today. There have been two deaths of Newport Beach residents.

According to the County, OC is experiencing “elevated disease transmission,” “increasing hospitalization,” and “limited hospital capacity” – with a 9.4 percent increase in the three-day average of hospitalized patients. The County reports a total of 20,225 cumulative cases to date.

The County reports that 679 individuals are currently hospitalized with COVID-19 (includes ICU); 234 are in ICU.

Newport Beach has had 494 confirmed cases to date, a net increase of 43 cases today and 247 cases since June 26, a per capita rate of 5.666 cases per thousand residents.

Santa Ana has had 3,930 confirmed cases to date, a net increase of 219 cases today, and 101 deaths. Anaheim has had 3,638 confirmed cases to date, a net increase of 213 cases today, and 91 deaths. Huntington Beach has had 993 confirmed cases to date, a net increase of 72 cases today, and 40 deaths. Costa Mesa has had 612 confirmed cases to date, a net increase of 58 cases today, and three deaths. Irvine has had 648 confirmed cases to date, a net increase of 55 cases today, and five deaths. Laguna Beach has had 82 confirmed cases to date, an increase of four cases today.

The age group with the most confirmed cases is 25-34 years old, accounting for 4,605 of the total confirmed cases in the County to date. 

The County estimates 9,174 “recovered cases” according to its data criteria.

For questions about the data presented by the County, call (714) 834-2000 or email This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it..

To view the data dashboard, click here.

Numbers are updated daily by Stu News Newport and reported on our social media pages @StuNewsNewport.

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Courtesy of OC Health Care Agency

Orange County COVID-19 case data as of July 8, as reported by the County; click here to visit page that is updated daily


451 confirmed cases of COVID-19 in Newport Beach to date

Numbers released by the OC Health Care Agency today, July 7, reflect that there have been 451 confirmed cases of COVID-19 in Newport Beach to date, resulting in the deaths of two Newport Beach residents. This represents an increase of 39 cases today and 204 cases since June 26.

The County reported 1,010 additional cases of COVID-19 in OC today, following 1,028 cases reported yesterday, 663 cases on Sunday, 413 cases on Saturday, and 713 cases on Friday.

Sadly, the County reports that 369 people have died due to COVID-19, including three deaths received today.

According to the County, OC is experiencing “elevated disease transmission,” “increasing hospitalization,” and “limited hospital capacity” – with a 10.6 percent increase in the three-day average of hospitalized patients. The County reports a total of 18,892 cumulative cases to date.

The County reports that 659 individuals are currently hospitalized with COVID-19 (includes ICU); 224 are in ICU.

Santa Ana has had 3,711 confirmed cases to date, a net increase of 216 cases today, and 98 deaths. Anaheim has had 3,425 confirmed cases to date, a net increase of 167 cases today, and 91 deaths. Huntington Beach has had 921 confirmed cases to date, a net increase of 48 cases today, and 40 deaths. Costa Mesa has had 554 confirmed cases to date, a net increase of 52 cases today, and three deaths. Irvine has had 593 confirmed cases to date, a net increase of 44 cases today, and five deaths. Laguna Beach has had 78 confirmed cases to date, an increase of three cases today.

The age group with the most confirmed cases is 25-34 years old, accounting for 4,251 of the total confirmed cases in the County to date. 

The County estimates 8,867 “recovered cases” according to its data criteria.

For questions about the data presented by the County, call (714) 834-2000 or email This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it..

To view the data dashboard, click here.

Numbers are updated daily by Stu News Newport and reported on our social media pages @StuNewsNewport.

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COVID-19: County reports 1,010 additional cases, “increasing hospitalization”

OC Health Care Agency reported 1,010 additional cases of COVID-19 in the County today, July 7, following 1,028 cases reported yesterday, 663 cases on Sunday, 413 cases on Saturday, and 713 cases on Friday.

Sadly, the County reports that 369 people have died due to COVID-19, including three deaths received today. There have been two deaths of Newport Beach residents.

According to the County, OC is experiencing “elevated disease transmission,” “increasing hospitalization,” and “limited hospital capacity” – with a 10.6 percent increase in the three-day average of hospitalized patients. The County reports a total of 18,892 cumulative cases to date.

The County reports that 659 individuals are currently hospitalized with COVID-19 (includes ICU); 224 are in ICU.

Newport Beach has had 451 confirmed cases to date, a net increase of 39 cases today and 204 cases since June 26, a per capita rate of 5.173 cases per thousand residents.

Santa Ana has had 3,711 confirmed cases to date, a net increase of 216 cases today, and 98 deaths. Anaheim has had 3,425 confirmed cases to date, a net increase of 167 cases today, and 91 deaths. Huntington Beach has had 921 confirmed cases to date, a net increase of 48 cases today, and 40 deaths. Costa Mesa has had 554 confirmed cases to date, a net increase of 52 cases today, and three deaths. Irvine has had 593 confirmed cases to date, a net increase of 44 cases today, and five deaths. Laguna Beach has had 78 confirmed cases to date, an increase of three cases today.

The age group with the most confirmed cases is 25-34 years old, accounting for 4,251 of the total confirmed cases in the County to date. 

The County estimates 8,867 “recovered cases” according to its data criteria.

For questions about the data presented by the County, call (714) 834-2000 or email This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it..

To view the data dashboard, click here.

Numbers are updated daily by Stu News Newport and reported on our social media pages @StuNewsNewport.

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Courtesy of OC Health Care Agency

Orange County COVID-19 case data as of July 7, as reported by the County; click here to visit page that is updated daily


SOCALPAPA artists present online exhibition

One of Southern California’s most anticipated events each summer is the “Back Bay Art Show and Sale” held at the Muth Interpretive Center in Newport Beach. This annual event is organized by SOCALPAPA (Southern California Plein Air Painters Association) in partnership with the Newport Bay Conservancy (NBC) and Orange County Parks.

Due to limitations on group gatherings right now, it is not possible to have a physical show this summer. But SOCALPAPA has created an exciting alternative in the form of an online exhibition of oil paintings, watercolors and pastel works inspired by the Back Bay and our OC Parks.

SOCALPAPA artists artwork

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Courtesy of Newport Bay Conservancy

Among this year’s artworks is “East View – Big Bend” by artist Terry Stanley, who also created the cover art of the book “Saving Newport Bay”

This new exhibition opens on Saturday, July 11 and continues through Sunday, July 19. Thirty SOCALPAPA artists have submitted nearly 60 original paintings inspired by the beauty and natural heritage of the Upper Back Bay as well as the varied landscapes of the OC Parks. The show can be previewed at www.SOCALPAPAGallery.com. New art will be added daily until the official opening on July 11 when the artwork will be for sale.

Online purchases are processed by NBC, and artwork will be available for pickup through the artist or at the Muth Center by appointment. All artwork is framed and ready to hang. A portion of the sales proceeds go to NBC, which allows a partial charitable tax deduction for the art purchaser.

Newport Bay Conservancy is a nonprofit conservation organization dedicated to the protection and preservation of Upper Newport Bay and its watershed through education, restoration, research and advocacy since 1968. For more information about NBC, visit www.newportbay.org. 

SOCALPAPA’s nearly 200-member association dedicates itself to plein air painting and arts education. To see this year’s show, visit www.SOCALPAPAGallery.com, and for more information about SOCALPAPA, visit the association’s website at www.socalpapa.com.


412 confirmed cases of COVID-19 in Newport Beach to date

Numbers released by the OC Health Care Agency yesterday, July 6, reflect that there have been 412 confirmed cases of COVID-19 in Newport Beach to date, resulting in the deaths of two Newport Beach residents. This represents an increase of 31 cases yesterday and 165 cases since June 26.

The County reported 1,028 additional cases of COVID-19 in OC yesterday, following 663 cases reported on Sunday, 413 cases on Saturday, 713 cases on Friday, and 652 cases on Thursday.

Sadly, the County reports that 366 people have died due to COVID-19.

According to the County, OC is experiencing “elevated disease transmission,” “increasing hospitalization,” and “limited hospital capacity” – with a 10.1 percent increase in the three-day average of hospitalized patients. The County reports a total of 17,882 cumulative cases to date.

The County reports that 634 individuals are currently hospitalized with COVID-19 (includes ICU); 203 are in ICU.

Santa Ana has had 3,495 confirmed cases to date, a net increase of 153 cases yesterday, and 96 deaths. Anaheim has had 3,258 confirmed cases to date, a net increase of 171 cases yesterday, and 91 deaths. Huntington Beach has had 873 confirmed cases to date, a net increase of 61 cases yesterday, and 40 deaths. Costa Mesa has had 502 confirmed cases to date, a net increase of 44 cases yesterday, and three deaths. Irvine has had 549 confirmed cases to date, a net increase of 40 cases yesterday, and five deaths. Laguna Beach has had 75 confirmed cases to date, an increase of five cases yesterday.

The age group with the most confirmed cases is 25-34 years old, accounting for 3,990 of the total confirmed cases in the County to date. 

The County estimates 8,634 “recovered cases” according to its data criteria.

For questions about the data presented by the County, call (714) 834-2000 or email This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it..

To view the data dashboard, click here.

Numbers are updated daily by Stu News Newport and reported on our social media pages @StuNewsNewport.

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COVID-19: County reports 1,028 additional cases, "increasing hospitalization"

OC Health Care Agency reported 1,028 additional cases of COVID-19 in the County yesterday, July 6, following 663 cases reported on Sunday, 413 cases on Saturday, 713 cases on Friday, and 652 cases on Thursday.

Sadly, the County reports that 366 people have died due to COVID-19. There have been two deaths of Newport Beach residents.

According to the County, OC is experiencing “elevated disease transmission,” “increasing hospitalization,” and “limited hospital capacity” – with a 10.1 percent increase in the three-day average of hospitalized patients. The County reports a total of 17,882 cumulative cases to date.

The County reports that 634 individuals are currently hospitalized with COVID-19 (includes ICU); 203 are in ICU.

Newport Beach has had 412 confirmed cases to date, a net increase of 31 cases yesterday and 165 cases since June 26, a per capita rate of 4.726 cases per thousand residents.

Santa Ana has had 3,495 confirmed cases to date, a net increase of 153 cases yesterday, and 96 deaths. Anaheim has had 3,258 confirmed cases to date, a net increase of 171 cases yesterday, and 91 deaths. Huntington Beach has had 873 confirmed cases to date, a net increase of 61 cases yesterday, and 40 deaths. Costa Mesa has had 502 confirmed cases to date, a net increase of 44 cases yesterday, and three deaths. Irvine has had 549 confirmed cases to date, a net increase of 40 cases yesterday, and five deaths. Laguna Beach has had 75 confirmed cases to date, an increase of five cases yesterday.

The age group with the most confirmed cases is 25-34 years old, accounting for 3,990 of the total confirmed cases in the County to date. 

The County estimates 8,634 “recovered cases” according to its data criteria.

For questions about the data presented by the County, call (714) 834-2000 or email This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it..

To view the data dashboard, click here.

Numbers are updated daily by Stu News Newport and reported on our social media pages @StuNewsNewport.

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Courtesy of OC Health Care Agency

Orange County COVID-19 case data as of July 6, as reported by the County; click here to visit page that is updated daily


Fair Game

By TOM JOHNSON

Trouble is troubling and something needs to be done, now

Tom Johnson Fair Game 2I’m concerned about our world, and I don’t think I’m alone. It’s not just the issues related to the coronavirus, although that also has me very troubled. Violence and hate seem to be inundating our society at every turn.

I was relaxing watching the early afternoon TV news yesterday. The stories came up almost one after another, all overwhelming me. First, it was two young people, 13 and 8, killed in a “violent carjacking” in Pico Rivera, while injuring all three of their young siblings. They then said that the hijacker/alleged killer was recently released from jail following a zero bail arrest because of COVID-19 worries. How does that happen?

Next up was the killing of a man in Gardena waiting in a parking lot for a tow truck to fix two flat tires. Moving to Compton next, three people, including two young children, shot in a car-to-a-car shooting. Up in Seattle over the weekend, during yet another protest, a car driving the wrong way on a highway killed one woman and injured another.

And it’s not always just about killing, sometimes it’s pure hate. At the restaurant Jimmy John’s, teenage workers reportedly videotaped themselves playing with a noose they made out of dough inside the store, all the time laughing and joking. 

Or in Baltimore, there’s another statue story, this time Christopher Columbus being toppled from his mount and thrown into Baltimore’s inner harbor.

Crazy. Now, I understand that these places are not Newport Beach, but my concern is that in time it might be.

I spent part of the 4th of July weekend enjoying my two grandchildren, 3 and 1. A third one is due in less than two weeks. I worry about the world they’ll grow up in.

I don’t have the answers, but it seems to me that we’re allowing the world to run amok. When police and first responders try to stop it, they’re immediately castigated at every front…brutality, targeting and such, are the claims. I find myself asking how the 99.99 percent of the “good” cops are supposed to do their job without looking over their shoulders.

Things for me have gotten so disconcerting that I found myself online last week exploring handguns for the very first time for potential self/home protection. Don’t get me wrong, I’m not a gun lover or even a prior gun owner, and not particularly thrilled about shooting anything, but again, I’m worried.

Locally, I do the police logs twice a week, reviewing each arrest for Stu News. I commend our police force for the job they do with so many bad seeds infiltrating our community with drugs, weapons, assaults and battery, burglaries, obstructing and resisting, firearms, domestic violence and more. Many others have warrants, some very, very serious.

We need to come together as a people and demand that our elected leaders do better. We need to get rid of, or at least pause, the in-fighting between political parties, and get focused on solutions toward making our country better. When a bad cop does something wrong, punish him or her, but not all for what one does. 

Stop the destruction of property, now, including monuments to our historical leaders. 

Put people who do wrong behind bars and have proper punishments.

If we don’t do something and do it now, and continue down the road we’re on, quite frankly, we’re all in trouble.

• • •

Three things on Thursday’s Planning Commission agenda worth noting. 

The first is an extension request by Hoag Memorial Hospital Presbyterian to their 2019 development agreement extension with the City of Newport Beach. In 2019, the City agreed to an additional 10-year extension with Hoag on a previous development agreement that was approved to expire in 2029.

However, due to the coronavirus pandemic, Hoag’s focus on further development has been diverted and not allowed them to focus on future development plans during this first year of the new agreement.

The additional one-year extension to 2030 would still keep intact the extensive set of regulations and mitigation measures in place as was agreed to in their fourth amendment in 2019.

The second item is an appeal of a Zoning Administrator’s approval of a cell tower at Balboa Blvd. and 30th St. 

The cell would be placed at the top of the replacement pole of an existing City streetlight.

The third item would be a potential general plan amendment and conditional use permit to construct an automated car wash in conjunction with the existing Shell Service Station at 1600 Jamboree Road (San Joaquin Hills Road).

• • •

 If you see sports agent Leigh Steinberg around town and you’re wondering why he has such a big smile on his face, I’ll tell you why. His top client, MVP quarterback Patrick Mahomes of the Kansas City Chiefs, signed a 10-year-contract for $450 million. It’s said it could go as high as $503 million.

There are also a couple of important clauses. First, it includes a $140 million guarantee even if Mahomes gets hurt, and there’s also a no-trade clause.

So what’s in it for Newport Beach resident Leigh Steinberg? Sports agents generally receive between 4 and 10 percent of the player’s playing contract, and 10 to 20 percent of the athlete’s endorsement contract.

Mahomes currently can be seen endorsing State Farm, Adidas, Oakley, Hunt’s Ketchup, Essentia Water, Hy-Vee grocery stores and EA Sports.

Yes, it’s good being a sports agent these days.


Capturing Mt. Whitney Trailhead Falls

Capturing Mt. Whitney

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 Artwork by Don Krotee 

Mt. Whitney Portal Trail Head Falls in Lone Pine, Calif.

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Artist Don Krotee was a member of the 2000 GPAC and is a member of SPON, the Corona del Mar Residents Association, the founder of the Newport Heights Improvement Association and lives in Corona del Mar. He is an architect, a sailor and a fine artist who has been drawing and painting from an early age. He provides Stu News drawings and paintings of iconic Newport Beach, its surrounding areas and the great State of California.


Chau issues Amended Orders and strong recommendations

Acting Orange County Health Officer Dr. Clayton Chau issued new Amended Orders and Strong Recommendations, effective immediately (July 6) in support of directives made last week by the California Department of Public Health and the Governor’s Office. 

The Amended Orders replaces the July 1 version and includes the mandatory closure of bars (with certain exceptions) while also closing indoor operations of certain sectors including: 

–Dine-in restaurants 

–Wineries and tasting rooms 

–Movie theaters 

–Family entertainment centers (for example: bowling alleys, miniature golf, batting cages and arcades) 

–Zoos and museums 

–Cardrooms 

To read the Order in its entirely as well as related Frequently Asked Questions, go here.


City of Hope leaders to discuss vision on cancer care

The community is invited to a conversation on the City of Hope’s vision on cancer care. City of Hope Orange County at Newport Beach opened earlier this year as part of City of Hope’s first phase of a $1 billion investment to develop and operate a network of care and cancer campuses throughout Orange County.

Newport Beach Chamber of Commerce President and CEO Steve Rosansky will join Annette Walker, M.H.A., President of City of Hope Orange County, and Amrita Krishnan, M.D. for a virtual conversation.

The Zoom webinar will be held Thursday, July 9 at 10 a.m. Although the event is free, reservations are required and can be made here.

City of Hope Annette Walker

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Photos courtesy of City of Hope

Annette Walker

Annette Walker is the visionary health care leader building City of Hope’s comprehensive cancer campus and regional network in Orange County. Named one of the 25 most influential women leaders and one of the Top 100 most influential leaders in U.S. health care by Modern Healthcare magazine, Walker believes bringing City of Hope’s world-class, highly specialized cancer care to Orange County is the most important chapter in her career. 

Working with physicians, community leaders, health care experts, and others, Walker is leading the development of a 190,000-square-foot cancer center for innovative cancer research and treatment at FivePoint Gateway in Irvine.

City of Hope Amrita Y. Krishnan, M.D

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Amrita Y. Krishnan, M.D.

Amrita Y. Krishnan, M.D is the Director of the Judy and Bernard Briskin Center for Multiple Myeloma Research and Professor, Department of Hematology & Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation.

She is an international expert on multiple myeloma and director of the Judy and Bernard Briskin Center for Multiple Myeloma Research, which is part of the Hematologic Malignancies Research Institute at City of Hope. An Orange County resident, Dr. Krishnan also serves on the board of the International Myeloma Society.


Coastkeeper celebrates OC’s clean water grades from Heal the Bay’s 2019-20 Beach Report Card

Orange County Coastkeeper celebrates Heal the Bay’s 2019-2020 Beach Report Card, which grades the water quality of beaches across California. In this year’s report, nearly half of the beaches on the honor roll can be found in Orange County.

Coastkeeper attributes the good water quality of these 20 beaches in Orange County to its 21 years of efforts to curb pollutants. Coastkeeper’s work in regulation and water quality monitoring has resulted in:

–Better water regulations.

–More water education in schools.

–Positive behavior changes with Orange County community members.

–Better enforcement of industrial sites.

For 21 years, Coastkeeper has served as the region’s last line of defense protecting waterways for generations to come. From being the voice at the table advocating on behalf of the environment in regional policy decisions to legal enforcement against polluters, Coastkeeper has played a major role protecting the water quality of Orange County beaches.

Coastkeeper celebrates

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Courtesy of OC Coastkeeper

Newport Beach beaches who made the Honor Roll include Newport Bay, Via Genoa Beach and Newport Beach at 52nd/53rd Streets.

According to Coastkeeper, the beach report card relates only to bacteria in water. There are many other pollutants that Orange County struggles with that Coastkeeper is focused on for the health of the environment. More work is needed to ensure the health of the region’s beaches, that result in:

–Fewer beach postings of pollution at chronic sites.

–Heavy reduction in trash on beaches and near waterways.

–Reduction of contaminants such as metals, organochlorines, viruses and street pollutants.

–Greater restoration of marine habitats.

–Development of natural buffers to combat sea level rise.

“Our work over the past two decades is paying off, as we can see from the recent beach report card,” said Orange County Coastkeeper Executive Director Garry Brown. “However, there is still much work to be done to protect water quality and keep our beaches healthy and clean in Orange County.”

To view the 2019-2020 Beach Report Card, click here.


Guest Letter

Karen Heath Clark

Guest Letter KAren Heath Clark

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Submitted photo

NBPLF Chairperson Karen Heath Clark

Dear NBPLF Members & Friends, 

For the next two years, it is my distinct honor to serve the Newport Beach Public Library Foundation (NBPLF) as the Chair of the Board of Directors. The accomplishments and outstanding service of my predecessor, Cathy Voreyer, humble me. She, the Foundation board and staff have moved us into new territory and created a healthier and more transparent Library Foundation, permitting us to better focus on the services and programs we are able to provide for you and our library-loving community. 

Throughout the entire world, the pandemic has created a new, unexpected, and uncertain path. In bravely facing the future, I plan to focus on the words of Helen Keller: “A bend in the road is not the end of the road unless you fail to make the turn.” Rest assured, friends, we will make the turn, come round the bend, and accelerate! We will be resilient and adapt to find innovative and creative ways to move forward. The Foundation board and staff remain as passionate as ever about providing exciting, high quality programs and services. This year they will just look a little different. 

The Library Foundation’s future is dynamic and bright. When the pandemic subsides, I believe it will leave us with a legacy of new, inventive ways to serve you, our members, our friends, and our entire community.

Please do not hesitate to contact me for any reason – to make a suggestion, to ask a question, or to just chat! I’m looking forward to listening and learning from you. 

Thank you, 

Karen Heath Clark, Chair

NBPLF Board of Directors 

This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

www.nbplfoundation.org

Karen Heath Clark is both attorney and historian, as well as travel adventurer. She has sailed small boats most of her life and has always sought out off-beat travel throughout the world. Politics have also played a huge role in her life. She has always been intrigued by politics and how seemingly insignificant events can change the course of history, which she learned many times over in her research on Bill Clinton. She is the author of “Mediterranean Summers” and “Bill Clinton: America’s Bridge to the 21st Century.” She lives in Corona del Mar with her husband, Bruce.


Harbor Day breaks ground on construction, Gallo’s project chugging along and more

By AMY SENK

When the City Council voted in an emergency meeting to close city beaches on July 4 and 5 because of lifeguards with COVID-19 and in quarantine on top of a forecast of huge waves and expected crowds, I had little faith that the beaches would be empty. They weren’t during the governor’s order to close this spring. And 10 years ago, more than 26,000 gallons of untreated sewage spilled onto Little Corona over the July 4 weekend, closing the beach for the holiday. People of all ages would stop, read the warning signs and – you guessed it – dive into the contaminated water. If raw sewage and the governor couldn’t stop the beach crowds, nothing would.

Or so I thought. When city officials said it would be a “hard closure,” they meant it. At Little Corona, a lifeguard was in his stand, telling any would-be surfer or sandcastle builder to go home. Occasionally, a pair of Newport Beach Police officers would walk down to the sand, check on things and leave. I knew some college-age surfers who went by to check things out and reported that the lifeguard was sympathetic but firm.

Overall it was a weird July 4 weekend, and the high surf and beach closures were just part of it. Here’s to a more traditional Independence Day in 2021.

• • •

In other news, Harbor Day School has broken ground on a major campus building project, posting photos on social media of demolition at the campus at 3443 Pacific View Dr., Corona de Mar.

Harbor Day School

Photos by Amy Senk

Harbor Day School under new renovation, expansion

“The new campus at our current location will have nearly 100,000 square feet of classrooms and other educational and office spaces,” according to the school’s website. “Physical work begins on June 8, and the first thing you will see is a construction fence. Demolition of the Blass Gymnasium, Linden Arts & Science Building, and the Best Classroom Building occurs mid-June.’

• • •

Also last week, the Newport Beach City Council gave a break to businesses in town with out-of-compliance signs, doing away with a deadline that would have required them to meet city requirements by late October of this year.

Their decision came 15 years after the city revised its sign ordinance and gave businesses a grace period – 15 years – to change out their signs to meet the new code. Back then, there were about 400 signs that would have needed updating by this fall, and city staff said that about 140 of them have been brought into conformance or removed. This March, city staff sent letters to 327 property and business owners, informing them of the pending code amendment and asking for feedback. The overwhelming response to the proposal was to extend or eliminate the amortization period.

Harbor Day Korker Liquor

Click on photo for a lager image

Korker Liquor

Signs that would have had to be removed or changed included Korker Liquor in Corona del Mar. Its familiar rooftop sign would have become explicitly against the rules, as would any signs supported by a single pole “or similar support structure so that the bottom edge of the sign is one foot or more above grade.” Councilman Joy Brenner, of CdM, specifically said she loves the Korker sign and others in CdM, and Councilman Kevin Muldoon echoed the sentiment. 

“Nonconforming signs add so much character to our community,” Muldoon said.

Eliminating the deadline won’t mean new signs can be added that don’t conform, but likely will allow the city to decide on a case-by-case basis if a classic Newport Beach sign could be replaced as an exception to the rule.

• • •

Also, I have had several people over the past few months asking me what’s going on with Plaza Corona del Mar, the project that at 3900 and 3928 E. Coast Highway. Construction has been underway for more than a year to build condos and a replacement sandwich shop, which originally was scheduled to be complete by this time.

Harbor Day Plaza Corona del Mar

Construction is moving forward at Plaza Corona del Mar

I caught up briefly over email with Architect Marcelo E. Lische, who said there was no current completion date.

“We are aiming at December 2020 for now,” he said. “I can give you an update in a couple of months.” 

~~~~~~~~

Amy Senk has lived in Corona del Mar for 20+ years and was publisher of Corona del Mar Today, an online newspaper that ran daily for seven years. Senk, a graduate of the University of Missouri School of Journalism, is involved in the Corona del Mar Residents Association and the Corona del Mar High School PTA. She and her husband have two children.


Wild Wedge waves

Wild Wedge waves

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Photo by Tina Treglia (Instagram @ttregs)

The beach was empty over the holiday weekend while the waves were pumping


Rise and Shine

Rise and view

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Photo by Jason Berry (Instagram @its_jason_berry)

Summer mornings at Lido Island are something special


YMCA of Orange County appoints new director of development and advancement

YMCA of Orange County (YMCAOC) has announced William E. Sawin Sr. as the new Director of Development to help lead advancement efforts for the organization by expanding programs and services, establishing new relationships, and increasing the visibility of YMCAOC in Southern California.

Sawin brings more than 40 years of executive management experience combined with a passion for helping to make a difference and change lives in the community. He brings vast knowledge in fund development, fundraising, comprehensive philanthropic strategic, and tactical planning and working with nonprofit organizations and their networks.

YMCA of Orange County Bill Sawin Sr.

Courtesy of YMCA of Orange County

William E. Sawin Sr.

Sawin has raised more than $250 million in the last 10 years for major nonprofits throughout Southern California, including the Motion Picture and Television Fund Foundation, Archdiocese of Los Angeles, Catholic Big Brothers Big Sisters of Los Angeles, Mater Dei High School, disability organizations, children’s educational organizations, STEM enhancement programs and healthcare organizations.

“I am beyond thrilled to work alongside YMCA of Orange County’s team of dedicated and driven colleagues and very eager to help the organization grow and achieve their goals,” said William E. Sawin Sr., the new Director of Development at YMCA Orange County.

He has an Executive MBA from The Wharton School of the University of Pennsylvania and a bachelor’s degree from California State University, Los Angeles.

“We are pleased to have William join our team and help advance our mission of strengthening the community,” said Jeff McBride, president and CEO at YMCA of Orange County. “William’s extensive experience and commitment to improving the lives of adults, children, and families in the community will prove to be a valuable asset to our advancement team.”

The Newport-Mesa Family YMCA is located at 2300 University Dr., Newport Beach.


Rouda signs letter opposing reported plans for oil and gas leasing expansion on Pacific Coast

Congressman Harley Rouda (CA-48) joined 30 members of the California House Delegation to express concern about the Trump Administration’s reported plans to develop and expand oil and gas leasing along the Pacific Coast. In a letter to U.S. Secretary of the Interior David Bernhardt, the members expressed their strong opposition to any new oil and gas leasing off the coast of California and demanded to be informed of any such plans being developed by the administration.

“There is a reason why every single coastal governor along the Atlantic and Pacific coasts, both Republican and Democrat, stand opposed to offshore drilling, as the inevitable spills and the variety of other onshore and offshore impacts from oil and gas drilling have no place along our coasts,” the letter stated. “It is critically important for coastal communities whose livelihoods are built around fishing, tourism, and recreation that there is no risk of oil leaks or spills that could negatively impact these ocean dependent economies and fragile marine ecosystems.”

The Trump Administration’s 2019-2024 Outer Continental Shelf (OCS) Oil and Gas Program, released in January 2018, opened more than 90 percent of the country’s coasts to oil and gas leasing, including the entire Atlantic, Pacific and Arctic coasts, as well as the Eastern Gulf of Mexico after the current Congressionally-mandated moratorium ends in 2022.

The letter highlights that media reports indicate that President Trump and the Department of the Interior (DOI) are continuing to work toward expanding offshore oil and gas leasing into the Eastern Gulf off Florida’s West Coast and possibly other areas originally sought in the administration’s program released in 2018. 

According to the members, “While the article could not confirm nor deny that the DOI was continuing to pursue OCS leasing off California, the State’s inclusion into the 2018 program, as well as statements from current and former administration officials, is evidence of the Trump administration’s interest in opening up federal waters off California’s coast and remains a cause for concern.”

The letter concludes with the members expressing their opposition to any new oil and gas leasing off the California coast and demands that DOI answer the following questions:

–Is the Department still developing, or planning to release, a new Program that will allow for new oil and gas leasing on the OCS inconsistent with the 2017-2022 Five-Year Offshore Oil and Gas Leasing Program?

–If this is the case, does it contain new lease sales for areas in the Pacific off California’s coast?

The letter was led by Congressman Lowenthal (CA-47) and Congressmen Salud Carbajal (CA-24), Jared Huffman (CA-2) and Mike Levin (CA-49).


Newport Beach – A Look Back

Photo series courtesy of Balboa Island Museum & Historical Society

Newport Beach A Look Back 7.7.20

Click on photo for a larger image

The Lady Anglers of Newport Beach, 1970s

Balboa Island Museum and the Museum Store are located at 210 B Marine Ave., Balboa Island. They are open Monday-Thursday from 10 a.m.-5 p.m. and Friday-Sunday from 10 a.m.-6 p.m. For more information, call 949.675.3952, visit www.balboamuseum.org or email This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it..


NB Arts Commission invites residents to view new Civic Center Park sculptures

The Newport Beach City Arts Commission invites residents to take a walk in Civic Center Park and enjoy the view, which includes 10 sculptures from Phase IV and 10 new sculptures that will be added in mid-July as part of Phase V in the celebrated Sculpture Exhibition in Civic Center Park. Professional services for the coordination of the artist selection and installation of the sculptures is being provided by Arts Orange County.

NB Arts Commission Window to the Sea

Click on photo for a larger image

Courtesy of NB Arts Commission/NBPL

“Window to the Sea” by local artist Andrea Broekelschen is among the Phase V sculptures to be added

Among the new sculptures are: Cosmo by Roger Heizman, Scotts Valley; Fractured Peace by Nancy Mooslin, Los Angeles; I’m Listening by Monica Wyatt, Studio City; The Unbearable Lightness of Being by Patricia Vader, Martinez; Seated Diana by Curt Brill, Tucson, AZ; Link of Humanity by Danette Landry, Napa; Window to the Sea by Andrea Broekelschen, Corona del Mar; Marble Shooter by Ron Whitaker, Laguna Beach; Dude Ascending by Joe Forest Sackett, Albuquerque, NM; and Individuality n.1 by Dominic Panziera and Daniela Garofalo, Truckee.


Meet new Arts Commissioner Leonard Simon

The Newport Beach Arts Commission has appointed Leonard Simon as the new Arts Commissioner. 

Simon, a new resident of Newport Beach, brings a passion for the arts and a wealth of experience as a former board member and president of the Public Corporation for the Arts (now the Arts Council, Long Beach). 

He was also actively involved in the International City Theatre and Musical Theatre West during his 35 years in Long Beach.

Meet new Arts Commissioner Leonard Simon

Courtesy of NBPL

Additionally, the Newport Beach City Council recently confirmed Marie Little for a second term on the City Arts Commission.

The Cultural Arts Division of the Newport Beach Public Library, with guidance and support by the Newport Beach City Arts Commission, brings cultural and arts programming to the community. Cultural activities are ongoing throughout the year and include the coordination of revolving art and cultural exhibitions at Central Library, the Sculpture in Civic Center Park Exhibition, the annual Newport Beach Art Exhibition, Concerts on the Green, and a variety of arts lectures and special events.


Lifeguard makes high surf rescue, then returns to water immediately and makes a second one

City officials are commending the actions of a Newport Beach lifeguard who performed two extremely difficult, back-to-back rescues in high surf conditions on Friday, July 3.

From the A Street lifeguard tower near the Balboa Pier, at about 4 p.m. Friday, lifeguard Sean Richards spotted two swimmers in distress. He successfully rescued the first swimmer and then returned to the water to assist the second. 

During the second rescue effort, Richards held the swimmer with one arm while heavy surf slammed them both to the ocean floor and held them under. The two were also pushed into pier pylons by the strong waves. Richards was able to maintain his grip on the swimmer throughout the ordeal, and both made it to shore. 

After the two rescues, Richards collapsed from exhaustion on the beach and was transported to Hoag Hospital. He was released from the hospital at about 10 p.m. Friday with a clean bill of health.

Lifeguard makes high surf rescue Sean Richards

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Courtesy of NBFD/Lifeguards

Newport Beach Lifeguard Sean Richards

“I am convinced that Sean saved two lives,” said Fire Chief Jeff Boyles. “This was a heroic rescue in very dangerous ocean conditions.”

On Friday, City lifeguards made 100 rescues and issued 2,700 preventative warnings.

“Sean’s efforts remind us how dangerous the job can be under challenging and fast-changing surf conditions,” said Mike Halphide, Chief Lifeguard. “This rescue really highlights the importance of having well trained, professional and courageous lifeguards like Sean on our City team.”

Richards is part of the City’s seasonal lifeguard team. The two rescued swimmers are teenagers.   

While high waves were forecast for Friday, the surf conditions became unexpectedly powerful and intense throughout the day. Friday evening, during the high tide, the swell rose and eroded a protective sand berm, causing flooding in streets and parking lots on the Balboa Peninsula.


High tides cause flooding on Peninsula

City crews rebuilt a massive sand berm on the Balboa Peninsula after an unexpectedly strong swell overtopped and eroded the previous sand berm Friday night, flooding streets and parking lots on the Peninsula. 

The new sand berm was built larger and taller to prevent more flooding during Saturday’s high tide in the early evening. The City brought in additional resources, including personnel and heavy equipment, to rebuild the sand berm by Saturday afternoon, in advance of the high tide. 

High tides cause Berm City repairs

Click on photo for a larger image

Photos courtesy of City of Newport Beach

On Friday, an unusually high and intense swell overtopped the sand berms in an area from 8th Street to the Wedge. The primary impact was in the Balboa Pier area, and flooding extended to Balboa Boulevard. 

The flooding carried a large amount of trash and debris onto City streets that may take up to a week to clean up. 

The City had anticipated high surf conditions over the weekend, with waves of 5-7 feet. However, Friday’s swell brought unexpected conditions that combined with an extremely high tide to cause the flooding. 

High tides cause flooding

Click on photo for a larger image

The intense surf conditions also resulted in several water rescues by lifeguards on Friday, and the crash of a 40-foot sailboat in high waves Friday evening. 

City lifeguard officials said the Southern swell brought unusually high-energy wave conditions similar to those of a tsunami, with a continued surge that traveled further and further up the beach with each wave, rather than dissipating between waves and sets of waves. 

All City beaches were closed to the public July 4 and July 5, in alignment with neighboring Orange County beaches.


Police and Fire Files

Large sailboat completely destroyed after washing ashore Friday night

Shortly after 9 p.m. on Friday, July 3, an approximately 40 ft. sailboat was washed ashore near Coronado St. on the Peninsula. Six males exited from the boat as it crashed into the shoreline.

Paramedics and lifeguards responded to treat all six on the scene. However, because of higher than expected surf and challenging conditions caused by flooding and massive sand movement, paramedics’ response was challenging.

Only one of the six men was transported to a local hospital.

The boat was a complete loss, crumbling into many pieces in the shoreline surf.

No first responder personnel were injured in the incident.


381 confirmed cases of COVID-19 in Newport Beach to date, increase of 134 cases since last Friday

Numbers released by the OC Health Care Agency today, July 5, reflect that there have been 381 confirmed cases of COVID-19 in Newport Beach to date, resulting in the deaths of two Newport Beach residents. This represents an increase of 134 cases since last Friday.

Newport Beach, with a population of 87,180, has a per capita rate of 4.370 cases per thousand residents.

Sadly, the County reports that 366 people have died due to COVID-19, including three deaths received today

According to the County, OC is experiencing “elevated disease transmission,” “increasing hospitalization,” and “limited hospitalization” – with a 12.1 percent increase in the three-day average of hospitalized patients. The County reports a total of 16,854 cumulative cases to date.

The County reports that 663 individuals are currently hospitalized with COVID-19 (includes ICU); 197 are in ICU.

Santa Ana has had 3,342 confirmed cases to date, a net increase of 107 cases today, and 96 deaths. Anaheim has had 3,087 confirmed cases to date, a net increase of 90 cases today, and 91 deaths. Huntington Beach has had 812 confirmed cases to date, a net increase of 34 cases today, and 40 deaths. Costa Mesa has had 458 confirmed cases to date, a net increase of 24 cases today, and three deaths. Irvine has had 509 confirmed cases to date, a net increase of 22 cases today, and five deaths. Laguna Beach has had 70 confirmed cases to date, an increase of one case today.

The age group with the most confirmed cases is 25-34 years old, accounting for 3,714 of the total confirmed cases in the County to date. 

The County estimates 8,350 “recovered cases” according to its data criteria.

For questions about the data presented by the County, call (714) 834-2000 or email This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it..

To view the data dashboard, click here.

Numbers are updated daily by Stu News Newport and reported on our social media pages @StuNewsNewport.

381 confirmed cases 7 5 20 1

381 confirmed cases 7 5 20 2

Click on photos for larger images


COVID-19: County reports 663 additional cases, three deaths

OC Health Care Agency has reported 413 additional cases of COVID-19 in the County today, July 5, following 413 cases reported yesterday, 713 cases on Friday, 652 cases on Thursday, 570 cases on Wednesday, and 779 cases on Tuesday.

Sadly, the County reports that 366 people have died due to COVID-19, including three deaths received today. There have been two deaths of Newport Beach residents.

According to the County, OC is experiencing “elevated disease transmission,” “increasing hospitalization,” and “limited hospitalization” – with a 12.1 percent increase in the three-day average of hospitalized patients. The County reports a total of 16,854 cumulative cases to date.

The County reports that 663 individuals are currently hospitalized with COVID-19 (includes ICU); 197 are in ICU.

Newport Beach has had 381 confirmed cases to date, a net increase of 14 cases today and 134 cases since last Friday, a per capita rate of 4.370 cases per thousand residents.

Santa Ana has had 3,342 confirmed cases to date, a net increase of 107 cases today, and 96 deaths. Anaheim has had 3,087 confirmed cases to date, a net increase of 90 cases today, and 91 deaths. Huntington Beach has had 812 confirmed cases to date, a net increase of 34 cases today, and 40 deaths. Costa Mesa has had 458 confirmed cases to date, a net increase of 24 cases today, and three deaths. Irvine has had 509 confirmed cases to date, a net increase of 22 cases today, and five deaths. Laguna Beach has had 70 confirmed cases to date, an increase of one case today.

The age group with the most confirmed cases is 25-34 years old, accounting for 3,714 of the total confirmed cases in the County to date. 

The County estimates 8,350 “recovered cases” according to its data criteria.

For questions about the data presented by the County, call (714) 834-2000 or email This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it..

To view the data dashboard, click here.

Numbers are updated daily by Stu News Newport and reported on our social media pages @StuNewsNewport.

COVID 19 County 7 5 20 1

COVID 19 County 7 5 20 2

COVID 19 County 7 5 20 3

COVID 19 County 7 5 20 4

Click on photos for larger images

Courtesy of OC Health Care Agency

Orange County COVID-19 case data as of July 5, as reported by the County; click here to visit page that is updated daily


367 confirmed cases of COVID-19 in Newport Beach to date, increase of 120 cases since last Friday

Numbers released by the OC Health Care Agency today, July 4, reflect that there have been 367 confirmed cases of COVID-19 in Newport Beach to date, resulting in the deaths of two Newport Beach residents. This represents an increase of 120 cases since last Friday.

Newport Beach, with a population of 87,180, has a per capita rate of 4.210 cases per thousand residents.

Sadly, the County reports that 363 people have died due to COVID-19, including three deaths received today

According to the County, OC is experiencing “elevated disease transmission,” “increasing hospitalization,” and “limited hospitalization” – with a 12.8 percent increase in the three-day average of hospitalized patients. The County reports a total of 16,191 cumulative cases to date.

The County reports that 594 individuals are currently hospitalized with COVID-19 (includes ICU); 193 are in ICU.

Santa Ana has had 3,235 confirmed cases to date, a net increase of 69 cases today, and 95 deaths. Anaheim has had 2,997 confirmed cases to date, a net increase of 72 cases today, and 89 deaths. Huntington Beach has had 778 confirmed cases to date, a net increase of 24 cases today, and 40 deaths. Costa Mesa has had 434 confirmed cases to date, a net increase of 13 cases today, and three deaths. Irvine has had 487 confirmed cases to date, a net increase of 12 cases today, and five deaths. Laguna Beach has had 69 confirmed cases to date, an increase of two cases today.

The age group with the most confirmed cases is 25-34 years old, accounting for 3,557 of the total confirmed cases in the County to date. 

The County estimates 8,244 “recovered cases” according to its data criteria.

For questions about the data presented by the County, call (714) 834-2000 or email This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it..

To view the data dashboard, click here.

Numbers are updated daily by Stu News Newport and reported on our social media pages @StuNewsNewport.

367 confirmed cases 7 4 20 1

367 confirmed cases 7 4 20 2

Click on photos for larger images


COVID-19: County reports 413 additional cases, three deaths

OC Health Care Agency reported 413 additional cases of COVID-19 in the County today, July 4, following 713 cases reported on Friday, 652 cases on Thursday, 570 cases on Wednesday, and 779 cases on Tuesday.

Sadly, the County reports that 363 people have died due to COVID-19, including three deaths received today. There have been two deaths of Newport Beach residents.

According to the County, OC is experiencing “elevated disease transmission,” “increasing hospitalization,” and “limited hospitalization” – with a 12.8 percent increase in the three-day average of hospitalized patients. The County reports a total of 16,191 cumulative cases to date.

The County reports that 594 individuals are currently hospitalized with COVID-19 (includes ICU); 193 are in ICU.

Newport Beach has had 367 confirmed cases to date, a net increase of 15 cases today and 120 cases since last Friday, a per capita rate of 4.210 cases per thousand residents.

Santa Ana has had 3,235 confirmed cases to date, a net increase of 69 cases today, and 95 deaths. Anaheim has had 2,997 confirmed cases to date, a net increase of 72 cases today, and 89 deaths. Huntington Beach has had 778 confirmed cases to date, a net increase of 24 cases today, and 40 deaths. Costa Mesa has had 434 confirmed cases to date, a net increase of 13 cases today, and three deaths. Irvine has had 487 confirmed cases to date, a net increase of 12 cases today, and five deaths. Laguna Beach has had 69 confirmed cases to date, an increase of two cases today.

The age group with the most confirmed cases is 25-34 years old, accounting for 3,557 of the total confirmed cases in the County to date. 

The County estimates 8,244 “recovered cases” according to its data criteria.

For questions about the data presented by the County, call (714) 834-2000 or email This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it..

To view the data dashboard, click here.

Numbers are updated daily by Stu News Newport and reported on our social media pages @StuNewsNewport.

COVID 19 County 7 4 20 1

COVID 19 County 7 4 20 2

COVID 19 County 7 4 20 3

COVID 19 County 7 4 20 4

Click on photos for larger images

Courtesy of OC Health Care Agency

Orange County COVID-19 case data as of July 4, as reported by the County; click here to visit page that is updated daily


High tides cause flooding on Peninsula

City crews are rebuilding a massive sand berm on the Balboa Peninsula after an unexpectedly strong swell overtopped and eroded the previous sand berm Friday night, flooding streets and parking lots on the Peninsula. 

The new sand berm will be larger and taller to prevent more flooding during Saturday’s high tide in the early evening. The City has brought in additional resources, including personnel and heavy equipment, to rebuild the sand berm by Saturday afternoon, in advance of the high tide. 

On Friday, an unusually high and intense swell overtopped the sand berms in an area from 8th Street to the Wedge. The primary impact was in the Balboa Pier area, and flooding extended to Balboa Boulevard. 

The flooding carried a large amount of trash and debris onto City streets that may take up to a week to clean up. Officials said the priority for this weekend will be addressing the sand berm to help prevent additional flooding, and cleanup will begin next week.

The City had anticipated high surf conditions this weekend, with waves of 5-7 feet. However, Friday’s swell brought unexpected conditions that combined with an extremely high tide to cause the flooding. 

The intense surf conditions also resulted in several water rescues by lifeguards on Friday, and the crash of a 40-foot sailboat in high waves Friday evening. 

City lifeguard officials said the Southern swell brought unusually high-energy wave conditions similar to those of a tsunami, with a continued surge that traveled further and further up the beach with each wave, rather than dissipating between waves and sets of waves. 

All City beaches are closed to the public July 4 and July 5, in alignment with neighboring Orange County beaches.


352 confirmed cases of COVID-19 in Newport Beach to date, increase of 105 cases since last Friday

Numbers released by the OC Health Care Agency today, July 3, reflect that there have been 352 confirmed cases of COVID-19 in Newport Beach to date, resulting in the deaths of two Newport Beach residents. This represents an increase of 105 cases since last Friday.

Newport Beach, with a population of 87,180, has a per capita rate of 4.038 cases per thousand residents.

Sadly, the County reports that 360 people have died due to COVID-19, including six deaths received today

According to the County, OC is experiencing “elevated disease transmission,” “increasing hospitalization,” and “limited hospitalization” – with a 13.1 percent increase in the three-day average of hospitalized patients. The County reports a total of 15,778 cumulative cases to date.

The County reports that 584 individuals are currently hospitalized with COVID-19 (includes ICU); 187 are in ICU. 

Santa Ana has had 3,166 confirmed cases to date, a net increase of 105 cases today, and 95 deaths. Anaheim has had 2,925 confirmed cases to date, a net increase of 107 cases today, and 87 deaths. Huntington Beach has had 754 confirmed cases to date, a net increase of 37 cases today, and 40 deaths. Costa Mesa has had 421 confirmed cases to date, a net increase of 34 cases today, and three deaths. Irvine has had 475 confirmed cases to date, a net increase of 29 cases today, and five deaths. Laguna Beach has had 67 confirmed cases to date, an increase of one case today.

The age group with the most confirmed cases is 25-34 years old, accounting for 3,449 of the total confirmed cases in the County to date. 

The County estimates 8,075 “recovered cases” according to its data criteria.

For questions about the data presented by the County, call (714) 834-2000 or email This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it..

To view the data dashboard, click here.

Numbers are updated daily by Stu News Newport and reported on our social media pages @StuNewsNewport.

352 confirmed cases 7 3 20 1

352 confirmed cases 7 3 20 2

Click on photos for larger images


COVID-19: County reports 713 additional cases, six deaths

OC Health Care Agency reported 713 additional cases of COVID-19 in the County yesterday, July 3, following 652 cases on Friday, 570 cases on Thursday, and 779 cases on Wednesday.

Sadly, the County reports that 360 people have died due to COVID-19, including six deaths received today. There have been two deaths of Newport Beach residents.

According to the County, OC is experiencing “elevated disease transmission,” “increasing hospitalization,” and “limited hospitalization” – with a 13.1 percent increase in the three-day average of hospitalized patients. The County reports a total of 15,778 cumulative cases to date.

The County reports that 584 individuals are currently hospitalized with COVID-19 (includes ICU); 187 are in ICU.

Newport Beach has had 352 confirmed cases to date, a net increase of 18 cases yesterday and 105 cases since last Friday, a per capita rate of 4.038 cases per thousand residents.

Santa Ana has had 3,166 confirmed cases to date, a net increase of 105 cases today, and 95 deaths. Anaheim has had 2,925 confirmed cases to date, a net increase of 107 cases today, and 87 deaths. Huntington Beach has had 754 confirmed cases to date, a net increase of 37 cases today, and 40 deaths. Costa Mesa has had 421 confirmed cases to date, a net increase of 34 cases today, and three deaths. Irvine has had 475 confirmed cases to date, a net increase of 29 cases today, and five deaths. Laguna Beach has had 67 confirmed cases to date, an increase of one case today.

The age group with the most confirmed cases is 25-34 years old, accounting for 3,449 of the total confirmed cases in the County to date. 

The County estimates 8,075 “recovered cases” according to its data criteria.

For questions about the data presented by the County, call (714) 834-2000 or email This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it..

To view the data dashboard, click here.

Numbers are updated daily by Stu News Newport and reported on our social media pages @StuNewsNewport.

COVID 19 County 7 3 20 1

COVID 19 County 7 3 20 2

COVID 19 County 7 3 20 3

COVID 19 County 7 3 20 4

Click on photos for larger images

Courtesy of OC Health Care Agency

Orange County COVID-19 case data as of July 3, as reported by the County; click here to visit page that is updated daily


Nature’s wonders

Natures wonders rocks

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Photo by Michelle Mar (Instagram @msmichellemar) 

On the rocks in Newport Beach


Corona del Mar Chamber seeks volunteers this July 4 for Highway flag display

The Corona del Mar Chamber of Commerce’s Flag Committee is looking for volunteers to place the traditional American Flags up and down Pacific Coast Highway throughout Corona del Mar this July 4th.

Corona del Mar Chamber seeks

Click on photo for a larger image

Courtesy of CdM Chamber of Commerce

(L-R) Danielle Rivas, Renee Pepys Lowe and Michelle Peschel

Set-up time: 6 a.m. Meet in front of the Chamber office at 2855 E. Coast Highway (between Starbucks and the Port Theater), Corona del Mar.

Take-down time: 4:30 p.m. Meet in same location as above.

Please be on time for instructions.

For more information, call 949.300.3068 or email This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it..

Social and sanitary precautions will be taken. The Chamber thanks participants for their volunteerism.


Speak Up Newport to look at how 2020-2021 City budget affects our quality of life

Speak Up Newport (SUN) is holding a special meeting on Wednesday, July 8 from 4-5 p.m. on: “How Will the 2020-2021 Newport Beach City Budget Affect Our Quality of Life?”

Because SUN is currently unable to hold its normal programs at the Civic Center, it will be hosting this fourth in a series of special programs via a Zoom meeting webinar.

Featured speakers include Newport Beach City Manager Grace Leung and Newport Beach City Treasurer Dan Matusiewicz.

Speak Up Newport Grace Leung Speak Up Newport Dan Matsusiewicz

Click on photos for larger images

Photos courtesy of Speak Up Newport

Newport Beach City Manager Grace Leung and Newport Beach City Treasurer Dan Matusiewicz are the featured program speakers

Faced with a $30 million revenue shortfall, the Newport Beach City Council recently adopted the 2020-2021 balanced budget. Topics to be covered include: What cuts were made? How will services be affected? What about police and fire? Will Newport Beach’s quality of life suffer? What plan does the City have if revenues are even lower than projected? What more would be cut? What are the priorities?

Leung became city manager for the City of Newport Beach in September 2018. She is responsible for the City’s day-to-day operations, directing the staff of approximately 730 full-time employees and 450 part-time employees, overseeing the services of 11 departments, and managing an annual operating budget of nearly $210 million. She has more than two decades of experience working in local government, beginning her career with the City of Long Beach and then serving the City of Sunnyvale for 18 years, specializing in municipal finance, budgeting and administration. Leung holds a Bachelor’s degree from Columbia University in Urban Studies and a Master’s degree in Public Policy from the Kennedy School of Government at Harvard University. She is a member of the International City Managers’ Association.

Matusiewicz has more than 30 years of experience in municipal finance and accounting. Before working at the City of Newport Beach, he started his career in public accounting, auditing local governments throughout California. He is currently the Finance Director/Treasurer of the City of Newport Beach overseeing a $300 million annual budget and a $300 million investment portfolio. He is a frequent speaker at local government conferences and webinars including the Government Finance Officers’ Association (GFOA), California Society of Finance Officers (CSMFO), California Municipal Treasurer’s Association (CMTA), Government Investment Officers Association (GIOA), State Association of County Auditors (SACA), California Public Employers Labor Relations Association (CalPELRA) and the CalPERS Education Forum. Matusiewicz is a graduate of the Leavey Business School at Santa Clara University and holds a Bachelor’s of Science degree in Accounting. He is a Certified California Municipal Treasurer (CCMT), a Certified Fixed Income Professional (CFIP) and the current Past-President of the California Municipal Treasurer’s Association (CMTA).

To participate in the free webinar, log in to www.speakupnewport.com/city-budget-2021.

Speak Up Newport (SUN) is a non-profit, non-partisan citizens group organized to promote the common good and general welfare of the Newport Beach community.


Fair Game

By TOM JOHNSON

COVID-19 is everywhere, why not the dictionary?

Tom Johnson Fair Game 2Every year Merriam-Webster adds new words to their dictionary. In 2018 they added more than 1,000 and in 2019 another 640.

The other day I checked and found that COVID-19 has been added in 2020. Rightfully so. I mean, it’s hard to put together a sentence these days without using the word COVID in it.

Merriman-Webster describes COVID as a noun, with a definition of “a mild to severe respiratory illness that is caused by a coronavirus.”

It got me thinking that there are a lot of words that are both nouns and verbs, why not COVID?

For example, balloon, divorce, fish and garden are just some examples of words with both uses. My weight ballooned, but it didn’t stop me from flying my balloon. Or, I fish for fish…I garden in my garden…I divorced again after my divorce.

Why not COVID as a verb?

After all, if you called your doctor and said you’re not feeling well, their first question is probably going to be, “could you have COVID?”

When, in actuality, if you are sick with COVID, why not just call and tell your doctor that “you’re coviding?” It’ll save everyone’s time.

Do me a favor, try it out and let me know how it works.

It’s sad to think that COVID is taking over all about our world.

Just when we thought everything was back to reopening, everything is now closing. Beaches, bars, indoor dining, to name a few. I can only imagine what our restaurant and bar owners must be thinking and can only imagine how they’ll survive?

Things appear to be bad, again, judging by the growing case numbers. There are two camps, wear a mask and don’t wear a mask. I’m in the former.

Of course, following a kidney transplant, fairly recent open heart surgery and various other ailments, including age, who can blame me. 

In my opinion, we all need to heed the advice of the authorities and once again get serious about shutting this recent trend down, that is, until a vaccine is discovered.

I know that everyone wants things back to normal, me too. But caution has to be urged.

• • •

Still on the subject of COVID, I received a warning message from a local Orange County hospital emergency room doctor on Tuesday of this week. It’s very serious.

It reads, “Just got home from a shift. Can’t sleep because I’m still thinking about the healthy 26yo that was intubated on arrival, 10 hours ago in my ED (emergency department). 

“Crashing and burning hard; Resp. Rate=60; O2 Sat=20; Hypotensive.

“People would wear masks if they saw this kid…and knew he is probably going to die.”

The doctor asked friends to spread the word and signed his note, “with sadness.”

• • •

In these awkward times of coronavirus it seems as though almost everything fun to do is closed. No dining out, bars are closed, can’t go to the beach, no summer fair…oh wait, check that. 

The folks behind the Orange County Fair are going to be bringing a “virtual fair” beginning July 17. No, you won’t be able to jump on carnival rides or enjoy that always tasty fair food, but what you will be able to do is a whole bunch of things. 

First off, there will be videos of favorite performers for viewing, special contests, a 5K fun run and more. Say you like to enter their contests, the Fair will offer 33 unique categories with things like “doughmestic” baking, home landscapes, best hen house, and photography categories that will include categories titled “Bedhead, Empty Streets and Essential Workers.”

You’ll also be afforded the opportunity to learn how to make crafts or “get the skinny on making deep-fried Oreos,” take a visit to Centennial Farm, learn a magic trick, find out about new recipes, and even attend a virtual dance party.

Okay, I get it, it’s not like the real thing. But I applaud the Fair staff for their creativity. Check it all out, including contest deadlines, at www.ocfair.com. 

• • •

Congrats are in order for Morgan Christen, the CEO of Spinnaker Investment Group and also their chief investment officer (CIO) and portfolio manager in charge of research and asset allocation. 

He, along with business partner Joe Stapleton, has built an ultra-successful, privately held investment boutique right here in Newport Beach, specializing in portfolio solutions for high-net worth clients.

Morgan has an impressive list of credentials that include, among other things, a B.S. in Finance from the University of Southern California and an MBA from Pepperdine’s Graziadio Business School.

Last week, he was appointed to the Graziadio Board. Quite a feather in his cap, considering Graziadio is one of the top MBA programs nationally.

They’re lucky to have him.

• • •

Happy Fourth! Stay safe.


City of Hope holds mock design sessions for upcoming billion dollar Irvine campus

City of Hope, with a facility in Newport Beach, is building a world-class cancer campus in Orange County for and with the community.

Using cardboard sets that could easily be moved, City of Hope invited more than 500 people to provide feedback on the design of its Irvine cancer campus, part of City of Hope’s plans to invest $1 billion in cancer care in Orange County.

They share the “mock design” sessions on this compelling YouTube video here.


Drive-in concert coming to OC Fair venue

The OC Fair and Autosonic Concerts have announced a two-night summer drive-in concert experience featuring The Fab Four, a local favorite that pays tribute to The Beatles, on Friday, July 31 and Saturday, Aug. 1. 

Both nights will feature two one-hour showtimes at 7 and 9 p.m. The drive-in concert experience is an Autosonic Concerts production and will take place at the OC Fair & Event Center.

The live band will be set up on a stage, and two large video screens will also be available for viewing. 

Here’s how it will work: 

–Guests arrive in vehicles at Gate 1 off of Fair Drive (gate will open one-hour prior to show time).

–Vehicles will then be positioned on a first-come, first-served basis in the general admission area, with oversized vehicles directed to designated areas. Each vehicle will be spaced apart to promote social distancing. 

–Guests will tune in through their FM radio for audio sent directly from the stage (a pre-show presentation will inform ticketholders of the station and instructions, as well as sound advisories).

Guests are encouraged to bring their own snacks and refreshments as no concessions will be available on the fairgrounds. Restrooms will be available with social distancing protocols in place. 

Masks are required for guests who choose to roll down their vehicle windows or use the restrooms. 

Tickets went on sale beginning Wednesday, July 1 at www.autosonicconcerts.com, for $75-$150 per vehicle (up to four guests allowed per vehicle). Pricing: $150 front row, $125 premium oversized vehicle, $125 premium general admission, $100 general admission (behind video screens) and $75 back row oversized vehicle.

OC Fair & Event Center is located at 88 Fair Dr., Costa Mesa.


Exchange Club presents check to benefit family of NBPD Detective Jon Jarema

The Exchange Club of Newport Harbor (ECNH) on Tuesday, June 30 donated $2,000 to the Newport Beach Police Association Charitable Foundation to benefit the family of Detective Jon Jarema. 

Det. Jarema, a 12-year veteran of the Newport Beach Police Department, passed away at the age of 36 on May 9 from a brain tumor. He left behind his wife, Lauren, and 3-year-old twins Jett and Quinn.

Tuesday morning, ECNH President George Lesley and Director David Schapiro presented the check to Sabrina Fabbri, President of the NB Police Association, and Jon Lewis, Newport Beach Chief of Police.

Exchange Club Check presentation

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Courtesy of ECNH

(L-R) Sabrina Fabbri, President of the Newport Beach Police Association, David Schapiro, Director of ECNH, George Lesley, President of ECNH and Jon Lewis, NBPD Chief of Police

ECNH is one of the oldest service organizations in Newport Beach, having served the community for more than 90 years. Its mission includes contributions to active and inactive military and first responders, Americanism projects, academic scholarships and child abuse prevention.

The organization has hosted the Field of Honor for the past 11 years at Castaways Park during the week between Armed Forces Day and Memorial Day each May. 

For membership and donor information, visit www.exchangeclubofnewportharbor.com.


Lido Marina Village is back and thriving

By GARY SHERWIN

Hanging out at a shopping center used to be so ordinary. Now it seems it is a special event.

Like many dads on Father’s Day, I ventured out of the house on a glorious Sunday to savor the sunny weather and a bit of the normalcy that we once took for granted.

We spent some time at Lido Marina Village, which has been an amazing success story since it reopened more than three years ago. Many longtime residents remember the Village’s heyday back in the 70s and 80s when it was the epicenter of the city’s upscale social life, playing home to boutiques, art galleries and nightclubs. 

The Warehouse, a huge Polynesian-themed restaurant, was a signature attraction and comedian Red Skelton, who hosted a popular CBS variety show in the 60s, had a store that sold his clown paintings.

Then for nearly twenty years, the village stood empty and forlorn as multiple property owners couldn’t come together and develop a cohesive future for the property. That is until DJM, a private equity investment firm, came in and purchased all the parcels, reimagined it and created an entirely new experience.

It was hit.

Gary Sherwin

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Courtesy of Visit Newport Beach

Gary Sherwin

Capturing the charm of the property’s history and architecture, DJM brought in luxury boutique retailers and restaurants that embodied an intimate and entirely Newport Beach-centric environment.

Trends in retail weren’t favorable prior to the pandemic and the recent shutdown made matters considerably worse for the industry. Stay-at-home orders forced people accelerate their online purchases, which had been already growing for years.

Some forecasters are anticipating 25,000 stores closing this year nationally and we are already seeing several big players giving up. Pier One Imports, Payless Shoe Stores and Gymboree are already fatalities and several large shopping centers are ghost towns. Other retailers have filed bankruptcy and are looking to reorganize.

That’s on top of the more than 9,500 stores that shut down in 2019.

As we slowly come out of our homes, I wondered how a place like Lido Marina Village was doing in this new world order that has become so Amazon focused.

The answer is that they are doing wonderfully well, thank you.

Marketing Manager Michelle St. Amour said the center has reopened 25 of their 30 stores as well as their five restaurants. Occupancy is at 100 percent and two new businesses have opened in recent weeks.

One of those retailers, LoveShackFancy, based out of New York, reported record-breaking business on its first day.

On Father’s Day, business was brisk just about everywhere with a mix of visitors both old and young, families and singles on dates. St. Amour said foot traffic was comparable to the same period as last year and got there within 21 days of the state’s reopening.

“I think people just want to get outside and enjoy themselves. They want to walk around, try things on, touch them and talk with people,” St. Amour said.

With its Instagram-worthy visuals, Lido is a great example of how retail can survive and prosper in this new digital world. Ultimately, it’s all about the experience.

Amazon is great at transactional retail. You need some socks? Sure, they can scratch your itch. But if you want to see something new by a smaller design-oriented shop, being there in person and literally picking it up is the way to go.

Complement that with an interesting array of dining options, a 47-slip marina with dock and dine capabilities as well as a location with a “laid back lux” personality that just oozes Newport Beach culture, then you get a winning formula.

It also doesn’t hurt to have a tenant like Lido Village Books, one of the last great independent bookstores in the region. They persevered through the tough times when the Lido was essentially empty and then through construction. Now reenergized with a new owner, they are embarking on um, well, a new chapter.

Lido Village Books is also a great metaphor for Lido Marina Village. Sure, you can order a new read on Amazon and get it in your hands in a couple of days. But sometimes it is a more satisfying experience to walk into a space, actually talk with real people and be a part of something memorable.

And today’s wise retailers and developers like DJM know that is the ultimate strategy that will save them in our impersonal online world.


Guest Letter

Robert Braithwaite

As COVID-19 case counts rise, masks or face coverings become more important than ever

Guest Letter Robert Braithwaite

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Courtesy of Hoag Hospital

Hoag Hospital President & CEO Robert Braithwaite

The July 4th weekend presents unique challenges in the fight against COVID-19, and I am writing to thank the community in advance for making the healthy and safe choices that can help us all turn the tide on this pandemic. 

So many communities in Orange County have gotten creative and modified July 4th celebrations, from virtual symphonies to online home decorating “parades.” These acts of civic mindedness are moving and highlight how much we care about one another. 

As you know, cases of COVID-19 are on the rise again throughout the state, and it is more important than ever to adhere to social distancing, mask wearing and handwashing. For people who do venture out in public this weekend, I especially want to reiterate the importance of wearing a mask or face covering, a courtesy and gesture of mutual safety. 

Choosing a mask that fits well or a face covering with a soft fabric will help you stay comfortable while you keep your family, friends, neighbors, and community safe from COVID-19. It does make a difference. For people whose respiratory status is too tenuous for a face covering, please stay home to avoid exposing yourself to any risk. 

Please rest assured that should you become ill or injured, Hoag is here for you. Our hospitals and medical facilities are safe, and our entire staff is committed to keeping you safe. Like many other hospitals, we care for patients with infectious diseases frequently and are well prepared to provide high quality, appropriate care to all patients while ensuring the safety of our staff, patients and visitors. 

Therefore, please do not delay care if you are experiencing potentially life-threatening medical conditions, such as strokes and heart attacks. We are proud of and grateful for our medical staff, nursing staff and the entire organization for continuing to provide the same compassionate and high-quality care for Orange County during the COVID-19 pandemic. 

For some, July 4th will not feel the same without fireworks booming overhead. No doubt that we will miss them. But for the Hoag family, we will celebrate the conscientious acts of personal safety which reduce the spread of the virus amongst neighbors, friends and families. 

Be safe and be well this Independence Day.

Robert Braithwaite is President & CEO of Hoag Memorial Hospital Presbyterian.


Mesa Water District and T2 Tech Group donate computers to nonprofits

Mesa Water District (Mesa Water®), which services parts of Newport Beach, along with long-standing partner, T2 Tech Group, an industry-leading IT consulting, advisory and project management services provider in Los Angeles, have come together to donate more than 70 computers to two Southern California-based nonprofit organizations. The two companies donated 30 laptops to Schools on Wheels, a nonprofit organization that provides free tutoring and mentoring to children whose homelessness prevents them from receiving academic stability, and more than 40 desktop computers to Children’s Bureau, a nonprofit leader in protecting vulnerable children through prevention, treatment and advocacy.

Mesa Water District Mark Lazartin

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Courtesy of Mesa Water District

Mark Lazatin of T2 Tech Group delivering the donated devices to Children’s Bureau

Mesa Water District, which provides high-quality water to businesses and 110,000 Orange County residents and unincorporated areas, provided the gently used, professional quality devices, while the T2 Tech team donated its time and expertise to safely wipe and prepare the computers to be donated in like-new condition. The T2 Tech team also handled prepping, boxing and shipping all of the donated laptops and computers to the two nonprofit organizations.

“As children continue to adjust to distance learning, we understand the importance of technology to stay connected during these times,” said Kevin Torf, managing partner of T2 Tech Group. “The lack of access to computers is an ongoing challenge faced by many nonprofit organizations and the at-risk youth they serve. We specifically sought out these organizations given their respective missions of supporting children during these difficult times and beyond.”

The laptops donated to School on Wheels will be directly distributed to the students it serves across six counties throughout Southern California. The organization uses laptops and other technology resources to better address students’ academic needs and help teach technology skills through its network of online tutors. Meanwhile, the majority of desktops donated to Children’s Bureau will be used by its Los Angeles-based staff to ensure the organization can continue to effectively and efficiently serve at-risk children and their families throughout Los Angeles and Orange Counties.


Newport Beach beaches now closed Saturday and Sunday

All beaches in the City of Newport Beach will be closed Saturday, July 4 and now Sunday, July 5, also in alignment with neighboring city and county beaches. 

On Wednesday, the Newport Beach City Council approved a July 4 beach closure after two seasonal lifeguards employed by the City tested positive for COVID-19, and more than 20 others were placed in quarantine. 

This followed L.A. County’s decision to close beaches over the July 4 weekend, which is traditionally the busiest summer weekend for beach goers throughout Southern California. 

On Thursday, the City added an additional closure on Sunday, July 5 to maintain consistency with beach closures throughout Orange County. The closures apply to Newport Beach’s ocean-facing beaches as well as bay beaches. 

City crews will be setting up barricades, signs and other notifications prior to tonight’s closure at 10 p.m.

Other closures include the Oceanfront Boardwalk to secure access to the beach, beach serving parking lots and the Newport Pier. 

Indoor and outdoor bars are also closed by order of the State Governor, as are indoor restaurants. Restaurants with outdoor seating are permitted to serve dine-in customers.

The City’s Police Department, with support from neighboring public safety agencies, will be maintaining a strong presence near the beaches to enforce the closure. 

In the West Newport safety enhancement zone, fines for violations such as loud music, unruly parties and drinking in public will be increased to as much as triple the usual amount. 

There will be no professional fireworks displays and street parades or festivals on July 4, in alignment with State guidance that restricts large gatherings.

With Orange County experiencing a sharp increase in COVID-19 cases and hospitalizations, City officials are urging the public to act responsibly over the holiday weekend and limit contact to those within their immediate household.


Take Five: Meet Bruce Batcheller, Commodore, American Legion Yacht Club

By AMY SENK

You can take the official fireworks displays out of Newport Beach, but you can’t take the July 4th spirit. Flags and patriotic bunting are everywhere, and some July 4th traditions will carry on, including the Old Glory Boat Parade in Newport Harbor. The American Legion Newport Harbor Post 291 (ALYC), located at 215 15th Street, hosts the annual boat parade, and this year, at least 70 boats are registered to participate. The theme is, “Honoring Our Frontline Heroes.” I caught up with ALYC Commodore Bruce Batcheller to find out more. 

Take Five Meet Bruce Batcheller and wife Debbie

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Photo by Kendall Madsen

ALYC Commodore Bruce Batcheller with his wife, Debbie, who chairs the Club Crew which provides volunteer support for the Club’s activities

Q: I read an article that said the Old Glory Boat Parade first started in the 1950s. Can you tell me more about the event and how it has evolved over the years?

A: It began as the Character Boat Parade sometime in the early-to-mid-1950s. It was supported by the Newport Beach Chamber of Commerce and occurred at various times during the summer. In 1992, the American Legion Yacht Club took on the sponsorship from the Newport Beach Chamber of Commerce. The Old Glory Boat Parade is always held on the Fourth of July with a patriotic theme. Most of the trophies are the same ones carried over from when the Chamber of Commerce sponsored the parade.

Q: What was the craziest or most moving thing that ever happened during the Old Glory Parade?

A: As to crazy, last year we had a large sailboat with a group of guys dancing in speedos. In 2014, when ALYC launched our Dive Club, we had a dedicated boat with a 10-foot-tall inflatable scuba diver on it. The most moving moment recently was in 2019, when one of our members hosted the Bob Hope USO and 25 service members in uniform, including an Air Force Major General. As they cruised past the spectators, they saluted in unison, making it a very powerful image. 

Take Five Meet Bruce Batcheller ALYC boat

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Courtesy of ALYC

A moving experience at the Old Glory Boat Parade last year when one of the ALYC members hosted the Bob Hope USO and 25 service members onboard in uniform, including an Air Force Major General. As they cruised past the spectators, they saluted in unison.

Q: How has COVID-19 affected the Old Glory Parade plans, and the American Legion post in general?

A: It has definitely made planning much more difficult. The American Legion post is now open for limited use, but we have no planned activities. Typically we have bands and a full house to celebrate Independence Day. As to the parade itself, COVID’s effect is mostly about how many people we can safely put on vessels in order to maintain distancing requirements. The parade is the one group activity that creates separation and therefore safety for the public under these unusual circumstances. The Post had to work quickly to adapt a business model to maintain some revenue in order to pay our employees. The team created a Drive-Thru Meal Service program that was an instant hit, providing much needed revenue to keep the restaurant open, and also low-cost meals to support the membership and the community through this crisis.

Q: I have heard people talking about possibly crashing your parade with the Trump flotilla boats. Have your heard this, and how will you handle it?

A: We are aware that there is a group of Trump supporters that plan to be in the harbor. We actually spoke with one of their organizers and asked that they not interfere with the Old Glory Boat Parade timing. They happily obliged and moved their planned cruise to the morning so as not to interfere with the official parade. We typically have a few boats with political flags of one type or another, and to some extent it is inevitable especially in an election year. We encourage all boaters to prioritize this day – our Independence Day – as a statement to what unites us in our country and celebrate our nation’s independence with patriotic displays tied to our flag. The American Legion is strictly apolitical and does not permit political material of any kind on its property or club vessels.

Q: What would you like our readers to know about the American Legion in general, and your post in particular?

A: The American Legion was formed after World War I to create an organization that would work for veterans and has evolved into a full-service organization that not only supports veterans and their families but also provides a place to gather and connect with other veterans. Post 291 in Newport Beach is one of the largest posts in the country, and the only one with its own yacht club. Our beautiful location and full-service restaurant and banquet facilities give us a unique opportunity to reach more veterans looking for a place to socialize and give us more resources to help veterans in need. We also are heavily involved in civic activities in our community, with the Old Glory Boat Parade being one example of the many ways we engage in our community.

~~~~~~~~

Amy Senk is a longtime resident of Corona del Mar and a regular contributor to Stu News Newport.


On the Harbor: The strength of the BCYC Jr. sailing program

By LEN BOSE

There are only a few times in my life where I have used the term “Dream Team” or witnessed it. For me, it was our 2017 Trans Pac Team aboard Horizon, others have included the Miracle on Ice, the 1992 Men’s Olympic Basketball team, Team Oracle 2013 America’s Cup comeback, while in other sports the term dynasty is used. It’s been in the making, over the last couple of years, that the Bahia Corinthian Yacht Club (BCYC) has now produced a “Dream Team/Dynasty” in Junior Sailing programs within our harbor.

This week I had a chance to interview BCYC junior director Aubrey Mayer. Mayer grew up sailing at the end of Long Island at the Orient Yacht Club and Shelter Island Yacht Club sailing Optimist dinghies, lasers & 420s. In high school, he attended the Milton Academy where he met his mentor Charlie Enright, skipper of TP 52 Morning Light in the 2007 Trans Pac, Volvo Ocean Race skipper on Team Alvimedica and Vestas 11th hour Racing. At Milton, they won the High School Team Racing Championships and World Team Racing Championships in 2002 in England. Mayer attended St. Mary’s College where he competed on the sailing team. He then moved on to the 2005 US Sailing team sailing a 470.

The BCYC Jr. sailing program offers instruction for kids ages 5-17. The Starfish program for youth ages 5-7 includes three accredited teachers, two sailing coaches and a lifeguard. “The teachers provide positive stimulation on land followed up with two sailing coaches that take them on the water while fostering that early love for the harbor and the sport while being around the yacht club,” Mayer said.

On the Harbor three guys

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Courtesy of BCYC

(L-R) BCYC’s Aubrey Mayer, Steve Hunt and Christophe Killian

The Novice program is next for ages 8+ with coaches taking care of the kids while teaching them the nuts and bolts of sailing, building confidence for sailing a boat alone.

As the students improve their skills, they move to the Sabot C3 program with lead coach Max Mayol who has achieved many Sabot, Optimist and Laser Radial titles along with High School Keelboat National Championships. Mayol is now sailing at the University of Charleston and has proven to be the perfect person for this job.

Once the students have placed in a C3 Sabot regatta they start moving up into new divisions from C2 through A fleet. BCYC coaching in these divisions includes head coach, Newport Beach Sailing Hall of Fame sailor Mark Gaudio, who won the Jr. Sabot Nationals along with 17 senior sabot nationals; Jake Mayol who is a two-time Sabot Jr. National champion; and Jack Flores, Ryan Simpson and Jack Blackman – all outstanding sailors.

BCYC also offers a 420 racing program with coaches Christophe Killian who grew up near the harbor and was the last local sailor to win the Governor’s Cup and sailed for the College of Charleston. While attending Charleston, Killian won two team racing national championships and two match racing national championships. Teaming up with Killian is Steve Hunt. In 2012, Hunt was named the Sail1 Design Coach of the Year where he highlighted his “Family first, school second, sailing third philosophy,” that he learned at the College of Charleston. Hunt has achieved 11 sailing National Championships and has participated at the highest caliber the sport has to offer.

Thinking about my son, as a parent I asked what can you do for my kid who doesn’t want to compete, yet still wants to go sailing. That’s where the Junior Mariner program fits in with lead coach Berkeley Green and assistant Max Kleha, who is currently the Team Captain on the Mater Dei Sailing Team. The Junior Mariners are focused on seamanship and the love of being on the water. They do destination-type sailing where they will sail to a beach while learning about currents and wind direction.

The quality of the BCYC staff is what separates their programs from the other clubs. “Our staff really cares and makes the extra effort every day,” Mayer shared. Racing results are proving the strength of the staff with very strong results dating back to last season. This year’s Gold Cup BCYC was 1, 2 and 3 in A fleet, 1 and 2 in C2s, 1st and 2nd in C3 and 3rd in C1.

When I asked Mayer where he would like to see the BCYC Jr. program in five years he said, “Just be really effective, all our programs thrive and feed the others. The BCYC program will be noticed around the country for going the extra mile for our students. Our goal is to have people, out of the area, even at their peak want to come to us because we offer the strongest program. We are working hard every day creating a program that people want to take part in and so far, so good...it appears to be working.”

I have to reply “copy to that,” smiling ear to ear while watching my home team grow.

Sea ya!

~~~~~~~~

Len Bose is a yachting enthusiast, yacht broker and harbor columnist for Stu News Newport.


Pacific Symphony presents virtual July 4 spectacular

Celebrating this great nation is a little different this year. Though we’re not able to enjoy the Fourth in the great outdoors, Pacific Symphony invites the worldwide web to join together online for patriotic favorites, fireworks and musical festivities.

Music Director Carl St.Clair has re-imagined the Fourth, creating a streaming 50-minute program that captures the sense of a free-wheeling summer celebration that is a star-spangled 244th birthday party for America. Pacific Symphony’s first-ever virtual Independence Day concert will be available online on July 4 at 6 p.m. Beginning at that time, the concert can be viewed by signing in with an email address at www.pacificsymphony.org/VirtualJuly4 and will be available on demand for 45 days after that.

This July 4th Celebration is dedicated to the frontline healthcare workers, who inspire us with their strength and bravery in caring for their fellow Americans. The program also recognizes two great Americans: Charlie and Ling Zhang, for the countless ways they have supported Pacific Symphony and the advancement of music education. 

Pacific Symphony fireworks

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Courtesy of Pacific Symphony

The grand finale features a spectacular fireworks extravaganza orchestrated to “The Stars and Stripes Forever” by John Philip Sousa

The program, hosted by Music Director Carl St.Clair and Principal Pops Conductor Richard Kaufman, opens with video footage of a rousing rendition of St.Clair conducting Pacific Symphony musicians in “The Star-Spangled Banner” at Angels Stadium last summer. Kaufman conducts John Williams’ “Midway March” from the soundtrack to the classic World War II motion picture Midway. The program continues with “76 Trombones” from Meredith Willson’s The Music Man, and Kaufman will read the results from this year’s Nathan’s Famous Hot-Dog Eating Contest, the traditional annual competition that takes place on Coney Island every Fourth of July.

Selections from Peter Boyer’s “Ellis Island: A Dream of America” follow as well as a musical salute to the armed forces. Renowned country music star, Lee Greenwood, who was the headliner for last season’s popular “Hail to the Heroes” concert, makes a guest appearance with a special message and song selection specifically for Pacific Symphony audiences. 

The concert concludes with a moving mosaic video featuring members of Pacific Chorale and American Feel Young Chorus singing “America the Beautiful,” accompanied by Pacific Symphony, followed by the grand finale: a spectacular fireworks extravaganza orchestrated to “The Stars and Stripes Forever” by John Philip Sousa.


Rouda busy with new legislation to assist businesses and individuals

Tuesday, Representatives Harley Rouda (D-CA) and Brian Mast (R-FL) introduced the bipartisan Helping Businesses Reopen Safely Act of 2020. This legislation would provide a tax credit to small businesses, nonprofits and local governments of up to $25,000 annually to purchase personal protective equipment and other supplies that are crucial to mitigating the spread of COVID-19.

“States and local governments have given shops and restaurants the green light for reopening – but have failed to provide businesses with the resources they need to open safely,” said Rouda. “This crucial legislation would help keep businesses open while protecting the public health of workers, customers, and communities. Small business owners should not be financially penalized for providing safe and clean service.”

Harley Rouda

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Courtesy of the Offices of Harley Rouda

Rep. Harley Rouda (D-CA 48th District)

“Small businesses in our community have been hit hard by the devastating impacts of coronavirus with many being forced to close their doors for months on end. As businesses begin the phased reopening process, we must do more to help them do so in a way that is safe for everyone without creating an additional financial burden,” said Mast. “This legislation will go a long way in helping small businesses reopen their doors and protect our public health in the process.”

On Monday, Congressman Rouda also voted to pass H.R.1425, the Patient Protection & Affordable Care Enhancement Act. This bill would strengthen the Affordable Care Act to lower health care costs and prescription drug prices.

“Even before the coronavirus crisis, Orange County families were struggling to afford health care costs,” said Rouda. “This legislation lowers prescription drug prices, expands coverage, and strengthens protections for people with pre-existing conditions. H.R. 1425 is a common-sense and critical bill to help working families stay healthy during the global pandemic.”

The bill would:

–Negotiate for lower prescription drug prices, so that Americans no longer have to pay more for our medicines than Big Pharma charges for the same drugs overseas.

–Expand coverage, pressing Medicaid expansion hold-out states while restoring the outreach and advertising funding that the Trump Administration has slashed to prevent Americans from learning about the affordable health coverage available to them under the ACA.

–Combat inequity in health coverage faced by communities of color, expanding more affordable coverage to vulnerable populations and fighting the maternal mortality epidemic by requiring states to extend Medicaid or CHIP coverage to new mothers for a full year post-partum.

–Crack down on junk plans & strengthen protections for people with pre-existing conditions, reversing the Trump Administration’s expansion of junk health insurance plans that do not provide coverage for essential medical treatments and drugs and that are allowed to discriminate against people with pre-existing medical conditions. 

In addition to spending time in Washington, Rouda is also running for re-election in November back home here in Orange County. His opponent is Orange County Supervisor Michelle Steel.


What’s open, what’s closed this weekend

City Hall

City Hall and most City facilities will be closed in observance of the Independence Day Holiday on Friday, July 3 and Saturday, July 4.

Newport Beach Library

Closed July 4.

OASIS Senior Center

Remains closed. 

U.S. Post Office

No postal service on Saturday, July 4.

Trash Collection

Since Independence Day falls on Saturday, trash will be collected on normal days with no delays.

Street Sweeping

There will be no street seeping on Friday, July 3.

Banks

Banks are closed on Saturday, July 4; because Friday, July, 3, is not a holiday recognized by the Federal Reserve, banks will be open.

Retail Stores

Most retail stores will be open with normal business hours

–Fashion Island: July 4 hours are 11 a.m.-6 p.m.

–South Coast Plaza: July 4 hours are 11 a.m.-6 p.m.

Beaches

All Newport Beach beaches are closed, including Bay beaches on Saturday and Sunday.

Oceanfront Boardwalk

Closed to secure access to beach.

Newport Pier

Closed.

Beach Served Parking Lots

Closed.

Bars

Closed.

Restaurants

Open for pick-up and takeout, but closed for dine-in services.

What you can’t do on the 4th…or trouble could follow 

Safety Enhancement Zone

The Safety Enhancement Zone (see map below) is effective from 12:01 a.m. on July 4 to 3 a.m. on July 5. Fines within this area are triple the normal amounts during this time frame and can be up to $3,000.

Safety Enhancement Zone

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Courtesy City of Newport Beach

Orange area above denotes designated Safety Enhancement Zone

Loud & Unruly Gatherings Ordinance

Establishes fines for responsible persons and/or property owners that participate in, or are part of, a loud or unruly gathering that requires a police response. Violations are tracked through the issuance of Disturbance Advisement Cards (DACs) and fines increase with each successive offense, which are tripled in the Safety Enhancement Zone on the Fourth of July.

Fireworks Prohibited

It is illegal to possess or use fireworks in the City of Newport Beach. This includes “safe and sane” fireworks such as fountains and sparklers that can be purchased in nearby cities.

Alcoholic Beverages Prohibited in Public Areas

Possessing open containers or drinking alcoholic beverages on streets, sidewalks, or other public areas is prohibited. Violators are subject to citation or arrest.

Water Balloons, Squirt Guns and Garden Hoses

Throwing water balloons or spraying water at pedestrians or vehicles is illegal. Violators are subject to citation or arrest.

Rooftop Hazards

People gathering on rooftops is a safety hazard that may violate building code ordinances. City Building Department inspectors will be working with the Police Department to address those violations.


334 confirmed cases of COVID-19 in Newport Beach to date, increase of 87 cases in the last week

Numbers released by the OC Health Care Agency yesterday, July 2, reflect that there have been 334 confirmed cases of COVID-19 in Newport Beach to date, resulting in the deaths of two Newport Beach residents. This represents an increase of 87 cases in the last week.

Newport Beach, with a population of 87,180, has a per capita rate of 3.831 cases per thousand residents.

Sadly, the County reports that 354 people have died due to COVID-19, including nine deaths received yesterday

According to the County, OC is experiencing “elevated disease transmission,” “increasing hospitalization,” and “limited hospitalization” – with an 11.4 percent increase in the three-day average of hospitalized patients. The County reports a total of 15,065 cumulative cases to date.

The County reports that 556 individuals are currently hospitalized with COVID-19 (includes ICU); 193 are in ICU. 

Santa Ana has had 3,061 confirmed cases to date, a net increase of 107 cases yesterday, and 95 deaths. Anaheim has had 2,818 confirmed cases to date, a net increase of 105 cases yesterday, and 86 deaths. Huntington Beach has had 717 confirmed cases to date, a net increase of 46 cases yesterday, and 40 deaths. Costa Mesa has had 387 confirmed cases to date, a net increase of 26 cases yesterday, and two deaths. Irvine has had 446 confirmed cases to date, a net increase of 27 cases yesterday, and five deaths. Laguna Beach has had 66 confirmed cases to date, an increase of two cases yesterday.

The age group with the most confirmed cases is 25-34 years old, accounting for 3,266 of the total confirmed cases in the County to date. 

The County estimates 7,862 “recovered cases” according to its data criteria.

For questions about the data presented by the County, call (714) 834-2000 or email This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it..

To view the data dashboard, click here.

Numbers are updated daily by Stu News Newport and reported on our social media pages @StuNewsNewport.

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334 confirmed cases 7 3 20 2

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COVID-19: County reports 652 additional cases, nine deaths 

OC Health Care Agency reported 652 additional cases of COVID-19 in the County yesterday, July 2, following 570 cases on Thursday, and 779 cases on Wednesday.

Sadly, the County reports that 354 people have died due to COVID-19, including nine deaths received yesterday. There have been two deaths of Newport Beach residents.

According to the County, OC is experiencing “elevated disease transmission,” “increasing hospitalization,” and “limited hospitalization” – with an 11.4 percent increase in the three-day average of hospitalized patients. The County reports a total of 15,065 cumulative cases to date.

The County reports that 556 individuals are currently hospitalized with COVID-19 (includes ICU); 193 are in ICU. 

Newport Beach has had 334 confirmed cases to date, a net increase of 25 cases yesterday and 87 cases in the last week, a per capita rate of 3.831 cases per thousand residents.

Santa Ana has had 3,061 confirmed cases to date, a net increase of 107 cases yesterday, and 95 deaths. Anaheim has had 2,818 confirmed cases to date, a net increase of 105 cases yesterday, and 86 deaths. Huntington Beach has had 717 confirmed cases to date, a net increase of 46 cases yesterday, and 40 deaths. Costa Mesa has had 387 confirmed cases to date, a net increase of 26 cases yesterday, and two deaths. Irvine has had 446 confirmed cases to date, a net increase of 27 cases yesterday, and five deaths. Laguna Beach has had 66 confirmed cases to date, an increase of two cases yesterday.

The age group with the most confirmed cases is 25-34 years old, accounting for 3,266 of the total confirmed cases in the County to date. 

The County estimates 7,862 “recovered cases” according to its data criteria.

For questions about the data presented by the County, call (714) 834-2000 or email This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it..

To view the data dashboard, click here.

Numbers are updated daily by Stu News Newport and reported on our social media pages @StuNewsNewport.

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Courtesy of OC Health Care Agency

Orange County COVID-19 case data as of July 2, as reported by the County; click here to visit page that is updated daily


Vintage WWII flyover will highlight late afternoon of the 4th

Due to challenges and restrictions faced with COVID-19, the 4th of July around Newport Beach will have a different feel this year.

Parades that normally highlight West Newport and the Mariners community have been canceled. Fireworks shows, that in the past have drawn thousands, are taking a pass. For most people, the holiday will restrict people to customs of the past, like small family backyard barbecues.

Two larger events do remain on the calendar.

The first is a flyover that’s scheduled in the late afternoon of July 4th over Orange County coastal cities, including Newport Beach. The flyover will feature four World War II AT-6 aircraft, courtesy of the Condor Squadron Officer’s and Airmen’s Association.

Vintage WWll AT 6 relics

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Courtesy of the Condor Squadron

Four vintage AT-6 World War II relics will fly over Newport Beach Saturday evening

The Association is a nonprofit organization founded in 1965 by a group of WWII fighter pilots. They maintain a museum at the Van Nuys Airport and the Portal of The Folded Wings Shrine to Aviation at the Valhalla Cemetery in Burbank.

The AT-6, as designated by the United States Army Air Corps, is a single-engine advanced trainer aircraft used to train pilots during World War II and up into the 1970s.

The estimated times, plus or minus a few minutes, are Huntington Beach, 5:25 p.m.; Newport Beach, 5:35 p.m.; Laguna Beach, 5:45 p.m.; Dana Point, 5:50 p.m., and San Clemente, 5:55 p.m.

• • •

Also Saturday will be the Old Glory Boat Parade on the Bay beginning at 1 p.m. This year’s theme is Honoring Our Frontline Heroes.

Vintage WWll Old Glory

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Courtesy of the ALYC

American Legion Yacht Club’s patriot watercraft decked out in red, white and blue is a highlight of the Old Glory Boat Parade

The parade is hosted and organized by the American Legion Yacht Club (ALYC). Decorations are encouraged and awards will be presented for Best Decorated, Outstanding Music, Finest Costumes, Most Creative and the Commodores Award. 

Winners will be announced at a banquet at the ALYC on Sunday, July 19 at 6 p.m.

To register to participate, contact This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. or call 949.673.5002. Registration is free.

• • •

The City of Newport Beach will close City Hall and most City facilities on Friday, July 3 in observance of the holiday. There will also be no street sweeping on Friday. Trash collection will remain on normal schedule with no delays to pick-ups.


Splashing into summer

Splashing into wave

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Photo by Content Savages (Instagram @content_savages)

Wondrous waves in shades of blue


Susan G. Komen® Orange County announces virtual MORE THAN PINK Walk™ 

Susan G. Komen® Orange County, the second largest Komen affiliate in the country, announced that its second annual MORE THAN PINK Walkwill be held virtually on a new date of September 26, 2020. The decision to conduct its signature fundraising event virtually this year was made in the interest of protecting the health and safety of its participants from COVID-19, many of which are breast cancer survivors and those living with the disease.

Registration is free, and participants are encouraged to form teams and fundraise and join a community of compassionate virtual walkers. Leading up to event day, the Komen OC affiliate will curate a virtual community experience that will engage participants, motivate and incentivize fundraising through supported Local Facebook Groups, a National Mobile App, Participant Challenges and Participant Generated Content. 

The opening ceremony on Walk Day will honor survivors and those living with metastatic breast cancer and share in a celebration of participants along with inspiring stories of resilience. 

Susan G. Komen Pink Group

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Courtesy of Susan G. Komen® Orange County

The impact of COVID-19, including rising unemployment, quarantines and an overburdened healthcare system are causing the perfect storm for breast cancer patients who have questions or need care. Funds raised through the Virtual MORE THAN PINK Walkwill address urgent needs in the local breast cancer community, including:

–Patient navigation to reduce systemic, programmatic and social barriers to breast care and services, resulting in improved outcomes for women in Orange County.

–Financial assistance for cost of living expenses for those in active treatment.

–Advocacy for transformative health policies and improved access to affordable, high-quality breast health and cancer care services.

–Breast cancer screening for uninsured or underinsured women in need.

–Virtual educational experiences facilitated by experts to provide critical, timely information related to breast health and COVID-19 and addressing questions and concerns on how to cope with stress and anxiety.

–Lifesaving research and clinical trials to discover new treatments.

–Operational Support in partnership with local breast health organizations to help meet higher demands they are seeing during the COVID-19 pandemic.

“We know that five women in Orange County are diagnosed with breast cancer and one woman dies of the disease every single day. With the current pandemic we are all facing, and the barriers to care that plague so many men and women, our work is more important than ever,” said Megan Klink, CEO of Susan G. Komen Orange County. “The decision to go virtual allows us to care for our immunocompromised brothers and sisters in Orange County who are breast cancer survivors or currently living with the disease. This transition does come with some big changes, but our goals remain the same – to raise critically important funds to support research, access to care, and advocacy and to one day see a world without breast cancer.”

To gear up for the new virtual edition of the MORE THAN PINK Walk, Komen OC will host a virtual kickoff event open to everyone and it’s free to register on July 21 from 5:30-6:15 p.m. Those who register will be entered for a chance to win great giveaways. 

Komen OC supports local patients, caregivers, and survivors with resources including patient navigation, research, wigs, transportation, diagnostics services, education and financial assistance. Community members are encouraged to sign up for free to participate in the 2020 Komen Orange County Virtual MORE THAN PINK Walkas individuals or teams.

For more information on this event, visit www.komenoc.org/walk.

The 2020 Komen Orange County MORE THAN PINK Walkis presented by Bank of America and Walgreens, with sponsors including The Allergan Foundation, ABC7, Kaiser Permanente Orange County, Natrelle, Cox Communications and The District at Tustin Legacy.


COVID-19 strikes local lifeguards, Council follows with vote to close the beaches this weekend

On Wednesday, July 1, the Newport Beach City Council, at an emergency meeting, approved a full closure of all City beaches in Newport Beach on Saturday, July 4, after two seasonal lifeguards tested positive for COVID-19. The beaches will close at 10 p.m. on Friday, July 3 and reopen at 6 a.m. on Sunday, July 5. 

The Council vote also gives City Manager Grace Leung authority to close the beaches on July 3 and/or July 5 if it is deemed necessary. 

Two seasonal lifeguards, employed by the City, have tested positive for COVID-19. Contact tracing confirmed that an additional 21 lifeguards were exposed, and they’ve all been referred for follow-up care, which may include testing and quarantining. 

Concerns over the number of exposed lifeguards prompted Mayor Will O’Neill to call a special council meeting Wednesday. 

The July 4 closure includes beach areas and amenities such as the Oceanfront Boardwalk and Newport Pier. While the majority of beach parking lots will also close, some spaces will remain open for business and restaurant activity. 

The Council’s action followed a number of other closures announced Wednesday by the County of Orange and Governor Newsom’s office, including indoor and outdoor bars, indoor dine-in restaurants, indoor wineries and tasting rooms, indoor family entertainment centers, indoor movie theaters, indoor zoos and museums, and indoor cardrooms. 

Earlier in the week, beaches in Los Angeles and Ventura were announced as closed for the July 4 weekend, due to coronavirus concerns. On Tuesday, the Laguna Beach City Council voted to close their beaches on July 4, with additional closure options for July 3 and 5 with their City Manager.

Governor Newsom also announced Wednesday that state beach parking will be closed, effectively shutting down Huntington Beach.

The end result is that virtually all beaches from Santa Barbara to San Diego will be closed on perhaps the busiest weekend of the summer.


309 confirmed cases of COVID-19 in Newport Beach to date, increase of 14 cases today

Numbers released by the OC Health Care Agency today, July 1, reflect that there have been 309 confirmed cases of COVID-19 in Newport Beach to date, resulting in the deaths of two Newport Beach residents. This represents an increase of 14 cases today, following an increase of 23 cases yesterday.

Newport Beach, with a population of 87,180, has a per capita rate of 3.544 cases per thousand residents.

Sadly, the County reports that 344 people have died due to COVID-19, including five new deaths received today

According to the County, OC is experiencing “elevated disease transmission,” “increasing hospitalization,” and “limited hospitalization.” The County reports a total of 14,413 cumulative cases to date.

The County reports that 542 individuals are currently hospitalized with COVID-19 (includes ICU); 192 are in ICU.

Santa Ana has had 2,954 confirmed cases to date, a net increase of 104 cases today, and 92 deaths. Anaheim has had 2,713 confirmed cases to date, a net increase of 122 cases today, and 85 deaths. Huntington Beach has had 671 confirmed cases to date, a net increase of 34 cases today, and 38 deaths. Costa Mesa has had 361 confirmed cases to date, a net increase of 19 cases today, and two deaths. Irvine has had 419 confirmed cases to date, a net increase of 32 cases today, and five deaths.

The age group with the most confirmed cases is 25-34 years old, accounting for 3,096 of the total confirmed cases in the County to date. 

The County estimates 7,642 “recovered cases” according to its data criteria.

For questions about the data presented by the County, call (714) 834-2000 or email This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it..

To view the data dashboard, click here.

Numbers are updated daily by Stu News Newport and reported on our social media pages @StuNewsNewport.

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309 confirmed cases 7 1 20 2

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COVID-19: County reports 570 additional cases today, five deaths 

OC Health Care Agency has reported 570 additional cases of COVID-19 in the County today, July 1, following 779 cases reported yesterday.

Sadly, the County reports that 344 people have died due to COVID-19, including five new deaths received today. There have been two deaths of Newport Beach residents.

According to the County, OC is experiencing “elevated disease transmission,” “increasing hospitalization,” and “limited hospitalization.” The County reports a total of 14,413 cumulative cases to date.

The County reports that 542 individuals are currently hospitalized with COVID-19 (includes ICU); 192 are in ICU.

Newport Beach has had 309 confirmed cases to date, a net increase of 14 cases today, a per capita rate of 3.544 cases per thousand residents. 

Santa Ana has had 2,954 confirmed cases to date, a net increase of 104 cases today, and 92 deaths. Anaheim has had 2,713 confirmed cases to date, a net increase of 122 cases today, and 85 deaths. Huntington Beach has had 671 confirmed cases to date, a net increase of 34 cases today, and 38 deaths. Costa Mesa has had 361 confirmed cases to date, a net increase of 19 cases today, and two deaths. Irvine has had 419 confirmed cases to date, a net increase of 32 cases today, and five deaths.

The age group with the most confirmed cases is 25-34 years old, accounting for 3,096 of the total confirmed cases in the County to date. 

The County estimates 7,642 “recovered cases” according to its data criteria.

For questions about the data presented by the County, call (714) 834-2000 or email This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it..

To view the data dashboard, click here.

Numbers are updated daily by Stu News Newport and reported on our social media pages @StuNewsNewport.

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Courtesy of OC Health Care Agency

Orange County COVID-19 case data as of July 1, as reported by the County; click here to visit page that is updated daily


295 confirmed cases of COVID-19 in Newport Beach to date, 23 cases reported today

Numbers released by the OC Health Care Agency today, June 30, reflect that there have been 295 confirmed cases of COVID-19 in Newport Beach to date, a net increase of 23 cases today, resulting in the deaths of two Newport Beach residents.

Newport Beach, with a population of 87,180, has a per capita rate of 3.384 cases per thousand residents.

The County reported 779 additional cases of COVID-19 in OC today, marking the highest single-day increase of reported cases to date.

According to the County, OC is experiencing “elevated disease transmission,” “increasing hospitalization,” and “limited hospitalization” – with a 9.7 percent change in the three-day average of hospitalized patients. The County reports a total of 13,843 cumulative cases to date.

Sadly, the County reports that 340 people have died due to COVID-19, including 10 new deaths received today. 175 of those who have died were skilled nursing facility residents; three were individuals experiencing homelessness.

The County reports that 510 individuals are currently hospitalized with COVID-19 (includes ICU); 176 are in ICU.

Santa Ana has had 2,850 confirmed cases to date, a net increase of 116 cases today, and 89 deaths. Anaheim has had 2,591 confirmed cases to date, a net increase of 128 cases today, and 84 deaths. Huntington Beach has had 637 confirmed cases to date, a net increase of 44 cases today, and 38 deaths. Costa Mesa has had 342 confirmed cases to date, a net increase of 22 cases today, and two deaths. Irvine has had 387 confirmed cases to date, a net increase of 22 cases today, and five deaths.

The age group with the most confirmed cases is 25-34 years old, accounting for 2,943 of the total confirmed cases in the County to date. 

The County estimates 7,423 “recovered cases” according to its data criteria.

For questions about the data presented by the County, call (714) 834-2000 or email This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it..

To view the data dashboard, click here.

Numbers are updated daily by Stu News Newport and reported on our social media pages @StuNewsNewport.

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295 confirmed cases 6 30 20 2

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COVID-19: County reports 779 additional cases today, “elevated disease transmission,” “increasing hospitalization,” and “limited hospital capacity”

OC Health Care Agency has reported 779 additional cases of COVID-19 in the County today, June 30, marking the highest single-day increase of reported cases to date.

According to the County, OC is experiencing “elevated disease transmission,” “increasing hospitalization,” and “limited hospitalization” – with a 9.7 percent change in the three-day average of hospitalized patients. The County reports a total of 13,843 cumulative cases to date.

Sadly, the County reports that 340 people have died due to COVID-19, including 10 new deaths received today. There have been two deaths of Newport Beach residents.

175 of those who have died were skilled nursing facility residents; three were individuals experiencing homelessness.

The County reports that 510 individuals are currently hospitalized with COVID-19 (includes ICU); 176 are in ICU.

Newport Beach has had 295 confirmed cases to date, a net increase of 23 cases today, a per capita rate of 3.384 cases per thousand residents. 

Santa Ana has had 2,850 confirmed cases to date, a net increase of 116 cases today, and 89 deaths. Anaheim has had 2,591 confirmed cases to date, a net increase of 128 cases today, and 84 deaths. Huntington Beach has had 637 confirmed cases to date, a net increase of 44 cases today, and 38 deaths. Costa Mesa has had 342 confirmed cases to date, a net increase of 22 cases today, and two deaths. Irvine has had 387 confirmed cases to date, a net increase of 22 cases today, and five deaths.

The age group with the most confirmed cases is 25-34 years old, accounting for 2,943 of the total confirmed cases in the County to date. 

The County estimates 7,423 “recovered cases” according to its data criteria.

For questions about the data presented by the County, call (714) 834-2000 or email This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it..

To view the data dashboard, click here.

Numbers are updated daily by Stu News Newport and reported on our social media pages @StuNewsNewport.

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Courtesy of OC Health Care Agency

Orange County COVID-19 case data as of June 30, as reported by the County; click here to visit page that is updated daily


Cox Charities surprises 10 deserving high school seniors on a video call with scholarships

It was a day of anticipation as Cox Charities Advisory Board members signed onto a video call to surprise high school seniors with scholarships to help defray college costs. Due to state and national social distancing recommendations to slow the spread of COVID-19, Cox Charities opted to virtually announce 10 recent high school graduates from Orange County and Palos Verdes as the 2020 Cox Scholars recipients. 

This year, Cox Charities awarded a total of $32,500 in scholarships to 10 students in the amounts. Charities is the philanthropic arm of Cox Communications and is funded by employee donations, matched by Cox, and overseen by an advisory board consisting of employees who volunteer their time. The donations are used to support the community in the form of scholarships and nonprofit grants. Statewide, Cox Charities has awarded more than $1.7 million in scholarships to date.

Cox Charities Kalya Lihardo

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Submitted photo

Kayla Lihardo was named a 2020 Cox Scholar; she will attend Duke University

 “This year has been unprecedented in so many ways for our graduating high school seniors, and we’re excited to bring them some good news during this challenging time,” said Sam Attisha, Senior Vice President and Region Manager for Cox Communications in California. “These 2020 Cox Scholars are so deserving of these scholarships, and Cox and our employees are proud to recognize all of their hard work and accomplishments.”

Cox Charities Advisory Board members invited students to participate in video calls to learn about their post-graduation plans and what a scholarship would mean to them. The students were unaware at the start of the calls that they had already been selected as Cox Scholars and were surprised and excited to learn that Cox would be awarding each of them with a scholarship for college. 

“On behalf of the Orange County Department of Education, I want to express my gratitude to Cox Charities and its employees for funding the dreams of 10 exemplary students,” said Orange County Superintendent Dr. Al Mijares. “The 2020 Cox Scholars have demonstrated a commitment to academic excellence and community service. While we are proud to celebrate their successes today, we know their greatest achievements are yet to come.”

Cox Charities surprises Avery Klauke

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Submitted photo

Avery Klauke was named a 2020 Cox Scholar; she will attend University of California, Berkeley

This 2020 Cox Scholars for the Orange County and Palos Verdes regions are: Casey Gallagher, Tustin High School, attending the University of Southern California, Santa Barbara; Chloe Gonzalez, Palos Verdes High School, hopes to pursue a degree in mathematics this fall with the intention of following a career in education; Erica Hsueh, Northwood High School, attending Princeton University; Aidan Kelly, Tesoro High School, plans to study aerospace engineering; Avery Klauke, University High School, attending the University of California, Berkeley; Kayla Lihardo, University High School, attending Duke University; Anton Lok, Palos Verdes High School, attending Stanford University; Mary Norman, Foothill High School, attending Cal Poly San Luis Obispo; Alyssa Simmons, Laguna Hills High School, attending Loyola Marymount University; and Maxwell Tumbrello, San Clemente High School, plans to study engineering in the fall.

Cox Charities awards college scholarships to graduating high school seniors across our California service areas, including Orange County, Palos Verdes, San Diego and Santa Barbara. These Cox Scholars are pursuing careers in a STEM related field with a passion for giving back to their community.  For more information on the Cox Scholars program, visit www.coxcharitiesca.org.


One of country’s top lawyers to discuss recent Supreme Court decisions at Chamber’s WAKE UP! Newport

The Newport Beach Chamber of Commerce presents UCI Chancellor’s Professor of Law and Political Science, Richard Hasen, at the organization’s July WAKE UP! Newport meeting. Hasen will provide an analysis of recent U.S. Supreme Court decisions.

The meeting is free to the public and will take place on Zoom at 9 a.m. on Thursday, July 2.

Hasen is a nationally recognized expert in election law and campaign finance regulation, writing as well in the areas of legislation and statutory interpretation, remedies and torts. He is co-author of leading casebooks in election law and remedies.

One of Richard Hasen

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Courtesy of Newport Beach Chamber of Commere

Richard Hasen

From 2001-2010, he served (with Dan Lowenstein) as founding co-editor of the quarterly peer-reviewed publication Election Law Journal. He is the author of more than 100 articles on election law issues, published in numerous journals including the Harvard Law Review, Stanford Law Review and Supreme Court Review. He was elected to The American Law Institute in 2009 and serves as reporter (with Professor Douglas Laycock) on the ALI’s law reform project: Restatement (Third) of Torts: Remedies. 

Professor Hasen was named one of the 100 most influential lawyers by The National Law Journal in 2013, and one of the Top 100 Lawyers in California in 2005 and 2016 by the Los Angeles and San Francisco Daily Journal.

He holds a B.A. degree (with highest honors) from UC Berkeley, and a J.D., M.A., and Ph.D. (Political Science) from UCLA. After law school, Hasen clerked for the Honorable David R. Thompson of the United States Court of Appeals for the Ninth Circuit, and then worked as a civil appellate lawyer at the Encino firm Horvitz and Levy.

From 1994-1997, Hasen taught at the Chicago-Kent College of Law and from 1998-2011 he taught at Loyola Law School, Los Angeles, where he was named the William H. Hannon Distinguished Professor of Law in 2005. He joined the UC Irvine School of Law faculty in July 2011 and is a faculty member of the UC Irvine Jack W. Peltason Center for the Study of Democracy.

To make reservations to participate, go here.


Rock slide closes Back Bay Drive to all

Back Bay Drive, between East Bluff and San Joaquin Hills Road, is closed to vehicles, bicyclists and pedestrians until further notice. A rock slide, from a private slope, occurred and spilled onto the roadway.

City staff is communicating with the property owner and will monitor their investigation and any necessary work to stabilize the slope. 

Cleanup and roadway reopening will occur once the slope’s stability is confirmed.


272 confirmed cases of COVID-19 in Newport Beach to date, two deaths

Numbers released by the OC Health Care Agency yesterday, June 29, reflect that there have been 272 confirmed cases of COVID-19 in Newport Beach to date, a net increase of 19 cases yesterday, resulting in the deaths of two Newport Beach residents.

Newport Beach, with a population of 87,180, has a per capita rate of 3.120 cases per thousand residents.

According to the County, OC is experiencing “elevated disease transmission,” “increasing hospitalization,” and “limited hospitalization” – with an 11.6 percent change in the three-day average of hospitalized patients. The County reports an increase of 456 cases received yesterday, and a total of 13,064 cumulative cases to date.

Sadly, the County reports that 330 people have died due to COVID-19, including four new deaths received yesterday. 171 of those who have died were skilled nursing facility residents; two were individuals experiencing homelessness.

Santa Ana has had 2,734 confirmed cases to date, a net increase of 76 cases yesterday, and 86 deaths. Anaheim has had 2,463 confirmed cases to date, a net increase of 71 cases yesterday, and 83 deaths. Huntington Beach has had 593 confirmed cases to date, a net increase of 21 cases yesterday, and 37 deaths. Costa Mesa has had 320 confirmed cases to date, a net increase of 18 cases yesterday, and two deaths. Irvine has had 365 confirmed cases to date, a net increase of 17 cases yesterday, and five deaths.

The age group with the most confirmed cases is 25-34 years old, accounting for 2,739 of the total confirmed cases in the County to date. 

The County estimates 7,193 “recovered cases” according to its data criteria.

For questions about the data presented by the County, call (714) 834-2000 or email This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it..

To view the data dashboard, click here.

Numbers are updated daily by Stu News Newport and reported on our social media pages @StuNewsNewport.

272 reported cases of COVID 19 1 6 29 20

272 reported cases of COVID 19 2 6 29 20

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COVID-19: County reports “elevated disease transmission,” “increasing hospitalization,” and “limited hospital capacity”

According to the OC Health Care Agency, Orange County is experiencing “elevated disease transmission,” “increasing hospitalization,” and “limited hospitalization” – with an 11.6 percent change in the three-day average of hospitalized patients. The County reports an increase of 456 cases received yesterday, June 29, and a total of 13,064 cumulative cases to date.

Sadly, the County reports that 330 people have died due to COVID-19, including four new deaths received yesterday. There have been two deaths of Newport Beach residents.

171 of those who have died were skilled nursing facility residents; two were individuals experiencing homelessness.

The County reports that 485 individuals are currently hospitalized with COVID-19 (includes ICU); 175 are in ICU.

Newport Beach has a cumulative case count of 272 confirmed cases to date, a net increase of 19 cases yesterday, a per capita rate of 3.120 cases per thousand residents. 

Santa Ana has had 2,734 confirmed cases to date, a net increase of 76 cases yesterday, and 86 deaths. Anaheim has had 2,463 confirmed cases to date, a net increase of 71 cases yesterday, and 83 deaths. Huntington Beach has had 593 confirmed cases to date, a net increase of 21 cases yesterday, and 37 deaths. Costa Mesa has had 320 confirmed cases to date, a net increase of 18 cases yesterday, and two deaths. Irvine has had 365 confirmed cases to date, a net increase of 17 cases yesterday, and five deaths.

The age group with the most confirmed cases is 25-34 years old, accounting for 2,739 of the total confirmed cases in the County to date. 

The County estimates 7,193 “recovered cases” according to its data criteria.

For questions about the data presented by the County, call (714) 834-2000 or email This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it..

To view the data dashboard, click here.

Numbers are updated daily by Stu News Newport and reported on our social media pages @StuNewsNewport.

COVID 19 County 1

COVID 19 County 2

COVID 19 County 3

COVID 19 County 4

COVID 19 County 5

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Courtesy of OC Health Care Agency

Orange County COVID-19 case data as of June 29, as reported by the County; click here to visit page that is updated daily


Fair Game

By TOM JOHNSON

Tree injunction fails, but 300+ small businesses receive COVID-19 grant help

Tom Johnson Fair Game 2Trees or no trees, that is the question. Well, I guess that’s really not the question because most of the trees in question are now gone at Ensign Intermediate School. Still, attorney Phil Greer was in Orange County Superior Court yesterday pushing to obtain an injunction on remaining aspects of “Treegate” versus the Newport-Mesa School District’s overall campus project.

The court, however, ruled against Greer’s case. Greer said, “basically, the court believes that, based upon the complaint as it currently exists (a single action for declaratory relief, which is what was needed to get into court on such short notice) that we would not prevail at trial. Unfortunately, the court’s reasoning is rational.”

Two trees in question remain standing, but they would appear to be on the chopping block as early as today with no injunction. 

Last week, much to the dismay of many nearby residents, a number of trees were cut down that fronted Cliff Drive.

What’s next? I’m told the opposition side to the cutting of trees, with Greer’s help, could look to amend and/or expand their present complaint and possibly seek to shut down the entire project from moving forward.

Time will tell.

Fair Game Tipuana Fair Game Eucalyptus

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Photos by Lana Johnson

An exotic Tipuana and a Eucalyptus appear to be on the chopping block

• • •

Deputy City Manager Tara Finnigan released some pretty impressive numbers yesterday in relationship to the City’s small business grants program for COVID-19 relief.

First off, more than 300 small businesses will receive grants ranging from $5,000 to $10,000 to help them reopen and, hopefully, help recover from the pandemic’s impacts. Money to fund the program came from the approximately $2.1 million in federal CARES Act funds that the City received from the County of Orange.

The money was specifically targeted to small businesses that faced business interruptions and/or suffered from the statewide stay-at-home order.

After voting to approve receiving the funds in early June, the City Council approved an open application period from June 12 through June 16. More than 900 small businesses applied.

With guidance from the Orange County Small Business Development Center (OC SBDC), the applications were sorted through and the recipients selected.

It was the highest response rate of any grant or loan program that OC SBDC, a nonprofit organization, has ever administered.

• • •

Speaking of the pandemic, what does the City leadership in Newport Beach do when there’s a $30 million budget shortfall anticipated? Two of our best, City Manager Grace Leung and City Finance Director/Treasurer Dan Matusiewicz, will tackle that issue at the next Speak Up Newport, scheduled for Wednesday, July 8, from 4-5 p.m. on Zoom. More details, along with how to register, are elsewhere in today’s Stu News Newport.

• • •

Very excited to announce that Newport Beach landmark restaurant Billy’s at the Beach is joining the ranks as a new Stu News Newport advertiser. 

Now, most people begin advertising with us in the attempt to draw in more people into their establishment. Not the case here. Not yet, anyway. 

Here’s the deal. Billy’s is taking advantage of these unique pandemic times to do some remodeling. The Joneses, Ted and Asia, promise me it’s going to be good.

Their plan is to have a grand reopening toward the end of July. But, I promise you that when the work is done, the best Mai Tai around will be waiting to quench your thirst, complete with one of the great views of our Bay.

We’ll keep you posted.

• • •

My congrats to the Brenda McCroskey Team for their national recognition by America’s Best Real Estate Professionals who ranked them in the top 25 percent of the Top 1000 Small Teams in the United States by volume in 2020. 

No small feat.

One day later, following the announcement, that same team released a statement that they sold another CdM property for some $2.6 million, with a 14-day escrow.

It’s good to be good!

McCroskey and team are part of Compass.

• • •

The Democratic Club of OC wants the name of the airport to change, so they’ve organized a petition and are in the process of gathering signatures. 

They also want John Wayne’s statue removed from its spot smack dab in the center of the airport. 

I thought in today’s world that when you wanted a statue removed, you just got a bunch of people together and tore it off its mount. Asking for a friend.


Inside the Edge to present Dr. Joel Levey on navigating change

The Inside Edge Foundation for Education is holding an online event on Wednesday, July 1 from 9-11 a.m. Titled “Living in Balance in VUCA Times,” the featured speaker is Dr. Joel Levey, an internationally recognized master of navigating change.

As our lives, country and world become ever more turbulent and disrupted in these “VUCA” times of increasing Volatility, Uncertainty, Complexity and Ambiguity, it is becoming clear that to thrive, returning to “business as usual” would be both unwise and insufficient. Learning wiser ways to embody an evolutionary approach to realizing our “extra-ordinary” human potentials and helping others to do the same is essential.

Dr. Levey has crafted a new and unique presentation packed full of insights, inspiration and practical tools to share. Participants will be guided to explore and experience a variety of ways they can increase their change resilience and live In balance. Learn how you can help yourself and those you love to adapt with tips and tools to thrive in these challenging times. Dr. Levey will include a mix of visual presentation, personal reflection inquiry, breakout session, group sharing and Q&A time. There will be an hour presentation first, followed by a breakout session/discussion for those able to stay the full two hours.

Along with his wife, Michelle, Dr. Levey is the co-founder of Wisdom at Work, and is recognized as a global pioneer introducing change resilience, contemplative science, mind-fitness, mindfulness and collective wisdom into mainstream organizations around the globe for nearly 50 years. His work has inspired leaders in hundreds of leading organizations worldwide.

To get tickets ($25), go here. Use Promo Code “July2020” for $10 off.


OC Democratic Party circulating petition for JWA name change

There’s a move afoot, led by the Democratic Party of Orange County, to remove John Wayne’s name from Orange County’s airport. The group is currently circulating an online petition effort to do so.

In social media posts, the Democratic Party of OC cites comments from Wayne made in a 1971 Playboy magazine interview. One comment listed that is attributed to Wayne says: “I believe in white supremacy...I don’t feel guilty about the fact that five or 10 generations ago these people were slaves.”

Wayne is perhaps Newport Beach’s most famous resident. Additionally, he was one of Hollywood’s top box office draws for three decades, a recipient of the Presidential Medal of Freedom, the Naval Heritage Award and was also pursued by Republican backers to run for national office in 1968.

What the name removal effort doesn’t mention is the sentence that immediately precedes what is cited as his offending quote: “With a lot of blacks, there’s quite a bit of resentment along with their dissent, and possibly rightfully so.”

Another issue against Wayne points to his comments in the same interview referring to American Indians. “I don’t feel we did wrong in taking this great country away from the Indians. Our so-called stealing of this country from them was just a matter of survival. There were great numbers of people who needed new land, and the Indians were selfishly trying to keep it for themselves.”

Michelle Steel, currently an Orange County Supervisor and a candidate for the 48th Congressional seat in November, said in a statement: “John Wayne led the movement to make Orange County home to Vietnamese refugees, he was an ardent supporter of our men and women in uniform, and his family foundation has been a national leader in cancer research.

“As an immigrant to our country, I am extremely sensitive to the actions and statements of people who perpetuate and make racist statements. The comments by John Wayne from 50 years ago are wrong and sad from someone who so many people across America hold in high regard. 

“While I have experienced racism first-hand, I do believe that a person should be judged on the totality of their actions and contributions to society which is why I support keeping the name John Wayne Airport,” added Steel.

Rep. Harley Rouda (D-48th District), who as the incumbent will face Steel in this November’s congressional race, said, “Our community, particularly our airport, should be welcoming to all. It is clear that John Wayne’s legacy is one riddled with offensive comments and bigoted beliefs. I support the first amendment rights of Orange County community members who are questioning the status quo. As our nation progresses and seeks to rectify generations of injustice – revisiting the sins of our past is an important conversation. I hope the Orange County Board of Supervisors listens to and respects residents’ concerns.”

Other than JWA, Wayne’s name is also attached to the John Wayne Cancer Foundation whose “investments in research have resulted in groundbreaking treatments and the establishment of a cancer institute in Santa Monica.”

You can read Wayne’s 1971 Playboy interview in its entirety here.

The petition for the removal of Wayne’s name is available here.

The petition against renaming the airport is available here.


Making a splash

Making a wave

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Photo by Michelle Mar (Instagram @msmichellemar)

Summer is looking good on our local shoreline


Path to paradise

Path to water

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Photo by Michelle Mar (Instagram @msmichellemar) 

Right this way to more beauty in Newport Beach


Vintage WWII flyover will highlight late afternoon of the 4th

Due to challenges and restrictions faced with COVID-19, the 4th of July around Newport Beach will have a different feel this year.

Parades that normally highlight West Newport and the Mariners community have been canceled. Fireworks shows, that in the past have drawn thousands, are taking a pass. For most people, the holiday will restrict people to customs of the past, like small family backyard barbecues or perhaps a day out to the beach, with proper social distancing, of course.

Two larger events do remain on the calendar.

The first is a flyover that’s scheduled in the late afternoon of July 4th over Orange County coastal cities, including Newport Beach. The flyover will feature four World War II AT-6 aircraft, courtesy of the Condor Squadron Officer’s and Airmen’s Association.

Vintage WWll AT 6 relics

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Courtesy of the Condor Squadron

Four vintage AT-6 World War II relics will fly over Newport Beach Saturday evening

The Association is a nonprofit organization founded in 1965 by a group of WWII fighter pilots. They maintain a museum at the Van Nuys Airport and the Portal of The Folded Wings Shrine to Aviation at the Valhalla Cemetery in Burbank.

The AT-6, as designated by the United States Army Air Corps, is a single-engine advanced trainer aircraft used to train pilots during World War II and up into the 1970s.

The estimated times, plus or minus a few minutes, are Huntington Beach, 5:25 p.m.; Newport Beach, 5:35 p.m.; Laguna Beach, 5:45 p.m.; Dana Point, 5:50 p.m., and San Clemente, 5:55 p.m.

• • •

Also Saturday will be the Old Glory Boat Parade on the Bay beginning at 1 p.m. This year’s theme is Honoring Our Frontline Heroes.

Vintage WWll Old Glory

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Courtesy of the ALYC

American Legion Yacht Club’s patriot watercraft decked out in red, white and blue is a highlight of the Old Glory Boat Parade

The parade is hosted and organized by the American Legion Yacht Club (ALYC). Decorations are encouraged and awards will be presented for Best Decorated, Outstanding Music, Finest Costumes, Most Creative and the Commodores Award. 

Winners will be announced at a banquet at the ALYC on Sunday, July 19 at 6 p.m.

To register to participate, contact This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. or call 949.673.5002. Registration is free.

• • •

The City of Newport Beach will close City Hall and most City facilities on Friday, July 3 in observance of the holiday. There will also be no street sweeping on Friday. Trash collection will remain on normal schedule with no delays to pick-ups.


10th annual Project Access golf tournament raises $95,000, thanks to sponsor generosity

Nonprofit Project Access, founded by Jonathan B. Webb and Bill Hirsch of Newport Beach-based Affordable Housing Access, Inc., announced that the 10th Annual Project Access Charity Golf Tournament had to be canceled because of COVID-19. 

With the generosity of sponsors, the event still raised $95,000 for the organization that has programs and services for low- and moderate-income (LMI) apartment community residents.

10th annual Project Access

Courtesy of Project Access

(L-R) Shawn Boyd, David McKenzie, Anna Stanger and Danuel Stanger participating in last year’s Project Access Charity Golf Tournament

Again this year, Bridge Investment Group was the Hole in One Title Sponsor. Birdie sponsors were Affordable Housing Access, the Crean Foundation and the Danna Foundation. Par Sponsors included Guardian Construction, Highridge Costa, the Jerome A. Fink Foundation, Nautilus Affordable Housing, LLC and Regis-Stack Partners. Driving Range Sponsors were the C.V. and L. D. Young Family Foundation, Precise Construction Renovations and Related. Tee Sponsors were MFRG-ICON Construction, One Call Construction Services, LLC and Orix Real Estate Capital.

 “We’d like to thank all of our early sponsors, whose support has been critical to help us swiftly respond to our residents’ increased needs as a result of the pandemic,” said Project Access CEO and President Kristin Byrnes of Newport Beach. “Thank you to our golf committee for their leadership and service including Chairman Danuel Stanger, Chairman Emeritus James R. Reed, Shawn Boyd and Matt DeGraw.” 

Project Access strives to be the leading provider of vital on-site health, education and employment services to families, children and seniors living in affordable housing communities. Its goal is to help keep family members employed, children in school and seniors active.

For more information about Project Access, visit www.project-access.org.


Remembering Newport Elementary

By DUNCAN FORGEY

“Memory is the Diary that we all carry with us” –Oscar Wilde

Standing proud as the local “Parthenon,” Newport Elementary School has been the center for a free flowing and ocean-influenced education since 1936.  Designed by Balboa Island architect Donald B. Kirby, it was built as earthquake safe as possible. Because it sits on the doorstep of the planet’s largest ocean, early attendees were initiates and the first to receive the school’s unique blend of learning.

While learning reading, writing and arithmetic, students gained experience and insights unavailable to others. Over its many years, principals, teachers and parents dealt with influences of something far greater than simply providing an education – the Pacific Ocean.

When waves pounded the beach sending energy through the sand like mini earthquakes, or when powerful winds blew across the blacktop with the sand feeling like shotgun pellets, when a dead whale rolled ashore, when a grounded boat was pummeled by ocean waves, or when a mysterious invasion of giant squid, jellyfish or other sea creatures appeared, students were handed opportunities unavailable in the classroom.

Remembering Newport Elementary third grade class

Courtesy of Duncan Forgey

A beloved photo of a third grade class at Newport Elementary

Recess, a favorite “class” among youngsters, was fun, but also extremely important in a child’s growth. It created a social melting pot on an oceanfront unique to only our small seaport. The greatest connection on the playground was the vast ocean that lay directly in front of them. Every day, students went to the beach and often acted as if they had salt water in their veins instead of blood.

Knowledge and education was provided by “old fashioned” teachers using structure and order as the base of their lesson plans. At every opportunity, they taught the A, B, Cs, math, science and history alongside values, attitude and hope.

The school’s influence has outlived economic booms and financial downturns including the Great Depression. It stood at the forefront of a possible Japanese invasion during World War II when local militia scouted the ocean for submarines or balloon bombs. Newport El was the target for storms, hurricanes and tsunamis, plus withstanding countless earthquakes. Students experienced constant shifts in the Newport Beach’s culture, business trends and financial growth. Throughout it all, Newport Beach Elementary School and its loyal student body easily stood with McFadden’s Wharf, the Balboa Pavilion and Beek’s Balboa Island Ferry as a true gem of Newport Beach history.

Physical growth patterns in children have been the same since time eternal.  Youth mature from infancy to adolescence like a weed in a wet garden.

However with time, changes do occur. Each generation faces new influences and challenging temptations that are unique to their era. Whether it was the blue collar kids of Newport’s pioneer years, the “Greatest Generation” who lived through World War II and the Great Depression, multitudes of Baby Boomers, the tech-savvy Millennials and most recently Generation Z, they all have or will be instrumental in turning what was once nothing more than a sand pit into a bustling city.

For decades, soaring seagulls and cruising pelicans have looked down upon the school and seen kids, dressed in T-shirts and cute dresses as they frolic about the blacktop with arms flailing and smiles flaring. No matter the year, it seems as if these lucky children expel every bit of energy from their hyperactive minds and bodies.

“Boomers” became a bridge between small town Newport and big city Newport. Living under “old school” traditions as portrayed on television’s Ozzie and Harriet or Leave It to Beaver, they lived a fine line between right and wrong.

Dr. Spock and the old adage “boys will be boys” created excuses for male behavior while pigtailed girls were being programmed “not to be like the boys.” This, a far cry from today’s Generation Z’s, where almost everything is equal among the sexes.

Remembering Newport Elementary exterior

Courtesy of Gil Lukousky

A nostalgic shot of Newport Elementary

Every Newport El student’s first memory is the “drop off.” Kindergarten tears flowed, finding one alone in a decorated room full of strangers. In the beginning, these youngsters experienced numerous meltdowns, wet underpants and other toddler oddities. Being the youngest people on campus, the first seven days at school was sort of a hell week when a young child’s life changed forever.

Teachers were mostly women and they looked a lot like Mayberry’s Aunt Bee on The Andy Griffith Show. Learning experiences did not come only out of the Dick and Jane reader. Our educators were pros and knew when Principal Bernice Vestal walked the halls like a four-star general.

Intense foursquare and tetherball battles raged in days when these were of high importance. Physicality, technique and strength were harbingers of success as little boy juices boiled over like a whistling tea kettle. In the 1950s, larger-than-life girls risked the moniker of Tomboy when stepping up and beating the boys at their own game and sending an embarrassed loser to the back of the line. Yes, there were definite winners and losers in the old school.

Waving like leaves in the wind, girls hung from monkey bars. Upside down and fearless, they exhibited strength, agility and courage. Boys, more interested in being the best at whatever the current sport was in season, chose not to hang from their knees “like a girl.”

On the boardwalk, clusters of hustlers waged war over “cat’s eyes.” “steelies” and the rare and treasured “agate.” The marble contests had the importance of gamblers in the darkened alleys of Santa Ana with lucky winners stuffing their pockets with loot and losers learning to live without their favorite marbles.

By the fourth grade, everyone was truly themselves and we knew each other to the core. The smart, the very smart, the hyperactive, the fun-loving, and the not so smart all seemed to get along. There were revolving “sweethearts” between the sexes. An hour seemed to drag on forever. Boredom was painful and punishment was a life sentence. We had no time to think about our futures because the here and now was all consuming.

Relationships among students developed easily, unintentionally and oftentimes mysteriously. Sadly, a few kids could not find a way due to differences but new friendships came each year when you were assigned to a new classroom with a different mix of children. Friendships were as easy to collect as flowers.

But it was the ocean and its many unique opportunities that made us different from inland towns. Newport Beach provided the bay, surf, sports programs, plus boats, music, bicycling, box sliding, adventuring and an endless strand of beaches to choose from.

As we grew, different gangs picked different beaches as their brand. There were “rats” at the River Jetty, peaky beautiful waves at 36th Street, the inbred culture and the fire rings at Blackies, crunching Pipeline waves at the Point, massive crunchers at 15th Street and loco adventurers at the Wedge. Each of these groups overlapped creating a unique tribe of very wise misfits sharing memories during the best of times.

Our earliest sense of independence revolved around bicycles. Small groups of bikers hit the quiet streets and the boardwalk. Stopping at Henry’s or Frye’s Market for candy, it felt like we owned the Peninsula.

The greatest part of a school day was after school. This presented new opportunities for fun. With the city’s wide-open spaces, quiet winter streets, vacant lots converted to makeshift football fields and baseball diamonds, there was never a lack of facilities. Additionally, we all had a strong sense of security and safety, so staying indoors was not an option. Street lamps acted as alarm clocks, letting us know when to go home. Everyone’s favorite babysitter was the mild weather of Southern California which took very good care of all of us.

The Boomers of Newport Elementary welcomed Disneyland, a new Knott’s Berry Farm, the Buffalo Ranch, the LA Rams and the LA Dodgers to Southern California. Overwhelming changes to the town came each and every decade of our lives. As children, instantaneous gratification was our drug of choice and some felt we lived in a “child-directed society” due to all the attention given post-WWII youngsters. Today, every part of rural America is riddled with Newport El expatriates searching for what they had in childhood. Graduates of Newport El still replay their lives and a lifetime later, we seem to have the same characteristics as we did then. The only difference is that the young child that played on the blacktop is now covered with saggy skin and grey hair.    

~~~~~~~~

Duncan Forgey, a lifelong resident of Newport Beach, now makes his home in Hawaii. He is a regular contributor to Stu News Newport.


Lonely Crystal Cove Beach morning

Lonely Crystal Cove Beach morning 6.30.2020

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 Artwork by Don Krotee 

“Lonely Crystal Cove Beach morning,” captured in a wonderful mist and low light, is a fully transparent watercolor done on Fabriano extra white 300g paper, where the brightest whites are nothing more than blank paper. The painting was done, wet into wet, in a single pass. While pigment may run in wet parts of the painting, other parts that can dry can produce sharp edges. The piece was painted Saturday morning after the dense fog had lifted and the sun, low in the east, casted bright shadows across the scene. Last month’s early rain has made some of the grass red brown and some gray green. The couple moves quietly past the rowing dory and a sparse, verysmall group, run, in the distance, to the edge of a quiet Pacific.

~~~~~~~~

Artist Don Krotee was a member of the 2000 GPAC and is a member of SPON, the Corona del Mar Residents Association, the founder of the Newport Heights Improvement Association and lives in Corona del Mar. He is an architect, a sailor and a fine artist who has been drawing and painting from an early age. He provides Stu News drawings and paintings of iconic Newport Beach, its surrounding areas and the great State of California.


Orange County Coastkeeper’s Brown recognized with Hero Award

Orange County Coastkeeper Executive Director Garry Brown was awarded the Waterkeeper Hero Award for his 21 years of dedication to water protections. The recognition was given at the annual Waterkeeper Alliance meetings earlier in June.

The Waterkeeper Hero Award represents outstanding stewardship to the protection and preservation of clean water, ensuring water is accessible, drinkable, fishable and swimmable.

Coastkeeper's Garry Brown

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Submitted photo

Orange County Coastkeeper Executive Director Garry Brown

Waterkeeper Alliance is a worldwide network of environmental organizations founded in 1999 by Robert F. Kennedy Jr. The Alliance is the largest and fastest growing nonprofit solely focused on clean water, connecting waterkeeper groups worldwide.

Brown established Coastkeeper in 1999 as its founding director. Under his leadership the organization has become a powerful voice for water quality, marine habitats and water supply issues in the region and throughout California.

For more information on Orange County Coastkeeper, visit www.coastkeeper.org.


Spots are still available at Camp James 2020

Spots are still available for Camp James 2020 this summer. In response to COVID-19, changes to allow camp to operate safely have been made based on recommendations of the Centers for Disease Control (CDC) and the American Camp Association. It is recommended by the CDC that camp groups be as homogeneous as possible, so creating a camp where the groups have the same kids for 10 days at a time will help achieve this. 

Upcoming Sessions:

–Session 3 runs July 13 through July 24.

–Session 4 runs July 27 through August 7.

–Session 5 runs August 10 through August 21.

As of now, the Camp James Team will be expected to wear a mask while at camp with the exception of water activities, lunch and any other activities where it is deemed necessary. Due to the nature of their work and the heat, Camp James will monitor the mask policy to keep everybody as safe as can be. Campers are not required to wear masks, but are strongly encouraged to, however that is at each family’s discretion. Camp James would like campers to have masks with straps that allow for removal, but also hang around a child’s neck, as this will prevent masks being fully removed from the body and possibly lost. Camp James has spare masks available as well.

Spots are still available rock wall

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Courtesy of Camp James

Camper climbing the rock wall

Camp will now operate in five different base camp zones instead of one. This will allow groups to space out more during the morning drop off, lunch time and pick up. Extended daycare will be no longer be offered since it doesn’t permit for these homogeneous groups. 

As required by the CDC, Camp James will be doing a health screening each day using contactless thermometers. Parents will remain in their car and not come into camp. Camp James will be doing a drive through pick up this summer. Your patience and understanding with this new drop off and pick up process will be needed. It will take some time as Camp James implements this new system. 

Camp group capacity has been reduced. As has always been Camp James’ practice, they will not overfill a group. This is with the safety of everyone in mind. Overall camp size is expected to be half the size of their typical summer. This also means camps will fill up quicker than ever. Parents are eager for their children to get back to the important business of play.

Hot lunches will only be sold in advance either online within a camper’s account or by emailing the directors to add it. Lunches must be purchased at least the night before.

Summer Camp is geared to youngsters 4-13 years of age. Hours are 8:30 a.m.-4:30 p.m., with the main camp activities taking place from 9:45 a.m.-3:30 p.m.

Campers will be asked to bring their own water bottle and younger campers are encouraged to have a sunscreen face stick for easy application by them (or with a little help). Children will need to be able to put their own shoes on, clothe themselves, keep track of their water bottle, clean up after themselves and understand that they must keep their hands to themselves. It is time now to foster this independence and Camp James will support that continued learning at camp.

Camp will be adding additional hand washing stations as well as mandatory hand washing times throughout the day. The camp team will be taking extra steps between camp groups to sanitize any equipment or tables as well as a focus on planning activities that allow campers to spread out and have their own supplies for a project.

The Camp James staff is eager to make this a fun and memorable summer for all campers. In order to plan for this summer, refunds will not be given but rather a credit that can be used in the future. 

To register and for additional information and rates, call 949.729.1098 and visit www.campjames.com.


253 confirmed cases of COVID-19 in Newport Beach to date, two deaths

Numbers released by the OC Health Agency today, June 28, reflect that there have been 253 confirmed cases of COVID-19 in Newport Beach to date, a net increase of six cases today.

Newport Beach, with a population of 87,180, has a per capita rate of 2.90 cases per thousand residents.

According to the County, OC is experiencing “elevated disease transmission,” “increasing hospitalization,” and “limited hospitalization” – with a 15.7 percent change in the three-day average of hospitalized patients. The County reports an increase of 146 cases received today, and a total of 12,608 cumulative cases to date.

Sadly, the County reports that 326 people have died due to COVID-19, including three new deaths received today. 170 of those who have died were skilled nursing facility residents; two were individuals experiencing homelessness.

The County has begun reporting deaths by city and zip code – there have been two deaths of Newport Beach residents. 83 people who have died were residents of Anaheim and 83 were residents of Santa Ana, accounting for over half of the County’s total deaths.

The County reports that 492 individuals are currently hospitalized with COVID-19 (includes ICU); 170 are in ICU.

Santa Ana has had 2,658 confirmed cases to date. Anaheim has had 2,392 confirmed cases to date. Huntington Beach has had 572 confirmed cases to date and 37 deaths. Costa Mesa has had 302 confirmed cases to date and two deaths. Irvine has had 348 confirmed cases to date and five deaths.

The age group with the most confirmed cases is 25-34 years old, accounting for 2,628 of the total confirmed cases in the County to date. 

The County estimates 6,988 “recovered cases” according to its data criteria.

For questions about the data presented by the County, call (714) 834-2000 or email This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it..

To view the data dashboard, click here.

Numbers are updated daily by Stu News Newport and reported on our social media pages @StuNewsNewport.

253 reported cases of COVID 19 1 6 28 20

253 reported cases of COVID 19 2 6 28 20

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County unveils new COVID-19 data dashboard, reports “elevated disease transmission,” “increasing hospitalization,” and “limited hospital capacity”

The OC Heath Care Agency unveiled a new COVID-19 data dashboard on Friday, June 26, with increased data now available to the public.

According to the County, OC is experiencing “elevated disease transmission,” “increasing hospitalization,” and “limited hospitalization” – with a 15.7 percent change in the three-day average of hospitalized patients. The County reports an increase of 146 cases received today, and a total of 12,608 cumulative cases to date.

Sadly, the County reports that 326 people have died due to COVID-19, including three new deaths received today. 170 of those who have died were skilled nursing facility residents; two were individuals experiencing homelessness.

The County has begun reporting deaths by city and zip code – there have been two deaths of Newport Beach residents. 83 people who have died were residents of Anaheim and 83 were residents of Santa Ana, accounting for over half of the County’s total deaths.

The County reports that 492 individuals are currently hospitalized with COVID-19 (includes ICU); 170 are in ICU.

Newport Beach has a cumulative case count of 253 confirmed cases to date, a per capita rate of 2.90 cases per thousand residents. 

Santa Ana has had 2,658 confirmed cases to date. Anaheim has had 2,392 confirmed cases to date. Huntington Beach has had 572 confirmed cases to date and 37 deaths. Costa Mesa has had 302 confirmed cases to date and two deaths. Irvine has had 348 confirmed cases to date and five deaths.

The age group with the most confirmed cases is 25-34 years old, accounting for 2,628 of the total confirmed cases in the County to date. 

The County estimates 6,988 “recovered cases” according to its data criteria.

For questions about the data presented by the County, call (714) 834-2000 or email This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it..

To view the data dashboard, click here.

Numbers are updated daily by Stu News Newport and reported on our social media pages @StuNewsNewport.

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Courtesy of OC Health Care Agency

Orange County COVID-19 case data as of June 28, as reported by the County; click here to visit page that is updated daily


County unveils new COVID-19 data dashboard, reports “elevated disease transmission,” “increasing hospitalization,” and “limited hospital capacity”

The OC Heath Care Agency unveiled a new COVID-19 data dashboard late yesterday, June 26, with increased data now available to the public.

According to the County, OC is experiencing “elevated disease transmission,” “increasing hospitalization,” and “limited hospitalization” – with a 17.6 percent change in the three-day average of hospitalized patients. The County reports an increase of 479 cases received yesterday, and a total of 11,960 cumulative cases to date.

Sadly, the County reports that 323 people have died due to COVID-19, including 17 new deaths received yesterday. 170 of those who have died were skilled nursing facility residents; three were individuals experiencing homelessness.

The County has begun reporting deaths by city and zip code – there have been two deaths of Newport Beach residents. 82 people who have died were residents of Anaheim and 82 were residents of Santa Ana, accounting for over half of the County’s total deaths.

The County reports that 451 individuals are currently hospitalized with COVID-19 (includes ICU); 166 are in ICU.

Newport Beach has a cumulative case count of 247 confirmed cases to date, a per capita rate of 2.83 cases per thousand residents. 

Santa Ana has had 2,630 confirmed cases to date. Anaheim has had 2,371 confirmed cases to date. Huntington Beach has had 586 confirmed cases to date and 37 deaths. Costa Mesa has had 297 confirmed cases to date and two deaths. Irvine has had 342 confirmed cases to date and five deaths.

The age group with the most confirmed cases is 25-34 years old, accounting for 2,439 of the total confirmed cases in the County to date. 

The County estimates 6,763 “recovered cases” according to its data criteria.

For questions about the data presented by the County, call (714) 834-2000 or email This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it..

To view the data dashboard, click here.

Numbers are updated daily by Stu News Newport and reported on our social media pages @StuNewsNewport.

County unveils 1

County unveils 2

County unveils 3

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Courtesy of OC Health Care Agency

Orange County COVID-19 case data as of June 26, as reported by the County; click here to visit page that is updated daily


CAIN Group recognized nationally for real estate sales volume

Newport Beach-based CAIN Group was recognized by the Wall Street Journal, Real Trends, and Tom Ferry The Thousand this past week when their real estate team ranked No. 11 in sales volume for small teams nationwide – that’s any team with two to five professionals. They’re also the No. 1 team in Orange County with a total of $248,098,500 in sales volume for the 2019 year. Published annually, these national awards discover and honor the top agents and teams in the country. 

CAIN Group recognized John Cain

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Submitted photo

John Cain, founder and principal of CAIN Group

John Cain, founder and principal of CAIN Group and broker associate at Pacific Sotheby’s International Realty in Newport Beach, launched his storied career in real estate in 2004 and has since become one of Southern California’s most successful real estate agents. He has received top real estate industry accolades including being named “Top Real Estate Agent” by Orange Coast Magazine, “Agent of the Month” by Executive Agent Magazine and recognition on Realtor Magazine’s prestigious “30 Under 30” list in 2010.

Cain has also made guest appearances on Bravo’s Million Dollar Listing Los Angeles and The Real Housewives of Orange County. Trusted by discerning clients, ranging from celebrities and professional athletes to premier homebuilders and captains of industry, Cain is renowned as the agent of choice in the luxury real estate market throughout coastal Orange County.


City Council grants $350,000 to community groups and special events

The City Council on Tuesday, June 23, approved the distribution of nearly $350,000 in grants for community groups and special events that benefit Newport Beach and its residents.

The support by the City of these community programs and special events, during a time of budget cuts, is especially important for these nonprofit and community-based organizations whom have been severely impacted by COVID-19. 

The grants are awarded in several categories: Community Program Grants to community groups that serve Newport Beach residents; Community & Charitable Events and Special Event Grants that support residents’ quality of life.

The City awarded $54,000 in Community Programs Grants to 10 groups, ranging from historical and environmental organizations to youth employment and homeless services.

In the Special Events category, about $295,000 was awarded to 18 events, from smaller community activities such as surf and sandcastle contests to large, signature events such as the Newport Beach Film Festival and the Newport-Mesa Spirit Run.

In addition, a fee waiver for the cost of renting the Community Room at the Civic Center for their recurring community programs was granted to the San Diego Blood Bank and Speak Up Newport. The value is approximately $13,293.

The following is a breakout of the individual grant amounts:

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Newport Beach Public Library announces launch of new catalog system

The Newport Beach Public Library (NBPL) Board of Library Trustees announces the launch of a new Integrated Library System on July 13, 2020. The powerful new software, Sirsi-Dynix Symphony, will be seamlessly integrated into the Newport Beach Public Library website and will perform all the functions of the former system, along with many new technological advancements and customer service enhancements that were not available 12 years ago when the current system was initiated.

Newport Beach Public Library book shelves

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Courtesy of NBPL

According to Library Services Director Tim Hetherton, “The functionality of this new system extends far beyond the capabilities of the current catalog.” In addition, Hetherton points out that while the system retains the features that customers currently enjoy, such as browsing the collection, placing holds, managing accounts and creating reading lists, it provides new patron communication options such as text messaging and automatic renewals when items are not on hold by other customers. It also integrates well with Overdrive downloadable eBooks and eAudiobooks and offers additional filtering options to expedite and limit search results. A coordinated Mobile App will be added in August 2020.

Acting Library Services Manager Rebecca Lightfoot advises library patrons to save their current reading lists and history by July 5 when the transition to the new system begins. “While we are able to transfer much of our former catalog data electronically, we are not able to transfer reading lists and reading history from individual accounts,” said Lightfoot. “In order to have this information available after July 5, we recommend that readers save their lists by following instructions on the library website.”

Additionally, circulation services will not be available during the data transfer July 6-8, so customers will not be able to renew items or place holds online during that time. Staff will be available to service phone and email requests, check the shelves for books and check them out offline for Curbside pickup. 

For more information or assistance, call 949.717.3800, option 2 or use the Contact Us form on the Newport Beach Public Library website at www.newportbeachca.gov.


River Jetty Restaurant Group names new corporate executive chef 

River Jetty Restaurant Group, partnered with Joseph “McG” Nichol and Jordan Otterbein, are proud to announce the appointment of Alfonso Ramirez as Corporate Executive Chef of A Restaurant and CdM Restaurant upon the reopening of both dining destinations for dine-in and takeout service.

“We’ve been overwhelmed with positive messages from our community over the past few months,” said Otterbein. “We were excited to reopen our restaurants with Chef Alfonso’s inspiring influence on our menus alongside our incredible Chefs de Cuisine, Roberto Gomez at A Restaurant and Elvis Morales at CdM who have been instrumental in the success of our food over the years.”

River Jetty Restaurant Alfonso Ramirez

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Submitted photo

Corporate Executive Chef Alfonso Ramirez

Ramirez comes to River Jetty Restaurant Group from Patina Restaurant Group where he served as Executive Chef of Catal Restaurant & Uva Bar in Downtown Disney since 2015. Bringing an extensive culinary resume and a deep understanding of classic cooking and modern techniques, Ramirez brings to the restaurants a passion for “rustic flavor,” and a desire to let high-quality ingredients speak for themselves on the plate.

With a love for cooking that was instilled by his mentor and father who is himself a respected chef, Ramirez learned by doing from a young age and honed his expertise with guidance from some of the country’s top chefs. Over the course of his career he has worked alongside Joachim Splichal at Patina, Lee Hefter at Spago, and Eric Greenspan at Meson G and The Foundry.

“It’s an honor to be a part of the River Jetty Restaurant Group family,” commented Chef Ramirez. “With both restaurants reopening to a new normal, I look forward to continuing to help guide the kitchens to adhere to our stringent safety standards while delivering on the superior dining experience that guests expect from A and CdM.”

Ramirez takes over for Jonathan Blackford who has been with River Jetty Restaurant Group since 2010.

“We are incredibly grateful for Chef Jon’s dedication to our restaurants for nearly a decade,” said McG. “Through his food he gave our guests the elevated dining experience which they have come to expect from A Restaurant and CdM, and we will honor this legacy. We wish him the very best in his career.”

The reopening of A Restaurant and CdM Restaurant is in accordance with guidelines put forth by the Orange County Board of Supervisors and the California Department of Public Health as well as recommendations by the Center for Disease Control and Prevention and World Health Organization.

For more information and to make reservations, visit www.ARestaurantNB.com and www.CdMRestaurant.com. For details about River Jetty Restaurant Group, visit www.riverjettyrg.com.


Registration open for Segerstrom Center’s virtual Summer Dance

Segerstrom Center for the Arts announces open registration for Summer Dance 2020. Out of caution for dancers, faculty and staff, this year’s Summer Dance classes will be offered entirely online. Classes are led by instructors from the American Ballet Theatre William J. Gillespie School as well as the School of Dance & Music for Children with Disabilities, accompanied by live pianists. Whether continuing in their dance training, or taking a class for the very first time, students near and far will receive an immersive experience all from the safety of home. The deadline to register is July 1.

Registration open for dancer

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Courtesy of SCFTA

All experience levels are welcome to either of the two sessions offered. Ballet and Elective classes run July 13-August 7 and offer Kinder, Beginner, Intermediate and Advanced level classes for ages 3-22. Tuition varies by level from $20-$245 per week. Styles include jazz, modern, musical theater, hip hop and contemporary. Body conditioning classes will also be offered and include yoga for dancers, Pilates, floor barre and stretch.

School of Dance and Music for Children with Disabilities will run July 13-August 6 and feature inclusive dance and music classes for ages 4-22 as well as a musical theater class for ages 7-11. Tuition is $80 for all four weeks.

For a full breakdown of classes, pricing and to register, click here.


Scenic surf sessions

Scenic surf wave

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Photo by Stan Sievers (Instagram @stansievers)

Surfer Parker Cohn drops in on an epic Newport wave


Amazing Attessa

Amazing Attessa boat

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Photo by Kevin Pellon (Instagram @socalsnapz)

Living in luxury along the shore of Newport Beach


Arts Orange County partners with local funders to launch OC Arts and Culture Resilience Fund

Orange County’s nonprofit arts council, Arts Orange County (ArtsOC), has partnered with Charitable Ventures and the Orange County Community Foundation (OCCF) to launch the OC Arts and Culture Resilience Fund. The Fund will support creative artists and local nonprofit arts and culture organizations that offer essential community enrichment and education – and are facing significant challenges due to the COVID-19 pandemic.

A recent ArtsOC survey found that local arts organizations have lost an estimated $16M in revenue and donations since stay-at-home orders began in March. 62 percent of arts organizations view the financial impact of the pandemic as severe or extremely severe, while 52 percent report that they are depleting cash reserves to meet their obligations.

“This is a collective, purposeful action to support the Orange County arts community, which has experienced the most severe job losses of any segment of the economy in California,” said Richard Stein, president and CEO of ArtsOC. “Our creative sector directly employs more than 50,000 musicians, actors, dancers, filmmakers, and teaching artists and countless others who support them behind the scenes. Their ingenuity and spirit give us comfort, enlightenment and joy in the best of times; now it’s our turn to bring much-needed support to these selfless artists,” Stein continued.

The OC Arts and Culture Resilience Fund was launched with seed funding of $150,000 towards a goal of $500,000. The Fund will provide two types of response:

--Bridge grants to arts organizations so that they can retain essential staff and offer online programming and instruction.

--Financial assistance to individual creative artists.

“We are proud to advocate for the critical importance of the arts in our community,” said Shelley Hoss, president and CEO, OCCF. “Now, more than ever, we need the artists and nonprofit arts and culture organizations that enrich and educate our community. They are essential to the resilience and long-term health and economic well-being of Orange County.”

Creative artists and nonprofit arts organizations are invited to apply for bridge loans and grants, and community members are encouraged to donate at https://charitableventuresoc.org/resilience-fund-arts/.


School Notes

District to open athletics with approved guidelines

Newport-Mesa Unified School District (NMUSD) will be opening athletics in a modified capacity, Phase 1, beginning July 6. All programs are aligned with guidelines from the National Federation of State High School Associations (NFHS) and the Sports Medicine Advisory Committee (SMAC), which align with Orange County Healthcare Agency COVID-19 Phasing Guidelines, 

Student participation in a program is voluntary and based upon parental discretion. Any student who chooses not to participate in summer workouts will not be penalized. 

The three-phased approach outlines pre-workout/screening, limitations on gatherings, facility cleaning, physical activity/athletic equipment and hydration protocols specific to each phase. Health precautions will be in place to comply with guidance intended to prevent transmission of COVID-19, including appropriate physical distancing and wellness screenings. 

The following protocols will be implemented for all athletes/coaches:

–All coaches/teachers will participate in an NMUSD Athletics Reopening Training, prior to bringing athletes on-campus.

–Athletes must turn in a signed NMUSD Athletics Reopening Parent/Guardian Notification Letter prior to participation in any program. Schools will provide parent waivers.

–Athletes who fail to comply with social distancing and/or face covering guidelines will not be permitted to participate.

–Only athletes are allowed on campus and all parents/guardians must remain inside their vehicles while dropping off and picking up students.

–All athletes/coaches will wear face coverings at all times. Athletes/coaches will be allowed to remove their masks (maintaining six-foot distancing) for short periods throughout the workout/practice to avoid overheating.

–Athletes will be screened daily upon arrival. The screening will consist of a health survey and temperature will be taken, recorded and maintained on a monitoring form.

–Athletes with a temperature of less than 100.4, and no other COVID-19 symptoms will be given a bright-colored, circular sticker with the date indicating their clearance to participate in the program for the day.

–Athletes with a temperature of 100.4 or higher or symptoms of COVID-19 will be sent home and not allowed to participate in on-campus programs for 14 days or until clearance from a medical doctor is received.

–After a temperature check and when transferring locations, students/coaches will wash their hands and/or use hand sanitizer. 

–Waiting spots will be clearly marked on the ground for athlete use in the adjacent parking lot for pick-up procedures. 

–Schools will follow-up with additional information and parent waivers.

Facility Use By Outside User (non-district) Groups

At this time NMUSD is not authorizing the use of district facilities for outside user (non-district) groups. Priority is to safely re-open district summer and athletic programs in stages as described above. However, the District is currently reviewing which facilities may be safely re-opened without impacting district programs, on-going construction projects, or summer cleaning schedules. 

Alternative learning options approved by District

The Newport-Mesa Unified School District (NMUSD) determined a plan at the Tuesday, June 23 Board of Education meeting concerning the beginning of the 2020-21 school year scheduled for August 24.

Approved was a plan for a 100 percent Virtual Learning Option, with details being finalized and expected to be shared in mid-July. 

This option provides for parents who prefer not to send their student to a physical school setting. Reasons cited for this include concerns about potential changes during the school year due to health and government guidelines, and/or that their student has adapted and is thriving in a virtual/distance setting; it reduces the amount of students physically on school campuses; it addresses the need of students and staff in the high risk groups; and sets a foundation to continue and expand virtual learning in the district for future years.

Additionally, the Board gave direction to continue to explore alternative models to maintain social distancing per state guidance and keep students on campus as much as possible to support the instructional program and address the issue of childcare, particularly for elementary students; and, direction to prepare a 3-Level Plan that is adaptable for potential changing circumstances throughout the year and meets the state/county requirements for re-opening. The 3-Level Plan allows district schools to be prepared to shift between in-person, hybrid and distance learning necessitated by state, county or local orders and conditions. 

Next steps for the District include finalizing details of the Parent Choice Virtual Learning Option and the 3-Level Plan. The updated plans, alternative model(s) and other aspects of re-opening will be brought to the Board on July 14. 

For the latest information, visit the 2020-2021 School Reopening Webpage.


OC Fair Board issues solidarity proclamation in support of the Black Community

The OC Fair & Event Center Board of Directors unanimously issued a proclamation in support of the Black Community and stands united against discrimination and committed to inclusion, diversity and equality.

Recognizing this painful time for many members of our community, the Board voted to reaffirm its commitment to denounce discrimination or violence in any form.

The following statement was approved at the Board of Directors meeting.

Proclamation of the Board of Directors of the 32nd District Agricultural Association

WHEREAS, the mission of the 32nd District Agricultural Association (the 32nd DAA) is the “Celebration of Orange County’s Communities, Interests and Heritage”; and

WHEREAS, the 32nd DAA is against discrimination on the basis of race, creed, national origin, ancestry, religion, age, disability, political affiliation, gender, sexual orientation, gender identity and/or expression, or marital, parental or military status; and

WHEREAS, the 32nd DAA condemns the deeply troubling actions that occurred in Minneapolis, Minnesota, which led to the inexcusable and senseless death of Mr. George Floyd; and the same troubling actions that have taken the lives of so many other Black men, women, boys and girls, even since Mr. Floyd; and

WHEREAS, the 32nd DAA stands in solidarity with those that peacefully protest against violence, inequality and excessive force; and

WHEREAS, the 32nd DAA recognizes the community is in turmoil, and looking to its leaders to affirm their commitment to inclusion, diversity, and equality; and

WHEREAS, the 32nd DAA stands with the members of our Black Community and all people of color who have been ignored, marginalized and disenfranchised;

NOW, THEREFORE, the Board of the 32nd District Agricultural Association hereby does proclaim on June 25, 2020, that it stands in solidarity with the Black

Community and reaffirms its commitment to denounce discrimination or violence in any form.


Fair Game

By TOM JOHNSON

Trees are gone, but potential candidates are shaking the bushes

Tom Johnson Fair Game 2Earlier this week I took to this column to express my disappointment with the trees being cut down at Ensign Intermediate School. My concerns were directed to the school board for being too far removed from the pulse of the community.

One Trustee wrote me saying, “I realize this is about increasing your readership, but your editorials are becoming increasingly more political with you clearly pushing an agenda.” She even dismissed me saying that reporting on this “is not helpful to the community and tarnishes my reputation.”

I’m saving her identity for her sake.

But, let me be clear (as they say in Washington), writing what I did Tuesday had absolutely nothing to do with increasing readership. Our goal here at Stu News is to strengthen and support the community, not tear it down.

The actions of the District, in my opinion, were absolutely wrong. So, I completely stand by that.

Now, if you remember my final comment I made on the subject, “someone please, raise your hand and let’s get this started,” referring to my wish of voting Trustees out come November.

The good news is that so far this week two hands have been raised. Both are considering a run, with one already pulling papers. One is from Trustee Area 3 and the other from Trustee Area 6.

We’ll introduce them to you with their permission in the coming issues. 

Trustee Area 3 is presently served by Martha Fluor, who’s been in that seat since 1991; with Trustee Area 6 being served by Dana Black, who likewise has held her seat since 1994.

The third seat up for re-election is held by Vicki Snell in District 1. Leah Ersoylu, a parent actively involved in the District, has already announced her intentions for that spot. Another good thing.

The winds of potential change appear to be in the air.

What’s next, well the trees are still gone and they’re not coming back. So, we need to move on and focus our attention to getting our students prepared for what will be a very interesting and challenging 2020-21 school year. It’s going to be tough on everyone.

But, please, please, don’t forget come November.

• • •

We’re trying something new this week at Stu News and we’re excited about it. If you love music, we think you will be too.

A group that has been heavily impacted by a lack of work during these COVID-19 times is that of musicians. With bars and clubs closed, and concerts canceled, paychecks for musicians have been few and far between.

Well, the OneRoot Foundation has decided to do something about it, by reuniting the community with one another, thus allowing them to create music and fill the soul.

OneRoot Foundation (the Pyle family philanthropy) is hosting a small private event at an undisclosed local location. And yes, they’re taking all precautions, including social distancing on and off stage, and requiring masks for all who enter. It’s the brainchild of David Pyle, a music lover.

This effort is just one more example of what the OneRoot Foundation is all about. Over the past few months they’ve provided assistance for more than 1,400 individuals from restaurants, service industries, gyms and coffee shops. When I asked them why, they say they’re hoping to challenge others to do similar deeds.

At the end of the day it’s what makes our community better.

But wait, we’re going to record these musicians and re-broadcast it over our Stu News Newport YouTube channel for our readers’ enjoyment. It’ll post front and center over the weekend.

The musicians will include drums, horns, stand-up and 4-string bass and keyboards. Knowing Dave, I assure you it will be good.

So come back this weekend and enjoy…and, let us know what you think.

• • •

Perhaps you were one of the lucky ones that made it by the Balboa Bay Club for their 13th Annual Father’s Day Classic Car Show. There were some beauts!

VW Buses, 23s & 21s, classic Mustangs, including a pink one given by Hugh Hefner to a Playmate of the Year, old Chevys and Buicks, Ferraris, Porsches, and plenty of extremely rare classics.

The winners announced by BBC Governor John Wortmann: Sexyist Car Award - 2014 laFerrari (formerly owned by Steve Wynn), Craig Lyons, owner; Best Classic Car of the Show - 1931 Bugatti Type 51 Grand Prix race car, Craig Barto, owner; Governor’s Choice Award - Ford v Ferrari movie originals, Lance Stander and Simon Trumper from Superformance, owners; and Meguiar’s Best Paint - 1964 Austin Martin DB4 Superleggera, Nick Clements of European Collectibles, owner.

If you missed it, mark down next Father’s Day. You’ll enjoy it.

• • •

As the email I received said, “Not even COVID-19 can kill off a good Irish pub.”

It was an announcement for tomorrow’s (Saturday) grand re-opening of, wait for it…The Shamrock, located in the heart of Mariners Mile

Here’s the deal: retired judge Dan McNerney reached out to friends in an effort to help his son, Evan, raise money for the bar. The landlord is apparently helping The Shamrock with a restructured lease, but there’s a lot of lost revenue needed to make the lease payment work. As luck would have, it closed the day before St. Patrick’s Day, never good for an Irish pub.

The good news is that Dan called the right guys: “Duffy Duffield, Kevin Muldoon, Dave Ellis and Ed Susolik

Now, a GoFundMe account has been set up for those who want to help with the costs during these unprecedented times.

Oh, and the party tomorrow, the action begins at 11:30 a.m. with “great food, drinks and fun, including live entertainment in the afternoon featuring Jim Rice.


Go figure, JWA traffic down dramatically

Airline passenger traffic at John Wayne Airport (JWA) decreased in May 2020 as compared with May 2019. In May 2020, the Airport served 82,342 passengers, a decrease of 91.3 percent when compared with the May 2019 passenger traffic count of 942,680. 

Go figure JWA traffic

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Courtesy of John Wayne Airport

Commercial aircraft operations decreased 78 percent and commuter aircraft operations decreased 73.2 percent when compared with May 2019 levels.

Total aircraft operations decreased in May 2020 as compared with the same month in 2019. In May 2020, there were 17,352 total aircraft operations (take-offs and landings), a 34.5 percent decrease compared to 26,509 total aircraft operations in May 2019.

General aviation activity, which accounted for 88.7 percent of the total aircraft operations during May 2020, decreased 14.5 percent when compared with May 2019.

The top three airlines in May 2020 based on passenger count were Southwest Airlines (33,828), American Airlines (20,136) and Alaska Airlines (8,798)


It might be pared down, but it’s still our festival

By GARY SHERWIN

Take a look at the rest of your calendar for 2020. It looks pretty wide open, doesn’t it? Events including Coachella, Stagecoach and even the wonderful Hollywood Bowl summer season have all been pushed back to next year because of COVID-19.

It was only a few months ago that we thought that by fall we could enjoy things like concerts again, but that hope was quickly dashed as the pandemic continues along its destructive path.

But while most event producers nationally have thrown in the towel, Gregg Schwenk, the president and co-founder of the Newport Beach Film Festival, is undaunted. Although the festival’s signature April event was canceled, he is moving ahead with another one this August, although this one will be very different.

The Newport Beach Film Festival, now in its 21st year, is already the fastest growing festival in the United States attracting more than 50,000 attendees with films submitted from more than 50 countries. The event is a glittering gathering of Hollywood celebrities and filmmakers that hang out here in town, walk the red carpet and attract the paparazzi.

Gary Sherwin

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Courtesy of Visit Newport Beach

Gary Sherwin

In February, Schwenk and I were in London to co-host our annual Newport Beach Film Festival UK Honors program which has become a flagship event for the British Academy of Film Awards, which is the British version of the Oscars and a huge publicity opportunity for the city. Two weeks later COVID-19 shut everything down.

Now many film festivals around the country are pivoting to a different format or canceling. Even the famed Cannes event has moved to an all online format this year. Sacrebleu, as they say in France.

When the Newport festival was canceled just a few weeks before the event in April, the festival’s programming was already in the can. Rather than trash all that hard work, Schwenk decided to move ahead on two fronts this year.

This year’s festival, scheduled for August 6-20, a full two weeks, will be held exclusively at The Lot in Fashion Island with a robust 300-film schedule. There will also be a short film component with over 220 films to be screened.

Large social events, including the popular Opening Night gala attended by over 3,000, will be scrapped this year in favor of possibly smaller more socially distant options.

“We approached this festival with three objectives. First, we need to keep everyone safe while they enjoy the films. Second, be respectful of the filmmakers and protect the integrity of their work and thirdly, find a way to do all of this in a financially responsible manner,” Schwenk said.

Screenings at The Lot are expected to be limited to anywhere between 25-50 percent of capacity based on guidelines in August as well as temperature checks. Some of the expected popular films may play simultaneously on a few screens due to limited crowd size.

“Since The Lot is already a premium luxury theatre with reclining seats, spacing between guests is generally already there, but we will still spread out guests,” he said. One way to generate revenue will be to sell the empty seats to companies where they can place promotional signs.

The festival will also host an online version at www.newportbeachfilmfest.com featuring films in past years with links so people can access and watch on streaming platforms such as Amazon Prime, as well as filmmaker interviews taped at previous festivals.

The Opening Night film at The Lot will be the highly anticipated A Life of Endless Summers: The Bruce Brown Story, directed by Brown’s oldest son Dana. It chronicles the life of the man behind the iconic 1965 surf documentary, The Endless Summer.

Plans are also underway for the 2021 festival which will return to April. Due to the pandemic, the Academy Awards have been pushed back and now will be held two weeks after next year’s festival. That opens up new and unexpected opportunities with Oscar-nominated films and actors.

While most people have stayed home the last few months streaming films, Schwenk is betting that people want to get out, sit in a comfortable theatre and socialize a bit in a safe way.

“Several years ago, Mr. Edwards (of Edwards Cinema fame that once owned most of the local movie theatres) told me, ‘Everyone has a kitchen at home, but they still like to go out to dinner.’ I’m betting the same holds true for now.”

“As the old saying goes,” he said, “the show must go on.” 

Gary Sherwin is President & CEO of Visit Newport Beach and Newport Beach and Company.


Kevin Tiscareno named 2020 Newport Beach Firefighter of the Year

Captain Kevin Tiscareno has been named the 2020 Newport Beach Firefighter of the Year.

He began his fire service career as a Fire Explorer with the City of Orange Fire Department where he was named Fire Explorer of the Year and served as a Reserve Firefighter with the City of Santa Ana. He was hired as a Firefighter with the City of Newport Beach in January 2002. During the past 18 years, he has served as a Firefighter, Fire Engineer, PIO, Safety Officer, Fire Investigator, Administrative Training Captain and Fire Captain. In June 2020, he was named the Newport Beach Fire Department’s 2020 Firefighter of the Year.

Kevin Tiscareno named

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Courtesy of NBFD

NBFD Captain Kevin Tiscareno

Tiscareno has been involved in a wide range of professional organizations in Orange County and California. He has served on the Board of Directors for the California Conference of Arson Investigators, President of the Orange County Arson Taskforce, Secretary of the Orange County Training Officers, and as an arson liaison for the Orange County Fire Marshals. In addition, he has been an active member in numerous City safety and disaster preparedness committees. 

He holds a Masters of Public Administration from Long Beach State, a Bachelor of Arts in Organizational Leadership from Chapman University and an associate degree in Fire Administration. He is bilingual in Spanish and has served as a Big Brother of America.

Tiscareno was born at St. Joseph Hospital in Orange, Calif. He grew up in Anaheim attending Katella High School where he was the captain of the baseball team. He is married with two daughters, Brooklynn age 10 and Sailor age 2, and they have two dogs named Coco and Sadie. He enjoys golfing and supporting the Angels and Raiders teams each season.


Take Five: Meet Jonathon Harmon, Newport Beach recreation manager

By AMY SENK

COVID-19 blew up summer plans, from globetrotting adventures to sleepaway camps. But in Newport Beach, there have been some bright spots. First, Junior Guards was expanded from the original plan of only allowing the A guards to participate. And on June 12, Orange County moved into early Stage 3 of the Governor’s COVID-19 reopening plan, a plan that includes pools and day camps. I reached out to Newport Beach Recreation Manager Jonathon Harmon to find out how the city’s summer programs will look this year with the most recent developments.

Take Five Meet Jonathon Harmon

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Courtesy of City of Newport Beach

Jonathon Harmon

Q: It’s been a little over a week since the governor’s reopening orders were amended to include day camps and outdoor recreational activities, with modifications. What has been the reaction from Newport Beach residents to the news?

A: The reaction has been positive and well received. When the Recreation & Senior Services Department announced over Instagram and Facebook that we would indeed be offering summer camps, we had a very enthusiastic response from our residents. Our front desk staff are receiving a lot of questions from the community on the exact camps and activities permitted. The phones are certainly busy which feels “normal” for summertime.

Q: What will Newport Beach’s summer recreation programs look like this year, under the modifications?

A: The most significant modification is all of our programs will take place outdoors this summer, as our community centers remain closed.  Camps and classes will also require distancing and groups of 10 or less. Our ratio of participants to instructors will be 10 to 1. Campers and participants might also notice our frequent cleaning and sanitizing breaks during camps. Our motto this year is focus on the fun, and we are going to do that by offering many of the summer camps our residents and visitors love.

Q: What programs are taking place, and which ones will be on hold for the summer of 2020?

A: Our team has put together a great amount of camps this summer including our most popular surf camps, basketball and multi-sport camps, skateboarding, beach volleyball, and art camps. Unfortunately, we had to pause our favorite culinary, aquatics, and gymnastics camps this year. No doubt they will be back and better than ever. Check in with us often at www.campnewport.com as our list of weekly camps continues to increase. Or visit www.newportbeachca.gov/register for a sortable list of camps we are offering. All of these listed camps have been approved to meet state and county safety guidelines. If an activity you’re interested in has a waitlist, please add your camper to that waitlist. These camps are intended to run as long as the minimum number of participants is met. Call us if you have any questions or check the City of Newport Beach Instagram account often for exciting information on our camps and summer activities. Our team is here to help you and your family have a great summer outside in Newport Beach.

Q: What kind of online services has staff been providing during the shutdown? Will that continue this summer?

A: Staff launched the Online Recreation Center, or ORC as we call it, in March. It was a quick pivot into the virtual recreation and senior services world, but we are excited about the programs and resources being offered. We currently have Pilates, music, a wide variety of STEM classes, and art and culture for seniors, to name a few. The ORC also includes unique nature and outdoor resources through our partners at the Environmental Nature Center and Back Bay Science Center. We have no intention of taking the ORC offline, and it is something we will continue if the need and demand remains. I have found even in these challenging times, the ORC truly fulfills our mission to provide programs to people of all ages. We could not be more proud to show it off, so please visit the ORC at www.newportbeachca.gov/orc and stay active and engaged this summer.

Q: What is your personal favorite summer activity typically offered in Newport Beach, and what is its status? (If it will not take place this year, is there a substitute. If it will, how will it be modified?)

A: My 4-year-old son loves everything sports, so our favorite is the multi-sport camps. He is excited for Camp Playball, which is a learning based, high energy camp, where they play a variety of different sports and activities – perfect for my preschooler. These multi-sport camps take place outside at our parks so they will be running with the distancing and a 10 to 1 ratio this summer. 

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Amy Senk is a longtime resident of Corona del Mar and a regular contributor to Stu News Newport.


Why is Mariners School under the big top?

Why is Mariners School

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Photo by Lana Johnson

Driving past Mariners Elementary School the other day, Stu News noticed the buildings covered in tents. Our first thought was “Oh no, does this have anything to do with the health concerns going on in today’s world?” The simple answer is, “No. Just part of our ongoing facility maintenance. It is one of about four schools getting treatment this summer,” said Annette Franco, public relations officer for the Newport-Mesa Unified School District. Good to know.


Duke Hoey: Stu News salutes 2020 Corona del Mar High School Graduating Senior

Duke Hoey is matriculating from Corona del Mar High School this month. He is an AP Scholar with Honors student, an avid surfer, fisherman and custodian of our local oceans. He was the Captain and leading scorer for the CdMHS Ice Hockey team (Newport Mesa Ice Kings), which participates in the Anaheim Ducks High School Hockey League, playing games against local and regional schools in Southern California for the past four years, serving as Captain this past season, while leading the team in scoring and representing them in the league all-star game. 

Duke Hoey on the ice

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Photos courtesy of the Hoey family

On the ice during the league all-star game, Duke led his team in scoring

And if he’s not on the ice, you can probably find him surfing at El Morro or the Wedge, or fishing with his younger brother, Jackson, 14, at local hotspots like Catalina Island, the oil rigs or the Huntington Flats in search of a good bite. He has taught young kids to surf at Newport Surf Camp the past few summers and plans to do that again this year.

Duke loves all things related to the ocean – surfing, fishing, scuba diving, water skiing, spearfishing, snorkeling...you name it, he’s probably done it. 

In addition, he is an avid musician, playing acoustic and electric guitar, and electric and stand-up bass – and was in the CdM orchestra for the past six years. 

Duke with orange fish

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“Holy Cow(cod)” – fishing fun in Baja California, Mexico, when Duke caught this 20 lb. brightly colored cowcod. In an effort to keep the fish alive, it was dropped to a depth of more than 150 feet with a special device and released.

Heading to San Diego State University in the fall, Duke plans to study Environmental Sciences and Marine Biology. He will also play ice hockey for SDSU.

Go Duke! Go Aztecs!

Congratulations!

In order to celebrate our graduating seniors’ achievements together as a community, we would like to extend an invitation to graduating seniors and their parents to submit announcements about college acceptances and plans for next year. Please submit your information and images to This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it..


11,511 confirmed cases of COVID-19 to date, 306 deaths to date, 7 deaths reported yesterday

Numbers released by the OC Health Agency yesterday, June 25, reflect that there have been 11,511 confirmed cases of COVID-19 in Orange County to date, including 506 new cases reported yesterday. This marks the highest single-day increase in cases reported in OC to date. 3,700 cases have been reported in the last 14 days, 32.1 percent of the County’s cumulative case count.

The County states, “The large number of cases reported to us [yesterday] reflects another large batch of cases from the State’s CalREDIE system. These 506 individuals had their specimens collected over 28 different dates.”

Sadly, the County reports that 306 people have died due to COVID-19, including seven deaths reported yesterday.

The County reports that 394 individuals were hospitalized with COVID-19 as of yesterday; 147 were in ICU.

The State of California, whose data differs from the County’s, reports that 543 people were hospitalized COVID-19 patients as of yesterday, including suspected and positive-confirmed cases; this represents a 41.4 percent increase from the previous 14 days’ data. The State reports that 186 of these individuals were in ICU as of yesterday, a 21.6 percent increase from the previous 14 days’ data. 

According to the State, 38 percent of ICU beds were available in Orange County as of yesterday; 65 percent of ventilators were available.

The first confirmed Orange County case of COVID-19 was reported on January 25.

The County reports that 5,326 people have recovered from COVID-19 to date. Visit https://occovid19.ochealthinfo.com/coronavirus-in-oc for recovery data criteria and more information.

Numbers are updated daily by Stu News Newport and reported on our social media pages @StuNewsNewport.

For questions about the data presented, call (714) 834-2000 or email This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

For data from the State, visit https://covid19.ca.gov/roadmap-counties/#track-data.

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Courtesy of OC Health Care Agency

Orange County COVID-19 case data as of June 25, as reported by the County; click here to visit page that is updated daily


229 confirmed cases of COVID-19 in Newport Beach to date, a jump in 17 cases yesterday

Numbers released by the OC Health Agency yesterday, June 25, reflect that there have been 229 confirmed cases of COVID-19 in Newport Beach to date, a net increase of 17 cases yesterday.

Newport Beach, with a population of 87,180, has a per capita rate of 2.627 cases per thousand residents.

There have been 11,511 confirmed cases of COVID-19 in Orange County to date, including 506 new cases reported yesterday. This marks the highest single-day increase in cases reported in OC to date. 3,700 cases have been reported in the last 14 days, 32.1 percent of the County’s cumulative case count.

The County states, “The large number of cases reported to us [yesterday] reflects another large batch of cases from the State’s CalREDIE system. These 506 individuals had their specimens collected over 28 different dates.”

Sadly, the County reports that 306 people have died due to COVID-19, including seven deaths reported yesterday.

The County reports that 394 individuals were hospitalized with COVID-19 as of yesterday; 147 were in ICU.

The State of California, whose data differs from the County’s, reports that 543 people were hospitalized COVID-19 patients as of yesterday, including suspected and positive-confirmed cases; this represents a 41.4 percent increase from the previous 14 days’ data. The State reports that 186 of these individuals were in ICU as of yesterday, a 21.6 percent increase from the previous 14 days’ data. 

According to the State, 38 percent of ICU beds were available in Orange County as of yesterday; 65 percent of ventilators were available.

The first confirmed Orange County case of COVID-19 was reported on January 25.

The city with the highest per capita rate in OC is Los Alamitos, with 7.679 cases per thousand residents. 

Huntington Beach has had 522 confirmed cases to date, a net increase of 19 cases yesterday. Irvine has had 311 confirmed cases to date, a net increase of 18 cases yesterday. Costa Mesa has had 258 confirmed cases to date, a net increase of 22 cases yesterday. Laguna Beach has had 54 confirmed cases to date.

Santa Ana has had 2,415 confirmed cases to date, a net increase of 83 cases yesterday. Anaheim has had 2,207 confirmed cases to date, a net increase of 88 cases yesterday.

The County reports that 5,326 people have recovered from COVID-19 to date. Visit https://occovid19.ochealthinfo.com/coronavirus-in-oc for recovery data criteria and more information.

Numbers are updated daily by Stu News Newport and reported on our social media pages @StuNewsNewport.

For questions about the data presented, call (714) 834-2000 or email This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it..

For data from the State, visit https://covid19.ca.gov/roadmap-counties/#track-data.

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The Dos and Don’ts for July 4th and other information you should know

The Newport Beach Police Department (NBPD) has released important information concerning safety and street closures regarding July 4. Although most residents and business owners have knowledge of the City’s increased public safety efforts, the following are some of the reminders about what is and isn’t allowed in Newport Beach.

Updated road closure information, significant traffic advisories and community advisories are available on July 4 by texting NBJULY4TH to 888777.

Street closures are implemented beginning July 4 from 10:30 a.m. to the early morning hours of July 5. Closures include southbound Orange St. at W. Coast Highway and Via Oporto from Via Lido to 32nd St. All streets on the peninsula will be open to vehicle traffic, however, the NBPD will be monitoring traffic conditions throughout the day and will facilitate additional street closures should the need arise.

Parking for on-street and other public parking will be extremely limited in the West Newport area. All residents and visitors are cautioned to park in legal, public spaces or their own private spaces or garages. Vehicles parked illegally will be issued parking citations and may be towed.

Safety Enhancement Zone will be the area bounded by the Pacific Ocean on the south, 32nd St. and Newport Blvd. on the east, W. Coast Highway on the north and 54th St. on the west. The Safety Zone designation is effective from 12:01 a.m. on July 4 to 3 a.m. on July 5. 

The Dos and Don'ts Safety Enhancement Zone

Courtesy of City of Newport Beach

Fines within the Safety Enhancement Zone are tripled the normal amount and can be as much as $3,000.

Orange County Regional Mounted Enforcement Unit will be on duty to help ensure a safe holiday.

Alcoholic beverages are prohibited in public areas including streets, sidewalks, beaches, piers and other public areas, including alcoholic beverages that have been poured into a cup. Violators are subject to citation or arrest.

Fireworks are illegal to have in one’s possession or to use. This includes “safe and sane” fireworks such as fountains and sparklers that can be purchased in nearby cities.

Rooftop Gatherings present a potential safety hazard that may violate building code ordinances. City Building Department inspectors will be working with the NBPD to address those violations.

Water Balloons or Spraying Water at pedestrians, bicyclists or vehicles is illegal. Violators are subject to citation or arrest.

Loud or Unruly Parties are illegal under the Municipal Code. Property owners and/or party hosts are responsible for the conduct of their guests. Loud and unruly parties requiring a police response could result in a citation or arrest for those present, and fines for the property owners, tenants, renters and guests. 

Beaches are open to the public. Permitted hours to the public on beaches is from 6 a.m.-10 p.m., including the Santa Ana River Jetty to Crystal Cove State Park. However, Crystal Coves beaches close at sunset. Portable barbeques are not allowed on any City beach. For those wishing to barbeque, fire rings and public barbeques are available near the Balboa Pier and at Corona del Mar State Beach on a first-come, first-served basis. 

Piers (both Newport and Balboa) are open from 5 a.m. until midnight. Public restroom facilities are available at the base of both piers.


County reports 506 new cases of COVID-19 today, 306 deaths to date, 7 deaths reported today

The cumulative COVID-19 case count in Orange County is now 11,511, with 506 new cases reported today, June 25. This marks the highest single-day increase in cases reported in OC to date. 2,901 cases have been reported in the last 10 days, 25.2 percent of the County’s cumulative case count.

The County states, “The large number of cases reported to us today reflects another large batch of cases from the State’s CalREDIE system. These 506 individuals had their specimens collected over 28 different dates.”

Sadly, the County reports that 306 people have died due to COVID-19, including seven deaths reported today.

The County reports 394 individuals are currently hospitalized with COVID-19; 147 are currently in ICU.

The first confirmed Orange County case of COVID-19 was reported on January 25.

The County reports that 5,326 people have recovered from COVID-19 to date. Visit https://occovid19.ochealthinfo.com/coronavirus-in-oc for recovery data criteria and more information.

Numbers are updated daily by Stu News Newport and reported on our social media pages @StuNewsNewport.

For questions about the data presented, call (714) 834-2000 or email This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

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Courtesy of OC Health Care Agency

Orange County COVID-19 case data, as of June 25;

Click here to visit page that is updated daily


229 confirmed cases of COVID-19 in Newport Beach to date, a jump in 17 cases today

Numbers released by the OC Health Agency today, June 25, reflect that there have been 229 confirmed cases of COVID-19 in Newport Beach to date, a net increase of 17 cases today.

Newport Beach, with a population of 87,180, has a per capita rate of 2.627 cases per thousand residents.

There have been 11,511 confirmed cases of COVID-19 in Orange County to date, including 506 new cases reported today. This marks the highest single-day increase in cases reported in OC to date. 2,901 cases have been reported in the last 10 days, 25.2 percent of the County’s cumulative case count.

The County states, “The large number of cases reported to us today reflects another large batch of cases from the State’s CalREDIE system. These 506 individuals had their specimens collected over 28 different dates.”

Sadly, the County reports that 306 people have died due to COVID-19, including seven deaths reported today.

The County reports 394 individuals are currently hospitalized with COVID-19; 147 are currently in ICU.

The city with the highest per capita rate in OC is Los Alamitos, with 7.679 cases per thousand residents. 

Huntington Beach has had 522 confirmed cases to date, a net increase of 19 cases today. Irvine has had 311 confirmed cases to date, a net increase of 18 cases today. Costa Mesa has had 258 confirmed cases to date, a net increase of 22 cases today. Laguna Beach has had 54 confirmed cases to date.

Santa Ana has had 2,415 confirmed cases to date, a net increase of 83 cases today. Anaheim has had 2,207 confirmed cases to date, a net increase of 88 cases today.

The County reports that 5,326 people have recovered from COVID-19 to date. Visit https://occovid19.ochealthinfo.com/coronavirus-in-oc for recovery data criteria and more information.

Numbers are updated daily by Stu News Newport and reported on our social media pages @StuNewsNewport.

For questions about the data presented, call (714) 834-2000 or email This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it..

229 reported cases of COVID 19 6 25 20

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212 confirmed cases of COVID-19 in Newport Beach to date, 11,016 cases countywide, 26 deaths reported today

Numbers released by the OC Health Agency today, June 24, reflect that there have been 212 confirmed cases of COVID-19 in Newport Beach to date, a net increase of eight cases today.

Newport Beach, with a population of 87,180, has a per capita rate of 2.432 cases per thousand residents.

There have been 11,016 confirmed cases of COVID-19 in Orange County to date, including 354 new cases reported today. 2,594 cases have been reported in the last 10 days, 23.5 percent of the County’s cumulative case count.

Sadly, the County reports that 299 people have died due to COVID-19, including 26 deaths reported today.

The County reports 363 individuals are currently hospitalized with COVID-19; 145 are currently in ICU.

The city with the highest per capita rate in OC is Los Alamitos, with 7.508 cases per thousand residents. 

Huntington Beach has had 503 confirmed cases to date, a net increase of eight cases today. Irvine has had 293 confirmed cases to date, a net increase of 10 cases today. Costa Mesa has had 236 confirmed cases to date, a net increase of five cases today. Laguna Beach has had 54 confirmed cases to date.

Santa Ana has had 2,332 confirmed cases to date, a net increase of 72 cases today. Anaheim has had 2,119 confirmed cases to date, a net increase of 59 cases today.

The County reports that 5,249 people have recovered from COVID-19 to date. Visit https://occovid19.ochealthinfo.com/coronavirus-in-oc for recovery data criteria and more information.

Numbers are updated daily by Stu News Newport and reported on our social media pages @StuNewsNewport.

For questions about the data presented, call (714) 834-2000 or email This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it..” 

212 reported cases of COVID 19 6 24 20

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11,016 COVID-19 cases in OC to date, 299 deaths to date, 26 deaths reported today

The cumulative COVID-19 case count in Orange County is now 11,016, with 354 new cases reported today, June 24. 2,594 cases have been reported in the last 10 days, 23.5 percent of the County’s cumulative case count.

Sadly, the County reports that 299 people have died due to COVID-19, including 26 deaths reported today.

The County reports 363 individuals are currently hospitalized with COVID-19; 145 are currently in ICU.

The first confirmed Orange County case of COVID-19 was reported on January 25.

The County reports that 5,249 people have recovered from COVID-19 to date. Visit https://occovid19.ochealthinfo.com/coronavirus-in-oc for recovery data criteria and more information.

Numbers are updated daily by Stu News Newport and reported on our social media pages @StuNewsNewport.

For questions about the data presented, call (714) 834-2000 or email This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it..” 

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Courtesy of OC Health Care Agency

Orange County COVID-19 case data, as of June 24;

Click here to visit page that is updated daily


2020 Water Quality Report reflects Mesa Water District’s high quality standards

Mesa Water District’s (Mesa Water®) 2020 Water Quality Report, which is now available, highlights that the District’s high quality, local groundwater supplies meet all stringent state and federal drinking water regulations.

“Our top goal is to provide clean, safe water to our community,” says Shawn Dewane, Mesa Water Board President. “Mesa Water conducts over 30,000 water quality tests each year to ensure our water meets rigorous drinking water standards.”

2020 Water Quality Report water hands

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Courtesy of Mesa Water District

The annual Report provides valuable information about Mesa Water’s exceptional water supply sources. Mesa Water provides 100 percent of its water supplies from local groundwater, with some of that water pumped from deep underground and treated at the state-of-the-art Mesa Water Reliability Facility.

The Report also includes water-wise tips and instructions on how to check a water meter to detect a leak. Further water use efficiency information, rebates and recommended outdoor watering schedules can be found at www.MesaWater.org/SaveWater.

The Report is now available at www.MesaWater.org/WaterQualityReport.

Additionally, it is available at Mesa Water’s office, located at 1965 Placentia Avenue, Costa Mesa, and can be requested by emailing This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it., or by calling 949.631.1201. The report can also be translated into other languages upon request.

Mesa Water notified customers about the Report via a postcard mailed in late June to residents and businesses that receive water from Mesa Water. For more information about the Report, or for water quality questions, please contact Mesa Water’s water quality staff at 949.207.5491. 

Mesa Water District serves the city of Costa Mesa, parts of Newport Beach and John Wayne Airport.


Catalina Island Yacht Club

Catalina Island Yacht Club

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 Artwork by Don Krotee 

“Catalina Island Yacht Club” traces back to the Banning ownership of the Island in the late 1890s. Structures were built for a CYC and then later, the Sophia Yacht Club, that burnt to the pilings in the Island’s great fire of 1915. Creative key members from the neighboring Tuna Club, not wanting to admit women to their fishing club, built a “social club.” In 1924, the CIYC was born. Notable celebrities included Johnny Weissmuller and Humphrey Bogart who were members. The painting, done from the artist’s reference photo, was created with transparent watercolor and opaque white paint, on handmade cotton paper.

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Artist Don Krotee has been a resident of Newport Beach since 1986. He is a past president and member of the Newport Heights Improvement Association, the 2000 City GPAC and SPON board member. He is an architect who has been drawing and painting from an early age. His original watercolor and architectural marker drawings are featured periodically in Stu News Newport.


County launching community outreach to reach most vulnerable with COVID-19 resources

Posing the question, “Could it be COVID?”, the OC Health Care Agency (HCA) this week launches a multifaceted community outreach and advertising initiative aimed at the county’s most vulnerable populations – people who can’t get COVID-19 testing from their health care providers or may not have insurance.

Partnering with community health centers who are performing FDA-approved PCR testing, the HCA launched its COVID-19 Testing Network on April 21 with five initial locations. That testing network has now grown to nearly 20 locations throughout the county – where people with symptoms can get a free PCR test – the most reliable testing available to detect current infection. In addition, four State Optum Serve test locations and more than 30 private providers now offer no-cost testing to most people recommended for testing by Public Health Services.

“We are so pleased that our community health centers have partnered with us on this extremely important work,” said Dr. Clayton Chau, Acting County Health Officer and Director of the OC Health Care Agency. “Now, we need to get the word out and make sure those test sites are fully utilized.”

County launching community outreach

Courtesy of County of Orange

Orange County residents can go to www.ochealthinfo.com/covidtest or call the HCA’s Health Referral Line at 1.800.564.8448 to make an appointment at a nearby test site. Next-day or, in some cases, same-day appointments are available. In Orange County, testing priority is given to people with symptoms as well as asymptomatic individuals who are health care workers, first responders, social service employees, or those who are a may have been exposed to someone with COVID-19. 

Community outreach efforts to promote testing knowledge and utilization initially focused on countywide nonprofit, faith-based and social service organizations. Street teams distributed more than 45,000 fliers in eight languages – English, Spanish, Vietnamese, Farsi, Arabic, Korean, Chinese and Taiwanese – and the HCA used on online platform to reach more than 40,000 parents of school children in six Orange County school districts.

The next elements of the testing campaign – marketing and advertising elements launching in June and July – include print, radio, cable TV, digital outdoor boards, check cashing sleeves, digital and social media in three languages: English, Spanish and Vietnamese.

Focusing on symptoms of COVID-19 – like cough, shortness of breath, difficulty breathing, fever, chills, shaking, muscle pain, headache, sore throat, and loss of taste or smell, the ads feature images of people coughing, holding their head and blowing their nose with the simple premise that you can get the answers you need with free COVID-19 testing.

“It’s so important for the County to get the word out that testing is free and convenient for people who have had limited access to COVID-19 tests until recently,” said Chairwoman Michelle Steel, 2nd District Supervisor. “With more than 20 test sites throughout the county, we are better able to keep our communities healthy and safe.”

“Making sure that all Orange County residents have access to testing is of the utmost importance as we continue to safely reopen our businesses and work on getting our economy back on its feet,” said Vice Chairman Andrew Do, 1st District. “Since there is currently no vaccine or treatment, it is vital for everyone to take all the precautionary measures necessary to mitigate the spread of COVID-19 and protect our vulnerable populations.”

Supervisor Doug Chaffee, 4th District, concurs. “It is important to note testing will be done at no cost and no identification is required at the test sites. So, no one should hesitate to get the testing they may need to guide appropriate treatment and care.”

“The more we do to get the information out about COVID-19, especially to those who are most vulnerable, the safer our county will be,” said Supervisor Lisa Bartlett, 5th District. “It is so important that we use every tool at our disposal to connect with our hard-to-reach populations, so they know what options are available to them for testing.”

For more information and resources about COVID-19, visit www.ochealthinfo.com/novelcoronavirus.


10,737 COVID-19 cases in OC to date, 273 deaths to date, three deaths reported today

The cumulative COVID-19 case count in Orange County is now 10,737, with 147 new cases reported today, June 23. 2,544 cases have been reported in the last 10 days, 26.5 percent of the County’s cumulative case count.*

Sadly, the County reports that 273 people have died due to COVID-19, including four deaths reported today.

The County reports 349 individuals are currently hospitalized with COVID-19; 137 are currently in ICU.

The first confirmed Orange County case of COVID-19 was reported on January 25.

The County reports that 5,177 people have recovered from COVID-19 to date. Visit https://occovid19.ochealthinfo.com/coronavirus-in-oc for recovery data criteria and more information.

Numbers are updated daily by Stu News Newport.

*Editor’s Note: The County reports that it believes the number of cases reported yesterday (175), “is an undercount reflecting fewer than expected positive lab reports entered into the State’s electronic laboratory reporting system.” For questions about the data presented, call (714) 834-2000 or email This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it..” 

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Courtesy of OC Health Care Agency

Orange County COVID-19 case data, as of June 23;

Click here to visit page that is updated daily


204 confirmed cases of COVID-19 in Newport Beach to date, 10,737 cases countywide, 273 deaths

Numbers released by the OC Health Agency today, June 23, reflect that there have been 204 confirmed cases of COVID-19 in Newport Beach to date, a net increase of four cases today.

Newport Beach, with a population of 87,180, has a per capita rate of 2.340 cases per thousand residents.

There have been 10,737 confirmed cases of COVID-19 in Orange County to date, including 147 new cases reported today. 2,544 cases have been reported in the last 10 days, 26.5 percent of the County’s cumulative case count.*

Sadly, the County reports that 273 people have died due to COVID-19, including four deaths reported today.

The County reports 349 individuals are currently hospitalized with COVID-19; 137 are currently in ICU.

The city with the highest per capita rate in OC is Los Alamitos, with 7.508 cases per thousand residents. 

Huntington Beach has had 495 confirmed cases to date, a net increase of six cases today. Irvine has had 283 confirmed cases to date, a net increase of three cases today. Costa Mesa has had 231 confirmed cases to date, a net increase of four cases today. Laguna Beach has had 54 confirmed cases to date, a net increase of one case today.

Santa Ana has had 2,260 confirmed cases to date, a net increase of 33 cases today. Anaheim has had 2,060 confirmed cases to date, a net increase of 23 cases today.

The County reports that 5,177 people have recovered from COVID-19 to date. Visit https://occovid19.ochealthinfo.com/coronavirus-in-oc for recovery data criteria and more information.

Numbers are updated daily by Stu News Newport and reported on our Facebook page @StuNewsNewport.

*Editor’s Note: The County reports that it believes the number of cases reported yesterday (175), “is an undercount reflecting fewer than expected positive lab reports entered into the State’s electronic laboratory reporting system.” For questions about the data presented, call (714) 834-2000 or email This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it..” 

204 reported cases of COVID 19 6 23 20

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Beauty at Balboa

Beauty at Balboa

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Photo by Clark Reeder (Instagram @clarkreederphoto)

Basking in a sweet summer sunset


Lido Love

Lido Love

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Photo by Kevin Pellon (Instagram @socalsnapz)

Looking at Lido Isle from above


The Dos and Don’ts for July 4th and other information you should know

The Newport Beach Police Department (NBPD) has just released important information concerning safety and street closures regarding July 4. Although most residents and business owners have knowledge of the City’s increased public safety efforts, the following are some of the reminders about what is and isn’t allowed in Newport Beach.

Updated road closure information, significant traffic advisories and community advisories are available on July 4 by texting NBJULY4TH to 888777.

Street closures are implemented beginning July 4 from 10:30 a.m. to the early morning hours of July 5. Closures include southbound Orange St. at W. Coast Highway and Via Oporto from Via Lido to 32nd St. All streets on the peninsula will be open to vehicle traffic, however, the NBPD will be monitoring traffic conditions throughout the day and will facilitate additional street closures should the need arise.

Parking for on-street and other public parking will be extremely limited in the West Newport area. All residents and visitors are cautioned to park in legal, public spaces or their own private spaces or garages. Vehicles parked illegally will be issued parking citations and may be towed.

Safety Enhancement Zone will be the area bounded by the Pacific Ocean on the south, 32nd St. and Newport Blvd. on the east, W. Coast Highway on the north and 54th St. on the west. The Safety Zone designation is effective from 12:01 a.m. on July 4 to 3 a.m. on July 5. 

The Dos and Don'ts Safety Enhancement Zone

Courtesy of City of Newport Beach

Fines within the Safety Enhancement Zone are tripled the normal amount and can be as much as $3,000.

CANCELEDThe Newport Peninsula Bike Parade

Orange County Regional Mounted Enforcement Unit will be on duty to help ensure a safe holiday.

Alcoholic beverages are prohibited in public areas including streets, sidewalks, beaches, piers and other public areas, including alcoholic beverages that have been poured into a cup. Violators are subject to citation or arrest.

Fireworks are illegal to have in one’s possession or to use. This includes “safe and sane” fireworks such as fountains and sparklers that can be purchased in nearby cities.

Rooftop Gatherings present a potential safety hazard that may violate building code ordinances. City Building Department inspectors will be working with the NBPD to address those violations.

Water Balloons or Spraying Water at pedestrians, bicyclists or vehicles is illegal. Violators are subject to citation or arrest.

Loud or Unruly Parties are illegal under the Municipal Code. Property owners and/or party hosts are responsible for the conduct of their guests. Loud and unruly parties requiring a police response could result in a citation or arrest for those present, and fines for the property owners, tenants, renters and guests. 

Beaches are open to the public. Permitted hours to the public on beaches is from 6 a.m.-10 p.m., including the Santa Ana River Jetty to Crystal Cove State Park. However, Crystal Coves beaches close at sunset. Portable barbeques are not allowed on any City beach. For those wishing to barbeque, fire rings and public barbeques are available near the Balboa Pier and at Corona del Mar State Beach on a first-come, first-served basis. 

Piers (both Newport and Balboa) are open from 5 a.m. until midnight. Public restroom facilities are available at the base of both piers.


Junior Lifeguards program is back, special community fundraiser planned to offset additional costs

On Thursday, June 25, the Helmsman Ale House and City Councilman Kevin Muldoon will join forces in support of the Newport Beach Junior Lifeguards (NBJG). A special fundraising event is planned from 5-8 p.m., with all proceeds from dine-in and takeout orders directed to the NBJG program to offset the increased operating costs and safety measures incurred in response to COVID-19.

The Junior Lifeguard program, established in 1984 as a summer series to educate children on the importance of ocean safety, was facing possible cancellation this summer due to the pandemic, before finally deciding on a very limited and restricted offering. 

Junior Lifeguards program guards run down beach

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Photo by Lana Johnson

Then, Councilman Muldoon stepped in requesting more community access that would allow many more participants in all age groups to take part. Lifeguard staff quickly obtained the needed access to these additional locations, including Marina Park, and developed a revised program for reinstatement of NBJG for all age groups.

This year’s program requires a substantial increase in NBJG planning, staffing, and equipment to assure that social distancing and other health measures are met. To assist in covering these unplanned expenses, Muldoon suggested a fundraiser and has partnered with the Helmsman Ale House, whose team itself includes a retired Newport Beach lifeguard and a number of families whose kids participate in the JG program. 

The result has been an immediate surge of support with more than $15,000 already raised. 

To continue the momentum, the community is invited to join in to show their support. Guests will enjoy complimentary signature Helmsman bites and custom NBJG-inspired Miss Mini Donuts. 

This event will support this wonderful community asset that has positively affected the lives of countless children for 36 years. For those who are unable to attend, you can still contribute to the cause at https://apps.newportbeachca.gov/payforms/junior-guard-donation.aspx.


Newport Dunes announces elopement and virtual wedding packages

Newport Dunes Waterfront Resort is offering special elopement and virtual wedding packages for couples looking to safely get married at a picturesque venue in the heart of Newport Beach.

“Our hearts go out to all of the newly engaged couples whose excitement has been overshadowed by the pandemic, forcing them to delay planning and even postpone their wedding for an indefinite amount of time,” said Erika Roldan, sales manager at Newport Dunes. “We wanted to provide a creative way to give couples the wedding of their dreams while still adhering to local and state guidelines.”

With three idyllic waterfront venues to choose from, couples can say “I Do” under the Grand Gazebo, aboard the Marina Dock, or on the Golden Sandy Beach. Packages accommodate intimate weddings of up to eight people including the bride and groom, a photographer, an officiant and four guests. Couples will have the ability to allow additional family members and friends to tune in virtually and participate in their special day. 

Newport Dunes announces

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Photo by Larissa Bahr Photography 

Newport Dunes offers three idyllic waterfront settings

Following the ceremony, celebrate beachside with a waterfront first dance and a gourmet, candlelit dinner and Champagne toast courtesy of Newport Dunes’ in-house chef. The evening will end on a sweet note with delicious desserts made by local chef Albert Daniel of Albert’s Petite Sweets. Offering cozy beach cottages with gorgeous views of the bay, Newport Dunes has everything couples need to turn the perfect day into a romantic getaway.

Wedding and elopement package prices start at $1,100 and come with a wedding planner to handle day-of coordination and help customize the wedding to fit each couple’s unique tastes. To inquire about Newport Dunes wedding packages, contact Newport Dunes Sales and Catering Office Manager Erika Roldan at 949.999.3121 or visit www.newportdunes.com/elopement. 

For more information about Newport Dunes Waterfront Resort and to view the complete Business Continuity Plan in response to COVID-19, visit www.newportdunes.com.


10,595 COVID-19 cases in OC to date, 269 deaths to date

The cumulative COVID-19 case count in Orange County is now 10,595, with 175 new cases reported yesterday, June 22.* 1,895 cases have been reported in the last seven days, 18.1 percent of the County’s cumulative case count.

Sadly, the County reports that 269 people have died due to COVID-19.

The County reports 351 individuals are currently hospitalized with COVID-19; 137 are currently in ICU.

The first confirmed Orange County case of COVID-19 was reported on January 25.

The County reports that 5,075 people have recovered from COVID-19 to date. Visit https://occovid19.ochealthinfo.com/coronavirus-in-oc for recovery data criteria and more information.

Numbers are updated daily by Stu News Newport.

*Editor’s Note: The County reports that it believes the number of cases reported yesterday (175), “is an undercount reflecting fewer than expected positive lab reports entered into the State’s electronic laboratory reporting system.” For questions about the data presented, call (714) 834-2000 or email This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it..” 

10,595 confirmed cases 1

10,595 confirmed cases 2

10,595 confirmed cases 3

10,595 confirmed cases 4

10,595 confirmed cases 5

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Courtesy of OC Health Care Agency

Orange County COVID-19 case data, as of June 22;

Click here to visit page that is updated daily


200 confirmed cases of COVID-19 in Newport Beach to date, 10,595 cases countywide, 269 deaths

Numbers released by the OC Health Agency yesterday, June 22, reflect that there have been 200 confirmed cases of COVID-19 in Newport Beach to date, a net increase of two cases yesterday.

Newport Beach, with a population of 87,180, has a per capita rate of 2.294 cases per thousand residents.

There have been 10,595 confirmed cases of COVID-19 in Orange County to date, including 175 new cases reported yesterday.* 1,895 cases have been reported in the last seven days, 18.1 percent of the County’s cumulative case count.

Sadly, the County reports that 269 people have died due to COVID-19.

The County reports 351 individuals are currently hospitalized with COVID-19; 137 are currently in ICU.

The city with the highest per capita rate in OC is Los Alamitos, with 7.508 cases per thousand residents. 

Huntington Beach has had 489 confirmed cases to date, a net increase of three cases yesterday. Irvine has had 280 confirmed cases to date. Costa Mesa has had 227 confirmed cases to date, a net increase of five cases yesterday. Laguna Beach has had 53 confirmed cases to date.

Santa Ana has had 2,227 confirmed cases to date, a net increase of 38 cases yesterday. Anaheim has had 2,037 confirmed cases to date, a net increase of 30 cases yesterday.

The County reports that 5,075 people have recovered from COVID-19 to date. Visit https://occovid19.ochealthinfo.com/coronavirus-in-oc for recovery data criteria and more information.

Numbers are updated daily by Stu News Newport and reported on our Facebook page @StuNewsNewport.

*Editor’s Note: The County reports that it believes the number of cases reported yesterday (175), “is an undercount reflecting fewer than expected positive lab reports entered into the State’s electronic laboratory reporting system.” For questions about the data presented, call (714) 834-2000 or email This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it..”

200 reported cases of COVID 19 6 22 20

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A fond farewell to CdMHS Principal Kathy Scott

A fond farewell Kathy Scott and group

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Courtesy of NMUSD

(L-R) NMUSD board member Karen Yelsey, Newport Beach Mayor Will O’Neill, Corona del Mar High School Principal Kathy Scott and NMUSD President Martha Fluor. So many well wishes to Kathy Scott, principal of Corona del Mar High School as she moves on to new and exciting endeavors. She will be recognized for all of her contributions tonight at the Newport Beach City Council meeting.


Governor’s order requires masks in high-risk settings

Gov. Gavin Newsom and state health officials issued a statewide order last week that requires all Californians to wear face masks in high-risk settings.

Those settings include anyone:

–Inside of, or in line to enter, any indoor public space.

–Obtaining services from the healthcare sector in settings including, but not limited to, a hospital, pharmacy, medical clinic, laboratory, physician or dental office, veterinary clinic, or blood bank.

–Waiting for or riding on public transportation or paratransit or while in a taxi, private car service, or ride-sharing vehicle.

–Engaged in work, whether at the workplace or performing work off-site, when:

~Interacting in-person with any member of the public;

~Working in any space visited by members of the public, regardless of whether anyone from the public is present at the time;

~Unless exempted by state guidelines for specific public settings (e.g. school or childcare center);

~Unless directed otherwise by an employee or healthcare provider June 18, 2020;

~Working in any space where food is prepared or packaged for sale or distribution to others;

~Working in or walking through common areas, such as hallways, stairways, elevators, and parking facilities;

–In any room or enclosed area where other people (except for members of the person’s own household or residence) are present when unable to physically distance. 

–Driving or operating any public transportation or paratransit vehicle, taxi, or private car service or ride-sharing vehicle when passengers are present and when no passengers are present, face coverings are strongly recommended.

–While outdoors in public spaces when maintaining a physical distance of six feet from persons who are not members of the same household or residence is not feasible.

Orange County Health Agency Director & Acting County Health Officer Clayton Chau said yesterday that the County is reviewing the order and determining the course of enforcement moving forward.

Gov. Newsom’s order comes a week after Orange County rescinded its requirement for residents to wear masks. The decision to not require masks followed the sudden resignation of OC Chief Health Officer Dr. Nicole Quick, who received threats following her previous mask requirement order.


Guest Letter

Harley Rouda

Statement regarding face masks

Harley Rouda

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Courtesy of Harley Rouda

Harley Rouda (D-CA 48th District)

Local governments, small businesses, and families across the United States have been asking the same question for months, “How do we stay healthy without collapsing our economy?” The answer? Face masks. 

A recent study from researchers in California and Texas compared COVID-19 infection rate trends in Italy and New York before and after face masks were made mandatory. They found that mandatory mask orders prevented more than 78,000 infections in Italy and 66,000 in New York City.

Face masks – in addition to practicing good hygiene and maintaining critical elements of physical distancing – give the vast majority of us the freedom to safely return to our lives. They allow small business owners to keep their lights on and employees on their payroll. In Missouri, two hairstylists tested positive for COVID-19 after serving 140 clients while unknowingly contagious. Not a single customer contracted COVID-19. How? They wore face masks.

Last week, Governor Newsom announced Californians must wear face coverings in common and public indoor spaces and outdoors when distancing is not possible. 

Orange County’s reopening has given hope to business owners and a much-needed sense of normalcy to communities. Restaurants have resumed service, shops are open for business, and you can finally get an overdue haircut. All of these liberties are in jeopardy without wide-spread mask usage.

To the people of Orange County – I encourage you to wear a mask and protect life, liberty, and the pursuit of happiness across our great communities. You have the power to keep your neighborhood healthy, help your local coffee shop survive, and keep us on the path to normalcy.


Newport-Mesa Unified School District Board Meeting Brief

Board Meeting Brief – Tuesday, June 23, 2020

The Newport-Mesa Board of Education will meet via a virtual meeting today (Tuesday, June 23) at 6 p.m. This is the Video Link to view the meeting. Public Comment may be submitted prior to the meeting via electronic submissions no later than Tuesday, June 23 by 10 a.m. via the following link: Public Comment Forum. You may click the following link to view the full NMUSD Board of Education meeting agenda.

Some of the agenda highlights include:

12.b Adoption Resolution 30-06-20 All Funds June Budget – It is recommended that the Board of Education Adopt Resolution 30-06-20 adopting the 2020-2021 All Funds June Budget and authorize its filing with the Orange County Superintendent of Schools.

12.c Approve Preliminary Instructional Model(s) for Re-Opening of Schools for the 2020-21 School Year – It is Recommended that the Board of Education approve the Preliminary Instructional Model(s) for Re-opening of schools for the 20201 School Year. In order to begin the essential planning and preparation of the upcoming school year, staff recommends approval of the Instruction Model(s) for Re-opening of Schools for the 2020-21 school year that includes all of the following:

Level 1 (In-Person 100 percent) - Used if the State of California moves to Stage 4 and Orange County and local conditions support instruction without the need for social distancing.

Level 2 (Hybrid Model) - Used if social distancing is necessary.

Level 3 (Distance Learning 100 percent) Used if a Stay-at-Home order is issued by state, county or local health officials.

Levels will be determined by the District based on state, county and local health department guidance and/or orders. The district will prepare for all three levels and confirmation of the level for the start of the school year will be provided approximately two weeks prior to the start of the school year based on the criteria and conditions at the time.

12.d. Approve of Secondary Textbook Adoption – It is recommended that the Board of Education approve the final adoption of the secondary textbook.

Title: Calculus for the Advanced Placement Course 3rd Edition (2020)

–Publisher: Bedford, Freeman, and Worth Publishing Group

–Course Title: AP Calculus AB

–Department: Mathematics

–Grades: 11 & 12

Title: Calculus for Advanced Placement, 2nd Edition

–Publisher: Cengage Learning

–Course Title: AP Calculus BC

–Department: Mathematics

–Grades: 11 & 12

Title: Mathematics: Application and Interpretation

–Publisher: Oxford University Press

–Course Title: Math IB S

–Department: Mathematics/International Baccalaureate

–Grades: 11 & 12

12.f. Approve 2020-21 Student Board Members – It is recommended that the Board of Education approve the selection of the 2020-21 Student Board members to serve during the 2020-21 Academic year.

Baylee Bogard, Newport Harbor HS

Luka Gogorishvili, Costa Mesa HS

Paulina Enriquez Vazquez, Early College HS

Troy Tsubota, Corona del Mar HS

Britney Ebergenyi, Estancia HS

Maddiline McNamer, Back Bay/Monte Vista HS

Consent Calendar

13.b.10 Approve Addition to the High and Middle School Course of Study – It is recommended that the Board of Education approve the revisions to the High & Middle Schools Course Study.

Algebra I

Geometry 

Algebra II

13.c.3 Approve the Memorandum of Understanding between the Newport-Mesa Unified School District (NMUSD) and the Newport-Mesa Federation of Teachers (NMFT) Regarding the Extending of 2017-2020 Collective Bargaining Agreement.

15.d. Receive the Newport-Mesa Federation of Teachers’ Initial Proposal to the Newport-Mesa Unified School District for Negotiations Commencing 2020-2021 – It is recommended that the Board of Education receive the Newport-Mesa Federation of Teachers (NMFT) initial proposal to the Newport-Mesa Unified School District (NMUSD) for negotiations commencing 2020-2021.

15.f. Approve Newport-Mesa Unified School District’s Initial Proposal to the Newport-Mesa Federation of Teachers for Reopener Negotiations Commencing 2020-2021. – It is recommended that the Board of Education approve the initial Proposal to the Newport-Mesa Federation of Teachers for Reopener Negotiations Commencing 2020-2021.


Lauren Smith: Stu News salutes 2020 Corona del Mar High School Graduating Senior

Lauren Smith is a graduating senior from Corona del Mar High School.

At CdMHS, she played lacrosse all four years and has been on the varsity team for three years.

Lauren Smith

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Courtesy of the Smith family

Lauren is headed to Cal State Fullerton in the fall

Looking forward to matriculating to college, Lauren will be heading to Cal State Fullerton in the fall.

Go Lauren! Go Titans!

Congratulations!

In order to celebrate our graduating seniors’ achievements together as a community, we would like to extend an invitation to graduating seniors and their parents to submit announcements about college acceptances and plans for next year. Please submit your information to This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it..


Shaking up traditions, with mixed emotions

By AMY SENK

Of course we imagined watching graduations amongst a crowd of parents and friends, seeing first our oldest get his college degree in Ohio, then our youngest get her high school diploma at Corona del Mar High School. We imagined celebratory dinners, watching kids in blue caps and gowns striding along the stage, cheering and snapping a few frantic photos before they headed off to grad night.

Instead, in both cases, we watched a live stream, pre-recorded ceremony on a couch in our basement, then ate takeout food. It wasn’t the same, it was disappointing, but it also wasn’t all bad – not in the least.

I enjoyed seeing the Corona del Mar High School graduating seniors in their self-recorded videos as their names were read during the ceremony. It was a quick glimpse into their personalities that parents don’t usually get to see from the audience on a football field during a normal grad ceremony. Some of their videos were funny, some poignant, some apparently deleted for showing things like jumping illicitly off the Lido Bridge. There was a slide show, there were the students saying they would be a Blue Devil or a Bear or a Volunteer or a Mustang…but always a Sea King. There were ASB President Caroline Brewster’s words about missing the last 63 days of high school and how much it meant to lose them. To view the YouTube video, click here.

There were messages from teachers – a touch that normal graduations don’t have. It was nice.

Shaking up traditions NBPD leads parade

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Photo by Kim Cohen

NBPD motorcade leads the CdMHS graduation procession

Shaking up traditions Grads in Mercedes

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Photo by CdM Foundation

CdMHS grads rock it in the parade

Two days after, a new tradition might have been born after some mothers organized a CdM senior drive-by parade event – which I wrote about in my last column. At 8 a.m. on a foggy Saturday, families set up chairs on the sidewalks around Newport Center Drive while students drove slowly in a loop in cars decorated with balloons, posters and flags. Three police motorcycle officers led the procession, there was a fire truck there to block one Fashion Island entrance, and Mayor Will O’Neill dropped by to check things out. Nobody could know if this event, organized to celebrate the seniors in a safe and socially distant way, would succeed or not. But in the end, everyone seemed to be enjoying themselves. It felt like it neatly tied things up, and everyone I spoke to, both students and adults, seemed to think it could be the start of a new yearly senior week activity.

Shaking up traditions Grads in Hotrod

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Photo by CdM Foundation

Old School rules for these CdMHS grads in their hot rod

Shaking up traditions Will O Neill

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Photo by Amy Senk

Mayor Will O’Neill supporting our CdMHS graduates

After 17 years, we are finished with Newport-Mesa Unified School District, and that feels weird. I no longer must have the bell schedule on my computer or need to check what the spring break dates are before making a plan. In about six weeks, we will be empty nesters, which means patterns we’ve formed around kids’ schedules and preferences can be adjusted to more selfish habits. Do you cry about this situation, or do you do a Home Alone eyebrow raise and have some fun?

Since the COVID-19 quarantine became a thing, I’ve tried really hard to embrace the ways we have had to adjust and adapt and be more flexible, tradition-wise. Easter became dropping off mimosas and jellybeans at friends’ houses and watching Andrea Bocelli sing from Milan rather than restaurant brunches or in-person church services. Rules may be looser now than in April, but we still have to change the way we mark occasions. This July 4 will have no official fireworks or street parades because no permits can be issued for events that will draw large crowds. The mayor, who has two young kids, told the Corona del Mar Residents Association board members last week that it “was a rough day when we were making this decision.

“I’m looking forward to having a mulligan next year,” he said.

Personally, I am confident we will figure something out that will make this year’s July 4 something special. Maybe every year from here on out, our family will enjoy an annual viewing of the movie version of Hamilton or something else that begins fresh and new this summer, the summer of canceled plans and adjusted expectations. Or maybe we’ll go back to our old ways, but with more appreciation that we ever had before.

Shaking up traditions Kim Cohen

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Photo by Brad Cohen

(L-R) Kim Cohen, Kim and John (J.T.) Turner accept a donation of $4,500 to Patrick’s Purpose, an organization named for the Turners’ son, who died at 16 and was a member of the CdMHS Class of 2020. Parents raised money to pay for decorations and other costs, and the leftover funds ($2,000) and a donation from Granite Escrow were contributed to Patrick’s Purpose. More than 300 graduates participated.

Shaking up traditions Be Inclusive

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Photo by CdM Foundation

“Be Inclusive PT 26” is an homage to Patrick Turner, who was a member of the class of 2020. His baseball team number was 26.

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Amy Senk has lived in Corona del Mar for 20+ years and was publisher of Corona del Mar Today, an online newspaper that ran daily for seven years. Senk, a graduate of the University of Missouri School of Journalism, is involved in the Corona del Mar Residents Association and the Corona del Mar High School PTA. She and her husband have two children.


Newport Beach – A Look Back

Photo series courtesy of Balboa Island Museum & Historical Society

Newport Beach A Look Back 6.23.20

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House Rules for a Balboa Island Cottage rented during either the summer or Balweek, 1940s or 1950s.

Balboa Island Museum and the Museum Store are located at 210 B Marine Ave., Balboa Island. They are open Monday-Thursday from 10 a.m.-5 p.m. and Friday-Sunday from 10 a.m.-6 p.m. For more information, call 949.675.3952, visit www.balboamuseum.org or email This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it..


City Manager’s Updates

From the desk of Grace Leung

Grace Leung

Courtesy of City of Newport Beach

Newport Beach City Manager Grace Leung

To Our Community: 

Several additional business sectors were cleared by Orange County to reopen on Friday, June 19. The new business sectors include nail salons, tattoo and piercing shops, body waxing, skin care and cosmetology. 

For a more complete list of the business sectors authorized to reopen, and those that have not yet been authorized, visit the City web site at this link.

This week the California Department of Public Health released updated guidance that requires Californians to wear a face covering in high-risk settings. 

The State order differs from guidance given recently by the County of Orange. In this case, the State order supersedes local guidance. 

Remember, a face covering is meant to protect others in case you are infected. Public health officials emphasize that face coverings are not substitutes for physical distancing – keeping six feet away from others – and regular hand washing. 

We are looking forward to awarding grants to qualified Newport Beach small businesses that were affected by the COVID-19 shutdowns. 

Last week the City received hundreds of applications for the Small Business Relief Grants. Our partners in this project, the Orange County Small Business Development Center, is now reviewing applications and we expect to announce the grant awardees shortly. 

COVID-19 News and Resources 

Please visit www.newportbeachca.gov/covid19 for the latest City news and useful web resources, including information about the federal, state, and county resources available to help small businesses and workers that have been financially impacted. We also have a page of free resources available through the Newport Beach Public Library and local organizations like SCORE, including online learning and business databases. Visit the Orange County Health Care Agency’s COVID-19 webpage for countywide information, including the number of local cases. You can also follow the City on Facebook, Twitter and Instagram, and look for alerts from our City staff on Nextdoor.

COVID-19 Cases in Newport Beach 

The County of Orange posts reported COVID-19 cases by city at: www.ochealthinfo.com/novelcoronavirus

The number as of June 18, 2020 [was] 182 cases in Newport Beach out of 9,292 cases total in Orange County. The number of recovered COVID-19 patients countywide [was] 4,496 as of June 18. 

Fortunately, Newport Beach cases have flattened, with only modest day-to-day increases, over the past several weeks. 

OC COVID-19 Screening and Testing Network 

The Orange County Health Care Agency maintains a growing list of FDA-approved testing sites for County residents who are showing symptoms of COVID-19. If you are showing symptoms, please contact your healthcare provider for testing information first. If you do not have a healthcare provider, visit https://occovid19.ochealthinfo.com/covid-19-testing-andscreening for testing information. The SOS Health Center in Newport Beach is an approved community testing site. Call 949.270.2100 for an appointment. 

Newport Beach works in partnership with the County of Orange and its testing, tracking and contact tracing program. This coordinated, centralized approach under County oversight is an effective way to monitor and control the spread of the coronavirus in our communities. 

4th of July Fireworks Celebrations 

Due to COVID-19 and the restriction on large gatherings, the City has not been able to issue any permits for fireworks within the City. The City Council will be discussing this in more detail at their meeting on Tuesday June 23, 2020. Staff will be communicating this change to the surrounding communities after the City Council meeting. 

Back to Business Program Active: Accepting Applications Now! 

On May 26, 2020, the City Council adopted Emergency Ordinance No. 2020-005 to authorize the temporary use of public and private property for existing businesses or institutional uses. Upon adoption, the Emergency Ordinance authorized the Community Development Director to issue Emergency Temporary Use Permits subject to the satisfaction of certain specified conditions. The Ordinance temporarily suspends discretionary permit requirements and many Municipal Code requirements during the State of Emergency. 

This Program has received substantial interest and attention from the business community, as well as religious institutions. As of June 17, 2020, the Community Development Department has issued 25 temporary use permits. Permit applications are conveniently submitted online with permits issued within 24 to 48 hours of filing a request. 

For more information, please check out www.newportbeachca.gov/backtobusiness. City staff is here to help with any questions or even to assist with application preparation. We look forward to getting you back to business!

Homelessness Update 

Addressing homelessness continues to be a priority in the City’s ongoing COVID-19 response, working closely with contractor City Net and regional partners throughout the county and state. Recently, people in Newport Beach experiencing homelessness have been placed in motels through Project Roomkey, a state initiative to provide shelter during COVID-19. Newport Beach staff and City Net staff are collaborating with the Illumination Foundation, a local non-profit agency working with the state to implement Project Roomkey. 

Success Stories: 

–A 68-year-old woman from Corona del Mar, who has experienced homelessness for the past 10 years, was sheltered last week in the Project Roomkey program. She acclimated well to the location and on-site services. Staff is coordinating placement into a senior care facility for her long-term housing. 

–A 76-year-old woman who was staying near the Newport Transportation Center is now sheltered in a motel. City Net staff is providing care and services on-site and coordinating payment with the motel. 

–Staff completed two Vulnerability Index Intake Assessments with people staying near the Newport Pier. The assessment is used to screen clients to determine proper placement in the County’s Continuum of Care system. Some assessment factors include age, health issues, and length of time being unsheltered. Case managers will follow up with the clients to provide housing assessments and prepare documentation for housing. 

–In the first two weeks of June 2020, 40 veterans and their families were housed in Orange County, thanks to new supportive housing locations for veterans and a collaborative placement effort involving several agencies. The Santa Ana Veteran’s Village supportive housing now provides 75 units with on-site resident services. The Placentia Veterans Village, scheduled to open next month, is now accepting applications and referrals. The County’s Coordinated Entry System coordinator manages a roster of eligible veterans and confers with service providers, such as City Net, to match veterans with housing opportunities. 

The City Net hotline number is 714.451.6198. Those who call the hotline may leave a detailed voicemail message for themselves or others in need and City Net staff will respond within 48 hours. For immediate assistance call the County’s Crisis Prevention Hotline at 877.7.CRISIS or 877.727.4747. To enroll in Project Roomkey, call 714.834.3000. 

Insider’s Guide for the Newport Beach City Council Meeting on June 23, 2020 

During these unprecedented times, public participation is critical for good governance and accountability. To that end, the City has implemented an Information Technology solution to ensure your voice is heard. Using a program called Zoom, the City will livestream the meeting through its website (www.newportbeachca.gov/nbtvlive) and will broadcast the meeting on its cable television channel NBTV (Spectrum Channel 3 and Cox Channel 852). The Mayor and City Council members will be seen on screen as they participate in the meeting from the City Council Chambers or their homes. Members of the public can provide public comment by calling in to provide their comments for agenda items in real time. The telephone numbers are listed after agenda item titles on the Council agenda and will appear on viewers’ screens at the appropriate times. Consistent with in-person Council meetings, callers will have three minutes to provide comments on an agenda item. If you wish to comment, you may also send your comments via email to This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. by Monday, June 22 at 5 p.m. For those unable to utilize these options, participation is available in-person from the Community Room (across from the City Council Chambers). 

Our next City Council meeting is Tuesday, June 23, 2020 with a Study Session starting at 5 p.m. The entire agenda, and all reports, can be viewed here.

Over the past several weeks members of the community who have come to love our Junior Lifeguard Program, have requested that the City move forward this year in a safe manner for the participants. Staff will update the City Council on program details and modifications, staffing and costs to provide this program in these unprecedented times. 

The State of California has implemented a number of new rules and regulations as it pertains to solid waste collection and recycling. Public Works staff will provide the Council with an update on the new regulations and what steps the community will need to take to ensure we are compliant with State law. 

The Regular Meeting begins at 6 p.m. with the following items of note: 

–Annually the City provides a number of grants to the community. These grants support social and human services, community events (such as the sandcastle contest, 5k runs and parades) and large signature events which provide the community with unique experiences. The City Council will consider these grants for funding in the 2020-21 fiscal year. 

–The City Council will consider renewal of both the Newport Beach Restaurant Association and the Corona Del Mar Business Improvement District. This action will allow these organizations to levy assessments to their members to assist with economic development activities. 

–Fifteen years ago, the City revised its sign ordinance and provided businesses with a 15-year grace period to change the sign out to meet the new code. There are many businesses that are still out of compliance with the code. City Council will consider whether or not to extend the grace period or remove the timeline requirement and allow the change to occur when a new business goes into a space with a non-conforming sign.


Fair Game

By TOM JOHNSON

TIMBER! Trees fall at Ensign and people are upset

Tom Johnson Fair Game 2I am sick. No, it’s not the coronavirus. Actually, it might be worse. It’s community “badwill,” as opposed to goodwill. And, once again, it comes from our Newport-Mesa School District leadership. And frankly, I’m sick of it!

Many of you know that the District has been planning to remove a number of mature trees at Ensign Intermediate School for months now. Some of them as old as 50 years. And why? For a parking lot bordering the school on the Cliff Drive side.

Why they need more parking is anyone’s guess. After all, the kids going to intermediate school don’t drive, and the size of the school hasn’t grown.

But it seems like the District leadership doesn’t care.

When the idea first came up, the District did a half-hearted outreach last September. Only 10-12 people showed up because their communication was so poor. Months later the District, after being challenged, responded by holding a “ThoughtExchange,” where parents and residents could log in and offer feedback.

Most people said that that exercise was just the District going through the motions and that the feedback would never even be considered.

In my opinion, not listening and approving issues outside the board room have pretty much been the standard operating procedure for this Board. In fact, rumor has it that the two relatively new board members are regularly getting “ganged up” on when they offer suggestions or differ from the reigning majority.

It’s sad, not to mention wrong.

Fair Game crane removing tree

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Photo by Lana Johnson

A 50-year-old Tipuana tree being cut down on Cliff Drive

Anyway, here’s what happened yesterday. Rumblings started that the District was going to start removing some trees. Local attorney Phil Greer, representing the community side, including neighbors, SPON and others, contacted the District’s attorney, as required, to advise them he was giving them 24 hours’ notice to seek an injunction to stop any cutting or removal.

It’s called professional courtesy.

However, the District doesn’t play that way. They quickly brought in tractors and cranes in an attempt to circumvent any coming injunction and began removing the trees. 

Fair Game Phil Greer and others

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Photo by Lana Johnson

(L-R) Phil Greer, the attorney representing SPON; Nancy Scarbrough, a SPON board member and Nancy Barfield, a local resident residing on Kings Road

The District wanted an Encroachment Permit to allow them to go over the sidewalk and through the fence to make things easier, but that was stopped by Mayor Pro Tem Brad Avery until a City hearing could take place. No problem, the District’s workforce simply entered through a back gate and went to work, basically thumbing their nose at the surrounding community.

When the cutting started, many nesting birds began frantically screaming and flying about. Animal and wildlife officials were called. But, the work continued on.

It was like they were on a mission.

The callousness of this Board of Education and leadership at the District is beyond acceptable. One report said that because of concerns that they might not be able to get all trees removed by their 6 p.m. deadline that workers were taking chainsaws to trees to damage their integrity, so they’d eventually have to be removed.

Unbelievable.

The Newport Beach City Council has called a Special Meeting Thursday to discuss Mayor Pro Tem Avery’s concern.

Unfortunately, the damage appears to have been done. We mustn’t forget. This November, three Board of Education members are facing expiring terms. President Martha Fluor has been serving the Board since 1991, yes, you read that right, and Dana Black has been serving since 1994. Both, way, way, too long.

To me, they are completely out of touch, their arrogance is appalling and they need to be voted out.

We need to thank them for their service but find new candidates, now, to replace them. Fluor represents Trustee Area 3 (think Back Bay) and Black reps Trustee Area 6 (primarily eastside Costa Mesa and the Dover Shores/Westcliff area).

We need engaged people who will be responsive to the community. 

It’s also vitally important because the next Board will select the next Superintendent of Schools.

Someone please, raise your hand and let’s get this started.

• • •

You know, I receive a lot of nice notes. One last week pointed out that “Stu News is great about thanking the first responders, police, firemen, restaurant workers, etc., and it is really well deserved.” They then went on to say, “What about Newport Beach Public Library employees?” 

Good point, thanks! Our library personnel have been working through the pandemic providing our community with books, DVDs, magazines, call-in reference questions and the number of other things they normally do. Let’s not forget that they also take care of the hundreds of residents who come to the library each day waiting for their curbside pick-ups of thousands of books and more. Those books don’t just magically appear, the library staff has to chase and find each one.

So here goes, thank you for our “essential workers” at our library for the job they do.

• • •

Every year since 1976 when wide receiver Kelvin Kirk was selected by the Pittsburg Steelers with pic #487, Irrelevant Week has honored the last draft pick of the NFL here in Newport Beach. This year though, like everything else, has brought a new set of challenges.

I checked in with Irrelevant Week CEO Melanie Salata last week to see what is planned this summer for New York Giant linebacker Tae Crowder, out of the University of Georgia, who was this year’s final pick.

“Irrelevant Week has been in a ‘holding pattern’ to see what happens with allowing people to gather,” said Melanie. “I think the longer we wait the better are our chances of celebrating Mr. Irrelevant XLV. I am focused on the timing to be right before the NY Giants first game (this fall). Having said that, all things are subject to change and we may have to micro-size his celebration, but we think that he still should be honored and celebrated.”

Can you imagine being the only Mr. Irrelevant not honored? Talk about the definition of irrelevant.


198 confirmed cases of COVID-19 in Newport Beach to date, 10,422 cases countywide, 269 deaths

Numbers released by the OC Health Agency today, June 21, reflect that there have been 198 confirmed cases of COVID-19 in Newport Beach to date, a net increase of five cases today.

Newport Beach, with a population of 87,180, has a per capita rate of 2.271 cases per thousand residents.

There have been 10,422 confirmed cases of COVID-19 in Orange County to date, including 434 new cases reported today. This is the highest single-day increase in the County to date. 1,918 cases have been reported in the last seven days, 18.4 percent of the County’s cumulative case count.

Sadly, the County reports that 269 people have died due to COVID-19; two deaths were reported today.

The County reports 332 individuals are currently hospitalized with COVID-19; 133 are currently in ICU.

The city with the highest per capita rate in OC is Los Alamitos, with 7.508 cases per thousand residents. 

Huntington Beach has had 486 confirmed cases to date, a net increase of 12 cases today. Irvine has had 280 confirmed cases to date, a net increase of 18 cases today. Costa Mesa has had 222 confirmed cases to date, a net increase of 14 cases today. Laguna Beach has had 53 confirmed cases to date

Santa Ana has had 2,189 confirmed cases to date, a net increase of 73 cases today. Anaheim has had 2,007 confirmed cases to date, a net increase of 83 cases today.

The County reports that 4,953 people have recovered from COVID-19 to date. Visit https://occovid19.ochealthinfo.com/coronavirus-in-oc for recovery data criteria and more information.

Numbers are updated daily by Stu News Newport and reported on our Facebook page @StuNewsNewport.

Editor’s Note: The County reports that the June 20 and June 21 new case counts are higher due to “resolution of an electronic laboratory reporting delay” but does specify on which date(s) these positive cases should have been reported.

198 reported cases of COVID 19

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County surpasses 10,000 COVID-19 cases, reports another 434 cases, 269 deaths to date

The cumulative COVID-19 case count in Orange County is now 10422, with 434 new cases reported today, June 21. This is the highest single-day increase in the County to date. 1,918 cases have been reported in the last seven days, 18.4 percent of the County’s cumulative case count.

Sadly, the County reports that 269 people have died due to COVID-19; two deaths were reported today.

The County reports 332 individuals are currently hospitalized with COVID-19; 133 are currently in ICU.

The first confirmed Orange County case of COVID-19 was reported on January 25.

The County reports that 4,953 people have recovered from COVID-19 to date. Visit https://occovid19.ochealthinfo.com/coronavirus-in-oc for recovery data criteria and more information.

Numbers are updated daily by Stu News Newport.

Editor’s Note: The County reports that the June 20 and June 21 new case counts are higher due to “resolution of an electronic laboratory reporting delay” but does specify on which date(s) these positive cases should have been reported.

10,422 confirmed cases 1

10,422 confirmed cases 2

10,422 confirmed cases 3

10,422 confirmed cases 4

10,422 confirmed cases 5

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Courtesy of OC Health Care Agency

Orange County COVID-19 case data, as of June 21s;

Click here to visit page that is updated daily