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Seal to perform at Pacific Amphitheatre, first of Action Sports lineup and Speedway Fair Derby this summer

A special pre-OC Fair show is coming to Pacific Amphitheatre this summer, featuring singer-songwriter Seal on Wednesday, July 10 at 7:30 p.m. The OC Fair has also announced the first of the Action Sports Arena lineup, which includes X-treme Freestyle Moto-X on Friday, July 12 and Saturday, July 13 at 8 p.m. and the Speedway Fair Derby on Sunday, July 14 at 7:30 p.m.

Seal to perform Seal

Courtesy of OC Fair & Event Center

Seal to perform July 10 at Pacific Amphitheatre

SealIn a career that spans more than two decades, multi-platinum singer-songwriter Seal has been focused on a single creative pursuit: expressing the full experience of love through song. Known for his one-of-a-kind soaring, husky baritone voice and classic songwriting, Seal has seen success across numerous genres of music. His smooth vocal delivery on hits like “Crazy” and “Kiss from a Rose” quickly cemented his status as a formidable singer, and over the years he’s extended his influence with a wide catalog of original music and soulful covers. He has earned multiple Grammy awards and sold more than 30 million albums worldwide. Tickets start at $40. (Tickets purchased for this concert can also be used as one free admission ticket to the 2019 OC Fair.)

Seal to perform X treme

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X-treme Freestyle Moto-X comes to the Action Sports Arena July 12 and 13

X-treme Freestyle Moto-X – With its 50-year legacy and longtime history at OC Fair & Event Center, Costa Mesa Speedway brings two exciting nights of X-treme Freestyle Moto-X to Action Sports Arena, where spectators will be at the edge of their seats as races pull off impressive maneuvers and jaw-dropping stunts. Tickets start at $15: July 12 and July 13.

Seal to perform Speedway

Speedway Fair Derby returns July 14 to the Action Sports Arena

2019 Speedway Fair Derby – Also produced by Costa Mesa Speedway, the Speedway Fair Derby is headed back to the Action Sports Arena, featuring impossibly tight turns, sidecar races and more. The derby and moto-x performances are all part of Costa Mesa Speedway’s 11-night racing season, which runs May through October. Reserved seating at Action Sports Arena includes admission to the OC Fair. General admission seating is available on a first-come, first-served basis and does not require an additional ticket. Tickets start at $15.

Tickets to these shows will go on sale at 10 a.m. on Saturday, March 23. Tickets are available via Ticketmaster and include admission to the 2019 OC Fair. More performances and action sports at the Fair will be announced in the coming months.

Super Pass holders can purchase tickets to select Pacific Amphitheatre, The Hangar and Action Sports Arena performances at a two-for-one discount. The 2019 Super Pass is a season pass that includes admission to all 23 days of the OC Fair, as well as several exclusive discounts, and is on sale now at www.ocfair.com/superpass.

The 2019 OC Fair is July 12 - August 11, open Wednesday - Sunday.

OC Fair & Event Center is located at 88 Fair Drive, Costa Mesa.


Time is running out to vote for your favorite sculpture

Help choose the sculpture for Phase IV of the Sculpture Exhibition in Civic Center Park by selecting your favorite sculptures from the 31 submissions in the recent Call for Entry. Up to 10 artworks may be selected and prominently showcased for two years in the heart of Newport Beach in Civic Center Park. The period for voting ends Wednesday, March 20.

This poll allows members of the community and any other art lovers the opportunity to vote for the piece they would most like to see exhibited.

Time is running out

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Courtesy of nbpl.org

“Cosmic Glints” by Patricia Vader, one of the sculptures currently on display at Civic Center Park

Here’s how it works:

–Voting is online at www.sparkoc.com/nb_sculpture_poll. (You can view all the submissions with the artists’ names.)

–Members of the public may vote for up to three favorite works among those submitted.

–Individuals may only cast their votes once.

The result of the public vote will be taken into consideration by the judging panel, and the vote is advisory in nature and non-binding.

On Thursday, March 21 at 5 p.m., the Civic Arts Commission is holding a special meeting to discuss the sculptures, and the public is invited to attend. It takes place in the Central Library’s Conference Room on the Lower Level by the Media Lab, 1000 Avocado Ave., Newport Beach.

Coordination of the Sculpture Exhibition in Civic Center Park is managed under contract with the City of Newport Beach by Arts Orange County, the nonprofit countywide arts council. For more information, visit http://artsoc.org/.


Newport Beach – A Look Back

Photo series courtesy of Balboa Island Museum & Historical Society

Newport Beach A Look Back 3.19.19

In 1936, Hershey’s Café, which later became The Village Inn, added the apartment onto the building. The lower floor is now part of the Village Inn’s dining room.

 Balboa Island Museum and the Museum Store are located at 210 B Marine Ave., Balboa Island. They are open Monday - Thursday from 10 a.m. -  5 p.m. and Friday - Sunday from 10 a.m. - 6 p.m. For more information, call 949.675.3952, visit www.balboamuseum.orgor email This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.


ENC to hold native plant and rain barrel sale

Are you ready to save money on water and landscape maintenance? Whether your goal is to draw more butterflies or birds to your yard, save water, reduce pesticide use, or showcase color throughout the year, native plants can help.

On Saturday, March 23, the Environmental Nature Center (ENC) is holding a native plant and rain barrel sale.

ENC to hold native plant butterfly

Click on photo for a larger image

Schedule of Events:

–9 a.m. - 12 p.m.: Rain Barrels International will be on hand to sell rain barrels, with $20 from each sale benefiting the ENC.

10 a.m.: Free Workshop on Rainwater Harvesting

11 a.m.: Free Workshop on Native Plants for the Foodie Garden

Please note: Milkweed will not be available at this sale, although the ENC will have plenty of other host and nectar plants for the many dozens of other butterfly species native to the OC. It is not available from their supplier yet, however, they will notify you when it is.

ENC members will receive a 10 percent discount on native plants.

Environmental Nature Center is located at 1601 E. 16th St., Newport Beach.


Capturing a butterfly’s beauty

Capturing a butterflyjpg

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Photo by Mary Hurlbut

The camera captures a Painted Lady before continuing its annual migration to breeding grounds in the Pacific Northwest


Spirit Run on St. Patrick’s Day, March 17 created memorable moments

By LANA JOHNSON

Spirit Run on Hector Martinez

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Courtesy of Spirit Run

Hector Martinez takes first in the Youth 5k (13 - 14 year olds)

The 36th Annual Spirit Run, which took place on St. Patrick’s Day, Sunday, March 17 at Fashion Island, made for a day filled with fun and fitness, friendly sports competition, cherished time spent with family and friends, and myriad activities to keep youngsters energized...even after they crossed the finish line.

Spirit Run on Maya Weigel

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Courtesy of Spirit Run

Maya Weigel crosses the finish line to take fourth in the Elite Mile (women’s)

Offering something for every fitness level, from walkers to elite athletes, youth to toddlers and furry four-legged friends in the Dog Mile, the day captured a festive wearing o’ the green...complete with a costume contest. The Expo area was filled with interactive and informative vendor booths, bungee trampolines, a climbing wall and food samples. The CdM Cheer and Jazz band kept the pace lively.

Spirit Run on Isla Earlabaugh

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Photo by Lana Johnson

Isla Earlabaugh, 13 months, struts her stuff in the Toddler Trot. She also participated in the Family Mile with her parents and two brothers.

Net proceeds raised from Spirit Run benefit the participating Newport-Mesa Unified School District (NMUSD) schools and high school teams. Schools outside NMUSD also fundraised for their schools through the “Dash for Cash” program.

Spirit Run on OLQA

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Photo by Lana Johnson

Students from Our Lady Queen of Angels (OLQA) came out in full force to participate in Spirit Run

For the third consecutive year, Stu News was proud to be Spirit Run’s media sponsor.

Spirit Run on girl and pooch

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Photo by Lana Johnson

Participating in the Costume Contest, this Spirit Run participant donned her best rainbow garb and found her pot of gold on the back of her trusty pooch

Check out more photos from Spirit Run below by Lana Johnson


Energy and calm to go...CdM’s Jessica Frandson’s latest business venture puts her stamp on aromatherapy

By AMY SENK

Jessica Frandson of Corona del Mar calls herself – accurately – a serial entrepreneur. Born with a creative streak, courtesy of her Laguna Beach family of artists, early on she paired that with an uncanny eye for business. Spotting the juice bar trend in high school (she wrote a business plan for her own), then spending more than 20 years at Simple Green, she worked her way up to head of marketing. She opened Inkwells Paperie in CdM, then created the Twistband hair tie. When she sold that business, she created a staging company for real estate agents. Somewhere in the middle, she opened a popup holiday gift shop in CdM, remodeled her home and put it on the Corona del Mar High School PTA Home Tour. Frandson has always found a way to combine her senses of style and business, all while raising her daughter with her husband.

Her most recent venture is Campo Beauty, a business she created with her best friend in Texas, that combines aromatherapy with her sleek, minimal design aesthetic. 

Energy and calm to go Jessica Frandson

Click on photo for a larger image

Courtesy of Campo Beauty

Entrepreneur Jessica Frandson

Campo was born when Frandson visited her friend, Jill King, and the two noticed they had the same perfume. They began to compare notes, and King brought out a journal she’d kept since college with recipes using essential oils. They decided to combine interests, and forces, to create the Campo brand, with an eye toward an upscale market rather than a boring item on a shelf in a “crunchy, wellness health food store.”

“If Tom Ford and Apple had a baby and wanted to do essential oil, what would that look like?” Frandson said. “Minimal. Black and white. We studied the art of perfume. We sourced from the very best fields. We don’t skimp on ingredients. We said, ‘Let’s make it intoxicating. Let’s make in portable…’”

The Campo product line includes oils, diffusers and even smudge sticks that can “cleanse, purify (and) clear negative energy,” according to the company’s website. The oils, some of which come in tiny bottles with built-in rollers for easy application, are aimed to help you sleep, or focus, relax or find a boost of energy. The diffusers come in three colors, or you can choose a travel version that is USB powered. Prices start at $15 for the smudge sticks, with the oils around $25 and up.

According to Frandson, the two women have a divide-and-conquer approach to work, with Jill doing a lot of behind-the-scenes work, and both of them collaborating on formulas and sourcing the best quality ingredients. Frandson is detail-oriented. The bottles, for example, are violet glass from the Netherlands, which block all harmful light that might affect the oils inside. New products are constantly in the works – and a sleep line was recently launched. The women are considering creating a coffee table book that would feature photographs of the beautiful fields in Europe, where they find the sources for their natural scents.

Besides the online store (www.campobeauty.com), the products are sold at Laguna Supply, Anthropologie, J Crew and are featured at the Four Seasons, the Lido House and Marriott hotel properties. It may be a fun partnership fueled by two longtime girlfriends, but it most definitely isn’t a hobby.

“Any business I start, I must love the idea, and it has to be a lucrative venture out of the gate,” Frandson said. “Campo has been profitable from the start as a result of creating a beautiful collection with healthy profit margins, having an amazing sales team, timing and keeping the operating costs down by wearing a lot of hats.”

~~~~~~~~

Amy Senk has lived in Corona del Mar for 20 years and was publisher of Corona del Mar Today, an online newspaper that ran daily for seven years. Senk, a graduate of the University of Missouri School of Journalism, is involved in the Corona del Mar Residents Association and the Corona del Mar High School PTA. She and her husband have two children.


Dick Dale, “King of the Surf Guitar,” dead at 81

Dick Dale

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Dick Dale headlining the Rendevous Ballroom

Dick Dale, known as the “The King of the Surf Guitar,” died Saturday, March 16.

Dale was a local legend, filling the Rendezvous Ballroom in Balboa with 3 - 4,000 people for surfer dances in the 1960s.

His songs included his signature single “Misirlou” and “Let’s Go Trippin.” His first full-length album was Surfers’ Choice produced in 1962, which was later picked up and distributed nationally by Capitol Records. His next album was King of the Surf Guitar.

Dale’s songs were featured in Beach Party, starring Frankie Avalon and Annette Funicello in 1963 and Back to the Beach in 1987.

“Misirlou” was the famous lead-in song through the opening credits to the movie Pulp Fiction in 1994.

Dale was married twice, first to Jeannie Monsour, a Las Vegas dancer and then to Lana, who would become his manager.

At one point, Dale owned what is commonly known as the Gillette house on the end of the Peninsula.

He was named to the Surfing Walk of Fame in Huntington Beach in 2011 and the Musicians Hall of Fame in Nashville in 2009.

Dale was 81 years old.


Age Well Senior Services invites Mayor Dixon to deliver Meals on Wheels

In observance of the 17th annual national “Mayors Drive for Meals on Wheels Campaign,” nonprofit Age Well Senior Services has partnered with the mayors of several South Orange County cities to personally deliver nutritious meals to homebound seniors living in their respective OC cities.

Newport Beach Mayor Diane Dixon will drive and deliver a route in Newport Beach, from 11:30 a.m. - 12:30 p.m. on Friday, March 22.

The campaign is designed to heighten the awareness of the growing number of OC seniors in need of nutritious meals and the importance of the Meals on Wheels program conducted by Age Well Senior Services in our communities. March 18 - 22 is the designated week that city officials have been encouraged to actively join the Meals on Wheels program and participate within their cities.

Age Well Senior Services invites

Click on photo for a larger image

Newport Beach Mayor Diane Dixon

“We appreciate and are grateful that Mayor Dixon will have an opportunity to see firsthand how vital the Meals on Wheels program is to our seniors,” said Age Well Senior Services CEO Steve Moyer. “We thank her in advance for her participation.”

Established in 1975, Age Well relies heavily on donations in order to continue providing critical services, resources and programs to seniors in 21 cities in south Orange County. According to Moyer, Age Well’s message is simple: “If you live in OC, please give in OC. Our goal is to help seniors in our community to Age Well.”

In 2018, in Orange County, Age Well served 342,474 Meals on Wheels, and 75,747 lunches; provided 64,568 non-emergency medical transportation trips for seniors in need; and gave 4,627 hours of in-home case management. In addition, through its 10 senior centers, Age Well offers health and wellness classes, along with a broad spectrum of activities, seminars and educational classes.

To make a donation to Age Well, visit www.myagewell.org or call 949.855.8033.


Stump the Stu

Telling time by the sun

Stump the Stu 3.19.19

Click on photo for a larger image

Okay! It’s time for you to guess where you can tell the time by the sun...with this contemporary sundial on the top of a tower. Stu knows you can guess this one, located in a busy shopping mecca.

Take the challenge and submit your answers to This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it..

The answer will appear in Friday’s edition, along with the correct guesses. So, join us for this local adventure.

If you have a unique spot or icon around town that you think Stu News Newport readers would enjoy finding out about, please shoot it, share it and give us the location, so we can challenge them! Happy Hunting.


Spring Celebration begins Friday at Roger’s Gardens

Celebrate the spring season at Roger’s Gardens from March 22 - 24. Experience a weekend of artistic garden displays, special events, seminars and interactive demonstrations to inspire ideas for your home and garden.

Rejuvenate your garden by learning from gardening experts on how to grow abundant rose blooms, create a bountiful edible garden, landscape with native plants, and the benefits of nurturing indoor plants.

For entertaining inspirations, view beautiful tablescapes, learn from their designers how to make floral and planted arrangements, and taste their most popular seasonal gourmet foods.

The gardens have been inspired by Spring itself with endless photo opportunities. Embrace the season while learning how to bring beauty into your home and garden.

Spring Celebration tulips

Click on photo for a larger image

Here are some Spring Celebration highlights:

Gadbois Jewelry Trunk Show on Friday, March 22 from 10 a.m. - 4 p.m. Meet the local Mother & Daughter duo behind Gadbois Jewelry, exclusively available at Roger’s Garden. Industry veteran, Frances Gadbois, and daughter and co-founder, Charlotte, have partnered to create a fresh and vibrant, luxury jewelry line with classic and wearable staples that will outlast the test of time with their signature strié texturing running through each hand-finished piece. With something for everyone, Frances and Charlotte, have combined their elegant design expertise and modern flare to build a versatile jewelry collection that can be worn to yoga or out on the town. Breaking down the walls of generational stereotypes, the collections range from dainty giftable diamond pendants or ring stackers, to statement cocktail rings showcasing their rare, luxurious semi-precious gemstones. 

New Spring Container Concepts with Kathleen Nestell & Sarah Smith on Saturday, March 23 at 9 a.m. Learn from their horticulture and design specialists, Kathleen Nestell & Sarah Smith, how to create a blooming spring container garden. They will explain how to incorporate amazing textures and layers to create containers that will be the visual envy of the neighborhood, while focusing on thriving plants that flaunt their best blooms and buds all season.

Interactive Displays & Demonstrations on Saturday, March 23 from 10 a.m. - 3 p.m. Among these are Edible Garden Demonstrations with David Rizzo, Expert Rose Advice in the Nursery, Tablescape Displays & Tips by Emily Morgan, Kokedama Demonstrations in the Pergola, Gourmet Food Tastings in the Gallery, Landscape Design Demonstration, Ceramic Pottery Design Demonstration with Dustin Gimble and Farmhouse mocktails and small bites.

Interactive Displays & Demonstrations on Sunday, March 24 from 12 - 4 p.m. In addition to experiencing similar happenings as Saturday, enjoy floral arrangement demonstrations on the Patio.

Spring Celebration Bluebirds and Wrens

Click on photo for a larger image

Courtesy of Roger’s Gardens

Nature Gardening featuring Bluebirds and Wrens in your Garden with Kathleen Nestell & Ron Vanderhoff on Sunday, March 24 at 10 a.m. Western Bluebirds and House Wrens may be the most sought-after birds to attract to a garden. Attracting wild birds often involves the correct nest boxes, which are easy to provide, but vary depending on the type of bird. Learn the secrets to attracting these charming and entertaining birds, as well as, finches, sparrows and others. Nestell and Vanderhoff will demonstrate and explain in this photographic seminar the proper sizes and other nesting details. They will also review the three important ingredients for attracting a wide variety of feathered wildlife: places to raise young birds, places to feed and places to hide. Nestell is an authority on wild bird and gardening, an advocate of gardens that encourage wildlife and sustain the planet. She is also a former owner/operator of a Wild Birds Unlimited retail store.

For more information on the Spring Celebration, visit www.rogersgardens.com.

Roger’s Gardens and Farmhouse are located at 2301 San Joaquin Hills Rd., Corona del Mar.


Sign of the times

On Fridays we give you a partial glimpse of a sign around town. You guess what the overall name of the business is.

This one puzzled everyone, as Stu received no correct responses. You can find this “spicy chili” in the sign welcoming you to Chipotle with two locations in Newport Beach: 3101 Newport Blvd. on the Peninsula and at 1322 Bison Ave. in The Bluffs Shopping Center. Check out this eatery for authentic Mexican food offering fresh, made-to-order bowls, burritos, tacos and salads.

If you’re a business and you want to play, you can send us a high-quality photo of your business sign to This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. and we’ll take it from there and challenge our readers.

Let’s have some fun!

SOTT 3.19.19

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Sunny days in Newport Beach

Sunny days in Newport

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Photo by Jason Berry (Instagram @its_jason_berry)

Spring officially begins tomorrow, March 20, marking longer, sunnier days in our beautiful city


Pink and gold

Pink and gold

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Photo by Tina Treglia (Instagram @ttregs) 

The sky, tower and palm came together to create a perfect Newport moment near The Wedge


Fair Game

By TOM JOHNSON

Spring is here and so are the Anteaters

Fair Game Tom New

Spring has sprung! Or at least it will tomorrow at 21:58 UCT.

What is the UCT you ask? The Coordinated Universal Time defined as “on the day of the equinoxes, the sun shines directly on the equator and the length of day and night is nearly equal.”

Or, also called the Vernal or March Equinox, “when the sun crosses the celestial equator, moving south to north.”

And that is your study of meteorology for the day.

• • •

Looking for a longshot in this year’s NCAA March Madness? Look no further than our own UCI. The Anteaters finished the year with a record of 30-5 and play their first tournament game against Kansas State this Friday, March 22 at 2 p.m. in San Jose.

Trivia question? Who was the last Big West team (that’s the conference of UCI) to win 30 games in a season? If you said UNLV in 1990-91, go to the head of the class.

The Runnin’ Rebels, coached by the infamous Jerry Tarkanian, finished 34-1 and won the National Championship. Their roster included the likes of Larry Johnson, Stacey Augmon and Greg Anthony.

Back to UCI. They play a great team game. In the most recent Big West Conference Championships over the past weekend, several different stars stepped up to carry the load. 

Jonathan Galloway, 6-10, and Tommy Rutherford, 6-8, are in the middle. Guard Max Hazard lit it up from three-point land in the finals against Fullerton and Robert Cartwright saved the day against Long Beach in the semis.

Can UCI win? Sure, but it’ll be a longshot. The Wildcats finished the year 25-8 and won the Big 12.

One common opponent is Texas A&M. UCI beat the Aggies 74-73, while Kansas State lost to them 65-53.

The Anteaters are playing in the South bracket, with the victor playing the winner of WisconsinOregon on Sunday.

Go Eaters!

• • •

Trees on Marine Avenue in Balboa Island may soon be destined for the woodpile as the City looks at infrastructure upgrades.

Obviously, residents don’t want to lose the eucalyptus. However, there is concern that the trees’ root system is being supported by the surrounding, but aging pavement and concrete.

Independent arborists are presently studying the situation.

But, since the City has to err on the side of caution, it probably doesn’t look promising.

• • •

Finally, the Orange County Board of Education appears to be shoving a charter down the throats of the Newport-Mesa School District area.

Recently, the OCBE approved the International School for Science and Culture much to the chagrin of NMUSD and many local parents in attendance.

The new school potentially removes monies that would otherwise go to support the NMUSD.

The issue passed on a vote of 3-2, with Trustee Mari Barke, who represents Newport Beach, voting for the project.

Boo!


Spring Celebration begins March 22 at Roger’s Gardens

Celebrate the Spring season at Roger’s Gardens from March 22 - 24. Experience a weekend of artistic garden displays, special events, seminars and interactive demonstrations to inspire ideas for your home and garden.

Rejuvenate your garden by learning from gardening experts on how to grow abundant rose blooms, create a bountiful edible garden, landscape with native plants, and the benefits of nurturing indoor plants.

For entertaining inspirations, view beautiful tablescapes, learn from their designers how to make floral and planted arrangements, and taste their most popular seasonal gourmet foods.

The gardens have been inspired by Spring itself with endless photo opportunities. Embrace the season while learning how to bring beauty into your home and garden.

Spring Celebration tulips

Click on photo for a larger image

Here are some Spring Celebration highlights:

Gadbois Jewelry Trunk Show on Friday, March 22 from 10 a.m. - 4 p.m. Meet the local Mother & Daughter duo behind Gadbois Jewelry, exclusively available at Roger’s Garden. Industry veteran, Frances Gadbois, and daughter and co-founder, Charlotte, have partnered to create a fresh and vibrant, luxury jewelry line with classic and wearable staples that will outlast the test of time with their signature strié texturing running through each hand-finished piece. With something for everyone, Frances and Charlotte, have combined their elegant design expertise and modern flare to build a versatile jewelry collection that can be worn to yoga or out on the town. Breaking down the walls of generational stereotypes, the collections range from dainty giftable diamond pendants or ring stackers, to statement cocktail rings showcasing their rare, luxurious semi-precious gemstones. 

New Spring Container Concepts with Kathleen Nestell & Sarah Smith on Saturday, March 23 at 9 a.m. Learn from their horticulture and design specialists, Kathleen Nestell & Sarah Smith, how to create a blooming spring container garden. They will explain how to incorporate amazing textures and layers to create containers that will be the visual envy of the neighborhood, while focusing on thriving plants that flaunt their best blooms and buds all season.

Interactive Displays & Demonstrations on Saturday, March 23 from 10 a.m. - 3 p.m. Among these are Edible Garden Demonstrations with David Rizzo, Expert Rose Advice in the Nursery, Tablescape Displays & Tips by Emily Morgan, Kokedama Demonstrations in the Pergola, Gourmet Food Tastings in the Gallery, Landscape Design Demonstration, Ceramic Pottery Design Demonstration with Dustin Gimble and Farmhouse mocktails and small bites.

Interactive Displays & Demonstrations on Sunday, March 24 from 12 - 4 p.m. In addition to experiencing similar happenings as Saturday, enjoy floral arrangement demonstrations on the Patio.

Spring Celebration Bluebirds and Wrens

Click on photo for a larger image

Courtesy of Roger’s Gardens

Nature Gardening featuring Bluebirds and Wrens in your Garden with Kathleen Nestell & Ron Vanderhoff on Sunday, March 24 at 10 a.m. Western Bluebirds and House Wrens may be the most sought-after birds to attract to a garden. Attracting wild birds often involves the correct nest boxes, which are easy to provide, but vary depending on the type of bird. Learn the secrets to attracting these charming and entertaining birds, as well as, finches, sparrows and others. Nestell and Vanderhoff will demonstrate and explain in this photographic seminar the proper sizes and other nesting details. They will also review the three important ingredients for attracting a wide variety of feathered wildlife: places to raise young birds, places to feed and places to hide. Nestell is an authority on wild bird and gardening, an advocate of gardens that encourage wildlife and sustain the planet. She is also a former owner/operator of a Wild Birds Unlimited retail store.

For more information on the Spring Celebration, visit www.rogersgardens.com.

Roger’s Gardens and Farmhouse are located at 2301 San Joaquin Hills Rd., Corona del Mar.


Segerstrom Center presents Grammy winner Catherine Russell on March 23

Segerstrom Center for the Arts welcomes the Center debut of Grammy® Award- winning vocalist Catherine Russell for two performances on March 23 at 7 p.m. and 9 p.m. in Samueli Theater. Her repertoire features a selection of gems from the 1920s through the present – vital interpretations, bursting with soul and humor.

With an off-the-beaten-path song selection, sparkling acoustic swing,
and a stunning vocal approach, Russell has joined the ranks of the greatest interpreters and performers of American Popular Song. 

Segerstrom Center presents Russell

Click on photo for a larger image

Courtesy of scfta.org

Grammy winner Catherine Russell to grace the Samueli Theater stage

Single tickets start at $69 and are available online at www.scfta.org, at the Box Office at 600 Town Center Drive in Costa Mesa, or by calling 714.556.2787. For inquiries about group ticket savings of 10 or more, call the Group Services office at 714.755.0236.

Samueli Theater is located at Segerstrom Center for the Arts, 600 Town Center Drive, Costa Mesa.


Public invited to participate in Harbor Visioning Forum

The City of Newport Beach (City) Harbor Commission is hosting a Harbor Visioning Forum to develop a long-term vision for Newport Harbor. Community members and harbor users are invited to participate on Monday, March 18 from 6:30 - 8 p.m. at Marina Park, located at 1600 W. Balboa Blvd., Newport Beach.

Attendees will participate in group exercises to solicit input regarding the current state of the harbor, aspects that are currently serving the community well and areas that need improvement. Feedback collected from the forum, along with future sessions, will be used as part of a long-term Harbor Plan to be developed by the City’s Harbor Commission.

Public invited to participate

Click on photo for a larger image

Courtesy of City of Newport Beach

Newport Harbor is one of the largest-recreational harbors in the United States and supports numerous recreational and commercial activities, has many waterfront residential neighbors and offers scenic and biological resources. It is considered by many to be the jewel of the city. The Harbor Commission is an advisory body of the Newport Beach City Council that is charged with representing the diverse users and resources of Newport Harbor.

For more information about Newport Harbor or the March 18 Visioning Forum, contact the City’s Harbor Department by calling 949.270.8159 or visiting www.newportbeachca.gov/harbor.


Mesa Water District celebrates sixth anniversary of its Reliability Facility

Mesa Water District is celebrating the sixth anniversary of its Mesa Water Reliability Facility (MWRF), which allows Mesa Water® to serve its customers with 100 percent locally sourced groundwater supplies  – a unique achievement in Orange County.

Initially built in 2000, the MWRF was improved from 2010 to 2012 to boost its production capacity, and was recommissioned on March 13, 2013. The MWRF’s state-of-the-art treatment technology increased the facility’s water production by 50 percent over the prior treatment process. In addition, the improved MWRF is more energy efficient, with less greenhouse gas emissions and a lower carbon footprint.

Mesa Water District celebrates

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Courtesy of Mesa Water District

“The MWRF is a keystone of our innovative water reliability program,” said Mesa Water Board President, Shawn Dewane. “We are proud to be the only Orange County water provider to serve 100 percent of our community’s water needs with local water.”

With a one-million gallon reservoir and two deep-water wells, the MWRF pumps water from about 1,000 feet underground. The MWRF water is soft, high-quality water that meets all drinking water standards, and arrives with an amber tint which comes from an ancient redwood forest that formerly flourished in the area. Using nanofiltration technology, the water is filtered to ensure it is clear at the tap for Mesa Water customers.

The MWRF also features water-wise gardens with drought-tolerant plants, along with a small redwood forest as a tribute to the area’s past and the ancient-amber aquifer tinted by redwood remnants found deep in the lower groundwater basin.

Mesa Water is committed to the perpetual investment in, and proactive maintenance of, its water system, including the MWRF, which pumps, treats, and delivers around 1.4 billion gallons of quality drinking water annually to homes and businesses in its service area. An independent special district, Mesa Water provides water service to 110,000 residents in an 18-square-mile service area that includes most of Costa Mesa, a portion of Newport Beach and John Wayne Airport.


Increases in JWA airline traffic in January year over year

Airline passenger traffic at John Wayne Airport increased in January 2019 as compared with January 2018. In January 2019, the airport served 819,392 passengers, an increase of 0.3 percent when compared with the January 2018 passenger traffic count of 817,258.

Commercial aircraft operations increased 2.7 percent and commuter aircraft operations increased 508.8 percent when compared with January 2018 levels.

Increases in JWA airplane

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Submitted photo

Total aircraft operations decreased in January 2019 as compared with the same month in 2018. In January 2019, there were 22,810 total aircraft operations (take-offs and landings), an 8.9 percent decrease compared to 25,041 total aircraft operations in January 2018.

General aviation activity, which accounted for 65.3 percent of the total aircraft operations during January 2019, decreased 15.5 percent when compared with January 2018.

The top three airlines in January 2019 based on passenger count were Southwest Airlines (284,391), American Airlines (130,000) and United Airlines (129,854).


An evening to elevate your mind, body and soul

Join in an evening designed to elevate your mind, body and soul on Saturday, April 6 from 7 - 9 p.m. – “YOU ELEVATED” – at lululemon Athletica Fashion Island.

 Hosted by VerVefy CBD Infused Beauty in collaboration with lululemon and The Class by Taryn Toomey, experience an evening of wellness and education, and learn the benefits of plant health from CBD experts, while connecting with a local lululemon community.

Guests will explore the latest trends in CBD with the experts who are paving the way and enjoy a chance to move the body and witness the mind with The Class Relieve, a sweat-free version of The Class by Taryn Toomey.

You’ll indulge in light sips and snacks curated by Celebrity Chef to the stars, Chef Matt, and have an opportunity to leave with some ultra-luxe lululemon wear and much more.

An evening to elevate Cheyana

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Submitted photo

Cheyana Van Dender, co-founder and president of VerVefy 

You won’t want to miss an impressive panel led by Cheyana Van Dender, co-founder and president of VerVefy CBD Infused Beauty and featuring Cara Stewart Raffele of the MyJane powerhouse, helping to empower women and cannabis.

Rejuvenate with The Class Relieve, led by Brenna Dwyer, during a 20-minute, no-sweat option for those who want to efficiently clear the mind. Stay in the know with the latest reads by Cannabis book expert Lyna Thompson of the 420 Book Society. Learn how athletic recovery can be decadent and good for you with Bhang chocolate expert/brand manager Will McMahon and hear about the delights of cooking with CBD from Rico Tarver of CBDailyEats and founder of CannaGatherLA. Then culminate the experience as the journey is brought full circle with Cheyana Van Dender discussing clean beauty and CBD in your daily products.

Tickets are $35. Registration is required and space is limited. To register and for tickets, visit https://you-elevated-wellness.eventbrite.com.

lululemon Athletica Fashion Island is located at 203 Newport Center Drive, Newport Beach.


Power outage in Newport Beach affects 3,900+

A power outage that occurred in Newport Beach on Thursday, March 14 at 5:50 p.m., affected 3,989 customers with a loss of electricity. The boundaries of the affected area were: Magnolia Street to the north, Westcliff Drive to the south, Pembroke Lane to the east and 17th Street to the west.

According to a Southern California Edison media representative the outage was due to a pole switch and a repair of bad underground equipment.

Power was fully restored today, Friday, March 15 at 5:03 a.m.

If a customer is interested in filing a claim, they can visit https://edisonintl.sharepoint.com/legal/Pages/Claims.aspx.


On the Harbor: Getting ready to set sail in the NHYC’s Cabo Race

By LEN BOSE

For me and quite a few other people, it is all about the Newport Harbor Yacht Club’s Cabo Race which started yesterday (Thursday) for the boats that are smaller or pushing a little more weight through the water. Today’s (Friday) start has the Santa Cruz 50+ division along with a mix of boats from 40 to 60 feet. Then the big boys hit the starting line on Saturday with the 70s raters, and then a mix of 52s to 100 feet plus two crazy multihull boats.

Our harbor has nine boats participating with Seth Hall’s J-124 Marisol in ORR 5 class which started on Thursday. ORR stands for Offshore Racing Rule which is a handicap system in which the participants compete in. Friday’s starters in ORR 4 class are John Shulze’s Santa Cruz 50 Horizon and ORR 3 John Raymont’s Andrews 40 Fast Exit and Dan Gribble’s Tripp 56 Brigadoon. On Saturday, it’s Dave Clark’s Santa Cruz 70 Grand Illusion, Jim Bailey’s Trans Pac 52 Destroyer, Cal Maritime’s Andrews 77 and Manouch Moshayedi’s Bakewell White 100 Rio, the largest boat in the fleet.

On the Harbor Sailor

Courtesy of Len Bose

Kind of a boring story so far, huh? Well, if you are participating, it is anything but boring, specifically from a boat manager’s point of few. Most of my readers have read before that I manage the Santa Cruz 50 Horizon. The planning and preparation started back in October 2018 confirming the boat’s racing and maintenance schedules. New sails were ordered, crew recruiting started along with boatyard scheduling. At the start of the year, we haul the boat out and redo the boat bottom paint, inspect the mast, pull the rudder out and check the rudder bearings. Once the boat is back in the water, we have to go through the electrical and mechanical systems; this normally requires scheduling two technicians and one mechanic. All this leads to a growing task list.

There are also some logistics involved such as hotel rooms and air travel. Keep in mind that not all of your crew lives in town, so you have to fly a couple into town before the race starts. I almost forgot, there is also a delivery crew that needs flights to Mexico and rooms along with arrangements for the delivery gear to be transported to Mexico. Most teams also have crew gear such as team shirts and hats, sizes differ and the boat name is embroidered. Let’s not forget the safety gear, life rafts need to be repacked, flares need to be replaced and EPRIB (emergency location beacons) need to be re-registered. Mexican boat visas and insurance need to be forwarded to the Mexican authorities. Upholstery needs steam cleaning and sleeping bags need to be washed along with boat bilges needing to be scrubbed. Cooking utensils have to be accounted for, the stove detailed, and refrigeration and water maker exercised to encourage continued use. I don’t like it very much when my wife says, “FYI: Remember that with three females aboard, you will need more toilet paper than you normally do,”...and I thought I had this.

The last four days, I have had to go to the canvas person because we needed new covers – you guessed right – I didn’t get all the measurements correct on the first go around, as all the sail bags needed repair. Meals prepared and frozen, the weather forecast is calling for light winds that will add as much as two days which leads to more meals. Then, there is always something that breaks the last minute. For me this year, it was the boat’s bilge pump that needed repair. Oh, my mother just called and told me that her neighbor’s bathtub has overflowed, and she has a mold and asbestos problem she needs me to take care of today.

Wednesday night was the send-off party, where you have to have your good sportsmanship hat on and mingle with the competition, explain your mistakes in the previous Islands Race, and how you are still encouraged with your boat’s performance.

Now, I am down to the short strokes. My first task is to pick up our navigator at the train station at 10:30 a.m. and get her to the boat, then head to the fuel dock. Once back to the dock, it is time to provision, run two errands and try not to yell at the vendor that has been promising our wheel cover for the last three weeks. Next, I place the provisions onboard then head to a safety meeting at 5:30 p.m., with a team meeting at 7 p.m. After that, I pick up a crew member at the airport at 8:30 p.m. My mother just called to remind me of the dangers of mold in her drywall…I have to go. Wish us luck.

By the way, thanks for the good wishes for the Harbor 20 Championships. We beat our goals and finished 5th.

Sea ya!

~~~~~~~~

Len Bose is a yachting enthusiast, yacht broker and harbor columnist for Stu News Newport.


Guest Column

Jeff Herdman

Moving Forward to Reform our Politics

Guest column Moving forward to reform Jeff Herdman

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Newport Beach City Councilman Jeff Herdman 

On my recommendation, the city council unanimously agreed to place the subject of political reform on the agenda for action. I think this is a very positive indication that the time has come to ensure that the rules that govern our political campaigns are clear, fair and fully enforceable.

I believe there are four areas that demand immediate attention. First, enforcement of our campaign contribution limits. For more than forty years, council members and candidates scrupulously followed the contribution limits with little controversy. In 2014 when violations were reported, the city attorney took the position that he lacked authority to enforce the limits and the council refused to refer the matter to the District Attorney or an independent counsel for investigation. 

Predictably, this ambiguity in the enforcement of the law led to reported violations in 2014 and again in 2018. It is essential to our democratic system that no elected officials be above the law and that investigation and possible prosecution of violations not be subject to political manipulation. I propose an automatic referral of campaign limit violations to an independent counsel with a requirement that a report be returned to the city council. We cannot hold others accountable to follow the law if we do not hold ourselves accountable.

Laws that cannot be enforced invite abuse. This is a serious matter since the law requires the removal from office for violations of the contribution limits. All it requires is a lawyer to rewrite the ordinance in clear language. 

Second, we must close the slate mail loophole that was the subject of the recent finding of forty-four counts of probable cause violations in 2014. We cannot allow special interests to circumvent our campaign limits using this scam as was done then.

Third, we must require the registration of lobbyists so that we know who is being paid to influence the city council. This is done at the federal, state and county level and many cities such as Irvine have this requirement. I am pleased that Mayor Pro-Tem (Will) O’Neill has joined me in independently calling for this action and I believe it is long overdue.

Finally, we should restrict fundraising to the election year and six months after, so we are not asking for money from those with immediate business before the council.

The recent elections have introduced an element of big money special interests meddling in our elections and the coarsening of the political debate. Ensuring that everyone follows our political campaign laws is an important step in restoring public trust and protecting the rights of all of our residents.

Jeff Herdman

Council Member, District 5


A summer of fun, exploration awaits at Camp James

Kids – Camp James invites you to come join in the adventure and fun awaiting you this summer at Camp James Summer Day Camp!

Bring your favorite adult and come discover more about what camp is all about, meet the staff, try a sample of activities and check out the picturesque site at Newport Dunes during an Open House.

A summer of fun wall

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Courtesy of Camp James

Reach for the sky on the climbing wall, a popular place to hang out this summer at Camp James 

Open House Schedule:

–Saturday, April 13 from 10 a.m. - 1 p.m.

–Sunday, May 19 from 11 a.m. - 2 p.m.

–Wednesday, May 29 from 4 - 6:30 p.m.

Among the camp activities you will experience: watersports, drama, laser tag, gaga (a gentler version of dodgeball), archery, climbing wall, mini golf, go-carts, dance, yoga, martial arts, music, arts & crafts, kayaking, swimming, sports & athletics, nature lore and much more. There are even theme weeks! Summer Camp sessions run June 18 through August 24. All activities take place on the campgrounds.

For more information, call 949.729.1098, email This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

and visit the website at www.campjames.com.

Camp James is located at 101 N. Bayside Drive, Newport Beach.


Top Ten Reasons to Participate in Spirit Run this Sunday, March 17

The 36th Annual Spirit is this Sunday, March 17 – St. Patrick’s Day. Have you registered yet? It’s still not too late.

Here are 10 great reasons to register now.

A wide range of running events for adults of all ability levels.

Spirit Run offers something for every fitness level, from walkers to elite athletes. There are multiple distances including the mile, 5k and 10k. You can compete to win prizes in each one. Visit https://www.nmspiritrun.org/adultfamilyevents for the adult races.

Top Ten Reasons elite milers

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Photos courtesy of Spirit Run

Elite Mile competitors in last year’s Spirit Run

Watch your children compete in Spirit Run’s youth races.

Spirit Run hosts eight races for children. Each youth finisher receives an event shirt and finisher medal. Youth races include:

Youth 5k – The Youth 5k allows children to compete against one another without adult interference, and for a child to break the finish line tape.

Youth ¼ - 1 Mile and Open Mile – Spirit Run offers six separate ¼ - 1 mile races by age group including ¼ mile for age four, ½ mile for ages five and six, and four separate mile races for ages seven through 18.

Toddler Trot – As long as they can walk, even the little ones can join the fun at Spirit Run. The Toddler Trot takes place in a fenced area with astroturf in the expo.

Run or walk with the family, even the grandparents.

Spirit Run offers the 5k Family Walk and Family Mile. All family members are welcome to participate together, from your baby in his/her jogger, to the grandparents. Don’t worry about the price tag, either. Spirit Run offers a Family Rate to save as much as 30 percent off standard individual pricing. Add the grandparents and save even more.

Run with your furry four-legged friend in the Dog Mile.

Spirit Run includes everyone, even the family pet. Humans ages 13 and older can run or walk with their pooches on leash in the Dog Mile.

Get Your Green Gear at Spirit Run.

Spirit Run will help you get your green on this St. Patrick’s Day. Adults can purchase a green event shirt featuring a running four-leaf clover logo. Also, when they cross the finish line, adults will receive a four-leaf clover medal and a coupon for a free “Banger Bites” appetizer from Muldoon’s Irish Pub.

Top 10 Reasons girls in St. Patrick s Day costumes

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(L-R) Brooke Morris (headband) and Brooke Awad (cowboy hat), fourth graders at Mariner’s Christian School, don St. Patrick’s Day attire, as they get ready for this Sunday’s Spirit Run Costume Contest

Compete to win in Spirit Run’s St. Patrick’s-themed costume contest.

Show your Spirit, green spirit that is, in Spirit Run’s St. Patrick’s Day costume contest. Contest divisions include individual adult, individual child, team (family, friends, teammates, etc.), and human/dog duos. The Lot at Fashion Island is donating prizes. Contest judges include Newport Beach Mayor Diane Dixon, City Manager Grace Leung, Councilmember Joy Brenner, Newport-Mesa Unified School (NMUSD) Board Member Karen Yelsey and the Lot’s Assistant General Manager Rayner Chi.

Compete to win your share of the $4,750 purse and more than 200 prizes.

Spirit Run arguably has the most impressive prizes of any running event. It is offering a $4,750 cash purse in the Elite Mile and Adult 5k. Other prizes include the coveted pizza every month for a year card from Blaze Pizza, Fashion Island $50 gift certificates from Dick’s Sporting Goods, $25 gift cards from Lazy Dog Restaurant and $10 gift cards from Balboa Candy. Compete in multiple races and you are eligible to win in each one.

Be a spectator.

Not up for racing or walking? Be a spectator instead. With 12 races, there is plenty to see. Be part of the excitement when the Elite Mile winner breaks four minutes in the Elite Mile. You’ll get a good laugh watching the human dog duos run the Dog Mile. Of course, it’s always delightful to watch kids compete, especially the little ones in the Toddler Trot. Experience the sounds of the Corona del Mar High Vocal Music students singing the National Anthem before multiple races and the Corona del Mar Jazz Band playing in the expo. Corona del Mar’s Drumline and Cheer Teams will also perform before the races.

Enjoy the Youth, Fitness and Dog Expo.

Before and after your race, there’s plenty of fun in store at Spirit Run’s expo. Stop by Alexa’s food truck for breakfast burritos, coffee and more. There’s almost too much fun for the kids including bungee trampolines, a rock climbing wall, a mini-skate park, and giveaways and other activities at Camp Newport. Adults come meet health and fitness professionals, and discover the perfect summer day and away camps for your children at Camp Newport, Gold Arrow Camp and Yosemite Sierra Summer Camps. Bring your dog or adopt a new one at the Dog Expo. Your pouch can enjoy free food samples and more.

 Raise funds for youth fitness and education.

By participating in Spirit Run, you are supporting local youth. Spirit Run is presented by a 501(c)(3) non-profit dedicated to youth fitness and education, and its net proceeds are donated to local schools. More than $1.5 million has been donated, with more than $330,000 in the last eight years alone. Participating NMUSD schools and high school teams benefit from Spirit Run’s net proceeds. Schools outside NMUSD can also fundraise through Spirit Run’s “Dash for Cash” fundraiser.

To register and for more details about Spirit Run, visit www.nmspiritrun.org.

For the third consecutive year, Stu News is proud to be Spirit Run’s media sponsor.


Two local restaurants to help raise funds for Age Well 

Two popular local restaurants have joined forces with nonprofit Age Well Senior Services, Orange County’s leading provider of senior programs, services and resources, to raises funds through food purchases on designated days.

Interested members of the public are invited to patronize these restaurants on the dates and times the fundraising program is in effect: Ruby’s Diner at 2305 E. Coast Highway, Corona del Mar on Monday, March 18 from 11 a.m. - 9 p.m.; and Chipotle at 3101 Newport Blvd., Newport Beach on April 1 from 4 - 8 p.m.

Diners must bring in fliers with all of the details that are printable on the Age Well website at https://agewellseniorservices.org/events/.

“We invite the public to patronize these restaurants that have agreed to help raise much needed funds for our Meals on Wheels program which provides nutritious meals for seniors in O.C. in need,” Age Well CEO Steven Moyer said.

Established in 1975, Age Well relies heavily on donations in order to continue providing critical services, resources and programs to seniors in 21 cities in south Orange County. 

According to Moyer, “Our message is simple: If you Live in O.C., please Give in O.C. Our goal is to help seniors in our community to age well.”

In 2018, Age Well served 342,474 Meals on Wheels and 75,747 lunches; provided 64,568 non-emergency medical transportation trips for seniors in need; and gave 4,627 hours of in-home case management. In addition, through its 10 senior centers, Age Well offers health and wellness classes, along with a broad spectrum of activities, seminars and educational classes.

To make a donation to Age Well, call 949.855.8033 or visit the nonprofit’s website at www.myagewell.org. Ninety percent of all revenues received directly fund Age Well’s programs and services.


Fair Game

By TOM JOHNSON

Newport Beach Police are on a hot streak and it couldn’t come at a better time

Fair Game Tom NewI attended Wednesday night’s Speak Up Newport presentation on “Cold Case Investigations/Science & Social Media Innovations at NBPD.”

Sergeant Court Depweg, the NBPD Homicide Detective Supervisor, and Jennifer Manzella, Administrative Assistant to the Chief, made the presentation.

They talked about their innovation in drawing attention to the stories involving Peter Chadwick and Linda O’Keefe.

Chadwick, of course, is on the run following the murder of his wife in 2012. 

Manzella, at the urging of Depweg, created a compelling podcast titled “Countdown to Capture” to develop a worldwide focus on the Chadwick case. 

Fair Game Most Wanted

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Courtesy of the NBPD

Peter Chadwick is No. 15 on the U.S. Marshal’s Most Wanted List 

Depweg also challenged Manzella to design something to help solve the Linda O’Keefe murder. O’Keefe was the 11-year-old murdered in 1973 on her way home from school in Corona del Mar

For all these years its turned into a cold case.

Manzella went to Twitter and last month it appeared the case was solved following the arrest of James Alan Neal, 72, in Colorado.

Fair Game Three Images

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Courtesy of the NBPD

Three images of James Alan Neal; noteworthy is the middle one, which was a composite drawn in 1973 – quite a close resemblance

The cool part was that when Depweg’s team got the focus on Neal through DNA evidence and contacted Colorado police, they were already familiar with the case because of Manzella’s work.

Additionally, Depweg talked about the foresight an officer had back in 1973 when he swabbed the crime scene. After all, DNA wasn’t even developed yet, and nobody knew how it would emerge in the following years.

That incredible piece of police work led to Neal’s arrest some 45 years later.

Pretty incredible.

• • •

Do you like the sculptures in the City’s Civic Center Park? Well, you can now help choose the new sculptures for Phase IV. 

Here’s how it’ll work. Twenty-nine submissions have been received in the recent Call for Entry. Up to 10 of the 29 may be selected and showcased for the next two years.

You simply have to go online and vote for your favorites. But, you only have until next Wednesday, March 20.

According to the City’s website, “Members of the public may vote for up to three favorite works.” 

And don’t think for a minute that you can scam the system. “Individuals may only cast their votes once.”

Besides, the voting public is just one part of the process. There’s a judging panel and they’ll simply take the public’s vote under advisement. It’s “advisory in nature and non-binding.”

Still, it should be fun to put your two cents in.

Besides, some of the sculptures are cool.

Go here to check ’em out and vote.

My three, The Tot, Chairman of the Board and Slices of Heaven.

• • •

Kudos to city councilman Kevin Muldoon. Kevin has decided to take the $6,000 he’s given for his annual city allotment for discretionary neighborhood grants and offer it up to Newport Harbor High School for a field trip to a Los Angeles museum with a focus on the Holocaust.

This is, of course, in response to the recent news items highlighting a swastika and Nazi salute from students at a NHHS off-campus party and beer pong game.

And then the following week, some 10 fliers featuring swastikas, obviously in an attempt to incite the community, appeared around the NHHS campus.

Muldoon has even said he wants to join the students.

Good for him.


Take Five: Meet Brian O’Rourke, Newport Beach Lifeguard Training Captain and Junior Guard Coordinator

By AMY SENK

The Newport Beach Junior Lifeguard program began in 1984, and since that time, thousands of 9- to 15-year-olds have spent seven weeks of summer learning about ocean safety, preparing for the Monster Mile (a sand run and ocean swim race), jumping off the pier and more. But to get there, they all must start with a timed swim test – a test that can cause panic for newcomers. This year, the final test is Sunday March 17. I caught up with Lifeguard Capt. Brian O’Rourke, the program’s coordinator.

Take Five Brian ORourke

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Courtesy of Brian O’Rourke

Newport Beach Lifeguard Training Captain Brian O’Rourke

Q: The program started with 50 kids and two instructors back in 1984 and has grown to more than 1,300 kids and 60 instructors. Has it always included boys and girls equally, or have more girls been involved over the years?

A: Looking at past photos, it looks equally of boys and girls each year of the program. Even our Newport Beach Lifeguard Instructors were almost equally men and women. This was fun looking through the past photos as we enter the 35th anniversary of the program. We are going to start posting some of those photos on social media as we reflect on 35 super epic summers.

Q: The former city manager once said that, along with city libraries, junior guards is the best program in the entire city. What are the highlights that a new guard can look forward to?

A: As the program coordinator, I have to say without a doubt that the best thing a new Junior Guard can look forward to is our incredible Newport Beach Lifeguard staff. I was never a Junior Guard, and I imagine that having a Newport Beach Ocean Lifeguard, as a leader/coach/mentor is a person that a Junior Guard will remember for life. I hear that from alumni all the time. Our Lifeguard Instructors are the heart of the program. Pier jumps, Monster Mile, body surfing, swimming and enjoying the beach are things a new Junior Guard can look forward to, and also have a whole lot of fun doing them.

Q: Most kids probably don’t end up professional lifeguards, but I’m sure you’ve had some standout graduates – any specific guards come to mind?

A: Aaron Peirsol and Kaleigh Gilchrist are a couple Olympians that come to mind. We also have military personnel (A couple current Navy SEALS; it is a water thing), lifeguards, police officers, firefighters, teachers, nurses, doctors, business and community leaders.  We are so proud of our alumni, and they are part of the Newport Beach Lifeguard and Junior Guard Program family for life.

Q: The test requires hopeful JGs to swim 100 yards in 1 minute 35 seconds to 1 minute 55 seconds depending on age. Who came up with those times?

A: Retired Lifeguard Battalion Chief Reenie Boyer was the founder and program coordinator of the Newport Beach Junior Lifeguard Program in 1984. As an Ocean Lifeguard, she understood that participants are training in the Pacific Ocean and that a standard needed to be established for the safety of the kids. Newport Beach has some of the most dangerous beaches in California and the Newport Beach Junior Guard Program has the toughest swim standards that every participant must achieve each year.

Q: What advice do you have for an aspiring junior guard who will take the test this Sunday?

A: Train, train, train, and never ever give up on something you want to do. They earn participation into the Newport Beach Junior Guard Program.


Stump the Stu

Kobe...Kobe...Kobe

Stump the Stu 3.15.19

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With March Madness upon us, we thought this was a fairly easy one...but it tripped up some readers. We received three correct guesses as to where this abstract artwork hangs, signed by LA Lakers legend, Kobe Bryant

It’s at one of his favorite local hangouts: La Fogata Rotisserie Chicken in Corona del Mar, where we are told they serve a delicious California burrito.

Congratulations to Ashley Johnson, Craig Mardany and Joe Stapleton!

If you have a unique spot or icon around town that you think Stu News Newport readers would enjoy finding out about, please shoot it, share it and give us the location, so we can challenge them! Happy Hunting.


Sign of the times

It’s another edition of Sign of the times, so let’s see how well you know our town. Today, we are serving up something spicy: Identify this chili pepper providing a partial glance of a sign of a business that has two Newport Beach locations.

Good luck!

Stu loves publishing the winning answers on Tuesday.

Send your guesses to This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it..

If you’re a business and you want to play, you can send us a high-quality photo of your sign and we’ll take it from there and challenge our readers.

Let’s have some fun!

SOTT 3.15.19

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Cotton candy sunrise from CdM

Cotton candy sky

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Photo by Jason Berry (Instagram @its_jason_berry)

The early bird definitely gets the best views in Newport Beach


Upcoming entertainment at Newport Dunes & Back Bay Bistro

Upcoming entertainment Back Bay Bistro sunset

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Submitted photo

Mark your calendar for these upcoming live performances at Newport Dunes & Back Bay Bistro, complete with waterfront views.

Newport Dunes

Saturday, March 23 from 7 - 11 p.m.

80s on the Bay: StrangeloveA Depeche Mode Experience with The Band that Fell to Earth and These Handsome Devils

Ticket prices: $25 - $45

For tickets and information, visit www.newportdunes.com/event/80s-on-the-bay-a-tribute-to-david-bowie/.

Back Bay Bistro

Saturday, March 16 from 8 - 11 p.m.

IDOL XA Tribute to Billy Idol

Ticket prices: $15 - $20

For tickets and information, visit www.newportdunes.com/event/idol-x-tribute-to-billy-idol/.

Saturday, March 30 from 8 - 11 p.m.

Pretzel Logic – A Steely Dan Revue

Ticket prices: $15 - $20

For tickets and information, visit www.newportdunes.com/event/pretzel-logic-a-steely-dan-revue/.

Saturday, May 4 from 6 - 10 p.m.

Hirie

Ticket prices: $20 - $60

For tickets and information, visit www.newportdunes.com/event/hirie-reggae-on-the-beach/.

To make a reservation at Back Bay Bistro, call 949.729.1144, or visit www.NewportDunes.com/Bistro.

Newport Dunes Waterfront Resort & Back Bay Bistro are located at 1131 Back Bay Bistro, Newport Beach.


Save the Date: Annual KidWorks golf tournament returns May 15

On Wednesday, May 15, the 7th Annual KidWorks Classic Golf Tournament returns to the acclaimed Pelican Hill Golf Club.

Thanks to the generosity of Title Sponsor Michael F. Harrah and Caribou Industries, and other sponsors, including CBRE, Wells Fargo, Ben’s Asphalt, CMF, Inc., Capital One, CIT OneWest Bank, Citadel Outlets, Outlets at San Clemente and Kingston Technology, the golf tournament is set to again raise much-needed funds for programs that change the lives of at-risk youth living in challenging Santa Ana neighborhoods.

Save the Date Annual KidWorks golf tournament golfers

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Courtesy of KidWorks

Golfers will return to Pelican Hill Golf Club on May 15 for the annual KidWorks Classic Golf Tournament

“We are grateful to Mike Harrah and Caribou Industries for their generosity and commitment to KidWorks,” said David Benavides, KidWorks CEO. “They have had a profound effect on Santa Ana as the owners and operators of more than five million square feet of commercial office space in the city. Mike is a leader, who is not only building our city’s future as a developer, while simultaneously building our city’s future by investing in our youth.”

Golfer registration includes a Bloody Mary bar, breakfast, gourmet on-course food and cocktails, on-course contests, plus a dinner and awards ceremony. The scramble-style tournament begins with a 9 a.m. registration, breakfast and access to the driving range, followed by an 11 a.m. shotgun start. At 4:45 p.m., the 19th Hole Reception and Dinner begins.

For sponsorship information or event details, contact Lisa Gels at 714.834.9400 ext. 126 or This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it..


New name, same great Sherman Library & Gardens residential garden tour

Sherman Library & Gardens will present its Newport Beach Garden Tour on Saturday, May 11. Attendees will have the opportunity to stroll through seven private residential gardens. Each garden will host an “Artist in the Garden,” who will capture points of interest throughout the day. 

“It’s the same great garden tour that the community has come to know and love for the past 22 years,” said Scott LaFleur, Gardens Director at Sherman Library & Gardens. “We just gave it a new name. We’re located in Newport Beach and all of the gardens in the tour are too, so we’re just calling it what it is.” 

The Newport Beach Garden Tour is presented by the Sherman Library & Gardens Volunteer Association. The Volunteer Association is comprised of nearly 100 dedicated people who, together, work a total of more than 5,000 volunteer hours annually to help maintain and promote Sherman Library & Gardens as one of Southern California’s premier cultural centers.

New name same great

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Courtesy of Sherman Library & Gardens

“The community is supporting Sherman Gardens by donating wonderful items for our raffle and silent auction,” added Sue Swarth, co-chair of the Newport Beach Garden Tour. “After the tour, ticket holders are invited back to Sherman Gardens for a fun afterparty where we’ll announce the prize winners.” 

Tickets are $50 for members, $60 for non-members, and includes a light lunch. Shuttle service to each of the gardens on the tour is available by reservation for an additional fee. 

The tour will take place from 10 a.m. - 3 p.m., followed by the reception at Sherman Gardens from 3 - 5 p.m. 

Sherman Library & Gardens is a nonprofit cultural center. Proceeds from the tour will help support the redesign and landscaping of the frontage of Sherman Library & Gardens on East Coast Highway. 

For ticket information, go to www.sigardens.org or call 949.673.2261.

Sherman Library & Gardens is located at 2647 E. Coast Highway, Corona del Mar.


Mayumana makes West Coast debut at Segerstrom Center

Segerstrom Center for the Arts presents the Southern California debut of internationally renowned Israeli performance troupe Mayumana for one night on Saturday, April 6 at 7:30 p.m. in Segerstrom Hall.

The company brings its spectacular new show “CURRENTS,” a modern work inspired by the rivalry between the early developers of electricity Thomas Edison and Nikola Tesla.

Mayumana makes West Coast debut percussionists

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Photo by Zeev Roytman

Courtesy of scfta.org

Mayumana takes the Segerstrom Hall stage on April 6

Described by Time Out New York as a “cutting-edge blend of movement and technology,” Mayumana combines song, dance and percussion for innovative, immersive and visually striking performances. The acclaimed troupe is one of Israel’s most celebrated cultural exports, entertaining audiences around the world for more than 20 years. 

Tickets to Mayumana start at $39 and are on sale at www.scfta.org, at the Box Office at 600 Town Center Drive in Costa Mesa, or by calling 714.556.2787. For inquiries about group ticket savings of 10 or more, call the Group Services office at 714.755.0236. 

Segerstrom Center for the Arts is located at 600 Town Center Drive, Costa Mesa.


Lyric Opera to perform at Central Library

Newport Beach Public Library (NBPL) presents Lyric Opera of Orange County in a special program on Thursday, March 28 in the Central Library Friends Meeting Room, 1000 Avocado Ave., Newport Beach.

The program, “Opera Outsiders,” will feature talented opera singers in an entertaining and informative evening performance that explains how 400 years of music can be applied to a modern stage, complete with secrets, sex and scandals.

Lyric Opera Bree Betourne Lyric Opera Scott Ziemann Lyric Opera Diana Farrell

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Photos courtesy of NBPL

(L-R) Bree Betourne, soprano; Scott Ziemann, baritone and Diana Farrell, soprano

Learn why opera is for everyone. Enjoy listening to acclaimed singers present music from the Medieval to Modern times in multiple languages and operatic styles from a variety of composers. Lyric Opera of Orange County will open up a Q&A session following the performance, so come buff up your operatic IQ and learn why it’s an art form worth falling for.

Lyric Opera Caroline Nelms Lyric Opera Jessica Gonzalez Rodriguez Lyric Opera Kate Bode Lyric Opera Eliseo Zari

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 (L-R) Caroline Nelms, soprano; Jessica Gonzalez-Rodriguez, mezzo soprano; Kate Bode, pianist and Eliseo Zari, tenor

The performance features Caroline Nelms, soprano; Bree Betourne, soprano; Diana Farrell, soprano; Jessica Gonzalez-Rodriguez, mezzo soprano; Eliseo Zari, tenor; Scott Ziemann, baritone and pianist Kate Bode.

Admission is free. Seating is first-come, first-serve, based on room capacity. This program is funded by generous donations from the Friends of the Library.

For more information, contact the Library at 949.717.3800, option 2, or visit the website at www.newportbeachlibrary.org.


Jackson Browne headed to Pacific Amphitheatre; Ozomatli, Queen Nation and Rumours to perform at The Hangar this summer

The OC Fair has announced four more shows headed to Pacific Amphitheatre and The Hangar this summer.

Jackson Browne will headline a special post-OC Fair show at Pacific Amphitheatre on August 16. Plus, coming to The Hangar during the 2019 OC Fair are fan favorites Ozomatli, performing on July 21, Queen Nation – A Tribute to the Music of Queen performing on July 24 and Rumours – The Ultimate Fleetwood Mac Tribute Show performing on July 25.

Jackson Browne: Friday, Aug. 16 at 7:30 p.m., Pacific Amphitheatre. Tickets start at $50. (Tickets purchased prior to August 11 can also be used as one free admission ticket to the 2019 OC Fair.)

Jackson Browne has written and performed some of the most moving songs in popular music and has defined a genre of songwriting charged with honesty, emotion and personal politics. His debut album came out on David Geffen’s Asylum Records in 1972. Since then, he has released 14 studio albums and four collections of live performances. His most recent studio album, Standing in the Breach, was released in 2014.

Ozomatli: Sunday, July 21 at 8:30 p.m., The Hangar. Tickets start at $20.

A six-piece band whose genre spans everything from Latin rock to hip hop to funk and world music, Ozomatli produced its debut album in 1998 and has been rocking out ever since. The Los Angeles-based band’s recent album, Non-Stop: Mexico to Jamaica, was released in 2017.

Jackson Browne headed Queen Nation

Courtesy of OC Fair & Event Center

Queen Nation takes the stage at The Hangar on July 24

Queen Nation – A Tribute to the Music of Queen: Wednesday, July 24 at 8:30 p.m., The Hangar. Tickets start at $17.50.

Celebrate the music of Queen with Queen Nation as they put on a show that preserves the image, sound and stage persona of vintage Queen. They’ll perform hits like “We Are the Champions,” “We Will Rock You” and “Under Pressure.”

Rumours – The Ultimate Fleetwood Mac Tribute Show: Thursday, July 25 at 8:30 p.m., The Hangar. Tickets start at $17.50.

Recreating the Fleetwood Mac experience, rock out to songs like “Gold Dust Woman,” “Say You Love Me” and “Go Your Own Way.”

Tickets to these shows will go on sale at 10 a.m. on Saturday, March 16. Tickets are available via Ticketmaster and include admission to the 2019 OC Fair. More performances and action sports at the Fair will be announced in the coming months. Sign up for pre-sale emails at www.ocfair.com/newsletters. Super Pass holders can purchase tickets to select Pacific Amphitheatre, The Hangar and Action Sports Arena performances at a two-for-one discount. The 2019 Super Pass is a season pass that includes admission to all 23 days of the OC Fair, as well as several exclusive discounts, and is on sale now at www.ocfair.com/superpass.

The 2019 OC Fair taking place July 12 - August 11 is open Wednesday through Sunday. For more information, visit www.ocfair.com


Capturing iconic Newport Beach and beyond...

Capturing iconic HB

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 Artwork by Don Krotee

“Huntington Beach Pier” was created with transparent watercolor on handmade cotton paper

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Don Krotee has been a resident of Newport Beach since 1986. He is a board member of the Newport Heights Improvement Association and SPON, and is an architect who has been drawing and painting from an early age. His architectural marker drawings are featured periodically in Stu News.


Where will it all end up? Boomers vs. Millennials

By DUNCAN FORGEY

Millennials in Newport Beach relate to the “Boomer” generation as older folk.  Young people are sometimes impressed by the silver hair but more often than not, they look at us with a great deal of skepticism. Fortunate enough to be born into post WWII California, we grew up as “war babies.” The product of soldiers returning from a world war, Boomers have watched Southern California time travel from small towns with a few moderate cities into America’s greatest nonstop megalopolis. Population is currently so large as to make no sense. 

The single greatest cause for this rapid change came via the freeway. The first was from LA to Pasadena and was the combined brainstorm of politicians, oil companies and tire manufacturers. In what some conspiracy theorists say was a diabolical plot to change our way of life, others believe this change was inevitable and happened due to progress. In either case, Southern California had more than 1,000 miles of electric red car transit when Los Angles decided to “roll the dice” with the automobile. In the early 1950s, the freeway seemed a logical answer to a better life. 

We first heard about this sitting in a social studies class at Horace Ensign Junior High School. “The concept of a never-ending population connected by huge roadways seemed like science fiction. Something out of a Flash Gordon episode,” we used to think. Little did we know that the masterminds of development, our government and the automotive industrial complex were setting goals that would transform the primarily rural/agricultural communities of Orange County into what it is today.

Where will it all end McDonalds

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McDonald’s menu from the 1960s

“Why would they put a McDonald’s restaurant on old Farmer Gisler’s property in Costa Mesa,” we used to ask? There it sat all alone, half way up Harbor Boulevard, in an open field. “What are they thinking?” we would discuss, as we ate our 15-cent hamburgers. 

Like a gambler playing with marked cards, McDonald’s, as did other soon-to-become major retailers, knew the completion of the 405 Freeway would be the beginning of the end for rural OC. Houses, businesses, retail and high-rise developments along this stretch of freeway brought in millions upon millions of people, cars and hamburger-hungry patrons.

Southern California paved the way for the sprawl and others soon followed: San Francisco, Seattle, Las Vegas and Phoenix, plus cities in Texas, Florida and along the East Coast. Today, even Hawaii, Idaho, Montana are fighting the battles over pristine country settings versus urban growth. Many areas are getting run over with people trying to escape the madhouse of big city living. Just give population growth enough time and its tentacles will spread just about everywhere. 

Where will it all end Millenials

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Who are Millennials?

Today`s millennials have grown up in these crowded conditions, so it is the norm. As with all generations, today’s youngsters see present day from an entirely different place than the old timers. If black was black and white was white to an older generation, their descendants see life not only as grey but, in many cases, pink and bright purple.  Generational conflicts have been around throughout human history.

Looking to explain the fact that one generation is markedly different from the previous revolves around religion, values and money. All create strong emotions. Add into the mix wars, drug use, moral codes and current day fads, and you have an older generation that can’t conceive of younger kids running things. Our parents saw us that way and we see our children the same way.

Southern California went from a strong Christian-based society during World War II to today’s all-inclusive, anything goes way of life. For this rapid change you can probably thank or blame the boomers. Growing up with the largest single group of children in United States history, boomers initiated a group think around subjects like the environment, anti-war, free love and drugs, not necessarily resulting in a better society. Instead drug use, both legal and illegal, has increased, moral values have changed dramatically, wars have been virtually continuous and the environment as we knew it is on the verge of collapse.

World War II vets and their spouses gave their children a vibrant and exciting life, full of homes, education, cars plus plenty of food and fun. But hard work and ethics were preached. Today, “living in sin” is no longer sinful, homosexuality is not hidden, multiple marriages are common and “keeping up with the Joneses” now means you are pitting yourself against the mega-rich. There have always been hobos and drifters, but these days the homeless live close by. There have always been efforts to control immigration, but today we are dependent upon their cheap labor and they have become emboldened. 

Where will it all end farmland

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The farmland of old Orange County

The evolution of Newport Beach is not that of an average city, but it does track the changes in Southern California. Newport went from a Native American village, to a settlers’ outpost, to a turn-of-the-century town, to a post-World War II blue collar city, to a 1960s white collar city, to an internationally famous 21st century urban center in a little over a century.

An advocate for small town living, I have lived in Northern California, Oregon, Riverside County and Kauai. In 1984, when I sold real estate in Newport, I used to talk about the history of Newport Beach. I learned early in my career, delving in the past was a terrible sales approach. One day, sitting on a home in Dover Shores, a new client and I walked and talked and became friends. A jet from John Wayne Airport flew overhead and I went on the defensive, trying to explain why Dover Shores was a great place to live despite the airplanes. I will never forget his comment: “Duncan, I grew up in New York and I lived underneath La Guardia Airport. You have not heard noise until you’ve lived there.” To him...Newport Beach was paradise.

Where will it all end Back bay bridge

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Newport changing from old to new brought traffic along the Back Bay bridge 

At one of my Exchange Club meetings, I sat with a first-generation immigrant from the Middle East, accent and all. We talked business and became friends. Thinking that foreigners were worldlier, because I grew up in Newport, he looked at me very seriously and said, “Duncan, there is no place in the world, and I have been everywhere, that has the climate and business opportunities of Newport Beach. It is the finest place I have ever lived.” To him...Newport Beach was paradise.

But my favorite explanation about living in Newport Beach comes from one of my “other” mothers on Lido Isle. Polly Ober was a lightning bolt of fun and love, as she worked and enjoyed every social opportunity available in our fair city. She said this: “Count your blessings! I tell anyone who lives in Newport Beach – my family and I landed here in 1950 and it would take an avalanche to uproot me. Where else can you go sailing on the Pacific waters in the morning and two hours later ski in the local slopes. You can shop ‘til you drop at Fashion Island or soak up culture at the local museum and library. Even fires and earthquakes don’t seem to touch us. Does Newport have a lock on luck? Nope, the good Lord evidently designated Newport Beach as God’s country. To that I say amen!”

It was not an avalanche that uprooted our beloved Polly, it was old age and death. She now leaves her beloved town to a new generation of “youngsters,” and she only asks that they take care of it!

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Duncan Forgey, a life-long resident of Newport Beach, now makes his home in Hawaii. He is a monthly contributor to StuNewsNewport.


Twenty-four years since officer gave his life in line of duty

Twenty four years Bob Henry

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Twenty-four years ago today, Newport Beach Police Officer Bob Henry was shot in the line of duty checking on a drunk suspect shortly after 4 a.m. in a car near 16th Street and Dover Drive.

Upon contact, the suspect gave Officer Henry an ID card and then opened fire with a handgun that he had concealed.

The suspect then shot and killed himself.

Officer Henry remained in a coma and died 33 days later.

Henry left behind a wife, 6-year-old son, 2-year-old daughter and 4-week-old daughter.

Today, Bob Henry Park sits near the spot where the incident occurred.


Stump the Stu

Kobe...Kobe...Kobe

Stump the Stu 3.12.19

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Okay! It’s March Madness so Stu expects all of you diehard basketball fans to guess where this abstract artwork hangs, which is signed by Kobe Bryant, a Newport Coast resident, who played his entire 20-year NBA career with the LA Lakers. Hint: It’s at one of his favorite local hangouts. 

Take the challenge and submit your answers to This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it..

The answer will appear in Friday’s edition, along with the correct guesses. So, join us for this local adventure.

If you have a unique spot or icon around town that you think Stu News Newport readers would enjoy finding out about, please shoot it, share it and give us the location, so we can challenge them! Happy Hunting.


Kirk Triplett eagles second hole of sudden-death playoff against Woody Austin to win the Hoag Classic 

Kirk Triplett took home the crystal trophy on Sunday, March 10 by winning the Hoag Classic at Newport Beach Country Club, a premier stop on the PGA Tour Champions circuit.

Kirk Triplett club in air

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Photos by Lana Johnson

Kirk Triplett raises his putter to the crowd on the 18th green after sinking the eagle putt to win the sudden-death playoff

Triplett had previously birdied the 18th hole to tie Woody Austin at -10 at the end of regulation play to force extra holes. Both players then parred the first sudden-death hole, the par five 18th. Then playing it a second time, Austin hit his drive right to find the rough, while Triplett striped his down the middle of the fairway. Faced with a difficult lie, Austin hit his second shot short and right of the green.

Kirk Triplett group

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(L-R) Robert Braithwaite, president & CEO, Hoag Memorial Hospital Presbyterian; Jeff Purser, executive director, Hoag Charity Sports; Rick Taylor, president & CEO, Konica Minolta; Kirk Triplett, 2019 Hoag Classic champion; and Paul Folino, Hoag Classic tournament chairman

Triplett then, standing some 250 yards out, hit his second shot to 12 feet from the hole. Austin then pitched to within eight feet, but could only watch as Triplett rolled in his eagle putt for the win. The victory was Triplett’s seventh on the Champions Tour and was worth $270,000.

Kirk Triplett Martin, Triplett, Pickup 3.12

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(L-R) Kevin Martin, CEO of Newport Beach Country Club; Kirk Triplett, 2019 Hoag Classic champion; and Todd Pickup, CEO of the Balboa Bay Club and Bay Club International

Austin for his efforts won $158,400. Second round leader Fran Quinn struggled on Sunday, shooting a final round 74 to finish fifth.

Kirk Triplett Austin

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Woody Austin, who finished runner up, blasts out of the sand trap near the 18th green

Scott McCarron and Jeff Maggert finished tied for third. Maggert, after opening up the tournament with a 76, shot 63-65 over the weekend.

Local favorite Fred Couples finished tied for 10th after carding a final round 69.

Kirk Triplett Toledo

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Esteban Toledo, a local favorite, putting on the 18th green

Other notables included Tom Kite T72 (+17), Sandy Lyle T64 (+5), Jose Maria Olazabal T32 (-2), Mark O’Meara T15 (-4) and Colin Montgomerie W/D.

The Triplett-Austin playoff was the sixth extra-hole affair in the tournament’s history.

Kirk Triplett Military Day

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Service men and women were honored on Military Appreciation Day

Rounding out the weekend’s festivities were Military Appreciation Day on Saturday, presented by CoreLogic, honoring all active duty, military reserve, national guard, military retirees and veterans; and Student Day (ages 18 and under) on Sunday, presented by Kingston Technology, whereby youth enjoyed the Kids Fun Zone and competed in a putting contest for a chance to win tournament merchandise.

This year’s tournament marked a new era, as Hoag took on the title sponsorship.

For more information, visit www.hoagclassic.com.


Guest Column

Grace Leung

An insider’s look at what’s going on in and around City Hall

Grace Leung

Newport Beach City Manager Grace Leung   

I hope you are enjoying the break from the winter rainstorms, however brief this one will be! Our next City Council meeting is (today) Tuesday, March 12. The following are items that may be of interest. As always, this is not a summary of the entire agenda, which can be viewed here.

Study Session begins at 5 p.m. with three informative items: The Board of Library Trustee will present a detailed proposal for a Central Library Lecture Hall. A preferred site, funding and proposed next steps will be discussed for community and City Council input and direction. 

Staff will present the Capital Improvement Program (CIP) Early Look of proposed new projects and additional funding for existing projects for the FY 2019/20 Budget. The final recommended projects will be included as part of the City Manager’s recommended budget that will be submitted to City Council in mid-April.

 With changes to the flood zone map, as required by FEMA, going into effect this month, changes will be required to the City’s development standards in the mapped flood zones. Staff will discuss the changes and request input from City Council.

The Regular Session begins at 7 p.m. and the following are items of note on the consent calendar: An amendment to the contract for citywide tree maintenance services with Great Scott Tree Service is recommended to: 1) enhance service level – setting the grid tree pruning cycle from a range of two to three years to a complete two-year cycle, 2) establish a contingency to address as-needed storm response services, and 3) move the contract cycle to align with the City’s fiscal year. It is important to note that there is no change in billing rates, which were obtained through a competitive procurement process.

The Grand Canal Dredging Project – Phase 2 is underway and following a pre-dredge survey, there was much less material to dredge than previously anticipated. As a result, the dredging work is complete at lower cost than budgeted and sooner than expected. Due to this circumstance, staff is requesting Council approval to perform additional dredging maintenance in the Grand Canal. Additionally, dredging is needed within a private commercial marina at 2241 West Coast Highway as a result of the recent heavy rains coupled with the failure of a City storm drain pipe. Staff proposes available funds from this project for this dredging work.

The City Council expanded the membership of the General Plan Update Steering Committee from five to seven resident members. Applications for the two additional positions were reviewed and Mayor Dixon is recommending that James Carlson and Catherine O’Hara be appointed to the Steering Committee.

Items of note for Public Hearing and Current Business include: 

The applicant and appellant have requested the appeal of the Harbor Commission’s approval of the Newport Marina reconstruction and reconfiguration be continued to March 26, 2019

Staff will be conducting a comprehensive water rate study to ensure we have a rate structure that supports the City’s water service operations and system infrastructure needs. The last rate study was conducted in 2009. Following a competitive RFP process, staff is recommending Raftelis Financial Consultants conduct the study.

City Council and staff are actively looking for ways to address the issue of homelessness, an increasing concern for Newport Beach as well as the other cities in the County. In 2018, we engaged City Net, a nonprofit homeless services organization, in a six-month pilot program for outreach services. During the pilot period, City Net made 158 contacts, of those, 51 individuals agreed to enter into case management services with City Net. There were 17 actual street exits of homeless individuals during the pilot program. Based on these results, staff is recommending a three-year agreement with City Net that adds in on-call services outside of normal business hours in addition to engagement, outreach and case management services.

The County of Orange is considering modernizing the general aviation facilities at John Wayne Airport and has released a draft EIR for the project. After reviewing the draft EIR, staff and consultants believe the project will increase the number of corporate and private jets that depart JWA, resulting in potentially negative impacts on communities surrounding the airport. Project Alternative 3 appears to be the least impactful on Newport Beach neighborhoods, pending further environmental review. Therefore, staff is recommending the Mayor send a letter to the County requesting the supervisors adopt Alternative 3.

As a reminder, public comment is welcome at the City Council meeting. The public can comment on any item on the agenda. If you cannot attend the meeting and/or want to communicate with the City Council directly on an item, the following email address gets to all of them: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it..

Thank you for reading. Feedback is appreciated so please don’t hesitate to ask a question or offer a comment.

Grace K. Leung

City Manager

City of Newport Beach

This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

P: 949.644.3001 F: 949.644.3020


Sailing into a gorgeous week in Newport Beach

Sailing into boat

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Photo by Tina Treglia (Instagram @ttregs) 

Get ready for a stunning spring-like week along the coast


Sign of the times

On Fridays we give you a partial glimpse of a sign around town. You guess what the overall name of the business is.

This one puzzled everyone, as Stu received no correct responses. You can find the “curvy silhouette and DE” in the Body Design sign on the side of Edwards Big Newport 6 Theater at 210 Newport Center Dr., Newport Beach. This wellness center offers a range of classes from Pilates to TRX, plus personal training – all geared to help you get and/or stay in shape and feel terrific.

If you’re a business and you want to play, you can send us a high-quality photo of your sign to This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. and we’ll take it from there and challenge our readers.

Let’s have some fun!

SOTT 3.12.19

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Springing forward from Balboa Island

Springing forward sand

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Photo by Chris Crosson (Instagram @sandcastlekit)

Sandcastlekit.com 

A good reminder from Sunday’s time change that spring is on the way


Newport Beach – A Look Back

Photo series courtesy of Balboa Island Museum & Historical Society

Newport Beach A Look Back 3.12.19

In 1927, these odd boats with two small sails were called sailing canoes. With one in front and one in back around the opening of a canoe-like hull, they could be sailed in the area easily, and removed from the water with just as much ease.

Balboa Island Museum and the Museum Store are located at 210 B Marine Ave., Balboa Island. They are open Monday - Thursday from 10 a.m. - 5 p.m. and Friday - Sunday from 10 a.m. - 6 p.m. For more information, call 949.675.3952, visit www.balboamuseum.org, or email This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it..


City Manager’s Updates

From the desk of Grace Leung

Draft 2019 Water Master Plan – The Public Works Department has made available the initial Draft 2019 Water Master Plan Executive Summary for viewing by the public. It can be found on the City’s website under the Public Works Department tab and can be accessed here. The entire draft report will be available for review and comment in the coming weeks prior to finalizing the document this spring.

The Water Master Plan is a comprehensive review of the City’s water system infrastructure with a focus on planning the next 30 years of capital replacement and upgrades. The previous 1999 Water Master Plan was updated in 2008. The current draft 2019 Water Master Plan indicates an increase in capital spending is needed to maintain an extensive and dependable water system into the future. In conjunction with this plan, the Utilities Department will be conducting a water rate study that will be presented to City Council for future consideration. 

Fire Department Fee Changes – Last year, the Community Development Department and Revenue Division conducted a comprehensive cost-of-services fee study for the Fire Department for all operational fees, as well as Life Safety Services (including plan review services, construction inspections and operational permits) for fire prevention activities. On September 11, 2018, the City Council adopted the fee changes with a six-month effective date of March 11, 2019. The fees that are subject to change are accessible through the City’s website at https://www.newportbeachca.gov/fireupdate.

E Art Gallery – At the December 6, 2018 meeting, the Planning Commission denied a request for a tattoo establishment land use proposed in a multi-tenant building located at 2721 East Coast Highway in Corona del Mar. The applicant then appealed that decision to the City Council. Prior to their meeting on February 26, the City Council received a detailed letter addressing a myriad of concerns from a business owner opposed to the tattoo use at that location. Following the close of the public hearing, the City Council determined that the item should be referred back to the Planning Commission for their review and decision because of the new information presented in the letter. The Planning Commission is scheduled to hold a public hearing on the item on March 21, 2019.

Balboa Island Seawall – Now that the Balboa Island seawall extension project has been completed, there may be opportunity to further reduce the flood zone on Balboa Island. Community Development Department staff will be hiring a consultant to perform a scientific study for Balboa Island to determine how much the flood zone can be further reduced and additional properties removed from the designated flood zone. Staff will be working with representatives of FEMA on the study. 

Microenterprise Home Kitchens – Assembly Bill 626 became effective January 1, 2019. It is intended to authorize the use of home kitchens for small-scale, direct food sales by home cooks to consumers, providing appropriate flexibility in food types and appropriate health and sanitation standards. The State is attempting to reduce impediments keeping experienced cooks from entering the marketplace while addressing the fact that thousands of private chefs, home caterers, and many other food micro-entrepreneurs cook out of private homes or unlicensed food facilities, with little access to education for best practices or safety guidelines. The bill provides the County with the sole discretion to authorize and regulate these uses consistent with the limited provisions of the legislation. The legislation would limit meals served to 30 per day and annual gross sales to $50,000. It also exempts these kitchens from many health and sanitation requirements while requiring operators to complete a food safety certification program. 

The legislation bars cities and counties from prohibiting or restricting these operations in any dwelling for zoning purposes. The bill preserves a city’s ability to enforce nuisance ordinances but enforcement of the limited provisions of this new law would be the responsibility of the County of Orange, Environmental Health Services Division if these kitchens are authorized by the Board of Supervisors. The County is seeking input from cities to decide whether to authorize microenterprise home kitchens or not. Should the County authorize these operations City staff is very concerned with the following: compatibility with surrounding residents; the operation of these kitchens may potentially undermine existing restaurants; and the lack of resources the County has for enforcement. Staff is in contact with representatives from O.C. Environmental Health to ensure the City’s concerns are considered by the County of Orange before they decide to potentially authorize microenterprise home kitchens.

Future Affordable Housing Numbers – Community Development staff is participating in the Regional Housing Needs Assessment (RHNA) Subcommittee of the Southern California Association of Governments (SCAG). The purpose of the RHNA Subcommittee is to review in-depth the various policy considerations necessary for the development of SCAG’s RHNA, and to make critical decisions throughout the process. SCAG Director of Planning presented the five objectives of the meeting according to RHNA statute: increase housing supply and types, promote infill development, promote an improved intraregional relationship between housing and jobs, address disproportionate housing needs, and further fair housing. Staff will continue to participate in the RHNA Subcommittee meetings, which are held the first Monday of every month. A schedule of the RHNA Subcommittee Topic Outlook is found here.

Collection HQ at the Library – Staff now utilizes a new tool, Collection HQ, to manage materials purchasing and obtain deeper data analysis in each subcategory. Collection HQ allows staff to generate inventory reports and evaluate the holdings in a more robust manner. The tool has provided the following information:

–5 percent of the library’s collection has not circulated in 4 or more years. Most libraries average around 20 percent

–40 percent of the library’s collection has circulated 40 or more times. Most libraries average around 25 percent

Traffic Signal Rehabilitation Program – The Public Works Department operates and maintains 123 traffic signals. Every year, the traffic signal rehabilitation program replaces and rehabilitates older traffic signals that have reached the end of their useful life. This year’s program includes three signals: Jamboree Road at University Drive/Eastbluff Drive, University Drive at La Vida/Baypointe Drive, and Newport Center Drive at Civic Center Drive/Granville Drive. 

In addition to these traffic signal rehabilitation locations, the project includes installation of fiber optic communication cable on East Bay Avenue between 15th Street and Palm Street. This installation will close a gap in the communication network along the peninsula by connecting the Balboa Boulevard traffic signals at Palm Street and Main Street and allow for future connection to other City facilities.

Lastly, the project will install flashing pedestrian warning signs at the Balboa Boulevard/13th Street and 14th Street intersections to further enhance the crosswalks adjacent to Newport Elementary School. This installation is a continuation of the Balboa Peninsula Crosswalk Improvement Project.

Grant Howald Park Rehabilitation Project – On March 5, 2019, the Parks, Beaches and Recreation Commission approved the conceptual design for the Grant Howald Park Rehabilitation Project. The project scope will include the beautification of the Fifth Avenue streetscape, installation of a synthetic turf sports field and rehabilitation of the playgrounds. For more project information, please visit the project site: www.newportbeachca.gov/granthowaldpark.

Flourishing our Urban Forest – In our on-going effort to maintain and manage our wonderful urban forest, Public Works staff has worked with developers in re-planting new palm trees in the public right of way as part of the Lido Villas development project. Last week, contractors planted eight new California Fan Palm trees in the parkway adjacent to 3303 Via Lido Drive. Additionally, and as part of our Bayside Drive CIP project, eight new Date Palm trees were planted in the median on Bayside Drive. The Public Works staff is continuing to pursue opportunities to replenish our City’s tree inventory through our tree replanting program and keep our urban forest healthy and sustainable.

Drinking Fountains Updated – In addition to updating plant material, Public Works staff and crews continue to look for ways to enhance the look of our parks. Recently, staff noticed four weathered drinking fountains along the Corona del Mar Bluffs that needed attention. Our team updated the drinking fountains with primer and a fresh coat of green paint, and the fountains are now ready for use again.


Fair Game

By TOM JOHNSON

Life is good inside the ropes

Fair Game Tom JohnsonSo, the Hoag Classic is in the books. Kirk Triplett won it with an eagle on the second hole of sudden death. It was definitely his highlight of the week.

My highlight was a little bit different. I was honored to announce the players off from the first and 10th tees. I have to tell you, after years of playing golf, it’s very exciting to stand inside the ropes with some of the biggest legends of the game.

Of course, this wasn’t my first year, I’ve been doing it now for a while. Our group of announcers includes attorney and big-time Hoag supporter Bob Callahan, Northern Trust’s Mark Hardtke, former Hoag Classic Chair Jake Rohrer and me. 

One thing that’s evident by being out there is that the pros, for the most part, are appreciative and go out of their way to be cordial.

Still, we as announcers all have our own stories when things aren’t so cordial. One time, Mark was announcing Craig Stadler and Stadler decided to hit halfway through the intro. Mark, looking down at his notes suddenly heard a swoosh and was surprised at what happened. Being the consummate professional, Mark looked down again and finished.

Fair Game Tom and Bob

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Photo by Kathleen Freed

(L-R) Tom Johnson and Bob Callahan, chairman of the starters (announcers) committee, on the 1st tee

Then there was Bobby Watkins, not the friendliest guy on the tour. Bobby complained one year about some of the guys’ long intros. I think he was playing with Gary Player that year, so go figure. We often wondered if he would’ve still complained if he’d had a successful career like his brother Lanny.

Zing!

Then there’s always the small errors on our part. And, we’ve all done them. 

The best one this year was when Jake was introducing Glen Day. In his best announcer’s voice, Jake said over the crowd, “Next on the tee, from Alotian, Arizona…” Day suddenly had a puzzled look on his face. Jake, only halfway through the intro, thinking he’d done something wrong said, “Well, how would you pronounce it?”

Day fired back, “Arkansas.”

Oh, the pressures of being an announcer.

Anyway, it was great fun and always enjoyable supporting the efforts of Hoag Hospital.

• • •

The 36th Annual Spirit Run is this Sunday, March 17 at Fashion Island.

Although there’s still time to enter, there’s probably not enough time still to train.

Here’s what’s planned: five adult road race events, seven youth events, a 5k Family Walk and Family Mile, a Toddler Trot and, of course, the Dog Mile. 

When you’re not running or walking, you can visit the Youth & Fitness Expo that features live music, food, including a pancake breakfast, beverages, youth activities, shopping, health and fitness info, and even massages.

There’s also a Dog Expo with adoptable pets and a lot of other dog-friendly activities.

Remember, the money goes to the schools.

If you still want to run, you can register at www.nmspiritrun.org.

Things get under way at 6 a.m.

• • •

My man, Chance the Rapper, got married in Newport Beach last weekend at the Resort at Pelican Hill to his longtime girlfriend, Kristen Corley

Now honestly, I have no idea who Chance the Rapper is, but he’s apparently somebody. The guest list included the likes of Kim Kardashian, Kanye West and Dave Chapelle.

Can’t believe Stu News wasn’t invited to cover it.

• • •

Finally, Thursday is Pi Day. Not pie day, Pi day. As in 3.1415926535…

National Pi Day not only celebrates the famous number that represents the ratio of a circle’s circumference to its diameter, but it’s also the birthday of scientist and mathematician Albert Einstein.

I’ll probably celebrate by having a nice piece of Pecan.


Spirit Run is going to the dogs

Spirit Run is going to the dogs

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Submitted photo

Friends of Newport Beach Animal Shelter (FONBAS) will be out in full force at this year’s Spirit Run on Sunday, March 17, as exemplified by Amber, owned by FONBAS board member Sharon Esterley. This pooch is decked out in green for the St. Patrick’s Day event. FONBAS will have a booth at the event with doggie treats for four-legged participants. Shelter staff will be there as well with some delightful animals looking for a new home. Be sure and stop by.


Stump the Stu

Fresh catch of the day...

Stump the Stu 3.8.19

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We thought this was an easy one...but only received one correct answer...another tough one!

Congratulations to Joe Stapleton who really knows Newport and guessed that the “Fresh Fish” lettering can be found on the front window at Bear Flag Fish Co. across from Lido Marina Village on Via Lido.

According to Joe, “They have the best fish tacos and poke in town”...so stop on by and see for yourself.

If you have a unique spot or icon around town that you think Stu News Newport readers would enjoy finding out about, please shoot it, share it and give us the location, so we can challenge them! Happy Hunting.


Take Five: Meet Dr. Dore Gilbert, Newport Beach physician and Army Lieutenant Colonel

By AMY SENK

Dr. Dore Gilbert’s career path – USC medical school, a Newport Beach private practice affiliated with Hoag Hospital and mayor of the city of Laguna Hills – always lacked something important to him: military service. His father and grandfather served, but he missed the Vietnam War because of medical school. He thought about enlisting in the ‘80s and ‘90s, but there were family and practice commitments to consider. Finally at age 60 – the oldest possible age for physicians – he enlisted in the Army, and after months on a waiting list, he became Lieutenant Colonel Gilbert in the U.S. Army Medical Corps Reserve.

In 2011 at age 61, he was deployed to a combat theater in Afghanistan. He also served in the Army Reserves from 2010 until 2015. On Saturday (March 9), he will be recognized at the Hoag Classic on Military Appreciation Day, when the golf tournament’s second round will honor past and present military personnel with an opening ceremony that will include the National Anthem, a color guard procession, patriotic music and a flyover – and all active duty, military reserve, National Guard, military retirees and veterans – and up to three guests each – will receive complimentary admission with food and beverage to thank them for their service. I caught up with Dr. Gilbert to ask about his service and how it feels to be recognized at the Hoag Classic. 

Take Five Dore Gilbert

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Courtesy of Dr. Dore Gilbert

Dr. Dore Gilbert, U.S. Army Lieutenant Colonel

Q: You grew up in a family with a tradition of military service. Did you ever feel pressured to join the military, or did the desire come from within?

A: Both my grandparents served in World War I. My Dad was a tail gunner on a B-17 during World War II. I never felt any pressure to join. I joined because I wanted to serve my country during a time of war. I just felt it was my duty as a citizen and physician. I have always served my community – 29 years on the Board of Education and six years on the Laguna Hills City Council. I am currently the Mayor of Laguna Hills. Service has always been part of my life.

Q: What were you hoping to accomplishment by serving in the military, and did you succeed with those goals?

A: When I joined, my goal was to go to basic training and be able to compete with the younger soldiers and then, volunteer for deployment. My goals were met, and my deployment was absolutely one of the most rewarding experiences of my life.

Q: I understand you were stationed just outside of Kabul in a combat theater. What was your most frightening experience, or most memorable experience?

A: Every time I went out to see one of the 10 bases I was responsible for, I was always concerned about being attacked. I think starting “walking blood banks” in the Kabul Base Cluster (10 bases with 10,000 soldiers) was my best accomplishment, and I was rewarded with a medal and a seat at the general staff meetings. (Note: According to the Laguna Hills city website, Dr. Gilbert’s other awards include a Joint Service Commendation Medal, Army Achievement Medal with Oak Leaf Cluster, Afghan Campaign Medal with Campaign Bronze Star Device, National Defense Service Medal, Army Service Medal, Armed Forces Reserve Medal, ISAF NATO Medal, Global War on Terrorism Expeditionary Medal and an Army Overseas Ribbon.)

Q: What are you up to now? Did your service change your approach to medicine here in the U.S.?

A: I am back in private practice where I am the medical director of Newport Dermatology & Laser Associates. We have done over 35,000 laser cases, as well as general dermatology.

Q: What advice do you have for a doctor considering military service?

A: Follow your dreams. You will always be proud of your service.

Editor’s Note: On Saturday, March 9, the Hoag Classic Military Appreciation Day festivities will include an Opening Ceremony at 9:15 a.m. and Salute to Service with a live musical performance by John Daly & Jocko Deal at 5:15 p.m., both taking place in the Victory Lounge. Come out to show your support for those who currently serve and have served our country.


Third ranked Cal wins Nicholas III U.C. regatta

The 4th Annual Henry T. Nicholas III U.C. Challenge Cup Regatta took place Saturday, March 2 in Newport Beach. Men and women rowers from all six campuses, UCI, UCLA, UC-San Diego, UCSB, UC-Davis and Cal, participated.

Third ranked Cal rowing boats

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Photos courtesy of Francisco Hernandez

Races underway in Newport Harbor

Cal’s No. 3 nationally ranked men’s crew team took first place in the men’s final, with UC-San Diego and UCI coming in second and third, respectively.

UCSB won the women’s competition, with UCI coming in second.

Third ranked Cal rowers at American Legion Hall

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Rowers from all six UC campus teams celebrate at the American Legion Hall after the morning races

Rowers from all campuses celebrated following the morning races at the Newport Beach American Legion Hall. Nicholas III, Broadcom co-founder, philanthropist, victims’ rights activist and a major supporter of the UCI rowing program, was on hand to present the trophies.


You Must Remember This: Flying to Baja, fishing in Rancho Buena Vista

By NANCY GARDNER

There was a time when it was easy to fly your own plane to Baja, and this was how we became introduced to Rancho Buena Vista on the East Cape of Baja Sud.

My husband was a junkie. Now, before you start worrying about rehab and the like, this was an industry term used for people like him who bought and sold aircraft parts. As new planes became more and more expensive, it made more and more sense to keep your old one going; so he was very immersed in all things aviation and always had his own plane. We’re not talking Lear jets, here. Small, single engine – the kind he supplied parts for. The beauty was that you could take off from here and fly directly to Rancho Buena Vista, which had a dirt strip about a half mile away. You landed, a car from the ranch picked you up, and within minutes you were set.

You Must Remember Flying to Baja

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Courtesy of Nancy Gardner

(L-R) Nancy Gardner (in red suit) is hooked up and ready for her catch; sharing the rooster fish that she got to keep

This was before the transformation of Cabo. Everything was much lower key, and the key couldn’t get much lower than Rancho Buena Vista. There were little cottages with thatched roofs from which the occasional scorpion plopped down. The eating was family style, and the food was excellent in the sense of fresh, but that was pretty much the extent of it. It was all about the fishing, and the fishing was good enough to attract anglers from all over the world which was an advantage. The conversation might still be about fishing, but the various accents made it seem more interesting.

As in any industry there were “stars,” in this case the skippers, and there was always a rush to sign up with the top guys. But even if you didn’t get Jose, you were pretty sure to get some good fishing. Dorado and rooster fish were plentiful, but most came for the marlin. I remember the one time I got one. I was really excited. I knew the skipper and his mate were looking at this rather small person and thinking they were going to have to do most of the work, but what they didn’t know was that this rather small person was a lot stronger than she looked and very determined. I settled in for two or three hours of effort, except that after about five minutes of reeling, my fish swam right to the boat where it was freed. It must have known about the catch and release program and decided not to waste any energy fighting.

In addition to good fishing, good food and interesting company, Rancho Buena Vista also had an on-site infirmary. I know because on one trip I was particularly careful of the water, so careful that I became severely dehydrated and passed out. When I came to, I found myself in their infirmary with a doctor smiling down at me and an IV in my arm – one with lots of air bubbles in the tube. Everything I had ever read said that was not a good thing, so I pointed it out to the doctor. Instead of instantly ripping the IV out, he shook his head. “Hecho in Mexico,” he said sadly. I was less concerned with Mexico’s standard of production than of the bubbles, but the IV remained, as did I –living, I mean.

We flew to other places in Baja because, like flying to Rancho Buena Vista, it was convenient. There were little dirt strips located all over the peninsula making it easy for anglers, hunters and general tourists to get around. Unfortunately, the strips were also  convenient for drug smugglers, and in the early ‘80s, the Mexican government, under U.S. prodding, tore up all those strips. Now, if you wanted to fly to Rancho Buena Vista or elsewhere, you had to first stop at the Mexican airport nearest to the American border and check in there, and then fly to the regulation airport nearest your destination, and from there figure out transportation to wherever you were going, which could be several hours away...too much work. We stopped going, but Rancho Buena Vista is still there, and from reading a few reviews, it has the same low-key vibe and great fishing. If you go, though, you might want to take your own IV.

~~~~~~~~

Nancy Gardner, former Mayor of Newport Beach, long-time resident and daughter of Judge Robert Gardner, is a regular contributor to Stu News Newport.


Sign of the times

It’s another edition of Sign of the times, so let’s see how well you know our town. Identify this partial glance of a sign that includes these inviting palm trees welcoming you to a relaxing tropical paradise...but if not – where then?

Good luck!

Stu loves publishing the winning answers on Tuesday.

Send your guesses to This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it..

If you’re a business and you want to play, you can send us a high-quality photo of your sign and we’ll take it from there and challenge our readers.

Let’s have some fun!

SOTT 3.8.19

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Sherman Library to hold annual Open House

Sherman Library is holding its 6th annual Open House on Tuesday, April 2 from 5 - 8 p.m. This is an opportunity to view rare historical documents and to tour the archives storage, which is usually closed to the public. The tours will include a display of unique items from the Library’s collections, which this year will focus on historic Corona del Mar. Light refreshments will be served.

Sherman Library to hold

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Courtesy of Sherman Library & Gardens

A vintage Corona del Mar sign welcomed passersby to the “Crown of the Sea”

This event is free but please RSVP to 949.673.1880 by Friday, March 29.

For more information, contact Paul Wormser, library director, at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it..

Sherman Library is located at 614 Dahlia Ave., Corona del Mar.


Segerstrom Center presents “¡DAMAS! Celebrating Women Creators”

Segerstrom Center for the Arts presents its second annual “¡DAMAS! Celebrating Women Creators” on the Julianne and George Argyros Plaza on Saturday, March 30 from 5 - 7:30 p.m. This free event coincides with National Women’s Month and celebrates the creative voices of many of our community’s most talented and artistically influential women. Women poets, painters, performers and even a blacksmith will share their gifts and insights through exhibits, interactive booths, videos, demonstrations and a panel discussion about women and their creative processes. 

Segerstrom Center presents women

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Courtesy of scfta.org

“¡DAMAS! Celebrating Women Creators” comes to Argyros Plaza

The evening will include:

–Sherwynn Umali, associate dean of students at University of California, Irvine leading the panel discussion that includes Maria Simeone (teaching artist), Kari Barber (founder, Outer Limits Tattoos), and Karen P. Thomas (curator of Pacific Chorale’s UnSung Heroes concert that follows “¡DAMAS! Celebrating Women Creators,” as well as composer of “Le Stelle,” which will receive its World Premiere at that time).

–A 360-degree video performance of Hear Word!, an exhilarating performance piece that was a hit at this year’s Off Center Festival. Hear Word! combines artistry, social commentary and true-life stories of inequality and transformation, delivered by some of Nigeria’s most talented actresses. The show delivers an intimate view into the lives of women from all corners of Nigeria who are facing unique and universal issues, including the limitation of potential for achievement, independence, decision-making and leadership.

–Trinh Mai’s project and video That We Should Be Heirs. The project encourages participants to engage in the lost art of letter writing as a method of alleviating burdens and promoting healing. By putting hand to paper and joining one another in this collective activity of personal letter writing, we can share in this intimate process of privately documenting the stories, hardships and triumphs that connect us all.

And filling out the day will be blacksmith Joy Fire’s forging demonstration, Maria Simeone’s movement and holistic drumming, Chulita Vinyl Club’s DJ and a vinyl demonstration and Kari Barber of Outer Limits Tattoo art booth.

Food and beverages will be available at George’s Café. Following the Center’s “¡DAMAS! Celebrating Women Creators,” Pacific Chorale will perform UnSung Heroes in the Renee and Henry Segerstrom Concert Hall at 7:30 p.m.

UnSung Heroes is a paid ticketed event. All too often neglected and overlooked, the music of female composers takes its deserved place at center stage. This performance features the genius of creators such as Hildegard von Bingen, Lili Boulanger, Gabriela Lena Frank, Rosephanye Powell and Alice Parker, and includes a world premiere by Seattle composer Karen P. Thomas.

Tickets can be purchased at www.scfta.org, or on Saturday at the Center’s Box Office.

Julianne and George Argyros Plaza at Segerstrom Center for the Arts is located 600 Town Center Drive, Costa Mesa.


Pat Benatar & Neil Giraldo with Melissa Ethridge, Kool & the Gang and more headline Pacific Amphitheatre this summer

The OC Fair has announced three more shows coming to the Toyota Summer Concert Series at Pacific Amphitheatre during the 2019 OC Fair. Pat Benatar & Neil Giraldo will bring their 40th anniversary tour to Costa Mesa with Melissa Etheridge on July 20. Plus, Kool & the Gang and Evelyn “Champagne” King will perform on July 31, and The B-52s and Dead Man’s Party will hit the stage on August 1. Tickets for these shows will go on sale at 10 a.m. on Saturday, March 9.

Pat Benatar Girardo duo

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Photos courtesy of OC Fair & Event Center

Pat Benatar and Neil Girado celebrating the 40th Anniversary Tour

Pat Benatar & Neil Giraldo with Melissa Etheridge

Saturday, July 20 at 7 p.m.

Tickets tarts $40

Pat Benatar & Neil Giraldo have been making music together for four decades, after meeting each other in 1979 for the first time in a small rehearsal room in New York City. Benatar’s staggering vocals and take-no-prisoners attitude, along with Neil Giraldo’s trailblazing artistry as a guitarist, producer and songwriter, forged the unique sound that created some of rocks most memorable hits, including “We Belong,” “Invincible,” “Love Is A Battlefield,” “Promises In The Dark” and “We Live For Love.” Together they have created two multi-platinum, five platinum and three gold albums, as well as 19 Top 40 hits.

Melissa Etheridge stormed onto the American rock scene in 1988 with the release of her critically acclaimed self-titled debut album, which led to an appearance on the 1989 Grammy Awards show. For several years, her popularity grew around such memorable originals as “Bring Me Some Water,” “No Souvenirs” and “Ain’t It Heavy.” Etheridge hit her commercial and artistic stride with her fourth album, Yes I Am, which featured the massive hits, “‘m the Only One” and “Come to My Window.” Known for her confessional lyrics and raspy, smoky vocals, Etheridge has remained one of America’s favorite female singer-songwriters for more than two decades. Her upcoming album, “he Medicine Show,” is due out April 12.

Pat Benatar Kool and the Gang

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Kool & the Gang hits the stage July 31 

Kool & the Gang with Evelyn “Champagne” King

Wednesday, July 31 at 7:30 p.m.

Tickets start at $27.50

Get ready for a night of celebrating when Kool & the Gang hits the stage. Formed in 1968, the band has sold more than 70 million albums worldwide and influenced the music of three generations. Thanks to iconic songs like “Celebration,” “Cherish,” “Jungle Boogie,” “Open Sesame” and “Ladies Night,” they’ve earned two Grammy Awards, seven American Music Awards, 25 Top 10 R&B hits, nine Top 10 Pop hits and 31 Gold and Platinum albums.

They’ll be joined by Evelyn “Champagne” King, who released her debut album, Smooth Talk, in 1977, featuring the Top 10 hit “Shame” and “I Don’t Know If It’s Right.” She released her last studio album, Open Book, in 2007 featuring the single, “The Dance.”

Pat Benatar The B 52s

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The B-52s put their unique stamp on alternative music

The B-52s with Dead Man’s Party

Thursday, Aug. 1 at 7:30 p.m.

Tickets start at $27.50

Selling more than 20 million albums worldwide, The B-52s have quietly impacted alternative music, fashion and culture over the course of four-plus decades. Panic! At The Disco, Blood Orange, The Offspring, Pitbull, Roger Sanchez and DJ Shadow have sampled classics from the band’s discography, and Seth MacFarlane’s Family Guy, The Simpsons, Sugarland and more offered up covers of their own. They inched toward the forefront of the post-punk movement in America codified by 1979’s self-titled The B-52s. Not only did the record go gold, but it also placed on Rolling Stone’s “500 Greatest Albums of All Time” and VH1’s “Greatest Albums of All Time.” The B-52s began their 40th anniversary tour alongside Culture Club. As they prepare a high-profile documentary and first official book, The B-52s look forward to inspiring future generations.

Dead Man’s Party, the Oingo Boingo tribute band which has been bringing Boingo tunes live for almost two decades, will join in on the party, paying homage to the classic Oingo Boingo lineup. Featured is a three-piece horn section, guitar, bass, keys, drums and a frontman so convincing that people sometimes believe they are actually watching Danny Elfman himself!. Party along to Boingo favorites like “Just Another Day,” “No Spill Blood” and “Only A Lad.”

Tickets are now on sale for all of these shows. Tickets are available via Ticketmaster and include admission to the 2019 OC Fair. More performances and action sports at the Fair will be announced in the coming months. Sign up for pre-sale emails at www.ocfair.com/newsletters. Super Pass holders can purchase tickets to select Pacific Amphitheatre, The Hangar and Action Sports Arena performances at a two-for-one discount. The 2019 Super Pass is a season pass that includes admission to all 23 days of the OC Fair, as well as several exclusive discounts, and is on sale now at www.ocfair.com/superpass.

The 2019 OC Fair taking place July 12 - August 11 is open Wednesday through Sunday. For more information, visit www.ocfair.com.


Newport Beach Foundation celebrates future leadership and community organization, The Literacy Project

Local citizens, working professionals, business owners and civic leaders attended Newport Beach Foundation’s celebration event at the Balboa Bay Resort to honor recipients of the organization’s “Distinguished Citizens Program” (DCP) and charitable partner “The Literacy Project.” The Newport Beach Foundation, a nonprofit philanthropic organization re-established in 2017, is on a mission to strengthen current and future community leadership. To date, the organization has impacted several hundred people, showcased several charitable organizations and put on four marquee events.

Newport Beach Foundation celebrates Wortmann

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Photos by Meghan Black Photography

(L-R) Chairman of the Board of Governors, Balboa Bay Club, John Wortmann; Founder of the Literacy Project, Sue Grant; and Newport Beach Chamber of Commerce President & CEO Steve Rosansky

 “There is a generational divide between those who have created the legacy of Newport Beach and the next generation whose time is approaching to step up and serve,” said Joe Stapleton, chairman of Newport Beach Foundation. “It is our goal to give them a pathway and platform to build upon.”

Newport Beach Foundation celebrates Chris and Morgan

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 (L-R) Chris Delfs and Morgan Christen

The Distinguished Citizen Program was created from the vision of former City Manager and Citizen of the Year Homer Bludau. The program featured more than 16 presenters from the city of Newport Beach and successful local business owners. Event graduates were honored for completing the program at the February 27 event, along with a special presentation from two of the members on their experience.

Newport Beach Foundation celebrates Leung

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 (L-R) Newport Beach City Manager Grace Leung with Chairman of the Newport Beach Foundation Joe Stapleton and Sarah Stapleton

“The DCP is a four-week program that activates and connects you with our city leaders,” said DCP graduate Niki Stoller. “This program isn’t only for the politico. It’s also for the people who want to come together and get involved to make Newport Beach better for our next generation.”

Newport Beach Foundation celebrates Williams

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 (L-R) Gary Williams Sr., Cheryl Williams and Gary Williams Jr.

The event also supported “The Literacy Project” – a nonprofit dedicated to helping children become self-sufficient, productive and contributing members of our society with literacy programs.

Event sponsors included Newport Beach & Company, The UPS Store, Ballast, BreezeIT, Redwood West, Color Wine and Towne Park Brew.

Newport Beach Foundation celebrates graduating class

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Distinguished Citizen Program graduating class during their “pinning ceremony”

For more information on how to get involved or attend future events, visit www.nb-foundation.org.


PGA TOUR Legends tee it up today to start Hoag Classic Championship weekend

Today, Friday, March 8, the PGA TOUR Champions will be teeing it up for an exciting weekend of competition out at Newport Beach Country Club.

Legends such as Fred Couples, John Daly, Mark O’Meara, Colin Montgomerie and newcomers Darren Clarke, Chris DeMarco and Bob Estes, among others, join more than 80 players to compete in the 2019 tournament. In years past, the Hoag Classic has featured players with more than 400 worldwide professional victories, including 50 major championships. The event has also featured more than 40 PGA TOUR Championship members in the World Golf Hall of Fame, many of whom are still competing. 

PGA TOUR Champions Fred Couples

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Courtesy of Hoag Classic

Fred Couples held a media conference on the practice range on Thursday afternoon

Some of the highlights of the week to date included:

Monday, March 4: Womanology at the NBCC BallroomLed guests on a journey to better health and enhancing their well-being. The special event started with a morning brunch and meet and greet, followed by an entertaining open panel discussion with well-known female leaders and physicians from Hoag. Monday Pro-Am – Offered sponsors the first opportunity to experience the championship course before their favorite PGA TOUR Champions players go head-to-head later this week. Each amateur foursome was paired with a professional in this one-day competition.

PGA TOUR Champions Darren Clarke

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Photos by Lana Johnson

Darren Clarke was the featured speaker at “Breakfast with a Champion” on Tuesday morning

Tuesday, March 5: Breakfast with a Champion at the NBCC Ballroom featuring Darren Clarke in an informal Q&A session.

Wednesday, March 6 and Thursday, March 7: Legends Pro-Am – Featured a pro with a team of four amateurs, presented by Konica Minolta.

PGA TOUR Champions Bob and Jesper

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 (L-R) Bob Callahan, chairman of the starters (announcers) committee, with pro Jesper Parnevik on Hole 1

The Hoag Classic Championship Weekend kicks off today with Corporate Day presented by City National Bank, giving local business professionals an opportunity to get out of the office and engage with clients during the first round of competition. All City National Bank clients will receive complimentary admission when presenting a bank-related resource (such as a debit or credit card, check, etc.) at the admissions gate. After play, attendees are invited to listen to live music and enjoy appetizers presented by John Wayne Airport. 

PGA TOUR Champions Mike and Jeff

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 (L-R) Mike Petch with pro Jeff Sluman

Saturday, March 9 will honor current and former servicemen and women with Military Appreciation Day presented by CoreLogic. All active duty, military reserve, National Guard, military retirees and veterans – and up to three guests each – will receive complimentary admission with food and beverage to thank them for their service.

PGA TOUR Champions Jose Maria

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 (L-R) A ray of sunshine came out on Wednesday as Jose Maria Olazabal hit the practice range

For the Final Round on Sunday, March 10, students ages 18 and under will receive complimentary admission for Student Day presented by Kingston Technology. Youth can enjoy the Kids Fun Zone with a variety of games and prizes and participate in the putting contest with the opportunity to win tournament merchandise, tickets to local attractions and more. Kingston Technology and Hoag Charity Sports will also be awarding $70,000 in scholarships in support of The First Tee of Orange County to local students who have participated in the program.

PGA TOUR Champions Hal Sutton

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 Hal Sutton after his morning round on Thursday

Here are today’s tee times... so get out and enjoy some great golf this weekend.

PGA TOUR Hoag Classic Groupings 1

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PGA TOUR Hoag Classic Groupings 2

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Good Any One Day tickets for the Hoag Classic are available online before the event for $25. Tickets purchased at the Main Gate on the day of the event are $30. Tickets can also be purchased in advance at participating Roger Dunn Golf Stores. Children age 11 and under receive complimentary admission.

For more information, visit www.hoagclassic.com.


KidWorks celebrates Dr. Seuss Reading Week

With the goal of helping preschool students at Santa Ana-based nonprofit KidWorks develop a passion for reading, the rhyming words of beloved children’s author Dr. Seuss (Theodor Geisel) were joyfully read aloud to them again this year by local volunteers, including ​Newport Beach readers Jim Connelly, Kyle Team, Joey Booth and Lana Johnson, as part of the annual Dr. Seuss Reading Week at KidWorks.

KidsWorks celebrates Dr. Seuss kids with books

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Photos courtesy of KidWorks

Youngsters at KidWorks share their Dr. Seuss books

The event was held in conjunction with the National Education Association’s Read Across America annual reading motivation and awareness program, which culminated on March 2, Seuss’ birthday.

KidWorks celebrates Dr. Seuss with Jim

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Jim Connelly with students and the finger painting they made to thank him

“We know it’s critical for our preschool students to develop a passion for reading as that is key to developing literacy and language comprehension skills,” said David Benavides, KidWorks Executive Director. “This is one tangible way we transform the lives of the students we serve. We thank our volunteer readers for their time and passion.”

KidWorks celebrates Dr. Seuss with Joey

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Joey Booth donned some long tresses for “Crazy Hair Day” during his reading

Motivating children to read is an important factor in student achievement and creating lifelong successful readers. Research has shown that children who are motivated and spend more time reading do better in school.

KidWorks celebrates Dr. Seuss with Kyle

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Kyle Team, a board member of KidWorks, reads “Hop on Pop” to the students

KidWorks serves more than 1,000 children, youth and parents through weekly programs and more than 4,000 community members annually at four learning centers in central Santa Ana. 

KidWorks celebrates Dr. Seuss with Lana

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Lana Johnson having fun reading “Put Me in the Zoo” to these preschoolers

Save the Date: KidWorks is looking for sponsorships and foursomes for their annual KidWorks Classic Golf Tournament, taking place on Wednesday, May 15 at Pelican Hill Golf Course. Interested parties can contact Lisa Gels at 714.834.9400 ext. 126 or lThis email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. for more information on how to get involved.


Kids STEAM Workshop to be held at NBPL Sunday

Newport Beach Public Library will be holding “Kids STEAM Workshop: I Have a Brain,” on Sunday, March 10 with two sessions: from 2 - 2:45 p.m. and 3 - 3:45 p.m. in the Central Library Friends Room.

The “I Have a Brain” workshop series, presented by UCI Center for the Neurobiology of Learning & Memory, allows children ages 4 and up to learn about the ocean and brain with hands-on activities, exploring the wonders of the brain in a laboratory environment. Children will hold and feel real specimens, learn about cells and neurons that make up their nervous system, record electrochemical communications in their body and find out where their memory lives in their brain.

The program is presented by the Newport Beach Library Foundation, and sponsored by Diane and Dennis Baker.

Admission is free with an online reservation at www.nbplfoundation.org. Space is limited to 75 children per session. Contact This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.for more information or call 949.717.3818.

Newport Beach Public Library is located at 1000 Irvine Ave., Newport Beach.


Join the Organic Club Bonanza Seedling Exchange

Join the Orange County Organic Gardening Club (OCOGC) on Tuesday, March 12 from 7 - 9 p.m. at the OC Fair & Event Center’s Centennial Farm, for a seed exchange.

Each Club member will receive materials to plant a flat of vegetable seedlings at home right after the meeting, and grow a different vegetable. Containers, soil, seeds and instructions are provided by the Club.

Join the Organic Club

Courtesy of OC Organic Gardening Club

Grow vegetables and herbs from seedlings for your spring garden

On Tuesday, April 9, participants will bring their seedlings back for the Bonanza seedling exchange, and return home with a wide selection of vegetables and herbs for their spring garden.

Anyone can attend the meeting. Current paid members can participate in the Bonanza seedling exchange. Annual dues are only $20.

The OCOGC meets on the second Tuesday of each month from September through June in the Silo Building at Centennial Farm. Meetings start with light refreshments at 7 p.m., with an interesting and educational speaker starting at 7:30 p.m. Enter the Fairgrounds gate at 88 Fair Drive, and park near the Centennial Farm entrance.

For more information, email This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. or visit www.facebook.com/groups/1427109197539054/.

Centennial Farm at the OC Fair & Event Center is located at 88 Fair Drive, Costa Mesa.


Heroes Hall presents “Voices” – a Veterans Storytelling Project

Join Heroes Hall for its presentation of “Voices – Veterans Storytelling Project,” on Thursday, March 28 from 7 - 9 p.m.

Heroes Hall in conjunction with Arts OC and Tierney Center for Veteran Services will provide a compelling night of storytelling, where veterans will share their most memorable military experiences. The content of these stories will be raw and unfiltered and is sure to bring both tears and laughter. Due to the mature content of the stories, it may not be appropriate for children under 13. The performance will take place in the outside courtyard, so dress appropriately. 

Heroes Hall presents

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Courtesy of OC Fair & Event Center

This event is free and open to the public. RSVP is requested here.

Heroes Hall at the OC Fair & Event Center is located at 88 Fair Drive, Costa Mesa.


CdM restaurant announces public grand opening

Hollywood producer McG and restaurateur Jordan Otterbein, River Jetty Restaurant Group partners known for acclaimed A Restaurant and A Market in Newport Beach, have announced the grand opening of the brand new dining concept, CdM.

On Saturday, March 9, CdM will be open to the public for dinner daily beginning at 5 p.m.

The Corona del Mar High School alums have created a stylish community eatery offering an elevated, yet comfortable and approachable dining experience.

“We are thrilled to welcome all to experience CdM,” Otterbein said. “It’s an exciting feeling to open a new restaurant that we are so proud of in the amazing community that we grew up in.”

CdM restaurant announces

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Submitted photo

CdM exudes a seaside vibe with rich textures and comfortable seating

The restaurant’s design and color palette gives a nod to the seaside surroundings, while highlighting rich textures like plush velvet booths and comfortable leather lounge and barside seating areas. Interesting light fixtures from salvage shipyards complement intricate detailing like brass accents throughout the restaurant and herringbone reclaimed wood flooring.

Corporate Executive Chef Jonathan Blackford’s creative American menu highlights unique, hand-selected ingredients in each of his flavorful dishes, drawing influence from America’s melting pot of cuisines.

Start with an array of charcuterie offerings like Duck Liver Pate or Fancy Cheese Bread. Lighter fare includes veggie dishes such as BBQ Heirloom Carrots and Vegetable Samosas or small plates featuring Black Snapper Crudo or Crispy Pork Belly Adobo. Main dishes welcome a selection of unique housemade pastas including Hatch Chili Bucatini and larger plates presenting West Coast Grouper and Akaushi Skirt Steak.

With an all-new centralized bar and downstairs speakeasy-style room offering an exclusive list of libations, CdM’s bar program is led by the acclaimed Bar Manager Ravin Buzzell. The extensive list of his handcrafted cocktails include a spicy Corona del MARgarita, beach-inspired Tower #5 and a smoky La Ultima Fumar.

CdM is located at 2325 East Coast Highway, Corona del Mar. Reservations are recommended and can be made by calling 949.287.6600. Stay connected at @CdMrestaurant.


Capturing iconic Newport Beach and beyond...

Capturing iconic Newport Beach

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 Artwork by Don Krotee

“Greek Orthodox Church in Leros, Greece” was created with transparent watercolor on handmade cotton paper

~~~~~~~~

Don Krotee has been a resident of Newport Beach since 1986. He is a board member of the Newport Heights Improvement Association and SPON, and is an architect who has been drawing and painting from an early age. His architectural marker drawings are featured periodically in Stu News.


Looking out to longer and sunnier days ahead

Looking out view

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Photo by Michelle Mar (Instagram @msmichellemar) 

Stopping to take in the view from CdM on a gorgeous sunny day


Seas the day

Seas the day

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Photo by Jason Berry (Instagram @its_jason_berry)

A walk on the beach in CdM reminds us just how lucky we are to live here


Fair Game

By TOM JOHNSON

Inappropriate swastika game still topping local news

Fair Game Tom JohnsonSo last week I mentioned the inappropriate swastika story that happened at an off-campus party in a private residence on the eastside of Costa Mesa attended by kids primarily from Newport Harbor High School, but also from Costa Mesa and Estancia high schools.

I said it brought “outrage to the community and that the kids probably would face serious consequences.”

I closed by saying, “the other question that has to be asked is, where were the parents?”

My comment was more directed at the drinking game that accompanied the swastika set-up and the potential liability any homeowner would face in that type of situation if something went wrong.

I heard from a number of people, but the one that stuck out the most was this one. “Way to go Tom. Blame it on the parents as in ‘where were the parents?’ I guess personal accountability isn’t in your lexicon. Blah, blah blah.”

So, I asked the writer if they’d like to run their comment as a letter to the editor. After all, I’m a big boy, I can take it.

Here was their response: “No. Thank you for asking. I prefer to stay out of the limelight though I appreciate your asking. Unfortunately, with today’s social media, anytime you express an opinion you become an easy target for those who disagree with your views. Thanks again.”

Anyone else find that ironic? Go figure.

Meanwhile, the story isn’t over. 

One kid who was at the party and previously attended JSerra Catholic High School, apparently no longer does. It’s unclear whether the student was expelled or withdrew from the school

On another front, Eva Schloss, the stepsister of Anne Frank, met with students involved in the party gone awry yesterday.

Anne Frank documented her life hiding from the German occupation from 1942 - 1944 with the publication of The Young Girl.

Anne later spent time in Auschwitz and Bergen-Belsen concentration camps where she died in 1945, a few months short of her 16th birthday.

Also, Newport-Mesa Unified School District has held two community meetings. One last Monday at NHHS and one last night at Corona del Mar High School.

The meetings were held in conjunction with the Anti-Defamation League and two local Jewish organizations.

• • •

Golf, golf, golf, this weekend out at Newport Beach Country Club. It’s the PGA Champions Tour with the likes of Fred Couples, Colin Montgomerie, John Daly and more.

Hopefully the weather holds up because the golf is good.

You have to get out there if you can. Play runs today (Friday, March 8) through Sunday. 

• • •

Finally, the Newport Beach Chamber of Commerce, in a partnership with Rutan & Tucker, is holding a two-hour training for supervisors and a one-hour session on the subject of sexual harassment.

A new state law requires all businesses with five or more employees statewide to satisfy this training requirement.

It’s only $10.

You can contact the Chamber here.


Pet of the WeekDog and Cat print

Stu News Newport is delighted to be working with the Newport Beach Animal Shelter to help get the word out in search of loving homes for pets that deserve a warm, nurturing environment and a place to call “home.”

Pet of the Week 3.5.19

Courtesy of Newport Beach Animal Shelter

MEET MELON

The Newport Beach Animal Shelter would like to introduce you to Melon. She came from a litter of seven and enjoys the company of other cats. At just 15 to 16 weeks of age, she is still a little shy when meeting new people. She would love a peaceful household with at least one other playful kitten or cat. As a kind, domestic, long hair, tortoiseshell, she is as gorgeous as they come, but will need gentle combing throughout her lifetime. 

If you are interested in finding out more about Melon, or any other animals up for adoption, call 949.644.3656 or email Valerie Schomburg at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.. The Newport Beach Animal Shelter is located at 20302 Riverside Drive, Newport Beach. It is open daily from 11 a.m. to 4 p.m.

Adoption costs at the shelter:

–Dogs - $130

–Puppies - $150

–Cats - $90

–Kittens - $110

To find out how you can help support the shelter, visit www.nbpd.org and click on “Our Animal Shelter” to view the wish list. The shelter can always use food & treats; new toys; grooming, hygiene & comfort products; as well as laundry soap, dish soap, paper towels, sponges, scrub pads and lint rollers. If you are interested in volunteering, you can fill out and sign the application on the website.


Segerstrom Center announces 2019-2020 Broadway season

Segerstrom Center for the Arts has announced the 2019 - 2020 Broadway and Curtain Call series, filled with exciting new shows, classic blockbusters and Tony Award® winners with enough razzle dazzle to delight and entertain every musical theater fan.

Coming to the Center for the very first time are Anastasia, A Bronx Tale, Mean Girls, The Band’s Visit and Escape to Margaritaville. Audiences will be thrilled with the returns of Miss Saigon, Les Misérables, Blue Man Group, Chicago and the Disney’s beloved The Lion King

Segerstrom Center announces Miss Saigon

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Photo by Matthew Murphy

A scene from the “Miss Saigon” Tour

Free and fun pre-show and intermission activities will entertain and inform audiences, and the popular Thursday night Talk Backs with cast members will again be offered. One Saturday matinee performance of each show will be Open Captioned, Audio Described and ASL interpreted.

2019-2020 Broadway Series Lineup:

Miss Saigon from October 1 - 13 in Segerstrom Hall. 

Experience the acclaimed new production of the legendary musical Miss Saigon, from the creators of Les Misérables. This is the epic story of a young Vietnamese woman named Kim who is orphaned by war and forced to work in a bar run by a notorious character known as the Engineer. There she meets and falls in love with an American G.I., an encounter that will change their lives forever. Featuring stunning spectacle and a sensational cast of 42 performing the soaring score, including Broadway hits like “The Heat is On in Saigon,” “The Movie in My Mind,” “Last Night of the World” and “American Dream.”

Anastasia Center premiere from November 5 - 17 in Segerstrom Hall. 

Inspired by the beloved films, the romantic and adventure-filled new musical is on a journey to Orange County at last. From the Tony Award®-winning creators of the Broadway classic Ragtime, this show transports us from the twilight of the Russian Empire to the euphoria of Paris in the 1920s, as a brave young woman sets out to discover the mystery of her past. Pursued by a ruthless Soviet officer determined to silence her, Anya enlists the aid of a dashing conman and a lovable ex-aristocrat. Together, they embark on an epic adventure to help her find home, love and
family.

Segerstrom Center announces A Bronx Tale

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Photo by Joan Marcus

Young Calogero and Sonny in “A Bronx Tale”

A Bronx Tale, a Center premiere from March 10 - 22, 2020 in Segerstrom Hall.

Three years ago, Academy Award® nominee Chazz Palminteri teamed up with Academy Award winner Robert De Niro, Tony Award® winner Jerry Zaks and Tony Award nominee Sergio Trujillo to create this streetwise musical, based on Palminteri’s true life story. This Broadway hit crowd-pleaser takes you to the stoops of the Bronx in the 1960s, where a young man is caught between the father he loves and the mob boss he’d love to be. Bursting with high-energy dance numbers and original doo-wop tunes from Academy Award and Tony Award-winner Alan Menken (Beauty and the Beast) and Tony Award-nominee Glenn Slater (Love Never Dies), this is an unforgettable story of loyalty and family. 

Les Misérables from May 5 - 17, 2020 in Segerstrom Hall.

Cameron Mackintosh presents the new production of Alain Boublil and Claude-Michel Schönberg’s Tony Award®-winning musical phenomenon, direct from an acclaimed two-and-a-half-year return to Broadway. Set against the backdrop of 19th century France, this is an unforgettable story of heartbreak, passion and the resilience of the human spirit. Featuring the beloved songs “I Dreamed A Dream,” “On My Own,” “Stars,” “Bring Him Home,” “One Day More,” and many others, this epic and uplifting story has become one of the most celebrated musicals in theatrical history.

Segerstrom Center announces Mean Girls

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Photo by Joan Marcus ©2017

A scene from “Mean Girls”

Mean Girls a Center premiere from June 16 - 28, 2020 in Segerstrom Hall.

Direct from Broadway, this hilarious hit musical is from an award-winning creative team, including book writer Tina Fey (30 Rock), composer Jeff Richmond (Unbreakable Kimmy Schmidt), lyricist Nell Benjamin (Legally Blonde) and director Casey Nicholaw (The Book of Mormon). Cady Heron may have grown up on an African savanna, but 

nothing prepared her for the vicious ways of her strange new home: suburban Illinois. Soon, this naïve newbie falls prey to a trio of lionized frenemies led by the charming but ruthless Regina George. But when Cady devises a plan to end Regina’s reign, she learns the hard way that you can’t cross a Queen Bee without getting stung.

The Band’s Visit, a Center premiere from August 13 - 23, 2020 in Segerstrom Hall, which includes a 2 p.m. matinee on Thursday, Aug. 13.

Winner of 10 Tony Awards and one of the most celebrated musicals ever, it brings audiences to laughter, tears and ultimately...together. In an Israeli desert town where every day feels the same, something different is suddenly in the air. Dina, the local café owner, had long resigned her desires for romance to daydreaming about exotic films and music from her youth. When a band of Egyptian musicians shows up lost at her café, she and her fellow locals take them in for the night. Under the spell of the night sky, their lives intertwine in unexpected ways, and this once sleepy town begins to wake up. Features music and lyrics by Tony, Drama Desk and Grammy Award® winner David Yazbek, and a book by Tony, NY Drama Critics Circle, Lortel and Outer Critics Circle Award winner Itamar Moses. Based on the screenplay by Eran Kolirin, it’s directed by Tony, Drama Desk, Lortel and Obie Award winner, David Cromer.

Season ticket prices for the Broadway Series start at $140. 

2019-2020 Curtain Call Lineup:

Blue man Group, from January 7 - 12, 2020 in Segerstrom Hall.

Blue Man Group performances are euphoric celebrations of human connection through art, music, comedy and non-verbal communication. Since debuting at New York’s Astor Place Theatre in 1991, the live show has expanded to additional domestic residencies in Boston, Chicago, Las Vegas and Orlando, an international residency in Berlin, and multiple North American and World tours, reaching more than 35 million people worldwide. Expect new music, fresh stories, custom instruments and sensory stimulating graphics.

Escape to Margaritaville, a Center premiere from August 13 - 23, 2020 in Segerstrom Hall.

Welcome to Margaritaville, where people come to get away from it all – and stay to find something they never expected. With a book by Emmy Award® winner Greg Garcia (My Name is Earl, Raising Hope) and Emmy Award nominee Mike O’Malley (Survivors Remorse, Shameless) this musical comedy features both original songs and your most-loved Jimmy Buffett classics, including “Fins,” “Volcano,” “Cheeseburger in Paradise” and many more.

Segerstrom Center announces Chicago

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Photo by Paul Kolnik

Terra C. MacLeod as Velma Kelly and Merry Murderesses in Chicago”

Chicago from April 14 - 19, 2020 in Segerstrom Hall.

There’s never been a better time to experience this Broadway razzle-dazzle smash. Recipient of six Tony Awards, two Olivier Awards, a Grammy, thousands of standing ovations and now the No. 1 longest-running American Musical in Broadway history. With everything that makes Broadway great: a universal tale of fame, fortune and all that jazz; one show-stopping song after another; and the most astonishing dancing you’ve ever seen, it’s no surprise that Chicago has wowed audiences from Mexico City to Moscow, from Sao Paulo to South Africa. 

Season ticket prices for the Curtain Call Series start at $105. 

Segerstrom Center announces The Lion King

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©Disney – Photo by Brinkhoff-Mogenbburg

“The Circle of Life” from “The Lion King” North American Tour

Special Broadway Bonus Event: Disney’s The Lion King

Disney’s The Lion King from September 2 - 27, 2020 in Segerstrom Hall includes 2 p.m. matinees on September 10 and 24.

More than 95 million people around the world have experienced the phenomenon of Disney’s The Lion King, winner of six Tony Awards, including Best Musical. This landmark musical event brings together one of the most imaginative creative teams on Broadway. Tony Award®-winning director Julie Taymor brings to life a story filled with hope and adventure set against an amazing backdrop of stunning visuals. Features some of Broadway’s most recognizable music, crafted by Tony Award-®winning artists Elton John and Tim Rice.

Single ticket prices for Disney’s The Lion King start at $31.75. 

For tickets, go to www.scfta.org

Segerstrom Center for the Arts is located at 600 Town Center Drive, Costa Mesa.


Spirit Run: Run for $4,750 in cash in the Elite Mile, Adult 5k with more than 200 other prizes

The 36th Annual Spirit Run comes to Fashion Island on Sunday, March 17 and is celebrating you with cash prizes in the Elite Mile and Adult 5k, with more than 200 non-cash prizes...so come out and participate in a great event that also supports our schools.

Spirit Run Run for

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Courtesy of Spirit Run

Mostly Elite Milers running the 5k, with No. 3 Dan Herrera, last year’s male Elite Mile and 5k winner, who will be back this year to defend his titles

Increase your chance to win by racing two or three races. Even better, adults who register by March 10 can save on multiple races with code: “DOUBLE” for $50 for two (2) races; and “TRIPLE” for $60 for three (3) races.

NEW in 2019, compete in the St. Patrick’s Day costume contest and win even more.

Race Categories and Cash Breakdowns:

This year. elite athletes compete to win cash in the Elite Mile and 5k

Elite Mile:

The top five (5) men and women who finish under 4:15 and 4:50 minutes, respectively, win:

First Place - $500

Second Place - $350

Third Place - $200

Fourth Place - $100

Fifth Place - $75

Adult 5k:

The top five (5) men and women under 40 who finish under 15:15 and 17:15 minutes, respectively, win:

First Place - $300

Second Place - $200

Third Place - $150

Fourth Place - $100

Fifth Place - $75

Runners 40 and Over:

The top three (3) men and women age 40 and up who finish under 16 and 18 minutes, respectively, win:

First Place - $150

Second Place - $100

Third Place - $75

Visit the Awards Page to learn more about prizes and medals and the Elite Page for qualifying standards for elite athletes in the Elite Mile and 5k.

For more information, go to www.nmspiritrun.org.


Segerstrom Center continues March lineup of free events on Argyros Plaza

There’s much to take in this March on the Julianne and George Argyros Plaza with a diverse blend of free performances and events now and continuing through the end of the month.

Find your own rhythm with Tuesday Night Dance when all ages and skill levels can learn a new dance style with free classes every week through July. Each month will be dedicated to a specific dance style taught by expert instructors: Salsa and Bachata (March 5 - 26) to Broadway (April 2 - 30), Bollywood (May 7 - 28), Country (June 4 - 25) and Hip Hop (July 2 - 30). All experience levels are welcome. Each class is from 6:30 - 7:30 p.m. George’s Café will be open for pre- and post-lesson al fresco dinner and beverages.

Segerstrom Center continues March line up dancers

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Photo by Ana Gutierrez-Garcia

Courtesy of scfta.org

Here’s the March Events lineup: 

Tuesday Night Dance Series: March 5, 12, 19 and 26 from 6:30 - 7 p.m. 

Grab your dancing shoes! Learn Salsa and Bachata from OC Salsa instructor Cherry Saimon. 

Live on Argyros Stage - The Darden Sisters: Wednesday, March 6
from 6:15 - 7:15 p.m.

The Darden Sisters, comprised of Selah, on the violin; Clarah, the guitarist; Havi on mandolin; and Tabbi, the bassist, are four siblings who are spreading the joy of music with a sound that has been dubbed “Alternative Americana.” Enjoy their rich harmonies and musical blend. 

Live on Argyros Stage - Joseph Soul: Friday, March 8 and Saturday, March 16 from 6:15 - 7:15 p.m. 

A seven-time Na Hoku Hanohano award nominee (Hawaii’s Grammy®-sponsored music awards), Joseph Soul continues to command crowds for more than 15 years. With his accomplishments as a producer, engineer and songwriter widely recognized, Joseph Soul delivers a knockout performance every time. 

Segerstrom Center continues March line up the 131ers

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Courtesy of scfta.org

The 131ers take the stage on March 9

Live on Argyros Stage - The 131ers and The New Hippies: Saturday, March 9
from 6 - 8 p.m.

Two bands. Two unique genre-bending musical styles. The 131ers successfully infuse rock n’ roll with funk, edge, passion and soul. The New Hippies seamlessly mix new jazz and hip-hop while still staying true to jazz roots. 

Segerstrom Center continues March line up Mike Wilson

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Courtesy of scfta.org

Singer-songwriter and guitarist Mike Wilson

Live on Argyros Stage - Mike Wilson: Wednesday, March 13 from 6:15 - 7:15 p.m.

Orange County singer-songwriter and guitarist Mike Wilson delivers a rhythmic musical performance that blends covers and original music. With the Indie rock band Simple Green, he has shared the stage with Blink 182 and No Doubt. As a solo artist, his Indie/Folk music style is featured on two recordings and made him a regular on the concert circuit. 

Live on Argyros Stage - Hummingbird Hotel: Friday, March 15 and 22 from
6:15 - 7:15 p.m. 

Hummingbird Hotel is David Ornelas from the successful reggae, soul, pop band Stranger and Megan Love, a sultry Southern California singer-songwriter. The San Diego-based duo released their self-titled album earlier this year, and is a mainstay on the touring circuit, performing at the Sundance Music Festival in Park City, Utah, the Hawaiian Songwriting Festival, and concert dates throughout the United States and Mexico. With rich harmonies, strong musicianship and great stage presence, their live performance is not to be missed. 

P

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Courtesy of scfta.org

From gypsy jazz to folk... it’s the Jill Sargeant Quartet

Live on Argyros Stage - Jill Sargeant Quartet: Saturday, March 23 from 12:45 - 1:45 p.m. 

The Jill Sargeant Quartet is a fun-loving group who plays everything from gypsy jazz to folk to the occasional Disney tune. Enjoy the sweet and unique combination of ukulele, guitar, vocals, fiddle and upright bass. No matter your age, you’re bound to tap a toe and crack a smile! 

¡DAMAS! Celebrating Women Creators: Saturday, March 30 from 5 - 7 p.m. 

In observance of International Women’s Month, Segerstrom Center for the Arts presents its second annual ¡DAMAS! Celebrating Women Creators. This event draws special attention to the creative voices of many of our community’s most talented and artistically influential women. Women poets, painters, performers and even a blacksmith will share their gifts and insights through exhibits, interactive booths, videos, demonstrations and a panel discussion about women and their creative processes.

The evening will include:

~Sherwynn Umali, Associate Dean of Students at University of California, Irvine leading the panel discussion that includes Maria Simeone (teaching artist), Kari Barber (founder, Outer Limits Tattoos) and Karen Thomas (conductor of Pacific Chorale’s UnSung Heroes concert immediately following ¡DAMAS! Celebrating Women Creators).

~A 360-degree video performance of Hear Word!, an exhilarating performance piece that was a hit at this year’s Off Center Festival. Hear Word! combines artistry, social commentary and true-life stories of inequality and transformation, delivered by some of Nigeria’s most talented actresses. The show delivers an intimate view into the lives of women from all corners of Nigeria who are facing unique and universal issues, including the limitation of potential for achievement, independence, decision-making and leadership.

~Trinh Mai’s project and video That We Should Be Heirs. The project encourages participants to engage in the lost art of letter writing as a method of alleviating burdens and promoting healing. By putting hand to paper and joining one another in this collective activity of personal letter writing, we can share in this intimate process of privately documenting the stories, hardships, and triumphs that connect us all.

~And filling out the day will be blacksmith Joy Fire’s forging demonstration, Maria Simeone’s movement and holistic drumming, Chulita Vinyl Club’s DJ and a vinyl demonstration and Kari Barber of Outer Limits Tattoo art booth. Food and beverages will be available at George’s Café.

Following the Center’s ¡DAMAS! Celebrating Women Creators, Pacific Chorale will perform UnSung Heroes in the Renée and Henry Segerstrom Concert Hall at 7:30 p.m. UnSung Heroes is a paid ticketed event.

Segerstrom Center for the Arts is located at 600 Town Center Drive, Costa Mesa. For more information, visit www.scfta.org.


Pacific Symphony presents “Defiant Requiem: Verdi at Terezin” at Segerstrom Center

Praised by the New York Times as “poignant...a monument to the courage of one man to foster hope among prisoners with little other solace,” “Defiant Requiem: Verdi at Terezín” will be performed by Pacific Symphony on Tuesday, April 16 at 8 p.m. at the Renée and Henry Segerstrom Concert Hall.

Pacific Symphony presents Defiant Requiem Maestro Murry Sidlin

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Photos courtesy of Pacific Symphony

Maestro Murry Sidlin will conduct the full Verdi “Requiem”

The extraordinarily beautiful and moving concert/drama commemorates the courageous Jewish prisoners in the Theresienstadt Concentration Camp during World War II who performed Verdi’s “Requiem” 16 times, as an act of defiance and resistance to their Nazi captors. “Defiant Requiem” is a complete live performance of Verdi’s “Requiem” interspersed with historic film, testimony from survivors and narration that tells this tale of audacious bravery. For this performance, Murry Sidlin will conduct the full Verdi “Requiem” with the soloists, Pacific Chorale and Pacific Symphony.

Doors open at 7 p.m. for an 8 p.m. performance. Tickets for “Defiant Requiem: Verdi at Terezín” start at $25. This performance is sponsored by the Jewish Federation & Family Services Orange County, made possible by the Albert Weissman and Rhoda Yvette Weissman Estate. Tickets are available online at www.PacificSymphony.org, or by calling the Box Office at 714.755.5799. 

Pacific Symphony presents Defiant Requiem in concert

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 “Defiant Requiem” in concert

“Defiant Requiem” will be conducted by Maestro Murry Sidlin, president of The Defiant Requiem Foundation and creator of this powerful concert/drama. Murry Sidlin and The Defiant Requiem Foundation also produced an Emmy-nominated documentary film narrated by Bebe Neuwirth that has been praised as a “gripping documentary” by Examiner.com with a “very powerful message” (CNN).

For more information, visit www.DefiantRequiem.org.

Renée and Henry Segerstrom Concert Hall, located at Segerstrom Center for the Arts, is at 600 Town Center Drive, Costa Mesa.


OC Restaurant Week kicked off with launch party

Orange County Restaurant Week (OCRW), one of the region’s most celebrated culinary events for more than a decade, returned Sunday, March 3 and continues through Saturday, March 9.

OC Restaurant Week kicked off CUCINA enoteca

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Photos by Lana Johnson

CUCINA enoteca offered polenta with beer braised beef cheek

Kicking off the 11th OCRW was the launch party, which took place on Saturday, March 2 at the Marriott Irvine Spectrum from 2 - 5 p.m. Hundreds showed up to sample, swish and mingle.

Approximately 25 restaurants shared their inventive offerings at the launch party; notable among them were Great Maple and Pizza Mozza in Newport Beach, along with a dessert bar by Chambord. In addition to the tastings, guests enjoyed cocktails by Ketel One Vodka, El Tesoro Tequila, Maker’s Mark, Chambord and Spiked Agua Fresca by Golden Road Brewing and a wine bar by Celebrity Cruise. DJ Mark Moreno kept the ambience upbeat and lively. There was a live broadcast of KFI AM’s “The Fork Report” with Neil Saavedra.

OC Restaurant Week kicked off El Tesoro

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The El Tesoro Tequila bar beckoned attendees to a “fiesta” with its tequila samplings and spicy condiments as accoutrements

Following the party, attendees headed downstairs to the indoor bar, Hive & Honey, for an exclusive social gathering along with a DJ. They enjoyed $11 cocktails.

This year, nearly 150 restaurants are participating in OCRW, offering diners a wide variety of options, from casual and family-friendly establishments, to upscale and fine dining. Savor special three-course menus, many with a cocktail or signature item at no additional charge. Each restaurant will have the freedom and flexibility to showcase its best offerings by talented chefs who personalize each menu to reflect their individual culinary style. Participating restaurants will offer prix-fixe menus within the following price categories: lunch for $10, $15 or $20, and dinner for $20, $30, $40 or $50.

OC Restaurant Week kicked off Great Maple

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Great Maple drew guests to its chard cauliflower hummus and refreshing lavender lemonade

In addition, restaurants will work to accommodate a wide range of diners by offering something for everyone – from family-friendly dining and vegetarian dining, to date night and girls’ night out options (view the OC Restaurant Week Tips page at http://www.ocrestaurantweek.com/tips.html).

OC Restaurant Week kicked off Pizzeria Mozza

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Pizzeria Mozza served tasty Mozza Caprese pizza, comprised of burrata cheese with basil pesto and roasted cherry tomato

Newport Beach and Corona del Mar restaurants participating include: Back Bay Bistro, Bayside Restaurant, Beachcomber Café, Bluefin Restaurant, Bluewater Grill, Canaletto, Chihuahua Cerveza, CUCINA enoteca, Dory Deli, Eddie V’s Prime Seafood, Farmhouse at Roger’s Gardens, Five Crowns, Fleming’s Prime Steakhouse, Fly-n-Fish Oyster Bar, Great Maple, Harborside Restaurant and Grand Ballroom, Hornblower Cruises & Events, Juliette Kitchen and Bar, Lighthouse Bayview Café, Modo Mio Rustic Italian Kitchen, Moulin, Newport Landing Restaurant, Oak Grill, Pizzeria Mozza, Provenance, Red O Restaurant, Rusty Pelican, SOL Cocina, Stag Bar + Kitchen, Sushi Roku, Tackle Box - Local Grub Shack, Taco Rosa, The Bungalow Restaurant, The Winery Restaurant & Wine Bar, Woody’s Wharf and Yard House.

OC Restaurant Week kicked off Chihuahua Cerveza

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Danny Maron of Chihuahua Cerveza shared samplings of carnitas tacos and street corn

“OC Restaurant Week has become our region’s most anticipated and treasured culinary event and it’s because of the diverse dining options represented in Orange County,” explained Pamela Waitt, president of the OC Restaurant Association. “It is because of the many creative and talented chefs that we truly have something for everyone!”

OC Restaurant Week kicked off Pam Waitt

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(L-R) Pam Waitt, president of the OC Restaurant Association and Diedre Michalski

Myriad culinary experiences await you, so go out and discover some new dining adventures.


Lido Marina Village to celebrate International Women’s Day with special promotions

Friday, March 8 marks the 109th International Women’s Day, where we join together in celebrating the social, economic, cultural and political achievements of women everywhere. 

Lido Marina Village, with nearly 20 female-owned and operated businesses, will be holding special promotions to honor this special day.

Lido Marina Village the Deck

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Courtesy of Lido Marina Village

The Deck at Lido Marina Village

–Jenni Kayne will be giving away free mini votive candles to anyone who signs up for their rewards program.

–Sweaty Betty is currently selling limited edition women empowerment tops; $15 of each sale will be re-donated to the Fallen Angels Dance Theatre and Ditch The Label Charity. Special in-store discounts will also be available on March 8.

–Planet Blue will be offering roses, Champagne and treats with in-store purchases.

Note: Any Lido shopper who spends $150 can take their receipt to French Buckets for a free bouquet of flowers.

The women-owned businesses at Lido Marina Village include: Alchemy Works, Bailey44, Bixby & Ball, Broken English, Charlie & Me, Clare V., Cos Bar, Curl Fitness, Cynthia Rowley, Eberjey, Elyse Walker, Jenni Kayne, Lido Bottle Works, Malibu Farm and Sugar Paper.

Lido Marina Village is located at 3428 Via Lido, Newport Beach.


Newport Beach – A Look Back

Photo series courtesy of Balboa Island Museum & Historical Society

Newport Beach A Look Back 3.5.19

These women look like they’re having fun. And why not? In 1983, Pearl Avenue along with much of Balboa Island found itself flooded as the result of heavy El Niño rains.

Balboa Island Museum and the Museum Store are located at 210 B Marine Ave., Balboa Island. They are open Monday - Thursday from 10 a.m. -  5 p.m. and Friday - Sunday from 10 a.m. - 6 p.m. For more information, call 949.675.3952, visit www.balboamuseum.org, or email This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it..


River Jetty Restaurant Group to open in CdM in March

Hollywood producer McG and restaurateur Jordan Otterbein, River Jetty Restaurant Group partners known for acclaimed the A Restaurant and A Market in Newport Beach, have announced plans to open a brand new dining concept, set to unveil in March 2019. Having acquired the popular location at 2325 E. Coast Highway in Corona del Mar, River Jetty Restaurant Group will be welcoming “CdM,” an American-inspired culinary concept, courtesy of Executive Chef Jonathan Blackford.

Stepping into the new CdM will be an elevated dining experience with a warm and welcoming atmosphere. “We have completely reimagined the space and CdM is going to be a brand new and super stylish local eatery,” Otterbein said. “We are committed to offering the best culinary experience, but we want to do that in a way that’s very comfortable and approachable.”

River Jetty Restaurant

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Submitted photo

CdM restaurant, scheduled to open in March, will feature hand-selected ingredients and a seasonal menu

Executive Chef Jonathon Blackford of A Restaurant has been promoted to Corporate Executive Chef of River Jetty Restaurant Group and has developed a new signature menu for CdM. The kitchen will feature an in-house dry curing cabinet for custom charcuterie, a pasta extruder for fresh uniquely shaped pastas and a wood stone pizza oven.

The highest quality of unique, hand-selected ingredients will circle through CdM’s seasonal menu. More “creative American” and less “steak centric” than A, the menu will draw influence from America’s melting pot of cuisine and change multiple times a year.

Embracing irregularity and giving a nod to the seaside surroundings, the décor of the restaurant will feature unique light fixtures from salvage shipyards. Hand-selected tile and 19th century wood pulled from a Chicago warehouse will create the flooring. Plenty of natural light will spill into the restaurant, highlighting comfortable leather booths and tables surrounding the all-new centralized bar.

Head to the restaurant’s downstairs room to find a speakeasy-style bar offering an exclusive selection of cocktails and spirits as well as a vintage photo booth. From selecting unique chairs for each table to ensuring that no set of vintage salt and pepper shakers are alike, no detail will be left unturned.

For more information, visit www.CDMRestaurant.com.


Stormy Newport

Stormy Newport

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Photo by Kevin Pellon (Instagram @socalsnapz)

www.socalsnapz.com

The first weekend of March may have been grey but the views of Newport Beach never disappoint


Stump the Stu

Fresh catch of the day...

Stump the Stu 3.5.19

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We came upon this fresh fish, beckoning us to go inside. Where does this glass window lead? 

Take the challenge and submit your answers to This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it..

The answer will appear in Friday’s edition, along with the correct guesses. So, join us for this local adventure.

If you have a unique spot or icon around town that you think Stu News Newport readers would enjoy finding out about, please shoot it, share it and give us the location, so we can challenge them! Happy Hunting.


Swastika symbol on display at student party brings ire to the community

A group of Newport-Mesa Unified School District (NMUSD) students, primarily from Newport Harbor High School, were seen in a Nazi salute while surrounding a swastika made of red plastic cups. The students, at a party unauthorized by school officials, were seen during what appears to be a drinking game called beer pong.

Students in the photo have subsequently been identified. It is also reported that students from other local high schools were also in attendance.

Outrage from community leaders has followed the incident. Last night a community meeting took place in the auditorium at NHHS to discuss the issue and allow the community to offer insight. 

One of the organizers and speakers was Rabbi Rueven Mintz from the Chabad Center for Jewish Life in Newport Beach.

School officials were asked about potential discipline for the participating students and said that they didn’t know what was possible due to the fact that the party took place away from school property.

Another open town hall meeting being organized by NMUSD, the Anti-Defamation League and Temple Bat Yahm is planned for Thursday, March 7, at 6 p.m. at Corona del Mar High School.

Below are comments following the incident by community leaders:

“We are appalled and saddened by the deeply disturbing photo of Newport-Mesa students circulating on social media and on mainstream media outlets. That behavior is not acceptable and not reflective of our community’s collective character. We can and we must expect better. We pledge to work together to demonstrate that tolerance, mutual respect and dignity define this community.

“We will stand with and comfort those who are offended and hurt by this conduct. We will be attending an open town hall meeting on March 7, 2019 tentatively scheduled by Newport Mesa School District, the Anti-Defamation League and Temple Bat Yahm at 6 p.m. at Corona del Mar High School. Members of the public are invited to attend.

“This behavior is not learned in our schools. But once learned – wherever and however it is – anti-Semitism can and must be unlearned through education and dialogue.”

–Newport Beach Mayor Diane Dixon 

–Newport Beach Mayor Pro Tem Will O’Neill

“Last week I met Sidney Walton, a 100-year-old WWII veteran who fought to eradicate Nazism. The incident with the Newport Harbor High School students, like so many recent events across the country, is an example of this ruinous ideology trying to become mainstream again. We owe it to Sidney and our kids to call it out, and not whitewash these moments of antisemitism and racism, whether in my district or anywhere else across the country.”

–Harley Rouda, Representative, 48th District

“We were recently made aware of social media postings involving some students who created inappropriate anti-Semitic symbols, and possible underage drinking. While these actions did not occur on any school campus or school function, we condemn all acts of anti-Semitism and hate in all their forms.

“We continue to gather information regarding the conduct of these students and work with law enforcement. 

“We remain focused on educating students on all aspects of life’s challenges and are committed to holding students accountable, educating them on the consequences of their choices, and the impact these actions have on our schools and community at large.

“We ask that you as parents please partner with us in helping students make good decisions, be respectful of others, and to always use good judgment.”

–Dr. Fred Navarro, NMUSD Superintendent


Sign of the times

On Fridays we give you a partial glimpse of a sign around town. You guess what the overall name of the business is.

This one puzzled everyone, as Stu received no correct responses. You can find the twin palm trees at Islands Restaurant located in The Bluffs Shopping Center, 1380 Bison Ave., Newport Beach.

If you’re a business and you want to play, you can send us a high-quality photo of your sign to This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. and we’ll take it from there and challenge our readers.

Let’s have some fun!

SOTT 3.5.19

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Solving a St. Patrick’s Day mystery in CdM... 

By AMY SENK

Corona del Mar’s topiary dolphins apparently have a touch of the Irish in them – but who exactly is behind their annual wearing of the green is a village mystery.

For 30 or so years, the CdM dolphin topiaries have been decorated and bedazzled for the holidays – Santa hats at Christmas, witch masks on Halloween, surrounded by Easter eggs in spring and flags on July 4. An official committee of volunteers organizes and adds the costumes and decorations, then stores them between seasons, under the direction of, and with funding from, the Corona del Mar Chamber of Commerce.

Solving mystery dolphin with hat

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Photo by Amy Senk

The dolphins at E. Coast Highway and Marguerite get mysteriously decorated for St. Patrick’s Day each year

A year ago, some residents were complaining that the dolphins’ green hats and shamrock necklaces, placed in time for St. Patrick’s Day, were left on a month after the holiday.

CdM Chamber President Linda Leonhard promised to remove the costumes quickly, but confessed she had no clue who was responsible for the decorations to begin with.

“It’s a mystery,” Leonhard said. “Some Irish-loving person does it, and they do a nice job.”

The St. Patrick’s Day rogue decorations have been appearing for at least five years.

“For some odd reason, St. Patrick’s Day was never part of the program,” she said. “We’re thinking of adding it officially. Actually, we’d love to invite this person to join our committee. We like what they’re doing, but maybe they could take them (decorations) down after.”

Leonhard said she has tried to spot the person, or people, behind the March 17 decorations and even considered asking if the city cameras with views of the intersection may have recorded the decorating. But she’s never seen anyone – the costumes just suddenly appear each year – and no one ever seems to gossip about who did it, and she’s never heard of anyone bragging about their dolphin escapades.

• • •

Meanwhile, the fate of a proposed tattoo business for Corona del Mar remains undecided after the Newport Beach City Council decided at its February 26 meeting to return the matter to the Planning Commission for further review.

The owners of the E. Gallery at 2721 E. Coast Highway had sought a minor use permit to add tattoo services, but the city’s Planning Commission in December said no in a 3-2 vote. The owners appealed to the City Council, and a hearing was scheduled for the Council meeting on Tuesday, Feb. 26. But earlier the same day, the city received a 39-page email from a CdM lawyer, Melinda Luthin, outlining several legal arguments against granting the permit. City staff didn’t have time to review the email before the Council meeting.

“Savannah (sic) Gallegos, who filed the Application under the name of a business that does not exist, wants to fill a garaged-sized basement office space with at least four separate businesses, many of which would require the approval of conditional use permits and/or adult-oriented business permits,” Luthin wrote. Gallegos, one of the owners, told the Council that they would be discreet and follow health code regulations. 

Councilmember Joy Brenner, who represents Corona del Mar, moved to send the matter back to the Planning Commission for further consideration within 30 days. The motion passed unanimously, with Mayor Pro Tem Will O’Neill requesting that the commissioners offer facts to back up their decision, be it for or against granting the permit.

~~~~~~~~

Amy Senk has lived in Corona del Mar for 20 years and was publisher of Corona del Mar Today, an online newspaper that ran daily for seven years. Senk, a graduate of the University of Missouri School of Journalism, is involved in the Corona del Mar Residents Association and the Corona del Mar High School PTA. She and her husband have two children.


Newport Beach is our picture-perfect paradise

Newport Beach pink

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Photo by Eric Hernandez (Instagram @pacificcoastsurf) 

It doesn’t get much better than this…


Kids STEAM Workshop to be held at NBPL

Newport Beach Public Library will be holding “Kids STEAM Workshop: I Have a Brain,” on Sunday, March 10 with two sessions: from 2 - 2:45 p.m. and 3 - 3:45 p.m. in the Central Library Friends Room.

The “I Have a Brain” workshop series, presented by UCI Center for the Neurobiology of Learning & Memory, allows children ages 4 and up to learn about the ocean and brain with hands-on activities, exploring the wonders of the brain in a laboratory environment. Children will hold and feel real specimens, learn about cells and neurons that make up their nervous system, record electrochemical communications in their body and find out where their memory lives in their brain.

The program is presented by the Newport Beach Library Foundation, and sponsored by Diane and Dennis Baker.

Admission is free with an online reservation at www.nbplfoundation.org. Space is limited to 75 children per session. Contact This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.for more information or call 949.717.3818.

Newport Beach Public Library is located at 1000 Irvine Ave., Newport Beach.


Fair Game

By TOM JOHNSON

Golf and swastikas headline the local news

Fair Game Tom JohnsonSo, who’s going to win the Hoag Classic this year? Over the weekend it looked like it might be the weather. However, checking today, the forecast calls for mostly cloudy today, rain tomorrow, that’s a pro-am day, partly cloudy Thursday (another pro-am day), then sunny and windy Friday, partly cloudy Saturday and cloudy Sunday.

Except for Saturday, there’s a 20 percent chance of rain the other days.

What does this all mean? It looks like we’ll be able to get the newly named first year of the Hoag Classic in the books.

If you get out to Newport Beach Country Club there will be plenty of good golf to see. John Daly (look for wild pants), Jay Haas, Darren Clarke, Rocco Mediate (look for a big cigar), Colin Montgomerie, Mark O’Meara and Fred Couples are just of few of the big names on hand.

And, if you’re looking for more than just golf, there’s that too. Friday is Corporate Day and will offer live music at the course following the day’s play. 

Saturday is Military Appreciation Day honoring all active duty, military reserve, national guard, military retirees and veterans free of charge. They can also bring up to three guests. 

Then Sunday is Student Day. All students 18 and under first off get in free. Then they can enjoy a Kids Fun Zone and participate in a putting contest, complete with prizes.

And, weather permitting, if autographs are your thing, get out there Wednesday and Thursday for the Legends Pro-Am. Those days are more casual and allow fans to get much closer to the action.

In any case, it’s all fun and the money goes to a great cause, Hoag Hospital. It doesn’t get any better than that.

• • •

Hall of Fame golfer Vijay Singh, who won last year’s Toshiba Classic, will skip defending his championship this week. After a strong finish last week in the Honda Classic on the regular PGA Tour, Singh has decided to play in this week’s Arnold Palmer Invitational at Bay Hill Club & Lodge in Florida.

Singh finished fourth last week, two shots behind first-time winner Keith Mitchell.

• • •

You talk about a high school party gone bad. First they play a drinking game called beer pong. Second, they organize the cups in the symbol of a Nazi swastika. Third, they can be seen offering up the Nazi salute, because fourth, someone takes a picture and posts it on social media.

Outrage has not only come from local leaders, but the story has now morphed nationally. Great, just what Newport Beach needs.

The students can be identified in the social media posting and will probably be facing serious consequences.

The other question that has to be asked is, “Where were the parents?”

• • •

Last month, Camden Nicholson was accused of killing his parents, Richard and Kim Nicholson, and their housekeeper, Maria Morse.

Last week Morse’s family filed a wrongful death lawsuit against the estate of the couple.

• • •

Harold Walker, a pioneer in the surfboard blank business locally, passed away last week. According to surfline.com, Walker and his company, Walker Foam, “was the first successful enterprise to sell polyurethane blanks directly to surfboard builders.”

Prior to opening his own company, Walker worked at Hoskins Boat Works “painting, varnishing and fiber-glassing boats.” He eventually bought that business which was a prelude to his surfboard blank business.

Walker closed his business locally in 2005.

He was 86.


Speak Up Newport: Science & Social Media Innovations in Cold Case NBPD Investigations

Speak Up Newport will hold its monthly meeting on Wednesday, March 13, presenting Science & Social Media Innovations in Cold Case Investigations from the Newport Beach Police Department (NBPD). Come find out about NBPD criminal investigations including cutting-edge techniques used in our city to combat crime and cold case investigations.

Two noteworthy Newport Beach cold cases that will be discussed include:

Linda O’Keefe Homicide: Nearly 46 years after the abduction and homicide of Linda Ann O’Keefe, an 11-year-old Corona del Mar girl, the NBPD have identified and arrested James Alan Neal, 72, who now faces a special circumstances murder count – making the case eligible for the death penalty. NBPD never gave up, using cutting edge techniques to solve the cold case, like DNA matching and giving Linda a voice on Twitter (www.twitter.com/NewportBeachPD) where tweets in Linda’s “voice” were published narrating the last hours of her life.

Peter Chadwick & Countdown to Capture: Peter Chadwick was arrested for the murder of his wife, Q.C. Chadwick in 2012. In 2015, Chadwick, released on bail, escaped without a trace and is now wanted as a fugitive from justice. “Countdown to Capture” is a compelling podcast released by the NBPD in a series of short episodes covering the discovery of Q.C.’s murder, identification of Chadwick as the primary suspect in her homicide and efforts to locate Chadwick to this day. 

The featured speakers are Sergeant Court Depweg, Homicide Detective Supervisor and Jennifer Manzella, a 16-year veteran with the NBPD.

Speak Up Newport Court Depweg

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Submitted photos

Sergeant Court Depweg, Homicide Detective Supervisor

Sergeant Court Depweg:

Depweg began his career with the NBPD in 2001 and has worked a variety of assignments including Patrol Officer, Gang Suppression Officer, Field Training Officer, Terrorism Liaison Officer, Burglary Auto Theft Detective, Crimes Against Persons Detective (On Loan), Regional Narcotics Suppression Program Detective and Covert Operations Informant Network Investigator or COIN. In July 2011, Court was promoted to the rank of Sergeant and remained working COIN. He was later assigned to the Patrol Division, where he oversaw a patrol team and the K9 Program. Former Chief of Police, Jay Johnson, selected him to work in the Professional Standards Unit (PSU), where he served as Sergeant. In September 2017, Court was assigned to the Crimes Against Persons Unit (CAP) as the supervisor. As CAP Sergeant, he oversees three CAP Detectives, who are responsible for investigating all violent crimes committed against a person and two Cold Case Homicide Investigators.

The Cold Case Homicide Unit was developed and implemented in 2016. The NBPD currently has eight cold case homicides. The Cold Case Investigators solved a 1994 cold case homicide in November 2017 and are currently working on solving more.

Speak Up Newport Jennifer Manzella

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Submitted photos

Jennifer Manzella, administrative assistant to Police Chief Jon Lewis

Jennifer Manzella:

Manzella has worked for the NBPD for more than 16 years, including more than five years as the Press Information Officer. A graduate of Vassar College, she used her background in English to create several memorable public campaigns for the Department, including Linda’s Story (Linda O’Keefe Homicide) and the Countdown to Capture (Peter Chadwick) podcast. Manzella currently serves as the administrative assistant to Newport Beach Chief of Police Jon Lewis.

Meeting Schedule:

–5:15 - 6 p.m.: Reception with a complimentary light supper provided by The Bungalow with wine available for purchase.

–6 - 7 p.m.: Program

There is no cost to attend and the public is invited. Reservations are not necessary.

For more information, call 949.224.2266 or visit www.speakupnewport.com.

The Speak Up Newport meeting takes place at the Newport Beach Civic Center Community Room, 100 Civic Center Drive, Newport Beach.


Segerstrom Center presents March line-up of free events on Argyros Plaza

There’s much to take in this March on the Julianne and George Argyros Plaza with a diverse blend of free performances and events. Bring the whole family to celebrate the Year of the Pig with the Lantern Festival (March 2) or find your own rhythm with Tuesday Night Dance when all ages and skill levels can learn a new dance style with free classes every week through July (beginning March 5).

Segerstrom Center presents Tuesday Night Dance

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Photo by Doug Gifford

Courtesy of scfta.org

Dance the night away on Tuesdays with free lessons

Later, the Center commemorates International Women’s Month with the second ¡DAMAS! Celebrating Women Creators (March 30). This event highlights the power and diversity of Orange County’s women and the innovative ways in which they are using self-expression to better our own community.

Here’s the robust lineup: 

Lantern Festival Saturday: March 2 from 11 a.m. - 5 p.m.

Cultural demonstrations from across Asia feature Chinese Chen-style Tai Chi martial arts, South Korean K-pop dance, Lion dance, Chinese folk dance, Vietnamese cooking, Chinese Yo-Yos, Ukulele sing-along as well as a Vietnamese Áo dài fashion show. Try your hand at Chinese calligraphy, visit the petting zoo featuring this year’s animal: the pig, or make your own lucky Red Envelope lantern. 

Tuesday Night Dance Series: March 5, 12, 19 and 26 from 6:30 - 7 p.m. 

Grab your dancing shoes! Each Tuesday, learn Salsa and Bachata from OC Salsa instructor Cherry Saimon. Succeeding months will offer different styles of dance from expert instructors, including Broadway (April 2 - 30), Bollywood (May 7 - 28), Country (June 4 - 25) and Hip Hop (July 2 - 30). All experience levels are welcome. 

Live on Argyros Stage - The Darden Sisters: Wednesday, March 6
from 6:15 - 7:15 p.m.

The Darden Sisters, comprised of Selah, on the violin; Clarah, the guitarist; Havi on mandolin; and Tabbi, the bassist, are four siblings who are spreading the joy of music with a sound that has been dubbed “Alternative Americana.” Enjoy their rich harmonies and musical blend. 

Live on Argyros Stage - Joseph Soul: Friday, March 8 and Saturday, March 16 from 6:15 - 7:15 p.m. 

A seven-time Na Hoku Hanohano award nominee (Hawaii’s Grammy®-sponsored music awards), Joseph Soul continues to command crowds for more than 15 years. With his accomplishments as a producer, engineer and songwriter widely recognized, Joseph Soul delivers a knockout performance every time. 

Live on Argyros Stage - The 131ers and The New Hippies: Saturday, March 9
from 6 - 8 p.m.

Two bands. Two unique genre-bending musical styles. The 131ers successfully infuse rock n’ roll with funk, edge, passion and soul. The New Hippies seamlessly mix new jazz and hip-hop while still staying true to jazz roots. 

Live on Argyros Stage - Mike Wilson: Wednesday, March 13 from 6:15 - 7:15 p.m.

Orange County singer-songwriter and guitarist Mike Wilson delivers a rhythmic musical performance that blends covers and original music. With the Indie rock band Simple Green, he has shared the stage with Blink 182 and No Doubt. As a solo artist, his Indie/Folk music style is featured on two recordings and made him a regular on the concert circuit. 

Segerstrom Center presents Hummingbird Hotel

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Photo by Joesan Diche

Courtesy of scfta.org

David Ornelas and Megan Love compose Hummingbird Hotel

Live on Argyros Stage - Hummingbird Hotel: Friday, March 15 and 22 from
6:15 - 7:15 p.m. 

Hummingbird Hotel is David Ornelas from the successful reggae, soul, pop band Stranger and Megan Love, a sultry Southern California singer-songwriter. The San Diego-based duo released their self-titled album earlier this year, and is a mainstay on the touring circuit, performing at the Sundance Music Festival in Park City, Utah, the Hawaiian Songwriting Festival, and concert dates throughout the United States and Mexico. With rich harmonies, strong musicianship and great stage presence, their live performance is not to be missed. 

Live on Argyros Stage - Jill Sargeant Quartet: Saturday, March 23 from 12:45 - 1:45 p.m. 

The Jill Sargeant Quartet is a fun-loving group who plays everything from gypsy jazz to folk to the occasional Disney tune. Enjoy the sweet and unique combination of ukulele, guitar, vocals, fiddle and upright bass. No matter your age, you’re bound to tap a toe and crack a smile! 

¡DAMAS! Celebrating Women Creators: Saturday, March 30 from 5 - 7 p.m. 

In observance of International Women’s Month, Segerstrom Center for the Arts presents its second annual ¡DAMAS! Celebrating Women Creators. This event draws special attention to the creative voices of many of our community’s most talented and artistically influential women. Women poets, painters, performers and even a blacksmith will share their gifts and insights through exhibits, interactive booths, videos, demonstrations and a panel discussion about women and their creative processes.

The evening will include:

–Sherwynn Umali, Associate Dean of Students at University of California, Irvine leading the panel discussion that includes Maria Simeone (teaching artist), Kari Barber (founder, Outer Limits Tattoos) and Karen Thomas (conductor of Pacific Chorale’s UnSung Heroes concert immediately following ¡DAMAS! Celebrating Women Creators).

–A 360-degree video performance of Hear Word!, an exhilarating performance piece that was a hit at this year’s Off Center Festival. Hear Word! combines artistry, social commentary and true-life stories of inequality and transformation, delivered by some of Nigeria’s most talented actresses. The show delivers an intimate view into the lives of women from all corners of Nigeria who are facing unique and universal issues, including the limitation of potential for achievement, independence, decision-making and leadership.

–Trinh Mai’s project and video That We Should Be Heirs. The project encourages participants to engage in the lost art of letter writing as a method of alleviating burdens and promoting healing. By putting hand to paper and joining one another in this collective activity of personal letter writing, we can share in this intimate process of privately documenting the stories, hardships, and triumphs that connect us all.

–And filling out the day will be blacksmith Joy Fire’s forging demonstration, Maria Simeone’s movement and holistic drumming, Chulita Vinyl Club’s DJ and a vinyl demonstration and Kari Barber of Outer Limits Tattoo art booth. Food and beverages will be available at George’s Café.

Following the Center’s ¡DAMAS! Celebrating Women Creators, Pacific Chorale will perform UnSung Heroes in the Renée and Henry Segerstrom Concert Hall at 7:30 p.m. UnSung Heroes is a paid ticketed event.

Segerstrom Center for the Arts is located at 600 Town Center Drive, Costa Mesa. For more information, visit www.scfta.org.


OC Restaurant Week returns March 3 - 9

Orange County Restaurant Week, one of the region’s most celebrated culinary events for more than a decade, returns Sunday, March 3 through Saturday, March 9. This year, nearly 150 restaurants will participate, offering diners a wide variety of options, from casual and family-friendly establishments, to upscale and fine dining, which will once again allow for a “luxe experience” with a select group of menus priced at a $80 price point.

The official “Celebrating 11 Years” Launch Party, which is sold out, takes place tomorrow, Saturday March 2, from 2 - 5 p.m. at the Marriott Irvine Spectrum.

During the weeklong event, participating restaurants in Orange County will offer special three-course menus, many with a cocktail or signature item at no additional charge. Each restaurant will have the freedom and flexibility to showcase its best offerings by talented chefs who personalize each menu to reflect their individual culinary style. Participating restaurants will offer prix-fixe menus within the following price categories: lunch for $10, $15 or $20, and dinner for $20, $30, $40 or $50. 

This year, the Cocktails of Restaurant Week will be highlighted to complete dining experiences and many participating restaurants will be offering Breakfast for Dinner options. Honoring 11 years of OC Restaurant Week, cocktails for $11 showcase Chambord, Ketel One, Maker’s Mark and Hornitos.

OC Restaurant Week The Winery

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Courtesy of OC Restaurant Week

Among the Winery Restaurant & Wine Bar’s dinner menu offerings is a Zinfandel braised Angus beef short rib

Newport Beach and Corona del Mar restaurants participating include: Back Bay Bistro, Bayside Restaurant, Beachcomber Café, Bluefin Restaurant, Bluewater Grill, Canaletto, Chihuahua Cerveza, CUCINA enoteca, Dory Deli, Eddie V’s Prime Seafood, Farmhouse at Roger’s Gardens, Five Crowns, Fleming’s Prime Steakhouse, Fly-n-Fish Oyster Bar, Great Maple, Harborside Restaurant and Grand Ballroom, Hornblower Cruises & Events, Juliette Kitchen and Bar, Lighthouse Bayview Café, Modo Mio Rustic Italian Kitchen, Moulin, Newport Landing Restaurant, Oak Grill, Pizzeria Mozza, Provenance, Red O Restaurant, Rusty Pelican, SOL Cocina, Stag Bar + Kitchen, Sushi Roku, Tackle Box - Local Grub Shack, Taco Rosa, The Bungalow Restaurant, The Winery Restaurant & Wine Bar, Woody’s Wharf and Yard House.

“OC Restaurant Week has become our region’s most anticipated and treasured culinary event and it’s because of the diverse dining options represented in Orange County,” explained Pamela Waitt, president of the OC Restaurant Association. “It is because of the many creative and talented chefs that we truly have something for everyone!”

For dining guide tips, highlighting family-friendly dining, vegetarian and gluten-free options, cocktail specials, girls’ night out, desserts and dessert lover options, dining with a view, breakfast for dinner and more, visit www.ocrestaurantweek.com/tips.html.

For a list of participating restaurants by name, location and price point, visit  www.ocrestaurantweek.com/participating-restaurants.html.


Newport-Mesa Family YMCA names new executive director

YMCA of Orange County has announced Joe Jimenez as the new executive director of the Newport-Mesa Family YMCA.

Jimenez, a Whittier resident, has more than 10 years of experience working for YMCA locations throughout California and Arizona. He most recently served as the associate executive director of the Lakewood Family YMCA of Greater Long Beach. Jimenez helped manage the sustainability and growth of an overall budget of six million dollars. He oversaw and managed a team encompassing 180 staff, more than 14,000 members and a variety of enrichment, healthy living and community service programs.

Newport Mesa Family YMCA Jimenez

Submitted photo

Joe Jimenez, executive director of the Newport-Mesa Family YMCA

From 2009 to 2013, Jimenez served as the regional healthy lifestyles director for YMCA of Metropolitan Los Angeles – Hollywood Wilshire YMCA and Ketchum Downtown YMCA, where he managed healthy living programs. From 2008 to 2009, he was the regional program director for YMCA of Southern Arizona – Lohse Family YMCA. Jimenez planned and developed the creation of several adult and youth programs in the Tucson, Ariz. area, and provided leadership and direction to sports associates.

Jimenez has a Bachelor of Arts Degree in Sports Management from Washington State University.

“We are pleased to welcome Joe Jimenez to our team,” said Jennifer Heinen, Operations Director of Branches at YMCA of Orange County. “His leadership, experience and commitment to the organization will be a tremendous asset to our members in Newport-Mesa and the community we work with.”

For more information on Newport-Mesa Family YMCA, visit www.ymcaoc.org/newport-mesa-family-ymca.


Newport Dunes and Back Bay Bistro kick off March entertainment with Romantic Bossa Nova

Newport Dunes Waterfront Resort and Back Bay Bistro kick off waterfront events and live performances during the month of March with the appearance of Kaylene Peoples – Romantic Bossa Nova – A Birthday Celebration for Bunny Brunel, featuring Kaylene Peoples (vocals and flute), Bunny Brunel (bass), Mahesh Balasooriya (piano), Joe Calderon (guitar), Brian Cabrera (drums) and Monette Marino (percussion).

Newport Dunes Brunel

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Submitted photo

Kaylene Peoples on flute with Bunny Brunel on bass

The performance takes place on Saturday, March 2 from 8 - 11 p.m. Tickets are $20 at www.newportdunes.com/event/kaylene-peoples-romantic-bossa-nova/. Dinner seating is available, so make your reservations by calling 949.729.1144. 

Back Bay Bistro is located at Newport Dunes Waterfront Resort, 1131 Back Bay Drive, Newport Beach. For more information, visit www.newportdunes.com/bistro.


NBPL presents authors of A Boy Named Courage

On Thursday, April 4 from 7 - 8:30 p.m., Newport Beach Public Library (NBPL) presents author and Newport Beach surgeon Dr. Himmet Dajee, along with co-author Patrice Apodaca, who will discuss their book A Boy Named Courage: A Surgeon’s Memoir of Apartheid. The book tells the rags to riches tale of an Indian immigrant boy’s journey from his home of apartheid South Africa, with its racism and the bigotry and hatred of the Afrikaner ruling class, to realizing the dream of a medical degree and a career as a heart surgeon. It is a story of resilience, brotherly love, gratitude and perseverance.

NBPL presents Dajee

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Photos courtesy of NBPL

Himmet Dajee, M.D.

Himmet Dajee, M.D., holds medical degrees from the Royal College of Surgeons in Ireland and the University of London. He was an assistant professor at UCLA and a staff cardiac surgeon at Kaiser Permanente. After two decades in private practice in California, he retired from surgery in 2006 and currently serves as a medical director at a California health care organization that administers health insurance for low-income patients. He is a Fellow of the American College of Surgeons, the Society of Thoracic Surgeons and the American College of Chest Physicians. The recipient of numerous academic awards, Dajee has co-authored 21 papers published in prestigious medical journals and is a frequent speaker at medical conferences.

NBPL presents Apodaca

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Patrice Apodaca

Newport Beach resident Patrice Apodaca is a veteran journalist, a former Los Angeles Times staff writer, who currently writes a featured column for the Daily Pilot, a Los Angeles Times Community News publication.

Admission to the event is free, however space is limited, so registration is recommended. To register, visit https://apps.newportbeachca.gov/library/rsvp.aspx?id=SMCPiP2R0DM=.

The event takes place at the Central Library Friends Room located at 1000 Avocado Ave., Newport Beach.


Last chance to view current OCMA exhibitions

The last chance to view the current OCMA exhibitions is Sunday, March 17. The exhibitions feature the work of Kathryn Garcia, Valentina Jager, Alan Nakagawa, Mariángeles Soto-Díaz, Rodrigo Valenzuela, and Ni Youyu, plus the collection show Forsaken Utopias: Photographs from the OCMA Permanent Collection.

OCMAEXPAND-SANTA ANA, the temporary location, provides an opportunity for the museum to showcase what they do best: discovering new talent from California and the Pacific Rim. These presentations represent the thoughtful programming, risk-taking and support for artists that define OCMA. 

Last chance to view Forsaken Utopias

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Photos courtesy of OCMA

Forsaken Utopias: Photographs from the OCMA Permanent Collection

Little Saigon: Six Fieldtrips Generating led by artist Alan Nakagawa

Saturday, March 2 at 10 a.m.

Field Trip #6: Chua Dieu Ngu Buddhist Temple, 14472 Chestnut Street, Westminster

Visit this beautiful place of prayer in the heart of Little Saigon. Bring your portable art supplies and, if they allow, you’ll document the architecture in all of its color and form. They highly recommend you also bring water, a folding chair and sunscreen. Afterward, you’ll meet and share what you created.

Little Saigon: Six Field Trips Generating is a project created by Alan Nakagawa in which he leads field trips to important cultural sites to explore the complexities of cultural tourism. As an outsider to this community, Nakagawa seeks to understand how one can learn about a new place, and if there is a correct approach to this kind of exploration. This is the culminating field trip of the series.

Cinema Orange: Through the Repellent Fence

Thursday, March 7 at 7 p.m.

Through the Repellent Fence follows art collective Postcommodity as they construct Repellent Fence, a two-mile long outdoor artwork that straddled the U.S.-Mexico border. The film provides an intimate glimpse into the arduous process of creating this ambitious artwork that gives voice to the shared history and enduring culture of indigenous societies that have made the region their home for thousands of years, before a border ever divided it. This Southern California premiere will be followed by a discussion and Q & A with Postcommodity artist, Kade Twist. Presented in partnership with the Newport Beach Film Festival and organized by Leslie Feibleman, director of special programs and community cinema, Newport Beach Film Festival. 

Seating is limited and an RSVP is required at

www.ocmaexpand.org/events/cinema-orange-megalodemocrat-the-public-art-of-rafael-lozano-hemmer.

Free Family Day: Girl Power!

Saturday, March 9 from 11 a.m. - 4 p.m.

Experience an exciting day of art and performances aimed at empowering young women and girls. Make art inspired by the work of exhibiting artists, Valentina Jager and Ni Youyu. Participate in a workshop with artist Mariángeles Soto-Díaz and girls from local dojos, as they demonstrate their judo expertise in her exhibition Everyday Grappling Operations. Meditate inside artist Kathryn Garcia’s installation and catch Compass Dance performing in the galleries. Burger Records will provide live music and Lost Bean will serve tea and coffee.

Last chance to view Everyday Grappling

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Mariángeles Soto-Díaz’ “Everyday Grappling Operations”

Everyday Grappling Operations: Learning from Randori

Saturday, March 16 at 3 p.m.

Join an art performance and judo demonstration in connection with the exhibition Mariángeles Soto-Díaz: Everyday Grappling Operations, which engages judo as a framework for examining the role of affect and asymmetry in power relations. Directed by Soto-Díaz, performers and several renowned black belt judokas demonstrate the practice of Randori, a free-form, random exercise of combat with agreed-upon rules. Combatants may use any judo technique, including throwing, choking and holding an opponent down, provided they do not hurt each other and operate within the framework of the martial art.

The next slate of shows will open to members on Saturday, April 6 from 6 - 8 p.m. and to the public on Sunday, April 7 starting at 11 a.m. Admission to and parking at OCMAEXPAND-SANTA ANA are free. Hours: Thursday, 11 a.m. to 8 p.m. and Friday - Sunday, 11 a.m. - 6 p.m. Free tours on Saturday and Sunday at 2 p.m. Call 714.780.2130.

OCMA/EXPAND is located in South Coast Plaza Village, 1661 W. Sunflower Ave., Santa Ana. For more information, visit www.ocmaexpand.org.


Urban Arts OC presents “Tools for Transformation: A Meditation Workshop”

By now you are probably aware of the benefits of meditating. Perhaps you’ve even tried to meditate before. The reality is that for most people, starting a practice can be intimidating and confusing. In an upcoming experiential workshop, meditation will be demystified. 

Urban Arts OC is hosting “Tools for Transformation: A Meditation Workshop,” on Wednesday, March 13 from 7 - 9:30 p.m. and Saturday, March 16 from 9 - 11:30 a.m.

Come discover simple, powerful and practical techniques that you can incorporate in your daily life. Whether you are a beginner or practice daily, this workshop has something for everyone. The workshops will be led by Grant Aaron, Ph.D.

Urban Arts OC presents meditatio

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Courtesy of Urban Arts OC

Topics to be covered include:

–Demystifying meditation and how the mind functions.

–Postures and exercises for how to avoid injuries while meditating.

–Dynamic techniques to rapidly clear and quite the mind chatter.

–Subtle techniques to increase focus and concentration.

–Breathing techniques to energize and refresh.

–Relaxation techniques you can do on your own anytime.

What to bring:

–Yoga Mat

–Pillows

–Blanket

–Seating is available in chairs, if you prefer

–Loose comfortable clothing (whatever you’d wear to the gym)

The cost is $75 and space is limited.

To register, email This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. or call 949.474.1552.

Urban Arts OC is located at 4250 Scott Drive, Suite L & O, Newport Beach.


Spring Art Show, Art in the Park grace the beauty of Crystal Cove with a weekend of creativity

The shimmering ocean and rolling hillsides of Crystal Cove State Park have long inspired artists to paint, write, photograph, compose, tell stories, dance, and sketch. Be it a watercolor, a dance, or a musical composition, artists from different genres continue to be inspired by the beauty of the park and the spectacular landscapes, breathtaking scenery, and abundant gifts from nature.

On Friday, March 29, the Spring Art Show Artists Reception takes place from 5:30 - 7:30 p.m. This juried show features the work of 50 local artists along with live music, food and refreshments. Admission is $20 to the general public, $10 for Conservancy members. Tickets can be purchased at https://crystalcove.org/event/spring-art-show-3/

On Saturday, March 30 from 10 a.m. - 4 p.m., in the Crystal Cove Historic District, Crystal Cove State Park and Crystal Cove Conservancy will host a Spring Art Show and Art in the Park – a day filled with activities that celebrate the integration of art and nature through workshops, performances and activities. The Public Art Show continues on Sunday, March 31 from 10 a.m. - 4 p.m. One-half of the proceeds from the Art Show benefit Crystal Cove Conservancy.

Spring Art Show

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Courtesy of Crystal Cove Conservancy

Participants demonstrate their creativity at Art in the Park

The schedule of events for Art in the Park on Saturday, March 30 (more events will continue to be added) include:

Sea Glass Beach Walk from 9:30 - 10 a.m. Meet in the Education Commons. Come walk along the shoreline with Rick as he shares tips and tricks for finding sea glass and afterwards make your own one-of-a-kind creation. Free; register online.

Native American Blessing from 10 - 10:30 a.m. with Jacque Nunez in the Education Commons. Nunez is a descendent of Crystal Cove’s local tribe, the Juaneño Band of Mission Indians, Acjachemen Nation.

Watercolor Painting from 10 a.m. - 3 p.m. on the Promenade with artist Pamme Turner of the Saddleback Emeritus Institute.

Sea Glass Wrapping from 10 a.m. - 4 p.m. in the Education Commons.

Spring Art Show from 10 a.m. - 4 p.m. in the Education Commons. (The Public Art Show continues on Sunday, March 31 from 10 a.m. - 4 p.m.)

Bazaar from 10 a.m. - 4 p.m. in the Education Commons.

Native American Basket Weaving from 11 a.m. - 12 p.m. with Jacque Nunez at the Beaches Cottage (Cottage #13). Materials fee is $5 to the public, free to Crystal Cove Conservancy members. Register online.

Squid Dissection and Ink Art from 11 a.m. - 12 p.m. in Cottage #22. Come learn about the anatomy of a squid and use the squid’s ink sac and pen to create your own art piece.

Native American Storytelling from 12 - 1 p.m. with Jacque Nunez at the Beaches Cottage (Cottage #13).

Nature Poetry Workshop from 1 - 2 p.m. with writer Thea Gavin at Cottage #22. With the outdoors as inspiration and classroom, learn new ways of “giving voice” and connecting with nature through simple writing exercises that will combine methodical observation with wild creativity. Limited space available. Register online.

Native American Basket Weaving from 1 - 2 p.m. with Jacque Nunez at the Beaches Cottage (Cottage #13). Materials fee is $5 to the public; free to Crystal Cove Conservancy members. Register online for the basket-weaving session.

Acoustic Guitar from 2 - 3 p.m. with David Barba outside the Visitor’s Center.

On Monday, April 1, certain artists may be offered to display their work in the Park store’s permanent gallery.

For updated information and to register for events, visit www.crystalcove.com. If you are an artist and interested in entering the Art Show, visit www.onlinejuriedshiws.com for eligibility and guidelines or call 949.376.6200.


Guest Column

Fred Navarro, NMUSD Superintendent

Controversial issue could have negative impact on NMUSD

Guest Column Narvarro

Submitted photo

NMUSD Superintendent Fred Navarro  

A controversial issue is being discussed at the March 6 meeting of the Orange County Board of Education (OCBOE) that will negatively impact everyone in the Newport-Mesa Unified School District (NMUSD). As a member of the NMUSD educational community you need to know that we are working diligently to expose and stop this misguided effort.

Last September, a questionable petition was presented to the NMUSD Board of Education seeking to create a taxpayer funded charter school called the International School for Science and Culture (ISSAC). After careful review against the legal standards, our trustees could not in good conscience approve the petition. NMUSD unanimously voted it down.

In a 16-page resolution of denial, we provided a detailed critique pointing out the major flaws and deficiencies in the petition. Its financial plan was unsustainable and its educational plan was unsound. Sure, it had a fancy name, but it couldn’t be backed up with anything but vague promises. The petition sought to use taxpayer funds taken from our community as “venture capital” in a highly speculative, flawed proposition. 

Click here to read NMUSD’s Resolution of Denial.

This charter school is a bad idea that keeps coming back

This was not a new petition, but a repackaging of the failed Adrian Hands Academy Charter application that had been previously denied three times by a neighboring school district. Just like Adrian Hands, the ISSAC charter was riddled with errors, false assumptions, inaccurate data and faulty projections. Furthermore, the so-called Spanish translated version was so rife with translation errors as to be rendered meaningless.

The Charter school simply could not substantiate its business or educational plans. Our findings pointed out essential defects that the charter needed to correct, if possible. They could have done their homework and resubmitted a revised petition, but instead they went over our heads and submitted it to the county in a deliberate choice to end-run local control and seek a more favorable “pro-charter” audience with the OCBOE. It is significant to note that the state charter advocacy organization has been ramping up its participation in local elections to build an infrastructure of pro-charter elected officials in Orange County and across the state. 

OCBOE appears to have made up its mind despite the facts

It is up to elected trustees of local district and county boards of education to be prudent stewards of public funds. At the same time, they have to protect the educational needs and interests of all students and their families. In this situation, the NMUSD Board has fulfilled that mandate. We can only hope that the OCBOE will do the same.

The most recent OCBOE meeting was frustrating, troubling and disrespectful. A positive decision appeared to be pre-ordained despite the fact that OCDE staff found many of the same defects as had NMUSD. The OCBOE so limited the public comment period that our parents who had genuine concerns that needed to be heard were not allowed an opportunity to speak. It is telling that in all of the five public meetings to date on this charter, only parents of two potential students have expressed interest in this proposed school. 

Our parents don’t want this charter! In fact, many vehemently oppose it. The final approval was put off by OCBOE at the last minute to allow the charter petitioners to attempt to fix the charter. It is coming back to the OCBOE for final action on March 6.

What’s at stake?

The ISSAC charter wants to strip millions of dollars from the Newport-Mesa tax base to pay for their start-up. This is a lot of money that would otherwise be spent on valuable NMUSD programs and services to students. It would be unfortunate for these funds to instead be diverted to finance an unsound educational program. The defects in the proposal also put at risk the educational opportunities that would be afforded to students who enroll at the charter school.

What can you do?

First, read up on ISSAC so you can get past the rhetoric and promises and see it for what it is…an unsound educational proposal.

Second, email the members of the Orange County Board of Education to express your concern about their support of ISSAC.

Third, come to the March 6 meeting to tell county decision makers in person that you don’t want an inferior charter school trying to market itself as a quality alternative to our excellent public schools.

Parental choice and educational options that enable students to find their best pathway to success are important values we support in Newport-Mesa. This charter petition is not a quality choice for parents and students. 

We appreciate your continuing support. We know you have high expectations for your students and our schools. We strive every day to deliver an excellent educational experience for every child.

Sincerely, 

Dr. Fred Navarro

Superintendent


On the Harbor: Catching up this March

By LEN BOSE

To say I have sailed into a kelp bed is an understatement. As I back down to get the kelp free from my keel, I trim my sails back in and keep moving towards my next mark.

What I am referring to, is the start of the sailing season, commitments of support to the sailing community and to make sure I can support the family. Am I complaining? No, I am very fortunate to be able to make a living within the sport I love so dearly. This all just means that I have my plate full this month and have not found time to find some real harbor news or that interview of someone of interest within the harbor. Hence, the referral of being in the weeds and now my story on my recent thoughts, and what I have going on through mid-March.

On February 15, I woke up before the sun at the San Diego Yacht Club to one of the coldest mornings I have ever experienced in Southern California. My objective was to return the Santa Cruz 50 Horizon back to her slip in Cabrillo Beach. As I unplugged the electrical cord from the dock and moved across the foredeck of the boat, I barely kept my balance as I slipped on the ice that froze on the deck of the boat overnight. As I stepped back on to the dock to untie the dock lines, I let out a deep breath which resembled a vape cloud around my head. I looked up after untying the bowline, and glanced up to notice the super moon setting over Sunset Cliffs of San Diego. With little time to take in this surreal moment, I stepped aboard and started my journey home with four other boats that had competed in the Islands Race the previous weekend.

On the Harbor mountains

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Courtesy of Joysailing.com

View of the mountains from my vantage point, while leaving San Diego Harbor

As I round the last navigational marker leaving San Diego Harbor, I plotted my course to Cabrillo Beach. This time, the cloud that formed around my head was more in the form of blasphemy, as I noticed the distance to my mark was 80 miles. Over the next 12 hours, I had plenty of time to take in the snow-capped mountains that stretched 180 degrees across the horizon. In an odd way, the beauty of the landscape gave a type of internal warmth, while the calm sea reflected the mountain range which added to the presentation of just how lucky we are living in this little piece of the world.

By the time the 12th reflective red mylar valentine balloon passed my range of sight, I got rather upset with myself by not being able to retrieve them out of the water. I was doing something rather stupid anyway, by doing this delivery myself and the thought of reaching over the side of the boat with a boat hook seemed unwise.

So, I did the next best thing and came up with one of my “silly ideas,” let’s call this silly idea the “Southern California Group Hug.” It would be a rally similar to the Baja Ha Ha format that would start in Newport Beach and finish in San Diego with a raft up in La Playa Anchorage. The participants would be assigned a starting point somewhere between Newport Beach and halfway to Catalina. The MC of the event would broadcast the start over the VHF and the boats would start their cruise to San Diego looking for every bit of plastic flotsam, mylar balloons, etc. along the route. The plan is to catch and dispose of all the plastic flotsam along the way then, of course, take a crew photo of your catch. We could then enjoy our favorite beverages together and talk about the ones that got away. The ideas are endless for this type of event, but it would be very weather restricted; best served at the end of February with all the valentine balloons in the ocean. If any of you like the idea and would like to get in on the ground floor of something that really might achieve something good, send me an email at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it..

•••

Next up this weekend is the Harbor 20 Championships. The entry list is 30 plus participants and any one of these teams can sail into the top five on their best day. The favorites are Teams Perry & Brian Bissel, Argyle Campbell, Diane and Bill Menninger, Philip Thompson, and Anne and Kurt Wiese. There will also be six teams from out of the area that we have never lined up with before. Teams from Santa Barbara to Annapolis will be attending, and the weather does not look all that great with light winds and rain due in during Saturday’s racing. The regatta starts on today (Friday) and runs through Sunday. My goal is to qualify for Gold fleet on Friday, then just let it flow through the weekend and hope for the best.

•••

The Cabo race starts on March 15 and as always, it’s a push to have the boat ready with all the logistics, which keeps me up between 4 and 5 a.m. on most nights. We have high hopes aboard Horizon this season and we will be ready.

Sea ya!

~~~~~~~~

Len Bose is a yachting enthusiast, yacht broker and harbor columnist for StuNewsNewport.


OCSD reports rapid increase in drug seizures, including deadly fentanyl

Seizures of fentanyl, a synthetic opioid, and other illicit drugs have increased rapidly in Orange County Sheriff’s Department (OCSD) jurisdiction, with fentanyl seizures skyrocketing from less than one pound to more than 44 pounds in just two years.

Multiple narcotics, gang and interdiction teams covering OCSD contract cities and unincorporated areas work tirelessly to intercept illicit drugs. In 2018, these teams seized 44 pounds of fentanyl, 72 pounds of heroin, 451 pounds of cocaine, and 1,420 pounds of methamphetamine.

OCSD reports drugs

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Courtesy of OCSD

Fentanyl seizure from 2018

Even more alarming are the year-to-year increases in seizures, specifically of fentanyl. Pharmaceutical fentanyl is a synthetic opioid pain reliever, approved for treating severe pain, typically used for advanced cancer patients. It’s similar to morphine but is 50 - 100 times more potent. Illicit fentanyl, sold on the street, started to emerge locally in 2017. The chart below depicts the rapid growth in seizures of illegal fentanyl from 2015 through 2018.

While in a medical setting, fentanyl can be effective and safe for the treatment of severe pain, when it’s used illegally it can be incredibly dangerous. A fatal overdose of fentanyl can be 2 milligrams. For perspective, a sugar-packet-sized bag of fentanyl can contain 500 lethal doses. The 44 pounds seized by OCSD in 2018 contains more than 10 million fatal doses, enough fentanyl to overdose the entire population of Orange County three times.

OCSD reports chart

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Courtesy of OCSD

OCSD fentanyl seizures (in pounds) from 2015 - 2108

“These drug seizures will have an impact at the street level,” said Sheriff Don Barnes, Orange County Sheriff-Coroner. “When we couple enforcement with education, we will see reductions in drug activity across Orange County. Less drugs and less drug users will translate to lower crime rates, keeping us all safer.”


Pacific Marine Mammal Center reports drastic increase in dolphin strandings is cause for concern

Pacific Marine Mammal Center (PMMC) is not taking the recent increase in dolphin strandings lightly and believes they are a cause for concern. PMMC responded to six beached dolphins in 14 days. Five of the species were Common dolphins and one of them was a Bottlenose dolphin.

This influx of cetacean strandings began on February 4 when three Common dolphins beached themselves in one day. One male dolphin washed up deceased in Huntington Beach, and two other male dolphins were rescued in Laguna Beach, both alive but humanely euthanized after further examination by PMMC’s animal care and veterinary teams. On February 10, a deceased female Bottlenose dolphin washed ashore at Corona Del Mar. Five days later, another deceased female, this time a Common dolphin, washed ashore also at Corona Del Mar. Both female dolphins were pregnant. The most recent stranding was a male Common dolphin that was found in Corona Del Mar on February 18.

PMMC has performed necropsies on all of the dolphins. In addition, PMMC partners with the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) and NOAA-certified marine mammal diagnostic labs within academic universities across the United States to collectively collaborate and better understand why this unusual increase of beached cetaceans may have occurred.

Pacific Marine Corona del Mar bottlenose

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Courtesy of PMMC

A bottlenose dolphin stranded on the beach at Corona del Mar

“There are a variety of potential reasons as to why these dolphins are stranding. These include, but are not limited to, viral infections, bacterial infections, and toxins. We may not always get a definitive answer, but we consider our research with these dolphins to be a very important piece to the puzzle in providing clues as to what is going on in our nearshore habitats.” said Kristen Sakamaki, DVM, PMMC’s Veterinarian.

According to the Southern California Coastal Ocean Observing System (SCCOOS), recent harmful algae blooms have been occurring along the Southern California Coast. These blooms can produce domoic acid, a poison that is toxic for humans, marine mammals and seabirds when ingested. In addition, these stranding events can be caused or made worse by the heavy rains and storms that have doused Southern California, which results in excess nutrients and other harmful toxins from land washing out to the oceans.

 Two more beached dolphins were also reported to PMMC during the same 14-day time span. One washed back out immediately and another washed up in an unsafe location for the PMMC rescue team to respond.

Pacific Marine Fishermans

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Courtesy of PMMC

PMMC Team, Laguna Beach Marine Safety, and Animal Control responding to a dolphin stranding at Fisherman’s Cove

According to PMMC, this outbreak of beached dolphins is disturbing. Last year at this time, PMMC had only responded to one stranded dolphin. 

“This drastic and unexpected increase in cetaceans has had a significant impact on our Center. With so many incidents concentrated in such a short period of time, this has taken up much of the attention as well as our resources away from our more ‘traditional’ animal care operations focused on seals and sea lions, which coincidentally, we’ve also seen a major increase this year as compared to this same time last year,” said Peter Chang, CEO at PMMC. 

“Nonetheless, we are committed to understanding the root of the problem. Although absolutely heart-breaking, these stranding events will provide a tremendous amount of information that will not only contribute to important insights into the lives of dolphins, but also, it will help with the overarching science on the changes that we are seeing in our ocean waters.”

PMMC cautions, “Marine mammals are wild and can carry zoonotic diseases that can be transmitted to humans and pets. Children are particularly at risk from marine mammals and should stay well clear of them. If you see a beached dolphin or marine mammal, please call PMMC at 949.494-.050 and report the animal immediately. 

“While we understand your first instinct may be to assist the animal back out to the ocean, please do not attempt to move these animals without adequate and expert assistance. Additionally, these animals can strand as a sign of something serious that may be happening internally, and you may actually be doing more harm than good.”

PMMC is located at 20612 Laguna Canyon Rd. For more information, visit www.pacificmmc.org.

Editor’s Note: According to Krysta Higuchi, PMMC events and public relations coordinator, “The necropsy results can still be four to six weeks out. The only good news is that we haven’t found any other dolphins wash up this week (as of Wednesday, Feb. 27).” 


ENC to present 9th Annual Youth Art Showcase

Youngsters between the ages of 4 and 18 will have the opportunity to exhibit their art at the Youth Art Showcase taking place at the Environmental Nature Center’s (ENC) Spring Faire on Sunday, May 19.

Art must explore the theme of “Diversity in Nature,” and can include plants, animals and people. There are four age categories and awesome awards. All participants receive a ribbon for entering. The deadline to enter is Sunday, May 12.

ENC to present carpenter bee

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Courtesy of ENC

A carpenter bee rests on Cleveland Sage

ENC would like to express thanks to these sponsors so far: Art Supply Warehouse, C’est Si Bon Bakery, and Saddleback College Fashion Design and Merchandising, who are donating the prizes. Sponsorship opportunities are still available.

For more information on the guidelines, age categories and prizes, and to view past winners, visit http://encenter.org/visit-us/spring-faire/childrens-art/, call Lori Whalen at 949.645.8489 ext. 103, or email This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it..

Environmental Nature Center is located at 1601 E. 16th St., Newport Beach.


Stump the Stu

Towering sails...take us away

Stump the Stu 3.1.19

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This one was another stumper, as aStu only received one correct answer on where these towering sails unfurl. 

Congratulations to Joe Stapleton who really knows his town and guessed that these enormous sails grace the side of the contemporary Blackman Ltd Jewelers building down on Via Lido, overlooking the harbor.

Originally established in 1957 to service the marine industry, this family-owned luxury jeweler and watch salon caters to the most discriminating tastes. It is also a go-to for quality watch and jewelry repair.

If you have a unique spot or icon around town that you think Stu News Newport readers would enjoy finding out about, please shoot it, share it and give us the location, so we can challenge them! Happy Hunting.


Sign of the times

It’s another edition of Sign of the times, so let’s see how well you know our town. Identify this partial glance of a sign that includes these inviting palm trees welcoming you to a relaxing tropical paradise...but if not – where then?

Good luck!

Stu loves publishing the winning answers on Tuesday.

Send your guesses to This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it..

If you’re a business and you want to play, you can send us a high-quality photo of your sign and we’ll take it from there and challenge our readers.

Let’s have some fun!

SOTT 3.1.19

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Morning magic in Newport Beach

Morning magic ocean

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Photo by Jason Berry (Instagram @its_jason_berry)

Gorgeous ocean reflections along our stunning shoreline


Fair Game

By TOM JOHNSON

FPPC identifies 44 potential violations against Team Newport from 2014

Fair Game Tom JohnsonForty-four potential Fair Political Practices Commission violations are listed against David Ellis, Scott Peotter, Duffy Duffield, Kevin Muldoon, Diane Dixon and their related committees in a February 21, 2019, FPPC executive staff report.

The timing of the alleged violations was during their Team Newport campaign back in 2014.

The document says that on January 14, 2019, following a hearing, probable cause was found to believe that the above listed Respondents committed the following violations of the Fair Political Practices Act by failing to report two non-monetary contributions totaling $12,500 on a pre-election statement and failing to report ten non-monetary contributions totaling $14,539.56 on a pre-election statement.

One of their support committees, Residents for Reform (RFR), also failed to identify Ellis as its controlling candidate on its statement of organization, alleges the FPPC.

Another support committee, Neighborhood Preservation Coalition (NPC), failed to file a statement of organization; failed to timely file a pre-election campaign statement; failed to timely file a semi-annual campaign statement; received late contributions from Thomas Larkin, Jr., John Saunders, Fritz Duda, Donald Howard, and Robert Winkel for which it failed to timely file a report; made late contributions to the Peotter, Duffield, Muldoon, and Dixon Committees in the form of three doorhangers and six mass mailings for which it failed to timely file a report and sent seven mass mailings that failed to include proper disclosure, alleges the FPPC.

Additionally, the Peotter Committee, Duffield Committee, Muldoon Committee and Dixon Committee all failed to report receiving the non-monetary contributions from NPC and RFR; and failed to timely file a number of 24-hour reports for non-monetary contributions received from NPC, alleges the FPPC.

Finally, Ellis, a candidate for Municipal Water Distarict of Orange County at the time, controlled three committees, David Ellis for Water Board 2014, RFR, and NPC, leading up to the 2014 General Election. As a result, the FPPC alleges Ellis received contributions and made expenditures from multiple campaign accounts in violation. 

In all, the FPPC listed potentially 44 counts of violation.

Time will tell what outcomes result.

• • •

James Alan Neal, 72, who is suspected in the cold-case 1973 murder of 11-year-old Linda O’Keefe, will apparently waive his right to fight extradition from Colorado back to Orange County.

Arrangements are being made to transfer Neal, but no comment about timing has been released by the Orange County District Attorney’s Office.

• • •

Upcoming meetings: Civil Service Board, March 4 at 5 p.m., City Council Chambers; Parks, Beaches & Recreation Commission, March 5 at 6 p.m., City Council Chambers; General Plan Update Steering Committee, March 6 at 6 p.m., Central Library Friends Room.


Another captivating sand castle on Balboa Island

Another captivating Newport

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Photo by Chris Crosson (Instagram @sandcastlekit)

Sandcastlekit.com

Chris Crosson from Sand Castle Kit is at it again with another amazing sand sculpture 


Ole! Ole! Fiesta Fantástica fundraiser at OASIS

on April 13

Save the date for Ole! Ole! Fiesta Fantastica – the spring fundraiser at OASIS Senior Center taking place Saturday, April 13 from 5 - 9 p.m.

Presented by Friends of OASIS, the evening features dinner, dancing, drinks and gaming. Try your luck at the Wheel of Fortune, take part in the Silent Auction and Surprise Balloon Sales, with prizes donated by restaurants, retail shops and local services. Enjoy live music by Tears of Joy.

Ole Ole Fiesta

Tickets are $45 each and go on sale in March. Sponsorships are available.

For more information, call 949.718.1800 and visit www.friendsofoasis.org.

OASIS Senior Center is located at 801 Narcissus Ave., Corona del Mar.


Check out the Camp Newport Expo at Spirit Run, Sunday, March 17

The annual Camp Newport Expo is scheduled for Sunday, March 17 from 6:30 - 11:30 a.m., located near the finish line of the Spirit Run in Fashion Island, Newport Beach.

Check out the Camp Newport Expo these girls

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Courtesy of City of Newport Beach 

These girls had a great time at a previous Camp Newport Expo

The Expo features more than 20 contract instructors who will share information about their upcoming summer camps to be held all throughout the City. There will be giveaways, interactive demos, a photo booth and more!

Are you ready to seize your summer and make the most of all our area has to offer? With more than 500 weekly half- and full-day camps to choose from, Camp Newport, presented by the City of Newport Beach Recreation & Senior Services Department, has just the camp to keep your child busy all summer long. They have every topic under the sun from sports or science to dance or the arts... so kids, come seize your summer!

Check out the Camp Newport Expo skateboard ramp

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Courtesy of City of Newport Beach 

Checking out the skateboard ramp with Skatedogs

For additional information and to register, visit www.campnewport.com, call 949.644.3151, or email This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.. The website launches on March 2 with registration opening on March 7 at 8 a.m. Sign up by May 6 and receive a 10 percent or more discount.


NBPLF to present Amy Walter on March 8 and 9

The Newport Beach Public Library Foundation (NBPLF) continues its 22nd Annual Witte Lecture Series, featuring renowned speakers on a variety of compelling, current topics.

On March 8 at 7 p.m. and March 9 at 2 p.m., Amy Walter will be the featured speaker. Walter is the national editor of The Cook Political Report where she provides non-partisan analysis of issues, trends and events that shape the political environment.

NBPLF to present Amy Walter

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Courtesy of NBPLF

Amy Walter will be at Central Library on March 8 and 9 as part of the distinguished Witte Lecture Series

Over the past 19 years, Walter has built a reputation as an accurate, objective and insightful political analyst with unparalleled access to campaign insiders and decision-makers. Known as one of the best political journalists covering Washington, she is the former political director of ABC News. She is also a regular panelist on NBC’s Meet the Press, Fox News’ Special Report with Bret Baier and CBS’s Face the Nation. According to Charlie Cook of The Cook Political Report, Walter’s “work is trusted and respected by Democrats and Republicans alike. She knows how to get beyond bluster and spin to unearth – and explain – what really matters.”

The Friday evening lecture and community conversation with dinner and wine is $58 for NBPLF members and $63 for non-members. The lecture and Q&A takes place from 7 - 8:30 p.m.; light supper and wine follow at 8:30 p.m., with book sales and signing.

The Saturday afternoon lecture with coffee, cookies and conversation is $38 for NBPLF members and $43 for non-members. The lecture and Q&A takes place from 2 - 3:30 p.m.; coffee and dessert are at 3:30 p.m., with book sales and signing.

For more information and tickets, visit www.nbplfoundation.org/content/The-Witte-Lectures.html, contact This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it., or call 949.717.3818. The event will sell out! It takes place in the Central Library Friends Room, 1000 Avocado Ave., Newport Beach.

The Witte Lectures Series, established by the Witte Family in honor of Martin Witte, is made possible through the support of generous donors. It encourages dialogue on relevant issues of our time. Members of the NBPLF receive advance notice and ticket purchase access for the events, among other benefits. Reservations are encouraged to assure access to this popular series.


Newport Beach Chamber of Commerce invites locals to sunset mixer at Red O on Thursday

The Newport Beach Chamber of Commerce invites locals to a sunset networking mixer on Thursday, Feb. 28 from 5:30 - 7:30 p.m. at Red O Restaurant in Fashion Island. Come discover new business relationships while enjoying a great atmosphere. 

Newport Beach Chamber Red O exterior

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Courtesy of NB Chamber of Commerce

Red O is known for its unique combination of Prime Steak & Seafood with Rick Bayless’ signature Mexican-inspired influences and hard-to-forget Margaritas.

Cost: Free for Newport Beach Chamber members and $35 for non-members at the door. Come enjoy complimentary hors d’oeuvres, a no-host bar and opportunity drawing prizes. Valet parking is $6; self-parking is free. No reservations are required.

For more information, contact Pam Smith at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. or call 949.729.4411.

Red O is located at 143 Newport Center Drive, Newport Beach.


Newport Beach Sunrise Rotary announces March events

The Newport Beach Sunrise Rotary is holding two upcoming March events at the Eminent Speaker’s Guild. The club meets on Tuesdays at 7:30 a.m. at Five Crowns, 3801 E. Coast Highway, Corona del Mar. The public is invited to enjoy breakfast and the featured speakers.

Newport Beach Sunrise Rotary

Schedule:

–Tuesday, March 12: Ron Yeo, a local architect who has lived in Corona del Mar for 53 years, will discuss his environmentally friendly art consisting of recycled bottle caps, plastic tops, action figures, etc., that he has gathered on his morning beach walks. 

–Tuesday, March 26: Glenn Bozarth will discuss the Painted Turtle Camp, which provides a life-transforming, intensive, medically supported camping experience for children with chronic and life-threatening conditions for no charge at Lake Hughes. His other philanthropic activities include serving on the board of directors of Keep a Child Alive and the UCLA Mattel Children’s Hospital, president of the Mattel Children’s Foundation and 12 international trips with Habitat for Humanity, including Jordan this fall. Bozarth was senior vice president, Corporate Communications at Mattel, Inc. and director, public relations at the worldwide headquarters of Hilton Hotels. 

For more information and to RSVP, contact Herman Kelting, Newport Beach Sunrise Rotary Club membership committee member at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it..


OCMA announces second season of exhibits in temporary space

After a successful inaugural season in its temporary space in Santa Ana, the

Orange County Museum of Art (OCMA) announced it will present six new exhibitions of works by Pacific Rim artists and a seventh show featuring objects from the museum’s collection on view from April 7 through September 1. Through a wide range of media including interactive installations, photography and site-specific interventions, the works touch on notions of value, control and power, and truth and reality, responding to some of today’s most pressing global socio-political concerns.

For this second season at OCMAEXPAND-SANTA ANA, OCMA will continue the strategy of considering its interim location as a laboratory for artistic experimentation, taking the idea of the Pacific Rim as a research question.

OCMA announces second season Ultraviolet

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Photos courtesy of OCMA

“Ultraviolet,” 2016 by Hiromi Takizawa: Installation: polycarbonate film, neon, live plants

 “The season of exhibitions by artists Diego Berruecos, York Chang, Victoria Fu and Matt Rich, Fritzia Irizar, UuDam Tran Nguyen and Hiromi Takizawa continues OCMA’s proud history and trajectory as a leader in presenting the freshest art of our time,” said Todd D. Smith, OCMA’s director and CEO. “We look forward to a robust exchange of ideas born out of showing these artists, especially in such a public-facing space.”

Located in South Coast Plaza Village, OCMAEXPAND-SANTA ANA is the Museum’s temporary venue while it builds its Thomas Mayne-designed new home at Segerstrom Center for the Arts.

“We are also delighted to have an opportunity to continue exhibiting objects from our permanent collection of more than 4,500 works of modern and contemporary art during this time of change and growth as we prepare for our new home,” Smith said. The new iteration highlights small-scale sculptures and includes works by many artists who are central to the art history of Southern California, including Chris Burden, Vija Celmins, Judy Chicago, Ken Price and others.

Spring Exhibitions:

Diego Berruecos: Only A Shadow 

Known for his biting investigations into power structures in Mexican politics, photographer Diego Berruecos offers two bodies of work that together demonstrate the Mexican artist’s insightful and nuanced take on the effects of globalized economic power on rural or economically disadvantaged communities in Mexico. His series 26 Used To Be Gas Stations in Mexico features former state-run Pemex gas stations and shines a light on the impact of the global oil industry on Mexico. His Red Bull series documents Mexican farmers trying the energy drink for the first time. The images call attention to the implications of multi-national economic power dynamics in the context of this farming community.

York Chang: To Be Wrong with Infinite Precision

Los Angeles-based artist York Chang’s exhibition’s To Be Wrong with Infinite Precision probes how we make sense of the tumult of information we are confronted with today and how we struggle to decipher fact from fiction. The title of the show comes from an essay by Nassim Nicholas Talib, in which he describes our tendency to organize complexity (statistics, data, images and random events) into invented narratives that reinforce pre-existing beliefs. Through sculpture, photocollage, painting and performance, Chang sheds light on the fragile nature of truth and reality, especially in today’s media environment. The exhibition reveals how – more often than not – what one might have trusted as true may be inaccurate.

OCMA announces second season Monster A

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“Monster A.,” by Victoria Fu and Matt Rich, 2018

Victoria Fu and Matt Rich: Monster A.

Monster A. joins the artistic practices of San Diego-based artists and collaborators Victoria Fu and Matt Rich. Fu’s screen-like images and textures combine with Rich’s bold palette and painterly surfaces on sewn fabric elements that take the form of aprons. Their installation consists of a series of site-responsive vignettes that draw together the aprons with neon sculptures and vinyl wallpaper-like elements. The theatrical display challenges the traditionally utilitarian nature of the apron and the implications of gender and labor associated with it, while also suggesting the familiar bodily experience of wearing one.

OCMA announces second season Ostra

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Ostra by Fritzia Irizar: Research image for “Fritzia Irizar: CaCO3,” 2019

Fritzia Irizar: CaCO3 

Mexican artist Fritzia Irizar’s work explores the concept of value relative to precious materials such as diamonds and gold. CaCO3 focuses on the pearl and uncovers its vast, historic web of influence as a commodity for centuries and across civilizations. Through video, sculpture and ephemera, this exhibition examines the implications that the international trade of this precious material has had on natural resources and labor, with a particular emphasis on the history of pearl production in Mexico.

UuDam Tran Nguyen: TIME BOOMERANG California Edition – From S.E.A. Atolls to the Next Dead Stars

Vietnamese artist UuDam Tran Nguyen’s ongoing Time Boomerang project began in 2013 when he set out to explore China’s historic claim over the islands in the South China Sea, which were also claimed by Vietnam, The Philippines, Brunei, Indonesia and Malaysia. To Nguyen, this declaration was a bold exercise of power on the part of China, confusing the territorial map on an international scale. Nguyen began to consider this somewhat arbitrary and subjective approach to measuring ownership and recalled as a child how he would use his own hand with fingers outstretched as a unit of measure. He created a bronze cast of his hand, cut off the fingertips, and set out to drop each one in oceans bordering five continents. OCMA’s exhibition documents the stages of this project already completed in Europe, Australia, and Japan. It also includes an interactive element in which visitors are invited to break plaster maps Nguyen has created for different phases of the work. As part of the exhibition, the artist will complete the California phase of Time Boomerang in the Pacific Ocean.

Hiromi Takizawa: Open Air

Born in a small mountain village outside Nagano, Japan and now living in Santa Ana, Calif., Hiromi Takizawa investigates identity and the immigrant experience through themes of distance, time, space and longing. Takizawa’s exhibition consists of site-specific glass and light installations and new sculptural works exploring the wonder and phenomena of nature, inspired by contrasting landscapes on both sides of the Pacific Ocean. Takizawa has deftly pushed traditional notions of glassmaking to create delicate glass sculptures and immersive installations of neon lights, blown glass and natural sunlight.

Closer Look: Intimate-Scale Sculpture from the Permanent Collection

Co-curated with exhibiting artist Hiromi Takizawa and the Orange County Museum of Art, this exhibition provides a focused look at small sculpture in the OCMA permanent collection. Selected for their innovative materials, playfulness in scale and function, and historic importance within the context of significant art movements and artistic careers, each artwork in Closer Look is intended to be viewed at a close distance, providing the viewer with an intimate moment to make slow and careful observations about content and construction. Artists include Libby Black, Chris Burden, Vija Celmins, Judy Chicago, Joel Morrison and Ken Price, among others.

Admission to and parking at OCMAEXPAND-SANTA ANA are free. Hours are Thursday, 11 a.m. to 8 p.m. and Friday - Sunday, 11 a.m. - 6 p.m. 

OCMA/EXPAND is located in South Coast Plaza Village, 1661 W. Sunflower Ave., Santa Ana. For more information, visit www.ocmaexpand.org.


Sage Hill School hosts 2nd annual GEMfest on Saturday

Sage Hill School will host the 2nd annual GEMfest, a celebration-like conference that aims to educate girls in grades 6 - 8 (and their parents) about empowerment, self-esteem and independence, and will host the second annual event on campus on Saturday, March 2 from 9 a.m. - 2 p.m.

Back by popular demand, this ticketed event will feature accomplished guest speakers, panels and hands-on workshops that cover a variety of topics including nutrition, wellness, social media, public speaking, habits for a healthy life and more.

Sage Hill School two girls

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Courtesy of Sage Hill School

(L-R) Alex Losey, YouTube influencer and Eliza Feffer, co-president of GEMfest

“GEMfest is organized and run by 13 Sage Hill students who are part of the school’s GEM Team (Girls Empowerment Movement),” said Torrey Olins, director of Communications and Marketing for Sage Hill. “Based on what this group has observed in their own lives and what they wish they’d known in middle school, the GEM Team decided on this year’s theme of ‘Emotional and Physical Health & Wellness.’”

The event will kick off with a message from keynote speaker, Kamie Crawford, who is an activist for diversity and body positivity and former Miss Teen USA 2010. Then, attendees can choose to attend one of two panels: Healthy Habits for Middle School Girls or A Mindful Approach to Social Media.

Following the panel discussions, student attendees can partake in a variety of hands-on workshops while parents and chaperones attend a special session led by experts on how to help middle school girls thrive physically, emotionally, and academically during this time in their lives and beyond.

GEMfest 2019 will conclude with a message from keynote speaker, Victoria Garrick, USC Volleyball player and body-image advocate.

Sage Hill School GEMfest committee

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The GEMfest Committee

While learning about the importance of maintaining a balanced lifestyle, GEMfest ticket holders are invited to enjoy lunch, snacks and a special photo pop-up courtesy of The Confetti Project.

This year’s list of panelists and workshops include:

Panelists:

(Healthy Habits)

Sadie Radinsky, 17-year-old food blogger

Aurora Kaye, graduate student at USC Rossier School of Education, youth advocate and Sage Hill alumna

Kelsey Rose, OB/GYN at UCLA and Sage Hill alumna

Daisy Renteria, head Trainer at Orangetheory Fitness and American Ninja Warrior contestant

(Social Media)

Alexa Losey, YouTube influencer

Taylor Hiskey, social media director for Urban Decay Cosmetics

Kenzie Piper, social Media influencer

Krissy Saleh, photographer/social media influencer

Workshops:

–Coding

–Creativity for Self-Care

–Hula Hooping for Fun and Exercise

–My Story, My Way

–The Confetti Project

–Public Speaking

–Yoga for Students

–Adult Workshop for parents

In addition, every attendee will leave with a swag bag filled with gifts from sponsors including Honest Beauty, Lola, Polished Perfect by Twila True, Patchology and Urban Decay Cosmetics.

“The most wonderful element of this event is the impact that it has on young girls in our community,” said Head of School for Sage Hill, Patricia Merz,. “We recognize the importance of giving middle school-age students the opportunity to meet like-minded peers and learn from inspiring and approachable female mentors so that they can make positive changes in their life, school, the community and the world.

Event tickets* are limited with two options available for purchase, including $15 tickets for students and $25 tickets for parents, available online here.

*Ticket Giveaway: GEMfest is holding a ticket giveaway to the March 2 conference for Stu News readers. Parents/guardians of a middle school girl (grades 6 - 8) who would like her to participate in GEMfest may send an email to Miki Akil at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. by Tuesday, Feb. 26 at 5 p.m. PST. The first four readers to reach out will each receive a complimentary ticket to attend the conference.

For more information about this event, visit www.gemfestoc.com.

Sage Hill School is located at 20402 Newport Coast Drive, Newport Coast.


Tower 19 sunrise and silhouettes

Tower 19 orange

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Photo by Jason Berry (Instagram @its_jason_berry)

A stunning orange sunshine rising behind a perfectly silhouetted lifeguard tower


Stump the Stu

Towering sails...take us away

Stump the Stu 2.26.19

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We came upon these enormous sails adorning the side of a highly contemporary building. Can you tell us where you would find this artwork on the business that was originally established in 1957 to service the marine industry?

Take the challenge and submit your answers to This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it..

The answer will appear in Friday’s edition, along with the correct guesses. So, join us for this local adventure.

If you have a unique spot or icon around town that you think Stu News Newport readers would enjoy finding out about, please shoot it, share it and give us the location, so we can challenge them! Happy Hunting.


Sign of the times

On Fridays we give you a partial glimpse of a sign around town. You guess what the overall name of the business is.

This one must have been super tough, because Stu only received one correct answer. Congratulations to Ashley Johnson, who really knows her company logos. The two-toned petal symbolizes YogaWorks. This studio is located in Gateway Plaza at 230 Newport Center Drive, #230, Newport Beach.

If you’re a business and you want to play, you can send us a high-quality photo of your sign to This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. and we’ll take it from there and challenge our readers.

Let’s have some fun!

SOTT 2.26.19

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Join the CdM Chamber of Commerce tonight for sunset networking mixer at Priestley Chiropractic

The Corona del Mar Chamber of Commerce is holding its sunset networking mixer tonight, Tuesday, Feb. 26, at Priestley Chiropractic from 5:30 - 7:30 p.m.

Join in an evening of fun, while you network and enjoy hors d’oeuvres, wine and champagne. There is a DJ to get the party started and door prizes. (If you would like to donate a prize, please bring it with you.)

Come join the CdM

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Courtesy of Facebook

Meet the Priestley Chiropractic team tonight at the CdM Chamber of Commerce’s sunset networking mixer

Cost: CdM Chamber members and Priestley Chiropractic patients are free; guests are $10. 

Advance registration is not required, but if you RSVP at www.cdmchamber.com, it allows you easy access and confirmation. There is plenty of complimentary parking in the lot.

Priestley Chiropractic is located at 3 Corporate Plaza, #200, Newport Beach.


CdM restaurant to open in March

A new restaurant called CdM is scheduled to open in March at 2325 E. Coast Highway, Corona del Mar, where the gastropub Crow Bar & Kitchen was formerly located.

CdM restaurant to open in March

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Photo by Amy Senk

CdM will be run by Joseph “McG” Nichol and Jordan Otterbein, who also operate A Restaurant and A Market on W. Coast Highway in Newport Beach. McG also is a Hollywood director, producer and former record producer.

The restaurant, whose cuisine is described as “creative American,” will include a speakeasy-style bar.


City Manager’s Updates

From the desk of Grace Leung

Residential Street Parking Ordinance – Staff will be introducing an ordinance to modify sections of the Newport Municipal Code relating to street parking issues due to construction activities in residential areas. City Council directed staff at the January 22 meeting to consider changes to the Newport Beach Municipal Code that will lessen the impact of construction related parking on residents and address parking management issues. The revised ordinance addresses information signage, limits starting construction during peak summer season, and requirements for a parking management plan for new construction. Staff will be presenting the item for City Council consideration at the February 26 meeting. 

CDD Fourth Quarter Activity Report – The Community Development Department Fourth Quarter Activity Report is now available at www.newportbeachca.gov/cdd. The report compiles operational statistics to illustrate the volume of business activity that the Department handles on a quarterly basis. As we closed out the last quarter of 2018 (October – December), the Building Division worked steadily to issue 1,382 permits while performing over 10,000 building inspections. During this time, Code Enforcement maintained their performance by responding to 91 percent of their caseload in three days or less, while Planning reviewed and completed 81 percent of their plan checks at the public counter. Lastly, the Systems and Administration Division was busy supporting the Planning Commission and Zoning Administrator while answering 5,300 phone calls with a live person. Past reports are also available at the website listed above. 

Coastal Commission Meeting on March 8 – The Community Development Department would like to remind everyone of the first community Steering Committee meeting to be held at Marina Park, 1600 W. Balboa Blvd. on Wednesday, Feb. 13 at 6 p.m. This will be the initial forum to provide an overview of the General Plan Update process and to get feedback on the draft request for proposals for consultant services. 

General Plan Update Community Meeting – Following a well-attended community forum on the upcoming General Plan Update, the newly created General Plan Update Steering Committee held its first meeting on February 20 in the Civic Center Community Room. The Committee reviewed and discussed a draft request for proposals (RFP) for consulting services. The Committee will be meeting again on March 6, 2019 at 6 p.m. in the Friends of the Library Room at the Central Library. The draft RFP and the role of the Committee as part of the future community outreach effort will be discussed. A third Committee meeting is scheduled for March 20 at 6 p.m. in a location to be determined. Stay informed by visiting www.newportbeachca.gov/gpupdate. For additional information, please email staff at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Replacement of City’s Land Management System (LMS) – In October 2016, the Community Development Department and the IT Division released a request for proposals (RFP) for the full replacement of City’s legacy permitting software – Permits Plus. For the past 21 years, Permits Plus has been the key software to track all permit and development activity for Building, Planning, Code Enforcement and Public Works. Although the current system has served its purpose, the City has outgrown the software’s ability to keep up with the pace of technology. The general criteria and focus of the RFP was to evaluate software that will advance the City into the next generation of permitting while improving internal efficiencies and expanding online services for the public’s use. 

After a two-year vetting process of various systems, staff will be recommending Energov (Tyler Systems) as the LMS replacement. Staff is currently wrapping up the Statement of Work and agreement. This item is scheduled to go before the City Council for their comments on the process and potential system at the March 26 Study Session.

Discussion with AirbnbCity staff held a video conference meeting with representatives of Airbnb to discuss opportunities to partner. The discussion revolved around ensuring short-term lodging units that are posted on the platform are legal units located in the correct zone. Additionally, many cities have entered into a tax collection agreement, where Airbnb will track, report, and remit the transient occupancy tax back to the City. Staff is exploring the implementation of a similar agreement with Airbnb. 

Flood Insurance Community Outreach MeetingThe City of Newport Beach will be hosting a community public outreach meeting regarding the revised Flood Insurance Rate Map (FIRM) on March 14 at 6 p.m. at Marina Park Community & Sailing Center. Representatives from the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) will be attending to present information about flood insurance requirements. Homeowners, representatives or design professionals who are impacted by design standards in the Special Flood Hazard Zone or flood insurance requirements will be able to obtain information directly from FEMA representatives and ask questions.

Arrest Made in 1973 Murder of 11-Year-Old Linda O’KeefeOn Tuesday morning (February 19), detectives from the Newport Beach Police Department arrested James Alan Neal, a 72-year-old resident of Monument, CO for the abduction and murder of Linda Ann O’Keefe. Linda, an 11-year-old girl from Corona del Mar, disappeared on July 6, 1973 while walking home from summer school. Her body was discovered near Back Bay Drive the next morning. The facts of her case were shared through the #LindasStory campaign on Twitter last summer (visit https://twitter.com/i/moments/101563933312089292 to learn more). 

In addition to public awareness, the NBPD pursued a number of traditional and innovative investigative techniques, including the latest in DNA technology. And, after decades of work, investigators were able to use forensic DNA testing and an online genealogy website to identify the suspect’s DNA as being consistent with DNA left at the crime scene. 

Chief Jon Lewis shared this statement: “Thank you to Linda’s family, and schoolmates, and friends – who never gave up hope. Thank you to everyone all over the world who was touched by Linda’s Story – for your thoughts and prayers for this little girl, and the search for her killer. And thank you to everyone who worked on this case throughout the years – because of you, James Neal is now in custody.” 

Tree Plantings Flourish Around Town – In our ongoing effort to maintain and manage one of the gems of Newport Beach, our wonderful Urban Forest, Public Works staff reached out this week and contacted 76 property owners about replanting a new tree in the public parkway adjacent to their property. Owners have the option to select a tree from a designated list. Once their selections are made, staff will schedule the tree plantings. Additionally, 27 Forest Pansy trees were planted on the Jamboree Road median and 24 Gold Medallion trees were planted along West Coast Highway median. 

Restroom Repairs-Rehabilitation Project – The Public Works Department has started the Restroom Repairs-Rehabilitation Project along the City’s coast. When work is completed, the restrooms at 58th Street, Channel Place Park, Balboa Pier, Buck Gully and CDM State will have been rehabilitated and have a refreshed appeal. Work on the restrooms includes new flooring, plumbing, light fixtures and interior paint. While the restrooms are temporarily closed for construction, portable toilets will be provided. Work is scheduled to be completed before the Memorial Day Holiday weekend.

Storm Watch – During the latest storms, the log boom at the Newport Aquatic Center captured 20 tons of trash that flowed down the San Diego Creek. The trash was pulled ashore, stacked for drying, collected and then hauled away to the Bee Canyon dump by the Public Works Municipal Operation crew. 

Public Works Municipal Operations crews also responded to a mudslide on Back Bay Road and a rockslide at Pirates Cove. Back Bay Road was temporarily closed while crews cleaned up the mud and debris caused by the storm. In addition, crews were dispatched to Pirates Cove to clear fallen rocks. During the events, approximately 10 tons of combined material was removed from the two areas.


Looking north from CdM during our favorite hour

Looking north sunset

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Photo by Lupita Zambrano (Instagram @lupitazambranophotography)

We can’t get over how gorgeous this sunset from CdM was


Newport Beach – A Look Back

Photo series courtesy of Balboa Island Museum & Historical Society

Newport Beach A Look Back 2.26.19

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Strange as this looks, this is an old-fashioned eye glass case. Found in the attic of the Balboa Island Hotel, it is probably from the 1920s or ‘30s. The hard exterior would have protected the glasses inside from damage pretty effectively, while the indent would have allowed someone to remove their glasses with minimal fuss.

Balboa Island Museum and the Museum Store are located at 210 B Marine Ave., Balboa Island. They are open Monday - Thursday from 10 a.m. - 5 p.m. and Friday - Sunday from 10 a.m. - 6 p.m. For more information, call 949.675.3952, visit www.balboamuseum.org, or email This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it..


Some of the “bad apples” throughout the history of Newport Beach

By DUNCAN FORGEY

Throughout the history of Newport Beach, there has been a long line of questionable characters. Like the old west and its gunslingers, the east coast and its pirates, Newport Beach’s unique beauty and location helped grow storybook heroes and notorious residents. These individuals, though not famous like Blackbeard and Billy the Kid, were stepping stones creating a history of Newport Beach that current residents do not know. Even though the perception is that Newport is “morally clean and infallible,” there has always been a dark side. 

One of our earliest pioneers who helped start a trend in financial misgivings was local developer William S. Collins. He was the first to fall for Newport’s intoxication for development. Like many to follow, Collins was a dreamer, a visionary and a scoundrel.  Who else at the turn of the 20th century had an imagination big enough to foresee the swampy area of Snipe Island as a livable and viable community? He rearranged the sand in such a way that people could build homes and access this new island from both the tiny village of Balboa and an inland bridge.

Some bad apples WS Collins

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Submitted photo

W. S. Collins with a dredger, drawn by a cartoonist for “Out West” magazine

So why was Collins a “bad boy,” responsible for one of the most desirable zip codes in the U.S.? His project was full of empty promises at the time. There was a promise of sewers, a ferry, gas, electricity and streetlighting, along with a prominent hotel. Some of these eventually came to Balboa Island, but not due to Collins. He spent more money on his fourth wife, his mansion on Collins Island and his lifestyle than he did to satisfy the loyal customers who had paid $300 to $600 for lots. He started building Balboa Island in 1902 and by 1915, Collins was broke and left Newport Beach with a bad reputation. He died in Kansas in 1952.

Another early Newport pioneer, John Scarpa, found his way to Newport via Venice, Italy and Venice, Calif., and finally settled on Balboa. It was here that he became well known for romantic gondola cruises around the fledging harbor. These efforts at marketing the harbor included the first ever “boat parade,” which included a group of row boats adorned with Japanese lanterns. After a short period of positive notoriety, Scarpa chose to exit Newport and disappear back to Italy after a run-in with local police.   The “illegal sale of chickens and liquor” were his ultimate downfall. Not exactly a John Gotti crime wave, but one that helped John Scarpa make history in our beloved bay.

Some bad apples rum runner

Submitted photo

A rum runner illegally transported liquor during Prohibition

Another Italian of note during Prohibition was Tony “The Admiral” Cornero. He ran liquor in and out of our town with his favorite drop being along the large expanse of beach at Crystal Cove. Because it was owned by the Irvine Ranch, it was perfect for clandestine meetings with very little scrutiny by the authorities. Additionally, Judge Robert Gardner in his classic book on local history, Bawdy Balboa, talks about long lines of expensive black sedans queued up on Washington Street in downtown Balboa.  On these occasions, secret drop-offs were unnecessary, because someone in authority was turning a blind eye. Rum and whiskey came by way of boat and were delivered to the drivers of the many black sedans. Many cases went north to Los Angeles. During the Prohibition era, bootlegging liquor became a popular source of spirts, having been told that my mother lived above a neighborhood “blind tiger” or speakeasy in the 1920s.

In 1947, George (Bud) Gollum and Beulah (Louise) Overell became two of Newport’s most notorious by being accused of murdering Walter and Beulah Overell, Louise’s parents. The Overells, part of the Los Angeles high society, spent much of their time in Newport Harbor on their 47-foot powerboat ,The Mary E. On March 15, 1947, there was a large explosion killing Louise’s parents. Bud and Louise were seen near the explosion and apprehended for questioning while eating hamburgers and malts in Balboa. At first, authorities believed it was merely a propane explosion. But investigators and firemen found items that indicated dynamite. Suspicious behavior by Louise and her boyfriend, Bud, led police to find overwhelming evidence that the kids were guilty of murder. They were indicted and tried after the longest trial to that date in U.S. history. But the story does not end there. Often being compared to the OJ. Simpson trial of 1995, the Overall trial had frenzied news coverage and legal manipulation on a grand scale. The subsequent “not guilty” verdict was as unsuspected as that of OJ Simpson, and sent press and the justice system into a tailspin. The outcome has been lost in time, but because of this trial, the sale of dynamite was regulated and could no longer be bought by anyone at the local hardware stores. 

Some bad apples Louise Overell

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Courtesy of murderpedia.com

Buelah (Louise) Overell and George (Bud) Gollum, right, are shown on their way to the courtroom for attempted murder, where they heard a public reading of their torrid love letters

Newport Beach socialite Eloise Popeil lived on Harbor Island and wanted to rid herself of her husband. This 49-year-old blonde hired two men to kill her millionaire husband, Samuel, the inventor of the Veg-O-Matic. But the plot fell apart. She had a boyfriend, Dan Ayres, who was eager to share in the husband’s money. Popeil and Ayers were recorded discussing prospective murder methods on tape and offered diamond jewelry as a security deposit on a $25,000 payment to the hit men. As her defense during the trial, Popeil claimed that her husband was insanely jealous. She and Ayres were found guilty of attempted murder in 1974 and she served 19 months at the women’s prison at Frontera, was awarded a $250,000 divorce settlement in 1976 and then remarried Samuel Popeil after she got out of prison.

I was able to sit down and discuss life with another of Newport Beach’s “bad boys” – Sid Soffer – a restaurateur, gadfly and an overall pain in the ass for governments from the local level all the way to Washington. Corki Rawlins (longtime local advocate and owner of Corki’s Embroidery) had property affected by Soffer’s holdings. Rawlins and I spent an afternoon in Las Vegas with Soffer. He was not a murderer, nor a criminal in the true sense of the word. He was an anti-government fanatic. In fact, he spouted theory to the two of us that only could have come from either a true genius or someone insane. I left our three-hour meeting thinking that Soffer was closer to the former than the later. This was because of his absolute dedication to “individual rights” guaranteed to us by the Constitution of the United States. He railed upon hundreds of governmental abuses with a closing argument that nowhere in the Constitution does it mention income tax. He was truly one of a kind.

Soffer’s steakhouse on Old Newport Boulevard reflected the way he saw the world.  With a “my way or the highway” attitude, he offered no salt, no pepper and certainly no ketchup. He cooked food his way and that was it. Unfortunately, this restaurant failed, not due to a lack of loyal customers, but due to his escape to Las Vegas after the City of Costa Mesa put out a series of warrants on him. Still in existence, however, is “Sid’s Blue Beet,” which new owner Steve Lewis reminds us with a sign: “Sid doesn’t work here anymore.”

The Blue Beet is Newport’s oldest saloon and perhaps its most historical restaurant. It has a history of being a house of ill-repute, a speakeasy and having “never-ending poker games” in the back room. It is still famous for its food and its music, and is definitely a place where its walls speak the language of “Old Newport.”

One night in Cassidy’s Bar with our beloved bartender, Mary, a group of us were celebrating a birthday and watching the LA Lakers struggle to stay in the NBA finals.  Within 10 feet of us was Dennis Rodman, another of Newport’s “bad boys.” After a tumultuous life of numerous bouts with alcohol, movie star romances, a turbulent yet outstanding NBA career and far reaching political ideals that took him all the way to North Korea, he had left the Lakers to return home and party with his beach “bros.” He left behind story after story about the loud and illegal happenings at Rodman’s Reef, his home (80 police visits and a helicopter landing), on his boat Sexual Chocolate, his DUIs and the shutdown of his restaurant on PCH. Special ordinances were created to prevent future hellraisers like Rodman from disrupting the city. 

Newport Beach is as colorful as it is dynamic. After a lifetime here, it has shown me that those that maintain for the good of the town are truly accepted, but those that fall in disgrace are soon forgotten. That is, unless, one looks to the true history of the town, not just the glamorous.

~~~~~~~~

Duncan Forgey, a life-long resident of Newport Beach, now makes his home in Hawaii. He is a monthly contributor to StuNewsNewport.


Come out and support the NBPD Running Team...for a great cause

Come out and support the Newport Beach Police Department (NBPD) Running Team on Sunday, March 3 from 12 - 3 p.m. for a great cause.

NBPD will be raising funds for their team’s journey to the Baker to Vegas (B2V) Challenge Cup Relay (to be held March 23 and 24) and N.E.G.U. “Never Ever Give Up” presented by the Jessie Rees Foundation.

Taking place at Irvine Terrace Park, the event features food, carnival games and a chance to dunk a cop in the dunk tank.

Come out and support the NBPD

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The perfect way to spend a family-friendly afternoon, NBPD is asking for toy donations for N.E.G.U. to create their “JoyJars” for area hospitals’ children’s cancer wards. Suggested toy donations include: rubber ducks, bouncy balls, Hot Wheels, Play-Doh (4 oz.), 24 count crayons, crazy socks, beanies, iTunes gift cards, sports trading cards, mini play packs, mystery packs, mini LEGOS, card games, mini sports balls and playing cards.

The B2V Challenge Cup Relay is the world’s most prestigious and unique law enforcement foot race. Starting in Baker, Calif. and ending in Las Vegas, Nev., law enforcement officers from around the globe battle it out every spring for the chance to win the coveted cup trophy, persevering a grueling 120 miles of pavement through the desert.

The Jessie Rees Foundation was inspired by a 12-year-old girl, Jessie Rees, who was beautiful, athletic, smart and compassionate. She bravely fought two brain tumors for 10 months and two days. Her fight started on March 3, 2011 and ended on January 5, 2012, when she earned her angel wings. The Foundation’s mission is, “Help every kid fighting cancer to Never Ever Give Up!”

Irvine Terrace Park is located at 721 Evita Drive, Newport Beach.


48th Annual Police Appreciation Breakfast scheduled for March 29

The Commodores Club of the Newport Beach Chamber of Commerce will honor the city’s finest and hardest-working individuals at the 48th Annual Police Appreciation Breakfast, taking place Friday, March 20, from 7:15 - 9 a.m. at the Hyatt Regency John Wayne Airport Newport Beach.

The Chamber recognizes the Newport Beach Police Department in an effort to show how much residents and local businesses appreciate the work these men and women do for Newport Beach. Awards of Merit will be presented.

The event will feature special guest emcee Keith Morrison from NBC’s Dateline.

Morrison has covered a wide variety of stories on Dateline, from 9/11 to Columbine, from the peace process in the Middle East to tsunamis in the far east, from wars fought by child soldiers in Africa to the medical miracles that keep other children alive, from the struggle to Free Willy, to the battle waged over the fate of Elian Gonzales. Morrison has specialized in reporting “true mystery” stories for Dateline.

48th Annual Police Appreciation Breakfast Keith Morrison

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Courtesy of NB Chamber of Commerce

Keith Morrison of NBC’s “Dateline” is the special guest emcee for the breakfast

Year after year, hundreds of business representatives and city and county officials attend the annual Police Appreciation Breakfast to show their support. Let’s make this year’s event as memorable as the last – come witness the honoring of a special Officer, Reserve Officer, Civilian, Supervisor and Volunteer of the Year.

This event is open to the public and will sell out. Single tickets are available for $55 and include self-parking. Table sponsorships (table of 12 seats eight sponsors and four police personnel with special recognition) are $650.

To register and for more information, visit www.newportbeach.com/events/48th-annual-police-appreciation-breakfast/.

The Hyatt Regency John Wayne Airport Newport Beach is located at 4545 MacArthur Blvd., Newport Beach.


Chillin’ on the buoy

Chillin on the buy

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Photo by Derek Breaux

These sea lions were relaxing last week on the bell buoy, about 1,000 feet past the jetties of Newport Harbor


Guest Column

Grace Leung

An insider’s look at what’s going on in and around City Hall

Grace Leung

Newport Beach City Manager Grace Leung   

Our next City Council meeting is today, Tuesday, Feb. 26. The following are items that may be of interest. As always, this is not a summary of the entire agenda, which can be viewed here.

 Study Session begins at 5 p.m. with some notable recognitions: congratulations to Emily Park, 2018 Junior Lifeguard of the Year and to the Newport Harbor High Varsity Girls Soccer Team for clinching the League Championship! Great accomplishments! In addition, we will recognize the outstanding work of our Police Department in the Linda Ann O’Keefe Case. As you may have seen from the extensive media coverage, an arrest has been made in this 1973 cold case murder, a culmination of significant efforts by our staff and several law enforcement agencies. 

Also, for study session, staff will provide an update on the City’s water system with a focus on our groundwater basin. There will also be an update on the recent emergency waterline break on Jamboree Road (between Bayside and Coast Hwy). This was a significant break that required road closure and staff and contractors working long hours to repair. 

The Regular Session begins at 7 p.m. and the following are items of note on the consent calendar:    

Following extensive negotiations, agreements have been reached with the Newport Beach City Employees Association and the Newport Beach Professional and Technical Employee Association. The tentative agreements address the negotiated wages, benefits, and other terms and conditions of employment for the 172 employees in these two associations. Details of the agreements including costs, are attached to the staff report. The agreements will be presented for adoption at the March 12 Council meeting. 

A contract amendment with Host Compliance is recommended to continue to provide online short-term rental audit service for the City. This service assists our staff in the enforcement of our short-term rental ordinance by identifying unpermitted listings across the world’s 54 largest vacation rental websites. 

Items of note for Public Hearing and Current Business include: 

The applicant for a minor use permit for tattoo services at 2721 East Coast Highway, Suite 104, has appealed the Planning Commission’s denial of the permit. The City Council will hear the appeal at this meeting. 

Hoag Memorial Hospital Presbyterian (Hoag) is requesting an amendment of an existing development agreement to extend the term an additional ten years. Staff is negotiating with Hoag but needs more time before the current development agreement expires. Therefore, a six-month extension is recommended to allow additional time for negotiations to be completed. 

At the February 12 Council Meeting, the City Council directed staff to return with a resolution to amend the membership of the General Plan Update Steering Committee from five to seven resident members. Following City Council approval at this meeting, the application period will open on February 27 and applications will be accepted through noon on March 6. Any applications received, as well as the 34 applications already on file, will be considered by the ad-hoc Appointments Committee. The Mayor will then recommend two additional committee members to the City Council for its review and confirmation.      

About a year ago, City Council directed staff to consider changes to the municipal code to address residential street parking impacted by the ongoing construction occurring in residential neighborhoods. Over the past year, staff has discussed ways to address this issue with community groups and local builders and implemented a pilot program to enhance enforcement. As a result of this outreach, several changes are proposed for City Council consideration: restricting loud noise construction activity on Saturdays between Memorial Day and Labor Day; require a temporary project information sign on jobsite fences; require the submittal of a parking management plan for new residential construction; and limiting the length of time a construction project may take.    

As a reminder, public comment is welcome at the City Council meeting. The public can comment on any item on the agenda. If you cannot attend the meeting and/or want to communicate with the City Council directly on an item, the following email address gets to all of them: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it..

The Week in Review is provided this week. In case you missed it, the latest edition can be found here [and also in Stu News this issue].

 Thank you for reading. Feedback is appreciated so please don’t hesitate to ask a question or offer a comment. 

Grace K. Leung

City Manager

City of Newport Beach

This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

949.644.3001


Save the Date: Youth Track Meet of Champions
April 26 at new location

Attention kids! Registration is open...so sign up now for the 2019 Youth Track Meet of Champions in Memory of Frank E. Anderson, taking place Friday, April 26. Check in takes place at the stadium entrance from 2:30 - 4 p.m., with Opening Ceremonies beginning promptly at 4 p.m. Presented by the City of Newport Beach Recreation & Senior Services Department and Newport-Balboa Rotary Club, this year it is happening at a new location – Davidson Field at Newport Harbor High School.

Save the Date kids running

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Courtesy of City of Newport Beach

Youngsters who were born between 2004 and 2012 are eligible to participate, and may enter a maximum of three events: two track and one field or two field and one track.

The school that earns the most points for its students’ performance wins the Spirit Cup. (Only NMUSDF teams and schools will be eligible.) In addition to the Youth Track Meet, participants placing first through sixth will qualify to represent Newport Beach in the Orange County Champions Meet on Sunday, May 19. (Location and time TBA.) From there, athletes may move to the Southern California Track Championships held on Sunday, June 2 at Downey High School.

Registration fees: Residents – before April 12, $10; after April 13, $15 (online registration closes April 24). Non-Residents – before April 12, $13; after April 13, $18 (online registration closes April 23). Registration of the day of the meet will only be accepted for residents. Club teams must submit full team roster in Excel, individual waivers and register by April 10.

For more information, email This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it., visit www.newportbeachca.gov/sports, or call 949.644.3151.

Newport Harbor High School is located at 600 Irvine Ave., Newport Beach.


Take Five: Meet Joe Robinson, NHHS Latin teacher

By AMY SENK

Joe Robinson began teaching in the Newport-Mesa Unified School District in 1967, then two years later moved to Newport Harbor High School (NHHS), where he teaches art history and Latin – the only Latin offered in the district. I caught up with him to ask about how things have changed over the years, and why learning Latin is as important as ever. 

Take Five Joe Robinson

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Courtesy of Joe Robinson

Joe Robinson, NHHS Latin teacher

Q: You first started working at Newport Harbor High School in 1969. What sticks out in your mind about how students were then, versus today?

A:  I think high school students today are actually more serious, possibly because of the intense pressure they face trying to get into college. They are also more accepting and open-minded. They are, however, less polite than the teens of the ‘60s, perhaps reflecting the overall decline of courtesy in our culture.

Q: You and your son are both teachers at the school. What do you think made him want to follow in your footsteps?

A: My son had no intention of being a teacher when he was younger. After spending some time as an intern for a large corporation, he knew that was not for him. Upon graduating college, he realized he needed a job, so he signed up to be a substitute teacher. His first assignment was a four-week gig teaching English, not his major. After two weeks of analyzing Hamlet with his students he came to my classroom and asked me, “Dad, why didn’t you tell me teaching was so cool!” He went on to get his credential and wound up teaching history at Newport Harbor. He is an amazing teacher, so I couldn’t be prouder, even when students remark that he is better than me. 

Q: If someone asked, “Why take Latin,” what would you tell them?

A: Why take Latin? The clichés are quite true – learning Latin truly enhances your knowledge of English. But I try to take it to a deeper level. I tell my students they are taking a linguistics class as well as Latin. I want them to see something bigger – that language is the best way we humans have to express what’s going on in our brains. Language is a unique tool for understanding how other people think. By learning a highly inflected language like Latin, students get to see a different way to use and arrange words to express ideas. My hope is that while learning their own language better as they acquire a new one, they also become better thinkers. 

Q: What other local high schools offer Latin? 

A: None in our district, but Latin is huge in this state among the more academic high schools. University High School in Irvine, perhaps the highest ranked public high school in the county, has two full-time Latin teachers. Many middle schools in the nation have begun offering Latin. Every year in California about 1,500 toga-clad Latin students attend the state Latin convention. Their boisterous enthusiasm speaks volumes.

Q: What is your favorite Latin expression – is there a quote you love and use all the time?

A: As a young man I interpreted the term “carpe diem” (seize the day) as a somewhat shallow exhortation to “party like there’s no tomorrow.” But getting older, and having children and now grandchildren, have made me see the more profound aspects of this saying. One of my grandsons loves playing with his collection of toy trucks. I have begun to realize that when he comes to me and says “Papa, play twucks with me,” that at that moment, this is the most important thing in the world to him, and that I need to treat his request with the same importance as he does. This also applies to conversations with my wife, friends and other adults. As a teacher, I spend my days with teenagers who sometimes just need someone who will listen to them carefully. When a student lingers at my desk after class, or pops by at lunch, I need to be aware that this might be a time when they are desperate for my full attention. In a world overflowing with cell phones and other distractions, learning to focus completely on that person in front of me is maybe the most important thing I can do at that moment. Doing this in our modern world is getting harder as it gets more important. So yes, carpe diem.

Editor’s Note: Joe Robinson teachers three Latin classes, totaling about 90 students.


Pet of the WeekDog and Cat print

Stu News Newport is delighted to be working with the Newport Beach Animal Shelter to help get the word out in search of loving homes for pets that deserve a warm, nurturing environment and a place to call “home.”

Pet of the Week 2.26.19

Click on photo for a larger image

Courtesy of Newport Beach Animal Shelter

MEET KENDRA

Kendra, an absolutely gorgeous domestic, long-haired, white kitty with mesmerizing emerald eyes, is still looking for a forever loving home. She is very social and loves interacting with everyone. Kendra is a bit cat selective, so she should either be slowly introduced into her new environment that includes another cat, or would do wonderfully fine as an only cat that gets all of the attention. She loves dry food and is pretty particular with her palate as far as her wet food preferences go. She seems to enjoy the fish-flavored pâté best. She keeps her living quarters remarkably clean and tends to enjoy spending her day hanging out and just being mellow. Kendra is definitely a house cat that will require combing every few weeks. Her fur is astonishingly beautiful.

If you are interested in finding out more about Kendra or any other animals up for adoption, call 949.644.3656 or email Valerie Schomburg at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.. The Newport Beach Animal Shelter is located at 20302 Riverside Drive, Newport Beach. It is open daily from 11 a.m. to 4 p.m.

Adoption costs at the shelter:

–Dogs - $130

–Puppies - $150

–Cats - $90

–Kittens - $110

To find out how you can help support the shelter, visit www.nbpd.org and click on “Our Animal Shelter” to view the wish list. The shelter can always use food & treats; new toys; grooming, hygiene & comfort products; as well as laundry soap, dish soap, paper towels, sponges, scrub pads and lint rollers. If you are interested in volunteering, you can fill out and sign the application on the website.


Fair Game

By TOM JOHNSON

Dwyer out abruptly at Segerstrom Center for the Arts

Fair Game Tom JohnsonLast Friday, February 22, it was reported that Segerstrom Center for the Arts President Terrence Dwyer was suddenly out. No reasons have been offered up at this point other than to say, “he’ll pursue other opportunities.”

Dwyer served in that position since April of 2006.

A search will be underway for a replacement. In the interim, Executive Vice President Judy Morr and CFO Brian Finck will share the helm while that process is completed.

• • •

Tonight’s City Council meeting will amend the membership for the General Plan Update Steering Committee from five to seven resident members. Or that’s the plan, in any case.

There are already 34 applications still on file from the first go-round and anyone new can apply to add their name to that list from February 27 through noon on March 6.

Then, the mayor will recommend two additional committee members to the council for review and confirmation.

The best way to find info is to go through the city clerk’s office.

Rumor has it a letter writing campaign supporting the additions of former city council candidate Tim Stoaks and gadfly Jim Mosher to the committee is underway. We’ll see what happens.

• • •

The Newport Beach Planning Commission approved the 350-unit, five-story Newport Crossings mixed-use complex last week. The project, which will include some 80 apartments designated as affordable housing, will be located several blocks from John Wayne Airport and will replace a shopping center area.

Also included will be retail space, a restaurant and small park.

• • •

This in from our friends over at Sherman Library & Gardens. They’ve given their 22-year-old Private Gardens Tour a new name. Okay, I’ll bite, what is it? Of course, it’ll be the “Newport Beach Garden Tour presented by Sherman Library & Gardens.”

Clever, I must say.

Anyway, as Sherman Gardens is promising, it’ll be the “same great tour, same great day, just a great new name!”

So you can plan for this year and the years to come, it’ll always fall on the Saturday before Mother’s Day. This year it will be held on May 11 from 10 a.m. - 3 p.m. Tickets go on sale March 1 here

Here’s what you’ll enjoy – a stroll through seven private gardens, each featuring an artist painting in the garden throughout the day. It also includes lunch, raffle prizes, silent auction, musicians and an after-party at Sherman Gardens following the tour. 

Proceeds will support an entrance redesign on Pacific Coast Hwy.   

• • •

I find it interesting that Marco Antonio Rodriguez Arrango, 23, of San Marcos, listed his occupation as bank teller following his recent arrest with the Newport Beach Police Department. Arrango was arrested last week in the robbery of the Citibank in the Fashion Island area and suspected in several others.

He obviously knew what he was doing or apparently thought so.


Photograph 51 comes to SCR

On March 3 - 24, Photograph 51 graces the Julia Argyros Stage at South Coast Repertory ( SCR). Performance times and ticket prices vary.

Synopsis: Rosalind Franklin was a British pioneer in science in the early 1950s, yet her groundbreaking role in the discovery of DNA’s double helix structure is still often overlooked. Based on a true story, Photograph 51 presents an intriguing portrait of a complex, courageous woman making her way in a male-dominated field. While rival teams of researchers compete for a breakthrough, Franklin focused and unbending, is locked in a race of her own. A hit in the West End, it was proclaimed “A triumph” by the Telegraph.

Photograph 51

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Courtesy of SCR

The play is written by Anna Ziegler and directed by Kimberly Senior.

South Coast Repertory is located at 655 Town Center Drive, Costa Mesa. For more information and tickets, visit www.scr.org.


Segerstrom Center welcomes back comedian Brian Regan

Acclaimed comedian Brian Regan returns to Segerstrom Center for the Arts for one night only on Friday, April 5 at 7:30 p.m. in Segerstrom Hall.

Critics, fans and fellow comedians agree: Brian Regan is one of the most respected comedians in the country! Declared by Vanity Fair as “the funniest stand-up alive,” Regan made history in 2015 with his special Brian Regan, Live from Radio City Music Hall – the first live broadcast of a stand-up special in Comedy Central’s history. His non-stop theater tour visiting close to 100 cities each year fills the most beautiful venues across North America.

Segerstrom Center welcomes back

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Photo by Friedman Bergman

Courtesy of scfta.org

Comedian Brian Regan comes to Segerstrom Hall on April 5

Orange County comedy fans are in for a treat when the celebrated comic returns to the Segerstrom Center this spring.

Single tickets start at $54.50 and are available at www.scfta.org, at the Box Office at 600 Town Center Drive in Costa Mesa, or by calling 714.556.2787. For inquiries about group ticket savings of 10 or more, call the Group Services office at 714.755.0236.


Sage Hill School gears up for 2nd annual GEMfest

Sage Hill School has announced the return of GEMfest, a celebration-like conference that aims to educate girls in grades 6 - 8 (and their parents) about empowerment, self-esteem and independence, and will host the second annual event on campus on Saturday, March 2 from 9 a.m. - 2 p.m.

Back by popular demand, this ticketed event will feature accomplished guest speakers, panels and hands-on workshops that cover a variety of topics including nutrition, wellness, social media, public speaking, habits for a healthy life and more.

Sage Hill School two girls

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Courtesy of Sage Hill School

(L-R) Alex Losey, YouTube influencer and Eliza Feffer, co-president of GEMfest

“GEMfest is organized and run by 13 Sage Hill students who are part of the school’s GEM Team (Girls Empowerment Movement),” said Torrey Olins, director of Communications and Marketing for Sage Hill. “Based on what this group has observed in their own lives and what they wish they’d known in middle school, the GEM Team decided on this year’s theme of ‘Emotional and Physical Health & Wellness.’”

The event will kick off with a message from keynote speaker, Kamie Crawford, who is an activist for diversity and body positivity and former Miss Teen USA 2010. Then, attendees can choose to attend one of two panels: Healthy Habits for Middle School Girls or A Mindful Approach to Social Media.

Following the panel discussions, student attendees can partake in a variety of hands-on workshops while parents and chaperones attend a special session led by experts on how to help middle school girls thrive physically, emotionally, and academically during this time in their lives and beyond.

GEMfest 2019 will conclude with a message from keynote speaker, Victoria Garrick, USC Volleyball player and body-image advocate.

Sage Hill School GEMfest committee

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The GEMfest Committee

While learning about the importance of maintaining a balanced lifestyle, GEMfest ticket holders are invited to enjoy lunch, snacks and a special photo pop-up courtesy of The Confetti Project.

This year’s list of panelists and workshops include:

Panelists:

(Healthy Habits)

Sadie Radinsky, 17-year-old food blogger

Aurora Kaye, graduate student at USC Rossier School of Education, youth advocate and Sage Hill alumna

Kelsey Rose, OB/GYN at UCLA and Sage Hill alumna

Daisy Renteria, head Trainer at Orangetheory Fitness and American Ninja Warrior contestant

(Social Media)

Alexa Losey, YouTube influencer

Taylor Hiskey, social media director for Urban Decay Cosmetics

Kenzie Piper, social Media influencer

Krissy Saleh, photographer/social media influencer

Workshops:

–Coding

–Creativity for Self-Care

–Hula Hooping for Fun and Exercise

–My Story, My Way

–The Confetti Project

–Public Speaking

–Yoga for Students

–Adult Workshop for parents

In addition, every attendee will leave with a swag bag filled with gifts from sponsors including Honest Beauty, Lola, Polished Perfect by Twila True, Patchology and Urban Decay Cosmetics.

“The most wonderful element of this event is the impact that it has on young girls in our community,” said Head of School for Sage Hill, Patricia Merz,. “We recognize the importance of giving middle school-age students the opportunity to meet like-minded peers and learn from inspiring and approachable female mentors so that they can make positive changes in their life, school, the community and the world.

Event tickets* are limited with two options available for purchase, including $15 tickets for students and $25 tickets for parents, available online here.

*Ticket Giveaway: GEMfest is holding a ticket giveaway to the March 2 conference for Stu News readers. Parents/guardians of a middle school girl (grades 6 - 8) who would like her to participate in GEMfest may send an email to Miki Akil at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. by Tuesday, Feb. 26 at 5 p.m. PST. The first four readers to reach out will each receive a complimentary ticket to attend the conference.

For more information about this event, visit www.gemfestoc.com.

Sage Hill School is located at 20402 Newport Coast Drive, Newport Coast.


Pacific Symphony’s Café Ludwig pianist to perform at Samueli Theater

On Sunday, Feb. 24 at 3 p.m., pianist and host of Pacific Symphony’s Café Ludwig, Orli Shaham, performs the world premiere of David Robertson’s “A Goldberg Conjecture.” This new version of Bach’s Goldberg Variations reimagines this famous solo harpsichord work for piano and string quartet.

The pianist Orli Shaham, curator and host of the popular chamber music series in Costa Mesa, said she was looking for a different kind of entry point into this seminal work by J.S. Bach. “It’s such an incredible piece,” she said. “Every pianist wants to perform it. And, pretty much every pianist has performed it.”

Pacific Symphonys Cafe LudwigShaham felt that the combination of piano and string quartet was one of maximum versatility, and so she turned to David Robertson to create this new adaptation for her and selected members of the string section of Pacific Symphony. Why him? While Robertson is internationally known as a conductor, he has long had an interest in writing music – even before he triple-majored in composition, conducting and French horn at the Royal Academy of Music in London. Over the past few years, he has created a number of transcriptions for the interactive concert series for children, Orli Shaham’s “Bach Yard” (formerly “Baby Got Bach”).

“A Goldberg Conjecture” is beyond a mere transcription of Bach’s music, It is actually a hybrid form,” Robertson said. “There are places where I allow Bach to be just him, and then there are moments where I really get in there and mess things up. It’s an enlargement of elements that I feel are fascinating within the piece.” Robertson’s title is a play on words of the “Goldbach Conjecture,” an 18th century mathematical treatise.

Shaham is delighted with the way David Robertson takes advantage of the modern keyboard and its reach in this music. “He’s taken into account how different sounds and timbres affect each other. In some cases, he’s put variations on top of one another to be played simultaneously,” she said. “He has created a fascinating sound world employing various string techniques in combination with the piano.” 

The premiere includes just half of the variations from Bach’s original music. Robertson is still working on his ‘conjecture’ of the entire Goldberg Variations, so Café Ludwig audiences have something to look forward to.

For tickets and more details, click here.

Samueli Theater at Segerstrom Center for the Arts is located at 600 Town Center Drive, Costa Mesa.


OC teens take a stand in ending the cycle of relationship violence

Human Options, an Orange County-based nonprofit dedicated to ending the cycle of relationship violence, hosted a “Love Shouldn’t Hurt” Teen Dating Violence Conference on February 16, during National Teen Dating Violence Awareness and Prevention Month. Held at Newport Harbor High School, the event focused on raising awareness on teen relationship violence and digital safety.

While many are celebrating love in February, one in three teens in the U.S. experiences dating violence, which is more than any other age group. The conference was designed to get students talking about healthy relationships, destructive gender stereotypes, warning signs of dating abuse, and help them learn safe ways to address occurrences of abuse in their own lives.

OC teens take a stand two teens

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Submitted photos

Teens attend the fourth annual “Love Shouldn’t Hurt” conference” at Newport Harbor High School

Celebrating its fourth year, the annual “Love Shouldn’t Hurt: Teen and Parent Conference” was dedicated to promoting awareness about healthy relationships while increasing communication between teens and parents or caring adults. The day included parent and teen workshops, a community resource fair with 15 local agencies sharing about services and resources, activities for younger siblings, swag, opportunity drawing prizes and an opening performance by a teen from the Costa Mesa Family Resource Center Youth Action Council.

This year’s workshops included the importance of adults and teens knowing the facts surrounding digital relationship violence. Defined as the use of technology to bully, harass, stalk or intimidate a partner, this can include constant texts and phone calls, using social media or GPS to track locations, stealing passwords, pressure to send explicit photos and videos and sending negative messages.

OC teens take a stand teenage statistics plaque

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One in three adolescents in the U.S. is a victim of physical, sexual, emotional, or verbal abuse from a dating partner and, according to the CDC, nearly 1.5 million high school students nationwide experience physical abuse from a dating partner in a single year. By empowering teens with the education and tools they need to be advocates and role models for their peers, Human Options is aiming to shift the culture of dating violence and striving to break the ending of relationship violence.

If you’re interested in attending a “Love Shouldn’t Hurt Conference,” Human Options is also hosting one on Saturday, March 2 at Gerald P. Carr Intermediate in Santa Ana, featuring workshops for parents and teens, a complimentary breakfast and lunch, and children’s activities for younger siblings and more.

For more information about Human Options, visit www.humanoptions.org.


You Must Remember This: Orange County Illustrated, January 1976

By NANCY GARDNER

I recently came across a couple of old issues of Orange County Illustrated, a magazine published in the ‘60s and ‘70s. Each month it featured an original work of art on the cover* and original illustrations inside including cartoons by Virgil Partch (VIP) and others.

You Must Remember This Orange County Illustrated

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Photos courtesy of Nancy Gardner

“Orange County Illustrated,” January 1976 cover art by Stella Popowski

An interesting feature was “The County Calendar,” nearly 20 columns of events: Footlights, Exhibitions, Films (festivals and special showings), Music, Special Events, Sports, Lectures and Seminars, Meetings (Datsun Owners Club anyone?) and Special Attractions (Knott’s Berry Farm, admission $2.25, children $1). This was in addition to the “Gallery Guide” that provided a comprehensive listing of commercial art galleries. That’s a lot of service from one publication which also included a section on wines and spirits and one on restaurant reviews. In looking at that section, it reminded me of how much Newport Center/Fashion Island has changed over the years, not just in stores (J. C. Penney’s, Robinson’s, Broadway, etc.) but restaurants as well. I don’t even remember some of those listed. Chicago Gaslight. Apadana. The first seems decidedly down market for today’s Newport Center, particularly as the magazine only gave it two stars out of a possible six. As for the second – belly dancing at Newport Center? Really? I do remember Bob Burns, a longtime mainstay and the Velvet Turtle (four stars both), but this must have been before the Ritz, which isn’t listed. 

You Must Remember This Orange County Blackbeards

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Did Blackbeard’s near the airport welcome pirates?

There were a number of other restaurants that didn’t strike a memory chord – the pirate-themed Blackbeard’s (four star), the Beggar’s Opera (three), Baxter’s Street (three) and Harry’s New York Bar and Grill (four), but there were others I remembered, but which have since closed. Matteo’s in Corona del Mar got a five-star rating and a note that it was a good place for celebrity watching, which seems an odd credit for a place in Corona del Mar. There was Bobby McGee’s at PCH and Bayside. The magazine gave it three stars, but I remember it primarily as a place to dance and meet people. The magazine granted one six-star designation. This was given to Ambrosia in Lido Village, an establishment which really raised the local bar in food preparation. Its closing was much lamented at the time, but that was before Newport became such a gourmet garden with all sorts of highly regarded restaurants, food fairs and even our own local winery. 

You Must Remember This Orange County Beggars Opera

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Beggar’s Opera restaurant featured wine, beer and vittles

What Orange County Illustrated was not was a social magazine. There are no pictures of people attending a fundraiser, no effusive coverage of some gala. In fact, there is a rather ironic tone underlying many of the articles, particularly a regular feature, “The Duke of Orange,” which rambles over a variety of county subjects with a somewhat jaundiced view of government: “A rather ridiculous example of bureaucracy at work is...the county’s proposed final budget. It’s fairy tales time again...” It’s hard to imagine Coast Magazine or any of the other glossy publications around today taking that particular note, which is wise. When covering social events, irony is not appreciated. 

*Editor’s Note on the cover artist: Stella Popowski (1931-2008) was a prolific painter, mainly known for abstract and atomic designs. She was also a well-respected jewelry designer. In the U.S., she was active in Los Angeles, Berkeley and San Francisco. Popowski also played a big part in the modernist jewelry movement in Taxco, Mexico. Her jewelry and other works of art are in private collections throughout the world.

~~~~~~~~

Nancy Gardner, former Mayor of Newport Beach, longtime resident and daughter of Judge Robert Gardner, is a regular contributor to StuNewsNewport.


Leadership Tomorrow Alumni mixer on March 12

Leadership Tomorrow alumni are gathering together for a networking mixer to mingle on Tuesday, March 12 from 5:30 - 7 p.m. at Lighthouse Bayview Café in Marina Park. If you have experienced Leadership Tomorrow, come relax and reconnect with other alumni.

Admission is $10 and includes complimentary appetizers and a no host bar. Metered parking is free after 6 p.m. (If you have a boat, you can tie it up at the public dock.) The Lighthouse Café will provide picturesque harbor views!

Leadership Tomorrow Lighthouse Cafe

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Courtesy of lighthousenb.com

If you would like to attend, RSVP to www.leadershiptomorrow.org/alumni-mixer.

Celebrating its 30th anniversary, Leadership Tomorrow provides concerned citizens with a nine-month program for one full business day each month, whereby class participants focus on a workshop dedicated to one aspect of the local community (Newport Beach, Costa Mesa and Irvine). To find out more about the programs, view alumni classes and read testimonials, visit the website at www.leadershiptomorrow.org.

Lighthouse Bayview Café is located in Marina Park at 1600 W. Balboa Blvd., Newport Beach.


Fifth graders attend FiiN (Fostering Interest in Nature) Camp in Upper Newport Bay 

By LANA JOHNSON

The Newport Beach Recreation & Senior Services Department (NB Rec. Services) partnered with two Newport Beach-based organizations – Camp James and Newport Bay Conservancy (NBC) – to launch its inaugural year of Fostering Interest in Nature – FiiN, beginning this week in Upper Newport Bay.

From Tuesday, Feb. 19 through today, Friday, Feb. 22, NB Rec. Services hosted its first class of 33 fifth graders. This kicked off the eight-week season that will host Title 1 school students from throughout Orange County for a four day, three-night science camp. Students experienced camping in tents, tide pool exploration at the Back Bay Science Center, hiking the educational trails in Big Canyon, water safety with our lifeguards, a boat tour of the harbor and trying their hand at kayaking through the scenic and history-rich Newport Back Bay.

Fifth graders attend FiiN NB Lifeguard Andy Hayes

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Photos by Lana Johnson

Newport Beach Lifeguard Andy Hayes demonstrates water safety

There are a total of six schools participating in the program from Newport Mesa and the Santa Ana Unified School Districts this first year: Fremont Elementary (SAUSD), Heninger Elementary (SAUSD), Diamond Elementary (SAUSD), Romero-Cruz Elementary (SAUSD, two camp weeks), Sonora Elementary (NMUSD, two camp weeks) and Walker Elementary (SAUSD). Camp dates are: 2/19-2/22, 2/26-3/1, 3/5-3/8, 3/19-3/22, 3/26-3/29, 4/2-4/5, 4/9-4/12 and 4/16-4/19. The schools were chosen back in September 2018, based on responses to an email sent out to all Title I schools in SAUSD and NMUSD.

According to Derek Breaux, recreation supervisor of NB Rec. Services, who is overseeing the camp program, “We chose fifth grade, because not only does it coincide with what they are learning in school (Physical Activity, Growth and Development, Personal and Community Health, Earth/Life/Physical Sciences, and incorporation of the Education and Environment Initiative, to name a few), they are also reaching an age where we felt they would be comfortable branching out and staying a few nights away from home.

Fifth graders attend FiiN Collecting plankton

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Campers collecting phytoplankton and zooplankton in Upper Newport Bay

“Next year, we aim to reach out to other school districts in order to give everyone in Orange County a chance to send their class. We allow a maximum of 40 students each week, meaning we will be serving approximately 320 students this first year. In the future, we do have the capacity to serve anywhere from 350 - 400 per season. We will start recruiting schools for our 2020 program immediately after year one is complete.”

So, how does the FiiN partnership shake out? According to Breaux, Camp James runs the base camp and overnight portions of FiiN, including staffing the tents overnight, running nightly campfire programs and overseeing breakfast and dinner on site. Newport Bay Conservancy oversees the educational portion of camp, staying with the students throughout the day and leading them on the varied activities. 

Fifth graders attend FiiN Viewing plankton

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Students view the plankton they collected under the microscope

This week the youngsters were kept extremely busy: On Tuesday, following setting up their belongings in one of two huge tents, staff conducted ice breaking games. Newport Beach Lifeguard Andy Hayes came out to teach the importance of water safety. Time was set aside to write postcards, which were mailed to the youngsters’ addresses so when they arrived back home they could see what their thoughts were about being at FiiN. Lunch was served by Newport Dunes staff at the Back Bay Bistro, which created a special menu. (Throughout the week, some meals were camp-friendly, allowing the youth to take boxed lunches on the trails if need be, while other kid favorite-meals like tacos and spaghetti were made right at the Bistro.)

After lunch, NBC naturalists took the group to the Back Bay Science Center, where they had hands-on experience with tide pool creatures in the touch tank; performed various science activities in the teaching lab, such as collecting phytoplankton and zooplankton from the Upper Newport Bay (UNB) and then observing the plant and animal creatures under the microscope; walked the trail with binoculars to view birds in UNB (including seeing a nesting osprey); and learned about fresh and saltwater, and how the two types come together at UNB as an estuary. A surprise of the day was seeing a dolphin frolicking in the Back Bay.

Fifth graders attend FiiN Touch tank

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Youngsters experienced the touch tank that was filled with a variety of inhabitants, from lobsters and octopuses to sea urchins, sea stars and anemones

Wednesday was Big Canyon day, where the students hiked from Camp James to the Big Canyon trail system, stopping at educational stations that taught them about native and non-native plants, Native Americans and various other topics that are specific to Newport Bay. Thursday was spent on the water, starting with a boat tour of Newport Harbor, aboard the Cool Breeze, that was donated and captained by the staff from the Fun Zone Boat Company. Then, the students were dropped back off at Camp James where they tried their skills at kayaking and orienteering, which was the first for many of them. For dinner, the Camp James staff cooked up hot dogs and s’mores with the campers, allowing them to experience cooking over an open fire right on the beach.

Friday brought an end to camp activities, where the fifth graders reflected on what they had learned before eating lunch and getting back on the bus to head for home. What an eventful week!

Fifth graders attend FiiN Colin discusses artifacts

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Photos by Derek Breaux

Instructor Colin Robinson discusses Native American artifacts found at Big Canyon

Thanks to funding made available by the City of Newport Beach and the Lido House Hotel project, for youngsters who attend the camp, their schools only pay the cost of the transportation. Funding was required as a condition of approval of a Coastal Development Permit by the California Coastal Commission for the Lido House Hotel back in October 2015. Pursuant to the terms of the ground lease with RD Olson, the City contributed $975,000 and RD Olson contributed $440,232. These funds are earmarked for the program, allowing FiiN to run for the next 10 years!

For many of the students, this will be their first visit to the beach in addition to the unique hands-on activities planned for them. With an emphasis on marine ecology, FiiN provides an outdoor experience they will never forget, and at the same time fosters stewards of our precious resources. 

Fifth graders attend FiiN Dolphin in UNB by Derek Breaux cropped

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This dolphin was a surprise visitor in Upper Newport Bay

If you would like more information on the FiiN program, contact Derek Breaux, NB Recreation Supervisor, at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it., and visit the City’s website here.

Check out more photos from FiiN camp below


Time is running out on the Christmas Boat Parade online auction...

Time is running out, but you can still get in on the bidding on more than $30,000 worth of items at the Newport Beach Christmas Boat Parade online auction. Bidding closes tonight, Friday, Feb. 22 at 7 p.m....so hurry!

Get some great auction items while supporting the Newport Beach Christmas Boat Parade and Chamber of Commerce.

Time is running out

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Courtesy of NB Chamber of Commerce

Among the more than 60 items available are:

–Hotels and Getaways

–Dining Opportunities

–Entertainment and Shopping

–Harbor, Boating and Cruises

–Items for the Home

–Sports

–Wine

–Health, Fitness and Beauty

Bidding is easy. Just take a look at the items at https://bit.ly/2IdcuDR. If you see something you like, you can quickly and securely register with your credit card and start bidding. If there is an item you know you want, just use the “Buy It Now” button and that item will no longer allow other bids and it is yours!

You can even set up a “proxy” bid amount to bid for you in case you get outbid up to a maximum amount you set. 

Any questions? Call the Newport Beach Chamber at 949.729.4400.

Happy Bidding!


Sherman Library & Gardens to hold free Hollywoodland lecture

On Wednesday, March 6 at 7 p.m., Sherman Library & Gardens will hold a special lecture: “Hooray for Hollywoodland: 96 Year History of the Hollywood Sign.”

In 1923, Moses H. Sherman, namesake of Sherman Library & Gardens, partnered with several associates to create an upscale hillside housing development named Hollywoodland. Built as a temporary billboard to advertise the development, the Hollywood sign now ranks as one of Los Angeles’ top tourist attractions and one of the most iconic images in the world.

Sherman Library Hollywoodland

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Courtesy of Sherman Library & Gardens

Historian Mary Mallory presents the fascinating story of how this emblem of glamour and opportunity has come to symbolize the city in which it resides. This is a free event.

To RSVP, call 949.673.0033 or visit www.slgardens.org.

Sherman Library & Gardens is located at 2647 E. Coast Highway, Corona del Mar.


Police Files

Arrest made in cold case murder of 11-year-old Linda O’Keefe, additional witnesses sought

James Alan Neal, 72, of Colorado Springs, was arrested Tuesday, Feb. 19, in the Newport Beach cold case murder of 11-year-old Linda Ann O’Keefe from 1973.

The Orange County District Attorney’s Office along with the Newport Beach Police Department announced at a joint press conference on Wednesday, Feb. 20 at 10 a.m. that James Alan Neal was identified as the suspect in the abduction, sexual molestation, and murder of 11-year-old Linda Ann O’Keefe, after a tireless and exhaustive investigation that lasted for more than 45 years.

Arrest made Neal now Arrest made Neal then

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Courtesy of OCDA and NBPD

(L-R) James Alan Neal (now), James Alan Neal aka James Albert Layton Jr. (vintage photo)

At the news conference, Orange County District Attorney Todd Spitzer said, “We believe he (Neal) did this beyond a reasonable doubt.”

Neal was arrested Tuesday at 6:29 a.m. in “unremarkable” fashion. He is being held in Colorado and has yet to waive extradition. He will be charged with murder and two additional special circumstances, including kidnapping and lewd and lascivious acts.

Arrest made Linda

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Courtesy of NBPD

Linda O’Keefe, died July 1973, age 11

Spitzer said, “The significant arrest for the brutal sexual assault and murder of Linda O’Keefe is an affirmation to never give up on solving cold cases. The community resolve for justice, cooperation of local law enforcement, and the strategic use of investigative tools like DNA are what helped find answers for this family and community. Our office will work tirelessly to ensure justice is served in a court of law.”

Arrest made Jon Lewis

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Photo by Tom Johnson

Newport Beach Police Chief Jon Lewis addresses the media

Newport Beach Police Chief Jon Lewis said, “For 45 years, the Newport Beach Police Department continued to search for Linda’s killer. Generations of investigators worked on her case. We never gave up.”

O’Keefe was abducted while walking home from Lincoln School in Newport Beach on July 6, 1973. Her body was discovered in the Back Bay the following morning.

DNA from the investigation site was put into the Codis DNA system but failed to turn up any match. Then, last month, investigators “got a hit through indication genealogy DNA” leading them to Neal. NBPD detectives broke the case through genetic genealogy techniques after receiving an investigatory lead from FamilyTreeDNA’s Gene-by-Gene, LTD. laboratory of Houston, Texas with further assistance from genetic genealogist CeCe Moore of Parabon NanoLabs, Inc. of Reston, Virginia.

From there, Spitzer said, “It was good old fashion police work in gathering additional DNA” to solidify the case. Neal is looking at “life without the possibility of parole,” with “the death penalty as a consideration.”

The Newport Beach Police Department launched an extremely detailed Twitter campaign earlier last year focusing on the O’Keefe cold case. “The Twitter campaign created an awareness around the world,” Lewis said.

Authorities said Neal lived in the Newport Beach area back in 1973 working in general construction. Shortly after the murder his family relocated to Chicago. Subsequently, he moved to Florida and switched his name from James Alan George Layton following what Spitzer called “an incident” there.

Newport Beach Police contacted O’Keefe’s two surviving family members, sisters, who said the news was “bittersweet” and another “reminder of what happened.”

Orange County Senior Deputy District Attorney Matt Murphy will prosecute the case.

Additionally, the Orange County District Attorney’s Office and the Newport Beach Police Department have released a vintage photo of James Alan Neal, also known as James Albert Layton Jr., to seek potential additional witnesses who may have seen Neal at or around the time of the murder (in 1973). The exact date of this photo is unknown, however it was likely taken during the time period of the late 1970s to the early 1980s.

The Newport Beach Police Department asks that anyone who has further information concerning this investigation call the NBPD Cold Case Tip Line at 949.644.3669.

NBPD arrests suspected Citibank robber

Yesterday, Thursday, Feb. 21, the Newport Beach Police Department served a search warrant and arrested Marco Antonio Rodriguez Arango, a 23-year-old resident of San Marcos, for the crime of bank robbery. Arrango was the outstanding suspect in the bank robbery of the Citibank in Newport Beach (1100 Newport Center Dr.) that occurred on February 8. 

NBPD Aarests Arango

Courtesy of NBPD

Marco Antonio Rodriquez Arango jail booking photo

Arrango was booked at the Newport Beach Police Department jail on the charge of 211 PC - Robbery.

At this time, it is believed Arrango was involved in two additional crimes that occurred on February 5; the first involved a bank robbery of the Chase Bank in Oceanside and the second was an attempted bank robbery of the Wells Fargo Bank in Escondido.

NBPD arrests robbery

Courtesy of NBPD

Video still from recent Newport Beach bank robbery

Anyone with additional information on this crime is asked to contact Newport Beach Police Detective Prince at 949.644.3762.


ENC Presidents’ Week Camp was filled with outdoor hands-on science education...and lots of fun, too

ENC Tonga ki

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Photos by Lana Johnson

In honor of Presidents’ Week, naturalist Gigi Harvey is reading about President Martin Van Buren to the campers in a replica of a Tongva ki, a hut made of tules or willow reeds

The Environmental Nature Center (ENC) held Presidents’ Week Nature Fun Camp for Kids from Monday, Feb. 19 to Thursday, Feb. 21. The camp welcomed children in kindergarten through 6th grade with age-designed crafts and activities, combined with a great deal of fun and laughter. The outdoor hands-on nature-based curriculum was led by knowledgeable ENC naturalists.

ENC Tiger art with Gigi

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Gigi Harvey’s campers read through directions to create tiger art from recycled materials. This animal was chosen because President Van Buren owned two tiger cubs.

Campers explored and made natural crafts to take home using tools made from materials found in nature, such as making string from native plants, weaving and mask making. They explored the natural world, including traveling back in time and going on a “Native American Adventure” to learn about the tools, trade and customs of the native people of the Tongva (Gabrielino) and Acjachemen (Juaneño) people of Orange County. They sang and played music using authentic Tongva instruments, and used their senses of sight, touch and smell to understand the plants used centuries ago.

ENC Ashley and tiger art

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Ashley Coleman, age 9, a student at Carden Hall, shares her finished tiger art

They enjoyed a trip through the redwoods to the waterfall to listen to the sounds and experience animal yoga, competed in paper boat races, discovered pictures in the clouds, embarked on a scavenger hunt, played a pollination game and discussed why pollinators are important and viewed insect parts under the microscope.

ENC Making animal journals

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Campers cut out magazine wildlife photos to create animal journals

Exploration of the animal and plant kingdoms took center stage. Campers found out about the differences between mammals, birds, reptiles and amphibians and what made each of them unique. They created animal collages (cutting out wildlife pictures from magazines), plant collages (using leaf rubbings), made plant presses and kept nature journals where they wrote and drew what they observed. Arts & crafts were created from found objects or materials which were recycled or upcycled. Youngsters came away experiencing new friends and treasuring new memories.

ENC Lium and animal journal

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Lium Eide, age 7, a student at Top of the World, shares his animal journal

ENC is now enrolling for Summer Nature Camp. Geared toward ages 3 through grade 8 with three different camps offered by age/grade level, it runs from June 24 - August 15. Hours are 9 a.m. - 1 p.m. for a half day or 9 a.m. - 3 p.m. for a full day. To find out more information and what each of the week-long themed eight sessions cover, visit the website at www.encenter.org or call 949.645.8489.

Environmental Nature Center is located at 1601 16th St., Newport Beach.


Stump the Stu

Golden Dragon is illuminating

Stump the Stu 2.22.19

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This one must have been a head scratcher, as Stu only received two correct answers on where this Golden Dragon resides. It watches over Benihana (actually there are a pair of them) located on the eye-catching blue tile roof at 4250 Birch St., Newport Beach. If you enjoy Japanese hibachi cuisine, head over to Benihana for dishes served tableside by theatrical chefs.

Congratulations to Dominic Tucci and Missy Ann Schweiger.

If you have a unique spot or icon around town that you think Stu News Newport readers would enjoy finding out about, please shoot it, share it and give us the location, so we can challenge them! Happy Hunting.


Sign of the times

It’s another edition of Sign of the times, so let’s see how well you know our town. Identify this partial glance of a sign that includes this vibrant two-toned petal. Where can you find it?

Good luck!

Stu loves publishing the winning answers on Tuesday.

Send your guesses to This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it..

If you’re a business and you want to play, you can send us a high-quality photo of your sign and we’ll take it from there and challenge our readers.

Let’s have some fun!

SOTT 2.22.19

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Sand castles and boats at Balboa Island

Sand castle tower

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Photo by Chris Crosson (Instagram @sandcastlekit)

Sandcastlekit.com

A perfect pairing of a stunning sand sculpture and the near dusk-lit harbor


Tuesday night’s mesmerizing sky

Tuesday nights color

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Photo by Kevin Pellon (Instagram @socalsnapz)

Socalsnapz.com

Jaw-dropping colors light up the skyline on Tuesday


Fair Game

By TOM JOHNSON

Police get their man; airport worker killed and Costa Mesa United gets busy in Newport Beach

Fair Game Tom JohnsonKudos to the Newport Beach Police Department for their apparent solving of the Linda O’Keefe murder dating back to 1973. O’Keefe was the 11-year-old girl walking home from summer school who disappeared. Her body was found the next morning in the Back Bay area.

According to Newport Beach Police Chief Jon Lewis, O’Keefe’s photo has been on display all these years in the Detectives’ office as a reminder of the open case.

Fortunately, a hit last month on some DNA connected with the case tipped off officers to the lead. From there, it was “good old-fashioned police work” to zero in on the subject, 72-year-old James Alan Neal.

Next steps will include extraditing Neal back from Colorado, where he was arrested Tuesday. 

The Orange County District Attorney has promised to prosecute the case with their full capabilities.

Just to make matters more interesting, the District Attorney and NBPD released a vintage photo of Neal from the 1970/80s last evening seeking additional witnesses or information.

Both offices also corrected an earlier statement saying that Neal previously went by the name of James Albert Layton, Jr., and not James Alan George Layton. 

During his time in Newport Beach he is believed to have worked in general construction.

• • •

A blown tire on a John Wayne Airport walkway killed 37-year-old Brandon Allison, of Fullerton, this week in a freak accident.

Allison and a co-worker were attempting maintenance on the jet bridge walkway used to connect the terminal to the aircraft doors when the tire exploded.

The incident occurred Tuesday morning according to an airport spokesperson.

Another employee working with Allison refused treatment.

• • •

Costa Mesa United is a nonprofit group that over the years has raised money to improve sports fields, facilities and programs of local schools.

Most of their efforts have focused on Costa Mesa. That all changed this week when CMU approved a $23,500 grant to support the re-do of the Newport Harbor High School weight room.

NHHS’s population includes 65 percent of students from Costa Mesa.

Over the years, CMU has been instrumental in assisting in the building of both Estancia and Costa Mesa High School football fields, weight rooms and swimming pools.

CMU raises funds through community donations and an annual golf tournament held each January at Mesa Verde Country Club.

• • •

Ben Zdeba, from the City of Newport Beach Community Development Department, let me know that an apparent typo reporting an upcoming date of the General Plan Update Steering Committee needs correcting. 

We previously reported that upcoming dates were March 6 and March 29. The 29th date should be changed to Wednesday, March 20. 

Sorry for the inconvenience.


OCCF partnered with local nonprofits to raise funds supporting healthy teen relationships

On February 12, the Orange County Community Foundation (OCCF), based in Newport Beach, partnered with seven local nonprofits to host Love Is, a Giving Day in support of healthy teen relationships in Orange County. The 24-hour event raised $89,643 with participation from more than 282 donors.

The Foundation launched its Collaborative Giving Day initiative in 2018 to bolster the capacity of local organizations. Nonprofits with shared missions are invited to come together to boost collective giving for their causes.

OCCF partnered with

The seven nonprofits that participated in the Love Is Giving Day included Orange County Women’s Health Project, Human Options, Waymakers, LGBT Center OC, Women’s Transitional Living Center (WTLC), Planned Parenthood of Orange & San Bernardino Counties, Inc. and Laura’s House. 

“Thanks to the work of our local nonprofits and our compassionate community, teens throughout Orange County will be empowered to show respect and foster healthy relationships,” said Shelley Hoss, president, OCCF. “We’re thrilled with the success of the first collaborative Giving Day of 2019 – and we congratulate the efforts of our valued nonprofit partners who are tackling critical issues facing our county.” 

OCCF first challenged Orange County residents to “give where their heart lives” during the inaugural i©oc Giving Day in 2015, raising more than $1.8 million through gifts to 347 participating nonprofits in just 30 hours. OCCF nearly doubled those results in 2016 during the second annual i©oc Giving Day, receiving contributions totaling $3.2 million for 418 participating nonprofits. In 2017, OCCF re-envisioned i©oc as an expanded opportunity for nonprofits to connect with one another in support of their shared missions. The seven collaborative Giving Days held in 2018 raised a total of $1.4 million for local organizations.   

Additional collaborative Giving Days will be announced next year. For more information, visit www.oc-cf.org/iheartoc.


OC Fair’s Imaginology brings three days of free hands-on STEAM fun

Kids will have a blast at Imaginology learning about STEAM (science, technology, engineering, arts and math) at the annual free event at OC Fair & Event Center taking place April 12 - 14.

This exciting, three-day exploration of STEAM-related topics and careers features hands-on learning on Friday from 9 a.m. - 3 p.m., and Saturday and Sunday from 10 a.m. - 5 p.m. Admission is free and most activities are included. Parking is free on Friday, and $9 on Saturday and Sunday. Friday is field trip day and is open to the public. Schools and large groups of 10 or more are encouraged to register, but it is not required. 

Imaginology is where curious people of all ages go to discover the opportunities available in science, technology, engineering, arts and math fields. Students are encouraged to explore the possibilities as they learn by doing at a variety of workshops and exhibits. Food will be available for sale at the event.

OC Fairs Imaginology youngsters and microscope

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Photos courtesy of OC Fair & Event Center

Youngsters queue up to view what’s under the microscope

Family-friendly activities and competitions for Imaginology include:

NEW e-sports gaming: Imaginology›s new e-Playground will feature an e-sports tournament for high school students, free-to-play PCs with STEAM games, and a parent and educator panel with industry professionals to discuss misconceptions about video games and share facts. Careers in the e-sports/gaming field will be emphasized.

Workshops and makeshops: Students can participate in activities including woodworking, sewing, creative crafting, tech play, ceramics, sun prints and more. Local professionals and Imaginology staff lead the demonstrations and all necessary equipment and supplies are provided. Participants can take home the crafts and artwork they create.

OC Fairs Imaginology boy crafting

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A young boy adds color to his free craft project

Youth competitions: Budding scientists and artists will showcase their talents in photography, videography, fiber arts, fine art, poetry, science and engineering divisions. Competitions include 3-D printing, computer-generated art, fashion design, drawing, kinetic art, jewelry making, clay crafting, wood and metal art and more. All competitions are free to enter and open to Orange County students. The deadline for online entry submissions is Friday, March 22.

Cultural celebration returns: Día del Niño, Day of the Child, will be back for a second year at Imaginology on Saturday and Sunday, bringing an additional day of interactive arts workshops and performances by professional artists, local arts organizations, schools and community groups. Día del Niño is presented in collaboration with Arts Orange County and Media Arts Santa Ana.

Free on-site creative contests: Family members and friends can team up at Imaginology to compete in an on-site contest to decorate the best scarecrow on Saturday, April 13. Kids can enter the steampunk hat contest on Sunday, April 14. There are awards and prize money. It’s free to enter and basic materials will be provided, but people are encouraged to bring their own decorations to make their entry special. Visit www.ocfair.com/steam for details.

OC Fairs Imaginology school group

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A school group admires the gardens in the Centennial Farm

Centennial Farm: Imaginology visitors can check out animals and crops on the three-acre working farm and enjoy free tractor rides, an oxen exhibit, blacksmithing, sheep-shearing demonstrations, radish-seed planting, terrarium-making and the OC Beekeepers exhibit.

4-H competitions: Local youth are judged on their abilities to raise small livestock, their understanding of animal and veterinary sciences and their projects on community service, aerospace, electricity and more.

Vital Link STEM + the Arts Career Showcase: Vital Link provides resources to help students discover and consider professional careers in the fields of science, technology, engineering or mathematics with exciting displays, workshops and competitions.

More free activities: Exhibitors will offer things to do and see including Wild Science Activity Area and family-friendly entertainment. Also new this year is Fort Blisters Boot Camp, located near Heroes Hall, where kids can enjoy fun physical activities.

OC Fair & Event Center is located 88 Fair Drive, Costa Mesa.

For more information, visit www.ocfair.com/imaginology.


Anti-Defamation League to present 2019 Marcus Kaufman Jurisprudence Award

Three outstanding legal professionals and civil rights advocates will be the recipients of the 2019 Marcus Kaufman Jurisprudence Award to be presented by the Orange County/Long Beach region of the Anti-Defamation League (ADL). The dinner and presentation ceremony is scheduled for April 4 at the Fashion Island Hotel Newport Beach, beginning at 6 p.m.

This year’s honorees are Mark Erickson, a partner at Haynes and Boone, LLP in Costa Mesa; The Honorable Wendy S. Lindley, Ret., Orange County Superior Court; and Brett Williamson of O’Melveny & Myers LLP in Newport Beach.

anti defamation league Mark Erickson

Submitted photos

Mark Erickson

Erickson has been solving business disputes through litigation, arbitration and mediation for more than 35 years, handling a wide range of sophisticated commercial and real estate litigation, including contract, trade secrets, healthcare law, and business governance and dissolution disputes. He honed his trial skills with a diverse practice that began with the Army Judge Advocate General’s Corps. He then joined Latham and Watkins where he developed his current client base. He was later one of the founding partners of Dubia, Erickson & Tenerelli, a litigation boutique where he practiced for 16 years. A leader in the local bar and community, Erikson is a past president of the Orange County chapter of the Association of Business Trial Lawyers, and president-elect for the Orange County Bar Foundation.

anti defamation league Judge Wendy Lindley

Judge Wendy Lindley

Governor Pete Wilson appointed Judge Lindley to Orange County Municipal Court in 1994. Later, she succeeded upon majority vote of judges in the county to convert Municipal Courts to Superior Courts, effective August 10, 1998, thereby becoming a Superior Court Judge. Judge Lindley presided over the Adult Drug Court, Criminal Mental Health Court, DUI Court, Combat Veterans Court and the Homeless Outreach Court, all of which she played a crucial role in establishing. Judge Lindley was instrumental in the creation of the Community Court Building located in Santa Ana, which houses all of the Collaborative Court programs over which she presided. She has served on many committees and lectured extensively on therapeutic justice.

anti defamation league Brett Williamson

Brett Williamson

Williamson is a founding member of the Intellectual Property and Technology Practice within the O’Melveny Litigation Department. He has 30 years’ experience handling patent and technology litigation in a wide variety of industries, including computer hardware and software, telecommunications, electronics, medical devices and pharmaceuticals. He helps both established and emerging technology companies solve their most critical legal challenges through a practical approach that prioritizes fundamental “big picture” advice over procedural tactics that can obscure the client’s ultimate business goals, while maintaining the sharp adversarial edge required to ensure the best outcome possible. He co-founded O’Melveny’s Intellectual Property and Technology practice group, and currently heads that group in the Newport Beach office.

According to ADL Regional Director Peter Levi, “This year’s honorees truly exemplify Justice Kaufman’s legacy. Their professional records are outstanding and each has given a voice to people who were otherwise unheard. What both Mark and Brett have done for people in Orange County experiencing homelessness is critical and heartening, and the impact of Wendy’s court reform is inspiring. It is an honor to know them and a privilege to honor them on behalf of ADL.”

The prize is named after Justice Marcus Kaufman, the 103rd Justice of the California Supreme Court and a champion of civil rights. It is given annually to those attorneys who have made significant contributions to their communities and to the legal profession and embody ADL’s mission to stop the defamation of the Jewish people and to secure justice and fair treatment for all.

Visit www.adl.org/OCJurisprudence2019 for event details and sponsorship options.

Fashion Island Hotel Newport Beach is located at 690 Newport Center Drive, Newport Beach.


“Lucky 7” reasons to get your Irish on this St. Patrick’s Day at Spirit Run

Everyone wants to be Irish on St. Patrick’s Day, so this year Spirit Run is the perfect place to get your Irish on. The 36th Annual Spirit Run takes place Sunday, March 17 in Fashion Island.

Here’s Spirit Run’s “Lucky 7” reasons to participate:

1. St. Patrick’s-themed Shirts – The adult, tri-blend shirts are soft and light weight, perfect for racing, the gym, or everyday wear. They are available in the styles and colors shown. The long sleeve is also available in white. Spirit Run upgraded its cotton youth shirt to tech.

Lucky 7 reasons T shirts

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2. St. Patrick’s-themed Costume Contest – Dress up yourself, or together with your family, friends, or teammates. Whether you come as a leprechaun or simply wearing a green hat or socks, this promises to be fun and festive.

3. Finisher Medals for Adults and Kids – Everyone can race for their lucky charm. Adults claim a four leaf clover; kids, a Spirit Run medal.

Lucky 7 reasons claim your luck charm

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4. Muldoon’s Coupon for a Free “Banger Bites” Appetizer – Enjoy Irish cuisine at Muldoon’s Irish Pub Starting with Irish Bangers (sausages). Muldoon’s, located about a quarter mile from Spirit Run’s expo, is honoring adult finishers with a coupon for a free “Banger Bites” appetizer.

5. Race to Win your Pot O’Gold – Spirit Run is offering a cash prize purse and more than 200 prizes for adults and children. Prizes include gift cards for shopping and eating at Blaze Pizza, Lazy Dog Restaurant, Balboa Candy and Dick’s Sporting Goods. Adults and children also compete for Spirit Run’s winner medals.

6. Take a Step Forward for Good Health and Luck in 2019 – Lace up your shoes to celebrate fitness at Spirit Run. With 15 running and walking events, Spirit Run has an event for every age, from toddlers to grandparents, and every fitness level, from walkers and joggers to elite athletes. Run or walk yourself, with your family in the Family Mile or 5k Family Walk, or even with your favorite furry friend in the Dog Mile. 

7. Participants and Spectators Enjoy the Youth, Fitness & Dog Expo – Adults, children, and even dogs will find something to enjoy at Spirit Run’s expo. Everyone will enjoy food and beverage, and live music. Kids, find your perfect summer camps at the Camp Newport Expo, and enjoy a rock climbing wall, bungee trampoline, mini skate park, and much more. Adults, bring your wallet to shop and visit health and fitness vendors. Bring your dog or adopt a new one at the Dog Expo. 

For event details and registration, visit www.nmspiritrun.org. For more information, email This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it..


Renowned art critic, author to appear at OCMA

On Thursday, Feb. 21, renowned art critic Barbara Pollack will hold a lecture on her new book, Brand New Art from China: A Generation on the Rise, at OCMAEXPAND from 7 - 9 p.m.

Renowned art critic Barbara Pollack

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Courtesy of OCMA

Barbara Pollack

Pollack will discuss China’s millennial artists who are rapidly emerging as international art stars due to their uniquely global approach to their work. A special book signing will follow the lecture.

The event is free and open to the public. To RSVP, visit www.ocmaexpand.org.

Currently, OCMA is operating as OCMAEXPAND in South Coast Plaza Village at 1661 W. Sunflower Ave., Santa Ana.


OASIS holds inaugural Cars and Coffee car show

On Saturday, Feb. 9, the Friends of OASIS presented its inaugural, “Cars and Coffee” car show in the OASIS Senior Center parking lot. In attendance was Newport Beach Councilmember Joy Brenner, who represents District 6.

OASIS holds inaugural Best in Show

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Photos by Eleanor Anderson

Courtesy of Friends of OASIS

Bob Dryden’s 1936 Rolls Royce Phantom III took “Best of Show”

Twenty-three exquisite cars were on display, and trophies were presented to these winners:

–Bob Dryden for “Best of Show” with a 1936 Rolls Royce Phantom III

–Tom and Jean Naughton for “Best Original” with a 1956 Chevrolet Bel Air

–Bill Smirl for “Best Custom” with a 1939 Ford Convertible Coupe

–Herb Fisher for “People’s Choice” with a 1923 Model T Truck

OASIS holds inaugural Mike and Bill OASIS holds inaugural Best Custom

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(L-R) Mike Zimmerman, Friends of OASIS Board President, with Bill Smirl, who won “Best Custom” for his 1939 Ford Convertible Coupe (pictured right)

Braving the inclement weather, nearly 100 people came out to view the classic automobiles and enjoy a delicious pancake breakfast.

OASIS holds inaugural Model T Truck

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“People’s Choice” was awarded to this 1923 Ford Model Truck, owned by Herb Fisher

Friends of OASIS hopes to hold the next car show on September 7, so save the date. To view more car photos, visit www.friendsofoasis.org, click on events and scroll down to Cars and Coffee.

OASIS holds inaugural Chevrolet Corvette