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Fair Game

By TOM JOHNSON

It’s a busy long weekend on our beaches and, yes, in our jails; plus, still on the hunt for a murderer 45 years later

TomJohnsonAccording to numbers obtained from Mike Halphide, Newport Beach Lifeguard Battalion Chief, our guards were certainly busy over the 4th of July holiday weekend.

On the 4th itself, with light surf and still just warm conditions, lifeguards made 603 prevents and 24 rescues on a beach crowd estimated at 100,000. Additionally, there were 992 public assists and 38 medical aids. 

That’s one day.

Thursday, wave size increased to 6 – 8 feet, as a hurricane swell hit south facing beaches. The temperatures also started going up. At the conclusion of the weekend there were 248 rescues and 6,700 preventable actions. Crowd estimates along the coast for the five days were 612,000.

• • •

Speaking of the Newport Beach Lifeguards, Friday, July 6 marked the fourth anniversary of the death of Ben Carlson. Carlson died shortly after 5 p.m. on that ill-fated day attempting to save a swimmer in distress in turbulent water conditions.

Both men were hit by a large wave. The swimmer managed to find safety nearby, however Carlson’s body wasn’t found for several hours. 

The good news is that Carlson’s memory lives on in big ways throughout the Newport Beach community.

• • •

Well, we told you about the busy weekend of our lifeguards. Here’s one for you: the unofficial arrest count by the Newport Beach Police Department from 6 p.m. July 3 to 6 a.m. July 5 totaled 81.

Now, if you’ve ever been in the NBPD jail, visiting of course, it’s small. That’s processing a lot of bodies in a short period of time.

• • •

We reported last issue about a Newport Beach 45-year-old cold case murder of 11-year-old Linda O’Keefe.

Now, utilizing DNA, computer-generated photos of her killer have been produced. And the photos are age progressed.

Shown at age 25 Age progressed to 60 years

Click on photos for larger images

Photos courtesy of NBPD & 

  Parabon NanoLabs

These photos and an accompanying daylong Twitter program by the NBPD on Friday, July 6, offering “tweets in Linda’s voice,” apparently has stirred up a lot of publicity and interest.

When I emailed NBPD Public Information Officer Jennifer Manzella yesterday morning asking for a favor, her response was, “I’ve been swamped with media activity on the cold case…what time do you need it?” 

I asked her “if any leads were popping up?”

“We are definitely getting calls and tips on the cold case, but I don’t have anything I can share at this point,” said Manzella.

Hopefully, this turns out promising. Forty-five years is long enough.

I found the links to the story fascinating to read and have attached them here:

All tweets from Linda’s story collected by NBPD: https://twitter.com/i/moments/1015639333120892928.

The original press release announcement: https://nixle.com/alert/6667866

The video about this case: https://youtu.be/iIm6SX7XWPM.

The files and photos from this case: http://bit.ly/lindaokeefe.

• • •

Back in the mid ‘90s, while publisher of the Daily Pilot, we introduced the Top 103 Most Influential list, where we recognized the community’s best and added with a little tongue-in-cheek to take the edge off. For the first few years, we followed it up with a luncheon at the Balboa Bay Club for everyone on the list. 

One of those people invited back then was philanthropist Julia Argyros. The luncheon program was meant to be fun, so Julia gave us a fly fishing casting lesson, completely decked out in her gear…waders included. I remember it like it was yesterday.

Fast forward to the end of June 2018, Julia (along with her husband George) again showed her love of fishing with a $500,000 grant “as part of a multi-year effort to protect the native cutthroat trout population at Yellowstone National Park, the National Park Foundation announced.”

 The gift was to the local philanthropic organization Yellowstone Forever for the park’s Native Fish Conservation Plan.


Sign of the times

On Fridays we give you a partial glimpse of a sign around town. You guess what the overall name of the business is. 

Stu provided you with the logo that resembles a whirling dervish. Congratulations to Francine Jacome, Joe Stapleton and Rush Hill who guessed the sign correctly for Jamba Juice, located at 4341 MacArthur Blvd. #A, Newport Beach. 

Our friend Rush Hill, who is a graduate of Cal Poly, San Luis Obispo, shared that the company started as a Senior Project at his alma mater. It began as a required senior study for completion of one’s undergraduate degree from Cal Poly SLO. Thanks for letting us know!

If you’re a business and you want to play, you can send us a high-quality photo of your sign and we’ll take it from there and challenge our readers.

Let’s have some fun!

SOTT 7.10.18

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Stump the Stu

Jurassic World in Newport Beach?

Stump the Stu 7.10.18

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Straight out of Jurassic World: The Lost Kingdom, where would you find this Tyrannosaurus Rex?   

Take the challenge as to where this raptor is located and submit your answers to This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it..

The correct answer will appear in Friday’s edition, along with the correct guesses. So, join us for this local adventure.

If you have a unique spot or icon around town that you think Stu News Newport readers would enjoy finding out about, please shoot it, share it and give us the answer, so we can challenge them! Happy Hunting.


Lecture and Book Signing at Sherman Library & Gardens tonight

Book Cover

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Submitted photo

Join Sherman Library & Gardens tonight, Tuesday, July 10 for a lecture and book signing, beginning at 7 p.m.

Jason Dewees, horticulturist and palm expert at Flora Grubb Gardens in San Francisco, will give a presentation with photos by Caitlin Atkinson on the power of palms in garden design. His book is titled Designing with Palms.

Dewees will discuss palms’ appeal to the senses and their use in creating garden styles, as well as basic information gardeners need to know about the diverse palm family, including a portfolio of useful hardy palms and tropical staples.

Come see why palms’ beauty and diversity earns them a place in well-designed gardens throughout the warmer parts of the world – including California. 

This event is free of charge. RSVP at www.slgardens.org.

Sherman Library & Gardens is located at 2647 E. Coast Highway, Corona del Mar. 


City Manager Update at WAKE UP! Newport

City Manager Update

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Submitted photo

The Newport Beach Chamber of Commerce is holding its monthly WAKE UP! Newport meeting on Thursday, July 12. The featured presentation is titled “City Manager Update: Reflections from Dave Kiff,” led by Newport Beach’s city manager, who has been with the city of Newport Beach for more than 20 years, with nearly 10 as city manager.

Kiff’s talk will include: “Unforgettables” – past things important to our community’s success; advice going forward – how the city can stay prosperous; and things he’ll miss the most – and the least.

A complimentary continental breakfast begins at 7:15 a.m.; the program takes place from 7:45 - 8:30 a.m. Admission is free, but please make reservations for seating and food consideration. Walk-ups are welcome on a space available basis.

The meeting takes place in the Newport Beach Central Library’s Friends Room, 1000 Avocado Ave., Newport Beach. To register, visit www.newportbeach.com or contact Pam Smith at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. or call 949.729.4411.


Save the Date: Newport Beach Jazz Party

Saxophone

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Submitted photo

Mark your calendar for February 14 - 17, 2019 for the 19th Annual Newport Beach Jazz Party taking place at the Newport Beach Marriott & Spa in Fashion Island.

Appearing live will be five bands and more than 130 artists, including Jack Jones, Shelly Berg, Clayton-Hamilton Jazz Orchestra, Jeff Hamilton, Tom Scott, Scott Hamilton, Houston Person, Tierney Sutton, Jeff Clayton, Wycliffe Gordon, Akiko, Harry Allen, Pete Barbutti, Emmett Cohen Trio, Chris Colangelo, Bill Cunliffe, Terrell Stafford, Scott Whitfield, Ken Peplowski...and many more.

For tickets and more information, call 949.205.1252 and visit www.newportbeachjazzparty.com.

Newport Beach Marriott & Spa is located at 900 Newport Center Drive, Newport Beach.


Surfing is art in motion

Surfer

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Photo by Ryan Belda

Surfer Tyler Gunter tackles the waves at the River Jetties

~~~~~~~~

Photographer Ryan Belda captured this surfer on December 13, 2017.


On the Harbor: Award winners...who do you know?

By LEN BOSE

I am a bit of a history buff and one of the subjects that has intrigued me is the different achievements that can be won by our harbor users. In this column, I will go around the harbor and give a brief description of the different awards and who has won them over the years.

Let’s start with the Commodore Albert Soiland Perpetual Trophy, awarded to the winner of the “Flight of the Snowbirds” now referred to as “The Flight in Newport Beach.”

In 1957, 163 boats signed up to place their name on the trophy; Dick Ward crossed the finish line first and placed his name on the trophy that year. Other past winners that I recognize are Barton Beek in 1940 and Dick Deaver in 1949 with 138 boats that year, Burke Sawyer won in 1958 with 151 boats competing, Pat Scruggs won in 1968 and Jon Pinckney’s name is plastered all over the trophy. In fact, Pinckney was the first to win in a Harbor 20 last year. Participation has been down from the late ‘50s, but if you can get your name on this award you will be in the history books for a long time; the first race was sailed in 1936. This year’s race is on July 15 and is open to Harbor 20s and Lasers.

My next stop was at the Bahia Corinthian Yacht Club’s trophy cases. You’ll find two very prominent awards. The first being the Edward F. Kennedy Memorial that is awarded to the Newport Harbor Yachtsman of the Year. This is one of two awards in our harbor that can be given to a non-club member of the presenting club. First awarded in 1984, names that jumped out at me are Lloyd “Swede” Johnson 1985, David Grant 1996, Nick Scandone 2006 and Mike Pinkney 2008. The other award is the Elmer Carey Memorial (formerly Balboa Bay Club Yachtsman of the Year until 1982) Award to the BCYC Yachtsman who most contributed to the organized yachting community. This award was first presented in 1959. Past recipients included Cooper Johnson in 1966, Jim Emmi in 1975, Lorin Weiss in 1988, Carolyn Hardy in 1998 and in 2012, Peter Haynes.

Ryan Lawler

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Courtesy of Balboa Angling Club

Ryan Lawler, 2017 Outstanding Angler of the Year, with his bluefin tuna catch

For those of you that love our harbor but don’t happen to sail, I stopped by the Balboa Angling Club and talked with Mindy Martin, the club’s secretary. So, let’s see if a sailor can tell a good fishing story? One of the highest esteemed awards at the BAC is the “Outstanding Angler of the Year Award” which is scored on a point system based on line test used. Previous winners include Jim Duncan in 2002, Vick Sommers in 2011 and Ryan Lawler in 2017.

The J.A Beek Perpetual Trophy awarded for the First Tuna of the season has been restored by the Beek family and is displayed in the BAC’s trophy case. This award was first presented in 1979, and names on this award you might know are Jeff Jones 1983, Steve Crooke 2008 and Nate Dunham 2018. 

JA Beek Perpetual Trophy

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Courtesy of Balboa Angling Club

J.A. Beek Perpetual Trophy

Harbor 20 Fleet One has one particular award that has always grabbed my attention and is presented at the end of the year holiday party. The Arthur B Strock Service Award is given to members who have performed outstanding service for the Harbor 20 Fleet One organization. This award was first presented to Arthur Strock in 2001 for his service and in 2006, it became an annual award. Names of admiration are Phil Ramser 2007, Peter Haynes 2009, John Whitney 2013, Shana Conzelman 2016 and Debra Haynes 2017.

My next stop was at the Newport Harbor Yacht Club where two awards grabbed my attention the first time I ever walked in. The first is the Don Vaughn Award, which is bestowed annually to NHYC members’ “Crew of the Year.” This crew member has shown their positive influence and importance onboard racing sailboats. The recipient is chosen only by the previous winners. This award was first presented in 1981 to Gordo Johnson and other past winners included Bill Menninger in 1997, Marshall Duffield in 1998, Brad Avery in 1999, Craig Chamberlain in 2002, Tom Corkett in 2015 and Nick Madigan in 2016.

The next award is one of the most coveted trophies in our harbor and can be presented to any distinguished yachtsman that has brought unusual distinction or notice to West Coast yachting and the Newport Harbor Yacht Club, which was first awarded in 1936. This is not an annual award and is awarded upon the action of the NHYC board of directors. Names that grabbed my attention were Don Ayres, Grant Baldwin, Tom Blackaller, Tom Corkett, Dennis Conner, Bill Ficker, John Kilroy, Justin Law, Lowell North, Michael Menninger, Phil Ramser, Chris Raab and Nick Scandone.

Over at the Sea Scout Base, starting in 2007, they have presented the “Good Sea Scout Award” that honors local mariners for their contribution to the boating industry, from innovative yacht and sail designs, and improving youth access to boating and sailing, to sportsmanship at the highest level. Above all, those honored have shown the personal character traits that scouting embodies and promotes. Recipients include Duncan McIntosh 2007, Jim Warmington 2008, Dave Ullman 2009, Marshall Duffield 2010, David Janes 2011, Bill Ficker 2012, Gino Morrelli and Pete Melvin 2014, Timothy Hogan 2015, Gary Hill 2016 and Seymour Beek 2017.

My last stop was at the Balboa Yacht Club where two awards stand out above the rest in the large trophy cases you see as you enter the club. The first is the BYC Sportsman of the Year Award. It was first presented in 1939 and given to an active racing skipper who consistently displayed outstanding sportsmanship during the yachting season. Some of the names are Barton Beek 1940, Bill Ficker 1946, Bill Taylor 1966, Dave Ullman 1969, John Arens 1972, Lloyd “Swede” Johnson 1982, Paul Blank 1996, Nick Scandone 2003 and Alex Steele 2016. Another noteworthy area in the BYC is the “Wall of Recognition” that was created in 1980, and honors many of the members who have served as Distinguished Yachtsmen over a span of years in the world, yachting through excellence in racing, or have been a credit to the BYC. Names like Dave Ullman 1980, Lloyd “Swede” Johnson 1988 and Nick Scandone 2006 are just a few of the names that appear.

Unfortunately, I was not able to list every winner of these highly regarded awards, and will leave that to you when you view these trophies, to decide where your name should be placed.

Len Bose trophy

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Courtesy of Len Bose

Len Bose (left) accepting the 2018 Edward F. Kennedy Memorial Trophy

Sea ya!

~~~~~~~~

Len Bose is a yachting enthusiast, yacht broker and harbor columnist for StuNewsNewport.


Newport Beach – A Look Back 

Photo series courtesy of Balboa Island Museum & Historical Society

A Look Back 7.10.18

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This photograph of Robin and Claire Sibold comes with a rather amusing story. The two sisters launched a rowboat off Ruby Beach with Robin in the boat at the oars. However, she couldn’t row and ended up stranded in the bay. A 4th grade classmate of Claire’s had to rescue her in his parents' powerboat.

Visit Balboa Island Museum and the Museum Store located at 331 Marine Ave., Balboa Island. They are open Tuesdays - Sundays from 10 a.m. - 4 p.m. For more information, call 949.675.3952, visit www.balboaislandmuseum.orgor email This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it..


Guest Column

Dave Kiff

An insider’s look at what’s going on in and around City Hall

Dave Kiff

Newport Beach City Manager Dave Kiff   

I hope you all had a good and safe Independence Day. The Guide’s day was spent in part at the West Newport community parade, where the show was stolen by the family with five (or six, I couldn’t tell) small poodles all dressed in their patriotic finery. The little girl in the motorized cart was a kick, too, as she (probably no more than 3 years old) drove on down the road. Parents were carefully following behind, but she seemed to know where she was going. Which was both scary and cool.   

Anyway, here is the Insider’s Guide for the City Council meeting of Tuesday, July 10, 2018. This Insider’s Guide is not an attempt to summarize every item on the agenda – just the ones that seem of specific interest to me. I encourage you to read the full agenda if you wish. So then, here’s a summary of what’s on the agenda of the next City Council meeting:

We will have a 4 p.m. Study Session with some interesting topics: A nice update from our pals at the Friends of the Newport Beach Animal Shelter, who are making progress on providing more and more resources for the Shelter.

We’ll talk about our recent interactions with FEMA regarding flood maps, and you’ll learn if we’ve made any progress there to reduce the number of properties that might be subject to higher insurance costs. Folks on Balboa Island and the Peninsula will want to stay engaged on this.

One of the Council’s absolute favorite things to do (not!) is to hear about possible adjustments to fees – this time to our Fire, Lifeguard, and EMS fee structure.   

During the 7 p.m. Regular Session, it looks to be not too late of an evening. Here are two items that popped out at me:

One item involves the preparation of an Environmental Impact Report (EIR) for a proposed hotel/family inn at the Newport Dunes resort. This would be on the western side of the Dunes Lagoon. Many may forget (here I go again) that the development entitlement for this 275-room inn was and is outlined in a 1983-era Settlement Agreement associated with the Dunes’ overall development. The Dunes sits on tidelands assigned to the County of Orange, and the County leases that back to the Dunes operator. Some discretionary approvals would have to occur before the Inn could be constructed, but the development entitlement is there, and no General Plan amendment is required.

Here’s an interesting one: We seem to have a donation problem. Not too little, but maybe too many. Staff has asked the Council to consider suspending our donation policy – temporarily – so that we can get a handle on some issues associated with donated benches and trees (and similar) in public spaces. In some cases, we’re not meeting donors’ expectations. In others, the donations don’t cover the cost of some rather rigorous maintenance. Anyway, this will not affect already-donated benches or trees, but it will allow us to have a public dialogue on donations from here forward. I fully expect a good donation program to stay here in our community, but it may have some adjustments to make sure that it’s sustainable. If you are interested in this issue, please stay involved and follow it with the Parks, Beaches, and Recreation Commission.       

As noted previously, for my last handful of Insider’s Guides, I wanted to try to memorialize a few things in our community’s collective knowledge so that they are not forgotten as I head off to other ventures. Last time (Part 1) was about Sunset Ridge Park. I have two more today. 

So Please Don’t Forget This – Part 2

John Wayne Airport is probably the thing that worries me the most when I think about impacts to our quality of life. Yes, that’s probably too dramatic. Someday, planes will be a lot quieter and/or they’ll take off nearly straight up. But until that time comes please don’t be complacent about JWA. Our forefathers and mothers in the early 1980s (primarily with a group called the Airport Working Group, but later assisted by SPON) sued to attempt to stop JWA’s expansion. That lawsuit resulted in the landmark 1985 JWA Settlement Agreement, which still stands today – and is unique across the country. Among other things, the Agreement sets in place the all-important curfew, a cap on the number of passengers that can fly out per year, and a cap on the “loudest” flights that can go out on an average day. All of these important things are subject to that Agreement’s survival. 

I don’t worry too much about the Agreement surviving. I do worry about unexpected attacks on it, about when its next negotiations phase arrives (2027-ish?) and what happens after that. Our community has only succeeded in limiting the impacts of JWA when we have worked together. Not neighborhood-by-neighborhood, but as the entire city. Even then, the community hasn’t won every battle. For the battles ahead, our success rate will improve when we stick together. That means having some sympathy for those right under the flight paths, including realizing how those paths have changed over time. And if you’re not under the flight path, it means making sure that you still stay engaged with the larger city to make sure that JWA remains, overall, an airport that doesn’t overwhelm us. I am heartened now with the efforts of AWG, SPON/AirFair, and CAANP to indeed stick together as we work on our latest JWA challenge (that being post NextGen implementation). To help us all not forget, we’ll soon send out a snail-mail community newsletter on the latest happenings regarding JWA. Each time we do this, we step back and work to re-educate the community about the Settlement Agreement and All Things JWA. So, it’s a lot to read. But please read the newsletter when you get it, and please refer it to friends. By doing so, you help make sure no one gets complacent.

Lastly, a very important but short So Please Don’t Forget This – Part 3 is about Newport Beach Lifeguard Ben Carlson. He passed away four years ago (July 6, 2014), working to save a life in the tough waters south of the Newport Pier. No one expects to come to work and not make it home that night. Many, many will never forget Ben, and that’s as it should be.

City Council Meeting Information: The Newport Beach City Council meets on the 2nd and 4th Tuesdays of most months (the exceptions are August and December. Typically, there is a Study Session that starts at 4:00 p.m. Study sessions are times for the Council to take a deeper look at a specific issue, or hear a presentation, that might eventually lead to a specific and more formal action. A closed session often follows the Study Session. Closed sessions are typically to address legal, personnel, and other matters where additional confidentiality is important. The Regular (evening) Session typically starts at 7:00 p.m., and often has a specific listing of 20-40 different items ready for formal votes. Items on the “Consent Calendar” are heard all at once, unless a Council member has removed (aka “pulled”) an item from the Consent Calendar for specific discussion and separate vote. If an item on the agenda is recommended to be “continued,” it means that the item won’t be heard nor voted on that evening, but will be pushed forward to another noticed meeting.

Public Comment is welcomed at both the Study Session and the Regular Session. The public can comment on any item on the agenda. If you want to comment on a Consent Calendar item that was not pulled from the Consent Calendar by a Council Member, you will want to do so at the time listed on the agenda – right before the Council votes on the entire Consent Calendar (it’s Roman Numeral XIII on the posted agenda). If an item is pulled, the Mayor will offer that members of the public can comment as that specific item is heard separately. Additionally, there is a specific section of Public Comment for items not on the agenda, but on a subject of some relationship to the city government. If you cannot attend a meeting and/or want to communicate with the City Council directly, this email gets to all of them: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.. Please know that I get a copy of that email, too, because in almost all cases it’s something that the City Manager follows up on. It’s my head-start.

The Council meets in the Council Chambers at 100 Civic Center Drive, off of Avocado between San Miguel and East Coast Highway. There is plenty of parking in the parking structure behind City Hall. You are always welcome to attend in person, but you can also watch on TV Time Warner/Spectrum 3 and Cox Channel 852 or stream it on your computer.

Thank you for reading. Please forward this Guide to family, friends and members of your HOA if you represent one. I always like hearing from you, too, so please don’t hesitate to ask a question or offer a comment. 

Sincerely,

Dave Kiff

City Manager

This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

949.644.3001


Feed Your Inner Farmer at the OC Fair

Piglet

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Photos courtesy of OC Fair

It’s just two days until the OC Fair opens, so here are 15 ways to “free your inner farmer” that you might not be aware of...guaranteed to help you enjoy an amazing time!

1. Wear your favorite pair on Overalls Day. Every Thursday from 12 - 3 p.m. during the 2018 OC Fair, guests can get free admission just by wearing overalls. For more deals and promos, visit www.ocfair.com/deals

2. Go on the Culinary Crawl. New this year to the OC Fair is a special tour through the culinary world in the OC Promenade. Guests can sign up to take an exclusive tour, making stops at the Patisserie, Charcuterie, Fermentation Farm and so much more. Hit the information booth inside the OC Promenade at least an hour prior to tour time to sign up. Tour times are 2, 4, 6 and 8 p.m. daily.

3. Marvel at larger-than-life murals, Bounty of the County: Celebrating Local Agriculture. The John Cerney mural project will feature Tanaka Farms, Neff Ranch and Frank Fitzpatrick’s 5 Bar Beef. A mural can be found at each of the three major public entry gates.

4. Learn about cows in a milking demonstration. Stop by the Millennium Barn in Centennial Farm to see how a cow gets milked. Maxine, a demo cow, will be front and center.

Barnyard fashion show

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Join in the fun at the Barnyard Fashion Show

5. Visit the Livestock barns and showring. From birds to rabbits, cows, goats and pigs, there are all types of animals to see in the Livestock area, and you can learn from the 4-H or FFA club members on hand. Plus, check out the various activities in Livestock, including a Barnyard Fashion Show.

6. Participate in the Junior Livestock Auction. This is the largest livestock event at the OC Fair, and it’s a sight to see. Set up like a true auction, this is where the 4-H and FFA club members are able to sell their livestock in a fundraiser that allows them to continue learning and farming. For more information on the auction, visit www.ocfair.com/competitions/auction.

7. Find the life-size portraits of farmers Outstanding In Their Field. Download an app called Live Portrait before heading to the fair, and when you happen upon a life-size cutout of a farmer, scan it with the app. You’ll get a video and information about that farmer and learn about what they do for a living.

Willie Nelson

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Willie Nelson & Family along with Alison Krauss

8. Sing along with Willie Nelson & Family and Alison Krauss. On Thursday, Aug. 9, get tickets to see Willie and Alison in the Pacific Amphitheatre. You can sing along to one of country music’s greatest legends – and what’s more cowboy than that?

9. Have a farm-to-bar cocktail – A croptail! Hit up the OC Promenade for a tasty cocktail made from farm-fresh ingredients in the Craft Bar. During the day, you can try out a non-alcoholic mocktail that is just as delicious.

10. Stop by the Museum of Agrarian Art. This curated exhibit in the Visual Arts building will include contemporary artwork representing farming, agriculture and the people who cultivate the land, as well as replicas of renown fine art masterpieces.

11. Participate in one of the Garden and Floral Competitions. From Container Plants to Pressed Botanicals, there are several horticulture competitions that you can enter to win the coveted prize: a blue ribbon! Deadlines are August 6 and 7. Visit www.ocfair.com/competitions for details.

12. Go on the Garden Crawl. UCCE OC Master Gardeners will host a walking tour of Centennial Farm’s gardens and crops. Participants receive a prize at the end of the tour. Sign up on the day of, tours will be held weekdays during the Fair.

13. Hear from real-life farmers – the Peterson Farm Bros. These guys work on an actual farm and barely have time to do anything else, but they’re visiting the OC for a couple of days to bring a new spin on what farming is really like. Check them out on July 21 and 22 in the Livestock Arena and Centennial Farm. Preview them at www.youtube.com/petersonfarmbros.

Broncos and Bulls

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Catch all the action at Broncos & Bulls on August 2 and 4

14. Head on over to the rodeo. There are five nights of rodeos to choose from at Action Sports Arena, including Extreme Rodeo (August 1 and 3), Broncs & Bulls (August 2 and 4), and Fiesta del Charro. For more information, go to www.ocfair.com/action-sports-arena.

15. Cheer on the swine at the All-Alaskan Racing Pigs. Everybody’s favorite Livestock race is back, so pick your favorite number and cheer on a snorting, squealing swine. Races are daily at 2, 3, 4, 6, 7 and 8 p.m., but on Saturdays and Sundays, you get an extra show at 1 p.m. Oink!

The 2018 OC Fair is July 13 - August 12 and offers 23 days and nights of entertainment, food, rides, shopping, exhibits and more. Hours are 12 p.m. - midnight Wednesdays through Fridays, and 11 a.m. - midnight Saturdays and Sundays. For more information, visit www.ocfair.com.


Fair Game

By TOM JOHNSON

Is today the day to solve a 45-year-old local murder?

TomJohnsonIt’s a story that turns 45 today…and not a happy one. On Friday, July 6, 1973, an 11-year-old Linda Ann O’Keefe walked home from summer school in Corona del Mar only never to arrive.

Her body was found the next morning in the Back Bay area, although her killer never was.

The Newport Beach Police Department still has an open and ongoing investigation, even after all these years.

Beginning this morning at 7:45 a.m., the NBPD will share the Linda story on Twitter (www.twitter.com/NewportBeachPD) throughout the day until Saturday morning.

They’ll even offer up evidence, including photographs from the original investigation. But here’s where it gets interesting, the NBPD offer a new Parabon Snapshot of the suspected killer.

What’s a Parabon Snapshot you ask? “It’s a process of predicting physical appearance and ancestry from unidentified DNA evidence. Law enforcement agencies use the company’s (Parabon NanoLabs) Snapshot DNA Phenotyping Service to narrow suspect lists and generate leads in criminal investigations.”

In essence, predictions have been made for the killer’s ancestry, eye color, hair color, skin color, freckling and face shape. What you’ll be able to see on Twitter will be the Snapshot composite of the killer at 25 years of age and then an age-progressed version showing what he may look like today.

There is also a Cold Case Tip Line at 949.644.3669.

This would be a nice one to solve, once and for all.

• • •

Next week, WAKE UP! Newport will feature what’s being billed as “City Manager Update: Reflections from Dave Kiff.” 

First off, WAKE UP! Newport is the monthly morning breakfast meeting of the Newport Beach Chamber of Commerce.

Kiff, whose 20-year tour with the City, and nearly 10 as City Manager, will come to a close at the end of August, will discuss “Unforgettable past things important to our community’s success; advice going forward and how the City can stay prosperous; and things he’ll miss the most, and the least.”

Not sure if he’ll name names from his list of things he’ll miss least, but that would make for interesting programming.

Anyway, the breakfast takes place at the Newport Beach Public Library (1000 Avocado Ave.) on Thursday, July 12, with a complimentary continental breakfast at 7:15 a.m., then the program runs from 7:45 - 8:30 a.m. It’s all free.

This should be a popular one. You can register at www.newportbeach.com

or call 949.729.4411.

• • •

It is going to be hot this weekend beginning today. In fact, a heat advisory has been put into effect from 10 a.m. today until 9 p.m. tomorrow night. Forecasts today call for temps to exceed 100 degrees, 96 tomorrow and 88 Sunday.

Here are some things to remember: drink plenty of fluid, even if you don’t feel thirsty; keep a close eye on the elderly; and don’t leave pets or children in a vehicle, even for a minute.

Best idea, find a pool or a nice spot on the beach to escape the heat.


You Must Remember This: Take this quiz to see if you can recall where these places were located

By NANCY GARDNER

Andy Panda

Submitted photo

Pandaland was among the interesting historical spots in Newport

If I were a tech wizard, I could create a ripoff of Pokeman Go. I would call it Newport Went or something similar enough to attract all those Pokeman Go fans and yet just distinct enough to avoid a lawsuit, and then I would watch with great interest as people wandered around the city, eyes glued to their smart phones. However, I am not a tech wizard, so instead I will present a good old-fashioned quiz, a short list of places in our city the names of which have changed or disappeared, and you can try to locate them – or you can just go to the answers. As a hint, I grew up on the CdM side of the harbor. Ready?

--Shark Island 

--Scotchman’s Cove 

--Main Beach 

--Third Beach 

--The Pasture 

--The Point (original) 

--Pandaland

--The Lower Road 

Shark Island – The area now known as Linda Isle. Originally, it was a flat, sandy islet. Apparently, the developer didn’t think Shark Island had the proper tone, or maybe he just wanted to honor his daughter, hence the name change. I’ve always thought this particular alteration was a mistake. Linda is beyond boring. Shark? From Shark Week to Sharknado, sharks are even more compelling than zombies. 

Scotchman’s Cove – This is the beach now called Reef Point, just around the bend from the Crystal Cove Historic District. Whether state officials were unaware of the local designation, or whether they didn’t feel the Scotchman (whoever he was), deserved such recognition, they made the change. You still hear long-time surfers refer to it as Scotchman’s.

Main Beach – Interchangeable with Big Corona, which is more formally called Corona del Mar State Beach. Yawn.

Third Beach – At one point, all the beaches and coves on the CdM side were numbered. Main Beach and Little Corona always had names and El Moro toggled between El Moro and Seventh, but the rest were strictly numbers. Third Beach is the cove immediately south of Little Corona, now referred to by many people, like city staff, as Morning Canyon beach, but again, older surfers refer to it as Third, and it can be seen there on a good south swell.

The Pasture – This was the open space area between CdM and the Crystal Cove cottages. I’ve told the story of how three girls stumbled upon a horse, bought it, and began what became a horse establishment. We called it the Pasture, to distinguish it from the Stables (the current Irvine Terrace). It was never called anything else (well, to be accurate, some people not quite in the know called it “the horse pasture,” but “horse” was not part of the proper name). Again, when the state came in, officials ignored local usage, and the area became Crystal Cove State Park. In this case, I’ll go along.  Pasture State Park doesn’t exactly trip off the tongue.

The Point – If surfers refer to the Point today, they mean that area around 15th Street, but originally the Point was the area that became the Wedge. Surfing began there after the big dredge. Before that, there was a groin at a right angle from the jetty which precluded surfing, since the waves crashed into the rocks. Some of the dredged sand from the harbor was used to cover the groin, and body surfers began to frequent the Point which at some point morphed into the Wedge. 

Pandaland – An area about two thirds of the way down Big Corona, Pandaland was named after Andy “Panda” Smith who was the first person we knew to surf there. It takes a massive south swell to perform, but it still does under the right conditions. 

The Lower Road – If at one time you said you took the lower road, it didn’t necessarily mean you had behaved badly. If you lived in Corona del Mar, it probably meant that you took an actual street – what is now Bayside Drive, and it was THE Lower Road, not Lower Road. Running alongside the Lower Road was a deep gully. I suppose when they filled in the gully to make the park they decided to upgrade the name as well. At one point, the name made sense because you could actually see the bay once you got past Carnation beach. This was a lovely little beach right before the Carnation turn, coming south, which disappeared under houses as did the bayside view.

So, how’d you do? If you got all eight, you have lived here a long time and have probably accumulated more trivia than is healthy. Four or more is very respectable.  However, if you got one or less, you’re obviously a newbie and need to delve a little more into local history, although I would recommend more substantive subjects than what I’ve presented. 

~~~~~~~~

Nancy Gardner, former Mayor of Newport Beach, long-time resident and daughter of Judge Robert Gardner, is a regular contributor to StuNewsNewport.


What’s cooking at the OC Fair?

Part Two in a Two-Part Series on Culinary Arts at the OC Promenade

Lisa Torres

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Photos courtesy of OC Fair Culinary Arts

Lisa Torres of “Delicious Table” will wage a Food Bloggers Bacon Battle with Nancy Buchanan of “A Communal Table” on July 15

--Main Stage – The Heart of The OC Promenade:

The foods we eat are the products of forward-thinking chefs, farmers, ranchers, fisherman, food artisans, beverage experts and regional purveyors who are on a mission to help educate for a better tomorrow. The Main Stage in the OC Promenade is your passport to experience and learn from some of the best culinary experts in California. Make this your year to learn! Are you ready to satisfy your culinary passion?

Culinary Arts Demonstrations change daily from 1 - 7 p.m.

Renowned Food Historian Ernie Miller and MC Peter Harwick will announce more than 100 stage demonstrations throughout the fair – check out the daily schedule or the schedules posted at the Main Mall Entrance.

Pop-Up Cooking Competitions on Sunday at 2 p.m.

Live Judging of the Concessionaires’ Cup, Wednesday, July 25 at 1 p.m.

Live Judging of the Great American Spam® Championship, Saturday, August 4 at 1 p.m. 

Nightly Eating Contests at 7 p.m.

Live Music from 8:30 - 11 p.m.

Grab a “croptail” or mocktail” from The Craft Beer, a fermented root beer float from the Fermentation Farm, or treats from the Pâtisserie and listen to the music. 

Be Prepared, you never know when the Fair Foodies will show up.

Awards Celebrations for Homebrew (Saturday, July 14 at 1 p.m.) and for Culinary Arts, Home Arts and Visual Arts (Saturday, August 11, starting at 11:30 a.m.

--Stage Left with the schedule changing daily:

You won’t believe what will “Pop Up” here. Get a sample, purchase products from stage demos, watch food demonstrations or meet a cookbook author.

Cookbook Library – witness the evolution of cookbooks from the heavy, page after page of fabulous recipe books to the heavily illustrated cookbooks of today that read like novels.

Local cookbook authors Meet-and-Greet.

Feel free to page through the recipe books and take photos of your favorite recipes. Don’t forget to cast a vote for your favorite cookbook. The results will be tallied and announced once a week.

DIY Kitchen Hacks where you’ll learn how clever cooks get things done.

Check the clock for the next 15-minute demo of fun and creative DIY projects you can do at home. Handouts are available.

Baked Goods Competition where you’ll get inspired in the kitchen by checking out the displays from talent throughout South County.

Enter one of the four Baked Goods Competitions next year. Vote for your favorite exhibit and participate in selecting the People’s Choice Award that will be announced during the Award Ceremony on the Main Stage.

Farm-to-Table Train where you’ll learn about the journey our food takes from the farm to the California table. Take a moment to honor our farmers.

Vintage Apron Display throughout the decades.

In the ‘40s and ‘50s, full length handmade cotton aprons were donned in the morning and remained in place until evening. The large pockets were filled with everything from kitchen utensils to clothes pins. In the ‘60s and ‘70s, half aprons were the rage and they were only worn in the kitchen during meal preparation. When did aprons disappear from most kitchen? Let’s champion a comeback!

Sample of Culinary Arts Demonstrations:

Carnivores, omnivores, vegans, vegetarians, pescatarians, and semi-flexitarians! Relax, take a seat center stage and be prepared to be entertained and educated about all things culinary trending in the OC.

Stop by the information desk or consult the OC Fair website for a complete schedule of more than 100 stage demonstrations at 1, 3 and 5 p.m.

Here are just a few of the highlights: 

Robert Schueller, Produce Guru, shares his passion about produce on Friday, July 13.

Lisa Torres (Delicious Table) vs. Nancy Buchanan (A Communal Table) wage a Food Bloggers Bacon Battle on Sunday, July 15.

Thom Curry, Master Miller and Owner of Temecula Olive Oil Company, educates consumers about California Olive Oil and its many uses on Sunday, July 22.

Dr. JJ Levenstein, voted one of the Best Doctors in America, is also a wickedly wonderful, professionally trained chef and baker on Saturday, July 28.

Chef Alex Aviles, Orange County School of the Arts, presents the Art of Charcuterie on Sunday, July 29.

Chef Nicole Holtzman, from The Art Institute of California (Orange County) and Personal Chef for a Real Housewives of OC, shares her savvy tips, tricks and culinary expertise on Wednesday, August 1.

Chef Daniella Malfatano, Chef, nine-time Cookbook Author, TV and Radio host. and Costa Mesa resident, shares her crowd-pleasing Sweets Á La Mode on Friday, August 3.

Daniella Malfatano

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Chef Daniella Malfatano will share her Sweets Á La Mode 

Chef Stéphane Tréand, World Champion Pastry and Esteemed MOF, showcases his sugar art talents on Saturday, August 4. (MOF translates to Meilleur Ouvier de France or Best Craftsman of France. The title carries an important historical legacy and recognizes work approaching perfection.)

Chef Stephane Treand

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Chef Stéphane Tréand creating a sugar art piece

Chef Enrique Sanchez, from Northgate González Markets (The Whole Foods of Mexican grocery stores), brings Hatch chiles from the farm to you on Sunday, August 12.

California Kid Chefs and TV Personalities Featured on the Main Stage

Mason Partak, 2015 Chopped Junior Winner, Blog: Mason Made. For more information, visit www.masonpartak.com

Mason Partak

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Mason Partak, a “Chopped Junior” winner will make a guest appearance

Cloyce Martin, a contestant on Man vs. Child: Chef Showdown. He has also appeared on The Rachael Ray Show. This young culinary talent owns the Lock and Key pop up restaurant. He attends Orange County School of the Arts, Mekjian Family Culinary Arts & Hospitality Conservatory in Santa Ana.

Cloyce Martin

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Cloyce Martin, a contestant from “Man vs. Child: Chef Showdown,” will be featured on the Main Stage

Isabella Vegh, a student at Orange County School of the Arts, Mekjian Family Culinary Arts & Hospitality Conservatory in Santa Ana, is a 4-H Emerald Star recipient, Triple Best of Class winner in Preserved Foods and the winner of the Youth Spam Championship at the OC Fair.

Sean Le, MasterChef Junior contestant and a student at Fountain Valley High School. For more information, follow at @seanybonbon or visit www.lsaenq11.wizsite.com/seanybonbon.

Educational Programs on the Main Stage Focusing on Kids!

Learn How to Ferment Pickles with Fermentation Farm.

Learn About Bees with OC Local Honey.

Learn How to Pickle with UCCE OC Master Food Preservers.

Enjoy a Family-Friendly Fun Day with the Heritage Museum.

Learn How to Make Edible Cookie Dough Bites with Baking with Melissa.

Cupcake and Cookie Decorating, Chocolate Lollipop, Chocolate Bonbon and Fondant Fun with Chef Stéphane.

Mother-Daughter Spam® Duo with Isabella and Jackie Vegh.

Mother and daughter Spam Duo

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Isabella and Jackie Vegh, Mother-Daughter Spam® Duo

Cake Decorating with Chef Stéphane and Orange County School of the Arts students from the Mekjian Family Culinary Arts & Hospitality Conservatory in Santa Ana.

Valley High School Culinary Arts Students, who are the winners of the

2018 Cooking Competition.

Keep It Going With More Hands-On Fun For Kids Stage Left

Molecular Gastronomy from the students at Orange County School of the Arts, Mekjian Family Culinary Arts & Hospitality Conservatory in Santa Ana.

Learn How to Make Chocolate Spaghetti, Apple & Strawberry Caviar on Saturday, July 21, Sunday, July 22 and Saturday, July 28.      

Mega Cupcake Decorating Sponsored by Northgate Market on Thursdays July 19, July 26, August 2 and August 9.

Pop-Up Cooking Competitions

If you (13 years to adult) are not quite ready for the formal Culinary Competitions, sign up for one of the fun Pop-Up Cooking Competitions held live and center stage on Sundays at 2 p.m. The first eight participants to sign up at the Information Booth will comprise the field of worthy competition. All contestants will receive the same ingredients for their creations. Winners will be awarded 1st, 2nd and 3rd place ribbons and bragging rights for a year.

Scheduled line-up:

--Don’t Knock my Guac, July 15

--Best Deviled Egg, July 22

--Salsa Challenge, July 29

--The Ultimate Grilled Cheese, August 12

Nightly Eating Contests – The fun doesn’t stop when stage demonstrations finish at 6 p.m. Nighty Eating Contests follow on Main Stage at 7 p.m. Sign up at the Information Desk beginning at 5 p.m. nightly. Eating Contests are open to the first 10 guests who sign up and are open to fairgoers ages 9 and older. Check back at 6:30 p.m. to confirm your participation.

Scheduled line-up:

--Chicken Charlie’s Chocolate Spaghetti or Cotton Candy Sandwich, Saturday, July 14

--Watermelon, Saturday, July 21

--Australian Battered Potato, Sunday, July 22

--Old Tyme Ice Cream, Friday, July 27

--Strawberry Shortcake, Saturday, July 28

--”Get Pickled” Pickle, Saturday, August 4

Editor’s Note: The OC Fair is promoting the importance of agriculture for urban youth – every Thursday is Kids’ Day! The Fair is open July 13 - August 12; closed on Mondays and Tuesdays. For more information, visit www.ocfair.com.


Sign of the times

It’s another edition of Sign of the times, so put your thinking caps on. Stu thinks this resembles a whirling dervish...Where would you find this colorful whirl?

Good luck! Stu loves publishing the winning answers on Tuesday.

Send your guesses to This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it..

If you’re a business and you want to play, you can send us a high-quality photo of your sign and we’ll take it from there and challenge our readers.

Let’s have some fun!

SOTT 7.6.18

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Little Lido Kids Club is poised for summer fun

Dinosaur book cover

Submitted photo

This summer, join Lido Village Books for Little Lido Kids Club every Thursday from 10 - 11 a.m.

On Thursday, July 12, little ones will read “How Do Dinosaurs Stay Friends,” by Jane Yolen and Mark Teague, then make some dinosaur fossils.

Afterward, guests will receive special promotions at Lido Marina Village for shopping and dining, including 10 percent off book purchases at Lido Village Books, $25 off purchases at Eberjey and 15 percent off purchases at Bailey 44.

RSVP at http://bit/ly/LLdinos to be entered into a drawing for prizes and to ensure craft materials.

Lido Village Books is located at 3424 Via Oporto #102 in Lido Marina Village, Newport Beach. For more information, visit www.lidovillagebooks.com.


Stump the Stu

Metalwork on a brick facade is eye catching 

Stump the Stu 7.6.18

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Several of you knew where this architectural metal creation that graces a used brick wall can be found...complete with etched foliage and hummingbirds.

Congratulations to Charles Davison, David Pittman and Don Webb, who knew it was located in The Garden next to C’est Si Bon on Riverside Drive, Newport Beach.

Join us on Tuesdays as we try and stump you each week with a picture of something unique in our community, with answers and winners appearing on Fridays.

If you have a unique spot or icon around town that you think Stu News Newport readers would enjoy finding out about, please shoot it, share it and give us the answer, so we can challenge them! Happy Hunting.


Take your business to the next level at the CdM Chamber networking luncheon

Traci Cole

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Submitted photo

Mark your calendar for the upcoming Corona del Mar Chamber of Commerce Networking & Speaker Luncheon, taking place on Tuesday, July 17 at Bayside Restaurant.

While you mix and mingle, enjoy the featured speaker, Traci Cole, who is a business professional and entrepreneur with diverse experience in marketing strategy, sales, financial analysis, project management and consulting in organizations ranging from startups to large corporations and nonprofits.

Cole’s talk will focus on marketing your business by exploring the definition of marketing, its objectives, market research and marketing concepts such as: needs, wants and demands; markets; products and services; transactions and relationships; and value, satisfaction and quality.

The Chamber requests that guests RSVP in advance at www.CdmChamber.com. Check-in and networking is from 11:30 a.m. - 12 p.m.; the lunch and program is from 12 - 1:15 p.m. The cost is $30 for Chamber members, and $40 for Non-members and community friends. The menu will include: simple roasted chicken, seasonal vegetables, potato puree and lemon sauce. A vegetarian alternative is also available. 

For more information, call 949.673.4050 or email This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it..

Bayside Restaurant is located at 900 Bayside Drive, Newport Beach.


Tenants reportedly sue former landlord and City for fire that displaced 18

Tenants reportedly fire

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Courtesy of Kevin Warn Photography

Eighteen former tenants have reportedly filed separate $10,000 small claims lawsuits against a prominent Orange County real estate leasing and development company, claiming fraud and gross negligence resulted in a massive fire in 2016.

The plaintiff(s), Production Place Tenants Group (PPTG), consists primarily of small business owners and local residents who suffered damages to their operations and personal belongings as a result of the catastrophic fire. Each of the 18 former tenants have filed suit in small claims court for $10,000, the maximum allowed. 

As of Wednesday evening, July 4, Newport Beach officials said they have not seen the complaints.

The early morning four-alarm blaze on November 11, 2016, on 16th Street, Newport Beach, required firefighters from Costa Mesa, Huntington Beach, Fountain Valley and Newport Beach, and consumed 20,000 sq. ft. of tenant space and 33 vehicles. One former tenant suffered smoke inhalation and other injuries while escaping his unit. He was treated at Hoag Hospital and released the same day. 

The property is owned and managed by Corona del Mar-based Hunsaker Management and Development Co. The defendants in the suit are the Hunsaker Family Trust and its trustee, Richard C. Hunsaker, who is a prominent member of the Orange County community. Richard and Virginia Hunsaker made headlines in 2014 when they established a $35 million scholarship endowment to their alma mater, the University of Redlands. Other Hunsaker gifts include at least $6 million to the Orange County Performing Arts Center.

According to its website, Hunsaker Management, Inc. currently manages more than 3 million sq. ft. of properties located in Los Angeles, Orange, Riverside, San Bernardino, San Diego and San Joaquin counties. 

“Filing 18 separate suits in small claims court moves us one step closer to our goal of seeing justice served and exposing corruption and incompetence at the highest levels of business in Orange County,” said former tenant Ty Hansen. “The gross negligence and lack of accountability within Hunsaker Management Co. and the City of Newport Beach must be accounted for.” 

Allegedly, according to documents uncovered thus far, it has been over 30 years since fire prevention inspections were performed on either of two 10,000 sq. ft. former mobile home storage sheds. The plaintiffs also claim that the facility had no fire alarms, smoke detectors, or sprinklers; and that that the facility was improperly zoned, and not approved for use as self-storage. 

“There weren’t even any fire extinguishers on the property,” Hansen said.

Asked why the PPTG chose the small claims strategy, Hansen said, “We contacted dozens of lawyers and law firms, most of which said our case has merit, but all of whom declined to sign, because suing billionaire property owners and the City of Newport Beach can be an expensive proposition. They summarized our case as a bad investment.

“We also want others in the same or similar circumstance to feel inspired by what we are doing. You can’t be frightened into inaction just because the person who did you wrong is rich. Doing nothing is not an option.”


Today marks the 45th anniversary of the murder of Linda Ann O’Keefe, age 11

Linda Ann OKeefe

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Courtesy of NBPD

Linda Ann O’Keefe

Today marks the 45th anniversary of the abduction of Linda Ann O’Keefe, an 11-year-old girl who lived in Corona del Mar. O’Keefe was last seen alive on Friday, July 6, 1973 as she walked home from summer school. Her body was discovered the next morning in the Back Bay area. Her killer was never found.

Starting at 7:45 a.m. today, July 6, the Newport Beach Police Department will give O’Keefe a voice once again. Readers can follow along on Twitter (www.twitter.com/NewportBeachPD) as they share her story. Tweets in O’Keefe’s “voice” will be published throughout the day and into Saturday morning, narrating the last hours of her life.

Evidence, including photographs from the original investigation and a new Parabon Snapshot* of the suspected killer, will be included throughout the event. The tweets will culminate in a video overview of the homicide case, as told by the detectives who have been working on this investigation.

Years have passed since this heinous murder, but the NBPD remains dedicated to justice for O’Keefe, and committed to finding her killer.

This is an open and ongoing investigation, and no additional details will be available at this time. Anyone with information on this case is encouraged to call the NBPD Cold Case Tip Line at 949.644.3669.

*Additional Information on Parabon Snapshot DNA Phenotyping: 

 Newport Beach Police Department investigators have recently sought the services of Parabon NanoLabs (Parabon), a DNA technology company in Virginia that specializes in DNA phenotyping: the process of predicting physical appearance and ancestry from unidentified DNA evidence. Law enforcement agencies use the company’s Snapshot DNA Phenotyping Service (Snapshot) to narrow suspect lists and generate leads in criminal investigations.

Using DNA evidence from this investigation, Snapshot produced trait predictions for the suspected killer. Individual predictions were made for the subject’s ancestry, eye color, hair color, skin color, freckling and face shape. By combining these attributes of appearance, a Snapshot composite was produced depicting what the suspect may have looked like at 25 years old and with an average body-mass index (BMI) of 22. These default values were used because age and BMI cannot be determined from DNA. An age-progressed version, showing what the suspect might look like today, was also prepared by Parabon.

It is important to note that Snapshot composites are scientific approximations of appearance based on DNA, and are not likely to be exact replicas of appearance. Environmental factors such as smoking, drinking, diet and other non-environmental factors – e.g. facial hair, hairstyle, scars, etc. – cannot be predicted by DNA analysis and may cause further variation between subject’s predicted and actual appearance.


KX 93.5 Radio to hold summer media camp

KX Logo

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Submitted photo

Calling all Newport Beach students who are interested in broadcasting, podcasting, media or journalism! KX 93.5 Radio is looking for summer campers who would like to learn how to host, produce, record, write and edit just like a professional disc jockey. Sponsored by Cox Communications, all campers will depart with a flash drive of their completed work and an understanding of how to produce their own show from home.

Camp culminates on the final day with a live show hosted by each youngster, which will be broadcasted on KX 93.5 FM and online. It will also include a field trip and tour of the Cox Communications campus. 

There are three sessions, starting Monday, July 9, and each week of camp runs from 9 a.m. - 12 p.m., Monday through Friday. The cost is $185 per student.

Sessions include:

--Radio Camp 101A (ages 11 - 14): July 9 - 13

--Radio Camp 101B (ages 14 - 18): July 23 - 27

--Radio Camp 201 (all ages for graduates of 101): July 30 - August 3

To sign up, click here.

Radio Camp takes place at the KX 93.5 Studio, 1833 S. Coast Highway #200, Laguna Beach.


Healing puppies: a cure to a stressful workplace

BY LANA JOHNSON

What do Bella, Olive, Lou, Billie, Bob and Stevie all have in common? They are among the pets whose owners enjoy taking them to work on a regular basis. Their place of employment? Pacific View Mortuary & Memorial Park.

While lots of people take advantage of “Bring Your Dog to Work Day,” which recently took place on June 22, Pacific View Mortuary sees the importance of having pooches in their surroundings day to day.

Cathy Wadsworth with Lou and Billie

Courtesy of Pacific View Mortuary & Memorial Park.

Cathy Wadsworth with sisters Lou and Billie. Their older brother, Bob, also comes to the workplace.

Many scientific studies have concluded that the presence of pets can substantially reduce a person’s stress level in the workplace. Increased job satisfaction, team cooperation and morale have all been reported in employees that spend the workday with their pets. 

Sharleen Zigray

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Photo by Lana Johnson

Sharleen Zigray with Olive, who was the first pup to come to work in 2007

According to Pacific View Mortuary Manager Ruby Louis, they didn’t get the idea from this unofficial holiday created by Pet Sitters International in 1999. She was approached by an employee in 2007, Sharleen Zigray, who works in Family Services and wanted to bring her Cairn Terrier Poodle mix, Olive, to work. He is now 12 years old and still comes to the workplace with Zigray. This started the ball rolling for other employees to do the same.

Ruby Louis

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Photo by Lana Johnson

Pacific View Mortuary General Manager Ruby Louis with Bella, whose owner is Jill Pike

According to Louis, “We have a variety of breeds and all ages here now, and they provide a soothing calmness to our everyday rigors.” As long as the dogs are potty trained, are not aggressive or bark a great deal...they are perfect candidates. “The dogs have bonded us all together in an unspoken commonality, as well as the pups getting along well with each other, too.

“Also, when we work with a client family on funeral services, and they would like to meet the pups, we welcome them to do so...it truly can get them through a very trying time in their lives,” Louis explained.

Some of the animals stay with their owners while others wander around looking for treats. Louis says she always has healthy nibbles on hand at her desk.

Pacific View Mortuary employs a staff of 60, but depending on the scheduling, the number of puppies present Monday through Friday varies.

“We meet every morning at 8 a.m. in our Del Mar Room to get the employees together along with their dogs, so they can all greet each other,” Louis shared. “For me personally, it truly lifts my mood and makes for a wonderful day. Sometimes, I just need to slow down, and picking up the puppies is the best way I know how to feel uplifted.”

Group shot

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Courtesy of Pacific View Mortuary & Memorial Park.

Owners and their pets get together every morning for a Meet and Greet

Each day at Pacific View Mortuary promises to be a lot of fun for all those involved. So, maybe it’s time to give your dog a job!

Pacific View Mortuary & Memorial Park is located at 3500 Pacific View Drive, Corona del Mar. For more information, visit www.pacificviewcalifornia.com.


Celebrating July 4th around Newport

By CONRAD KRUEGER and LANA JOHNSON

Celebrating Lead In 1

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Photo by Lana Johnson

The South Shore Yacht Club showed their patriotism with a yacht beautifully decorated with flags

The 8th Annual Newport Peninsula Bike Parade and Community Festival was one for the books. The festivities began at 9 a.m. with the highly anticipated Bike Parade, which started at the 36th Street Park and continued all the way up to 44th Street at Channel Place Park. It was led by the Boy Scouts of America troop who marched down the streets while proudly displaying the American flag. They were followed by the fire and police departments in their shiny red fire truck and old school police cruiser. Then, locals rounded out the parade by riding decorated bikes, scooters, and golf carts in their best red, white and blue attire. The Community Festival followed on the grass at Channel Place Park. The City of Newport Beach fully sponsored the event, making it free of charge. The real fun began as children dispersed to enjoy carnival games, giant slides, bounce houses, arts & crafts, and food. Out of all the rides, the longest line was at the slides with even some adults getting in on the action.

Celebrating Lead In 2

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Photo by Conrad Krueger

The Peninsula started the 4th off with a Bike Parade & Channel Place Park Festival

Across town, the 46th Annual Mariners Park Independence Day Parade & Celebration took place beginning at 10:30 a.m. at the corner of Commodore and Mariners Drive. Families, bicycles, wagons, razors...and even furry friends were decked out in their best stars and stripes. The Newport Beach Fire Department, a vintage black and white police car and a band added to the festivities.

Celebrating Lead In 3

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Photo by Lana Johnson

Newport Beach Mayor Marshall “Duffy” Duffield and councilmembers Will O’Neill and Brad Avery enjoy the Mariners Day Parade with family and friends

After the parade, crowds converged at Mariners Park with carnival games, a rock wall, balloon burst, an opportunity drawing, face painting, DJ & Gamemaster, sports zone, free entertainment, and arts & crafts. Food was available for sale from Sgt. Pepperoni’s, Maui Ice, TK Burger, Pandor and Chronic Tacos. Presented by the Mariners School Foundation and the City of Newport Beach Recreation & Senior Services Department, proceeds from the event support Mariners Elementary School.

For those that wanted to cool off, Independence Day on the Back Bay provided the perfect setting, with Newport Dunes Waterfront Resort opening at 8 a.m. so people could grab a favorite spot on the sand, enjoy the sunshine, lagoon (with kayaks and standup paddleboards or pedal boats) and an inflatable water park. Many had their barbecues smoking, while others enjoyed the fare at the food trucks. Special events included a bounce house, horseshoe tournament nearby Moe B’s Watersports and a barn dance at Back Bay Bistro. Celebrants stayed for live music on the stage and the spectacular pyrotechnics show. 

For those who love boats and can never get enough of our picturesque harbor, the Old Glory Boat Parade delivered the pomp and circumstance from 1 - 3 p.m., with great vantage points from both the Peninsula and the Island. Hosted by the American Legion Yacht Club and American Legion Post 291, this year’s theme was “Valor – Through the Generations.” Boats of all sizes, from tugs to luxurious yachts were decked out in their best patriotic regalia. When evening came, so did the jazz music and fireworks display.

We hope you had a fun and memorable Fourth of July. Enjoy this slideshow celebrating Americana around our great community.


Check out more Independence Day photos below

Photos by Conrad Krueger and Lana Johnson


Brow Works celebrates grand opening in Newport Beach

Brow Works celebrates

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Courtesy of Brow Works

 (L-R): Newport Beach City Councilman Jeff Herdman, Morgan Williams, Alexandra DiCaprio, Thanh Huynh, Jana Williams, Adam Williams and Lois Kinsey officially open the Brow Works Flagship Studio

Brow Works, a full-service, permanent makeup, skincare and wellness studio hosted its grand opening and ribbon cutting on June 28, to celebrate summer and introduce its services to friends, family and clients.

With 5-star ratings and rave client reviews in its first month, Brow Works fills a 

unique niche in beauty and wellness for women 35+ years of age in Orange County who

want a more natural and non-invasive approach to beauty and aging gracefully.

Brow Works uses the latest beauty and wellness technology and treatments and is the owner of one of the first FDA-cleared LightStim LED Light Beds in Newport Beach for wellness. Brow Works is only one of nine providers in California with the LED bed.

Unlike pop-up brow bars, Brow Works’ licensed makeup artists follow the highest standards of quality control and use only safe disposable products, in a clean, modern studio.

Brow Works believes beauty begins with human kindness and support in our own communities. Through its Brow Angel program, the studio donates permanent makeup services to homeless women at the Casa Teresa Homeless Shelter for Pregnant Women. As the company grows, Brow Works will continue to expand its services for women in need.

Founded in 2016 by philanthropist Jana Williams, Brow Works was based on the idea that it is possible for women at any age to embrace effortless beauty. “Less is more” with Brow Works’ natural looking permanent makeup, “Alternative Facelift,” Microneedling, anti-aging Enzyme Treatments and LED Photo Facials.

Every permanent makeup treatment includes a 20-minute LED light therapy session, and all first consultations are complimentary.

Brow Works is located at 833 Dover Drive #15, Newport Beach. For more information, call 949.258.7711 or visit www.browworks.com.


Award-winning clinic opens in Corona del Mar

Arolyn Burns LPCC Director

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Photo by sarahjphoto.com

Arolyn Burns, LPCC Director, The A Treatment Center

The A Treatment Center, an award-winning therapy practice, is now open in Corona del Mar. The company has been the recipient of the 2018 Business Hall of Fame Award four years in a row in the city of Pasadena, and was honored for its psychotherapy, hypnotherapy, coaching and counseling services.

Each year, this program identifies companies that they believe have achieved exceptional marketing success in their local community and business category. The counseling clinic has two locations: one in Pasadena and now a new growing space in Corona del Mar. 

The mission of the clinic is to provide personalized care based on each client’s mental health needs, with specializations in solution-focused therapy, cognitive behavioral therapy, hypnotherapy, mindfulness and EMDR (eye movement and desensitization and reprocessing).

The A Treatment Center is located at 2721 E. Coast Highway, Corona del Mar. For more information, call 626.304.4690 or visit www.theatreatment.com.


THE LOT presents Fashion Island’s Friday Night Flix

Dirty Dancing

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Submitted photo

A scene from “Dirty Dancing” starring Patrick Swayze and Jennifer Grey 

Enjoy an outdoor movie under the stars every Friday in July in the Neiman Marcus Bloomingdale’s Courtyard from 7:30 - 10 p.m. The cost is $10.

Scheduled line-up includes:

July 6: Jaws

July 13: A League of Their Own

July 20: Dirty Dancing

July 27: Pretty in Pink

Check-in begins at 7:30 p.m. Showtime is at dusk. Enjoy a warm bag of popcorn with your purchase of a $10 general admission ticket. Movies are subject to change. Seating is first come, first serve. Chairs will be provided. Food is permitted, but please no coolers. No alcohol is not permitted. This event is weather permitting.

To purchase tickets visit, www.eventbrite.com/e/fashion-islands-friday-night-flix-tickets-47028719165?aff=ebdssbdestsearch.

Fashion Island is located t 401 Newport Center Drive, Newport Beach. For more information, call (949) 721-2000.


What’s cooking at the OC Fair?

Part One in a Two-Part Series on Culinary Arts

Chef Ryan

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Courtesy of OC Fair Culinary Arts

Chef Ryan Wagner – The Culinary Lab

If you think OC Fair food is just funnel cakes, fried turkey legs and caramel crack fries...you’re in for quite a surprise! There is an esteemed Culinary Arts program that will be bringing in top chefs, high-level competitions and demos, and a variety of celebrated exhibits and tours, thanks to Pam Wnuck, Culinary Arts Supervisor and her staff, who are planning many exciting happenings during this year’s Fair.

Here’s a rundown, taking place in the OC Promenade:

--Foodie Ambassadors lead small groups of 8 -10 “Crawlers” on a free 30-minute walking tour of the Culinary Arts Building.

The tour includes:

--Stories of OC Fair history

--A preview of what’s to come on the Main Stage and Stage Left

--Insights into OC Fair’s seven Culinary Arts Competitions

--Mini-bites and presentations from these seven celebrated exhibitors:

--Fruit & Vegetable Carver, Chef Ray Duey

--The Pâtisserie with MOF Pastry Chef Stéphane Tréand (MOF translates to Meilleur Ouvier de France or Best Craftsman of France. The title carries an important historical legacy and recognizes work approaching perfection.)

--The Canning Kitchen with UCCE OC Master Food Preservers

--Charcuterie, Hops & Grains

--The Honey Bar

--California Extra Virgin Olive Oil

--The Fermentation Farm

Sign up at the Information Desk to ensure a spot in the Culinary Crawl at 2, 4, 6 or 8 p.m., and receive a commemorative wristband. Observant Foodies who spot the “Hidden Farmer” during the crawl also can boast a special ribbon award.

Chef Ray Duey

Submitted photo

Chef Ray Duey, CEC Fruit and Vegetable Carver 

Celebrated Exhibits:

Culinary Artist Chef Ray Duey, CEC Fruit and Vegetable Carver

Open daily until 8 p.m.

Chef Ray Duey’s carving techniques using specialty produce that can’t be described – you have to see this! Have a seat and watch him sculpt a magical centerpiece that will come to life. His 35 years of experience, carving for numerous U.S. Presidents, and over three-dozen award-winning medals have prepared him to wow fairgoers. For more information, www.chefgarnish.com.

Pastry Chef Stephane Treand

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Courtesy of OC Fair Culinary Arts

World Champion Pastry Chef Stéphane Tréand demonstrating cookie decorating

The Pâtisserie with World Champion Pastry Chef Stéphane Tréand

Open daily until 11 p.m.

Costa Mesa has its very own MOF Pastry Chef; there are only four in the entire U.S. Stop by and learn what an MOF is, and how this prestigious honor is earned by a select few in France. Taste Chef Tréand’s French pastries, marshmallows, chocolate, gelato, macarons (Do you know the difference between a macaron and a macaroon?), and more. Sign up for Chef Tréand’s pastry and chocolate classes at The Pastry School right here in Costa Mesa. Classes are geared toward both amateurs and professionals. Internship opportunities are also available for pastry students. Check the Daily Schedule for Chef Tréand’s demonstrations on the Main Stage. For more information, visit www.thepastryschool.org.

Canned tomatoes and peaches

Submitted photo

Canning tomatoes and peaches preserves sweet summer fruits year round

The Canning Kitchen by UCCE OC Master Food Preservers (MFP)

Open daily until 8 p.m.

Stop by and learn what an MFP is and how to become one. Many of us have found our “Inner Farmers” in our own backyards, so come discover what to do with the lemons, peaches, tomatoes and beans that ripen all at once. Let the MFPs show you how to preserve the season to enjoy all year long. Watch as the MFPs demonstrate safe food preservation techniques including canning, fermenting and dehydrating. Learn where you can sign up for hands-on classes year round, check out all the award-winning entries in the Preserved Food & Liqueur Competition, and get inspired to enter the competition in 2019.

Charcuterie-Hops-Grains

Open daily until 11 p.m.

Learn about cheese and charcuterie, and how to assemble and enjoy a charcuterie platter to impress your family and friends. View the entries and winners in the Beer Competition and enjoy some beer trivia. Sit down and enjoy a “croptail” or mocktail” featuring libations from the Drift Distillery, only the second distillery in Orange County. This family business even grows its own wheat. Watch the bartenders create some amazing drinks fresh from the garden, and revel in cheesemaking.

Honey Competition & Tasting Bar

Open daily until 9 p.m.

Sample and purchase OC local honey, and pause a moment to read the educational kiosk celebrating the amazing contributions of bees. Don’t forget to peruse the display of the entries in the Honey Competition held on Tuesday, June 19.

California olive oil

Submitted photo

Sample California olive oils at the tasting bar

CA EVOO Competition & Tasting Bar

Open daily until 8 p.m.

Different CA Olive Oil producers will be on hand daily to educate, taste and sell. Learn what the terms EVOO and cold press mean, how to taste, read a label, purchase and properly store your olive oil. Like wine, olive oil is personal – taste some CA Olive Oil and learn what is pleasing to your palate. You will leave this exhibit appreciating how special the label “CA Olive Oil” is. Check out the winners of the Second EVOO Competition held on March 28.

Fermentation Farm

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Courtesy of OC Fair Culinary Arts

Dr. Yasmin Mason’s Fermentation Farm

Fermentation Farm

Open daily until 9 p.m.

Dr. Yasmin Mason’s Fermentation Farm is alive and well right here in Costa Mesa. Learn about fermentation and a healthy gut. See proof that yeast is alive with the yeast balloon demo. Taste and purchase some amazing flavors of kombucha, and her new fermented root beer; come back every day, as flavors change frequently. Purchase a fermentation vessel to make sauerkraut, escabeche, and more at home – you’ll be surprised how easy it is. For more information, visit www.fermfarm.com.

Editor’s Note: Part Two will cover all the happenings on the Main Stage, including appearances by TV celebrity chefs.


Enjoy these Fourth of July activities 

Newport Dunes fireworks

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Courtesy of Newport Dunes Waterfront Resort

Fireworks over the Back Bay lagoon light up the sky

Enjoy these Fourth of July Activities in and around Newport Beach:

Old Glory Boat ParadeParade takes place from 1 - 3 p.m. This Newport Harbor tradition starts off Collins Island and proceeds through Newport Harbor. Hosted by the American Legion Yacht Club and American Legion Post 291, this year’s theme is “Valor – Through the Generations.” Boaters are invited to decorate their boats and participate. Registration is free. Winners will be announced at the awards banquet on Sunday, July 22 at 6:30 p.m.

Schedule of events:

7 - 11 a.m. – Pancake Breakfast 

12 - 5 p.m. – Lunch Buffet

1 - 3:30 p.m. – Old Glory Boat Parade

1 - 5 p.m. – Rock music

5 - 9 p.m. – Jazz music

9 - 10 p.m. Fireworks

Cost TBD for breakfast only (open to the public); lunch, dancing and fireworks; and breakfast, lunch, dancing and fireworks.

For more information, call 949.673.5002 and visit www.alyc.com for a parade map and to register.

Old Glory Boat Parade

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Courtesy of balboaisland.com

8th Annual 4th of July is for Families Newport Peninsula Bike Parade & Community Festival – At 9 a.m., the Bike Parade takes place at 36th Street Park. From 9:30 - 11:30 a.m., the Free Community Festival takes place at Channel Place Park, ending at a free festival with bounce houses, a dunk tank, arts & crafts, giant slides, carnival games and food for sale. Participants are encouraged to decorate bikes, scooters, wagons and strollers, and to bring dogs on leashes. The event is presented by the City of Newport Beach. For more information, call 949.644.3151 or visit www.newportbeachca.gov

Road closures (all closure times are approximate): On July 4 from 10:30 a.m. to the early morning hours of July 5 – Southbound Orange Street at West Coast Highway and Via Oporto from Via Lido to 32nd Street will be closed. All streets on the Peninsula will be open to vehicle traffic, however NBPD will be monitoring traffic conditions throughout the day and will facilitate additional street closures should the need arise. On-street and other public parking will be extremely limited in the West Newport area. All residents and visitors are cautioned to park in legal, public spaces or their own, private spaces or garages. Vehicles parked illegally will be issued parking citations and may be towed. On the July 4th, text NBJULY4TH to 888777 to receive updated road closure information, significant traffic advisories and community advisories.

July 4th decorated bike

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Submitted photo

Decorate your bike in red, white and blue for the Mariners Day Parade

46th Annual Mariners Park Independence Day Parade & Celebration – At 10:30 a.m., the Parade begins at the corner of Commodore and Mariners Drive. From 11 a.m. - 1:30 p.m., the Celebration takes place at Mariners Park, 1300 Irvine Ave., featuring carnival games, a rock wall, balloon burst, an opportunity drawing, face painting, DJ & Gamemaster, sports zone, free entertainment and arts & crafts. Food will be available for sale from Sgt. Pepperoni’s, Maui Ice, TK Burger, Pandor and Chronic Tacos. The event is presented by the Mariners School Foundation and the City of Newport Beach Recreation & Senior Services Department. Proceeds from the event support Mariners Elementary School. For more information, visit www.marinersfoundation.com or call 949.644.3151.

Road Closures: From 6 a.m. - 12 p.m. – Dover Drive and Irvine Avenue, Mariners Drive and Dover Drive, Dover Drive and Sussex Lane, Commodore Road after Skylark Lane, and Santiago Drive and Mariners Drive will be closed. From 6 a.m. - 2 p.m. – Mariners Drive at Pembroke Lane will be closed

Newport Dunes inflatable waterpark

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Courtesy of Newport Dunes Waterfront Resort

Cool off at the inflatable waterpark at Newport Dunes

Independence Day on the Back Bay – Takes place from 2 - 10 p.m. Enjoy sunshine, music and fireworks on the bay. Come early to set up your spot on the beach for the most spectacular pyrotechnics fireworks show in Orange County. Bring your beach chairs and umbrellas for a fun day in the sun with live entertainment, dancing, food trucks and a full bar. Please note, no pets are allowed.

Highlighted Schedule of Events:

8 a.m.: Newport Dunes’ gates open; there will be a $50 per car parking fee throughout the day.

9 a.m.: The Marketplace opens for rentals of pedal go-karts, surrey carts and bicycles.

10 a.m.: Free bounce house for children in Pavilion A, inflatable waterpark and watersports rentals open.

11 a.m.: Food trucks and full bar service available by the live music/stage area.

1 pm.: Horseshoe tournament at the stakes by Moe B’s Watersports.

2 p.m.: Live music begins featuring headliner Wild Child, Redneck Rodeo and Skynyrd Reloaded with host DJ David Bugenske of Go Country 105 Radio.

3 p.m.: Volleyball tournament.

5 p.m.: Back Bay Bistro opens for dinner buffet.

9 p.m.: Live fireworks show, co-sponsored by the City of Newport Beach. Newport Beach residents can walk into the fireworks for free.

10 p.m.: Barn dance at Back Bay Bistro hosted by David Bugenske.

For more information, call 949.729.DUNE (3863). The event akes place at Newport Dunes Waterfront Resort, 1131 Back Bay Drive, Newport Beach. For more information, visit www.newportdunes.com

Fourth of July Coastal Flyover – Expected to take place over Newport Beach between 5:35 and 5:40 p.m. The Condor Squadron Officers’ and Airmen’s Association, a nonprofit organization founded by a group of WWII fighter pilots, will fly AT-6s over the coast. The City of San Clemente arranged this event.

Brass Transit: The Music of Chicago (with fireworks) – Takes place at 8 p.m.

Celebrate the Fourth with the music of Chicago, known as the “rock and roll band with horns.” With hits like “You’re the Inspiration,” “If You Leave Me Now,” and “Hard to Say I’m Sorry,” you’ll be swept away by the melodies that make this band such a beloved classic. To cap off the evening, sing along to your favorite patriotic tunes when you salute our armed forces and thrill to a sizzling Fourth of July fireworks show. Features: Richard Kaufman, conductor; Brass Transit – Chicago Tribute Band; and Pacific Symphony. The event takes place at Pacific Amphitheatre on the Orange County Fairgrounds, 88 Fair Drive, Costa Mesa.

For more information, visit NBPD’s website at http://www.nbpd.org/community/4th_of_july.asp


Stump the Stu

Metalwork turned art piece is eye catching

Stump the Stu 7.3.18

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Hummingbirds were attracted to this metal artwork and so was Stu. Foliage etched out of metal against the used brick backdrop created a visually appealing mix of elements and textures. But where is it?

Take the challenge and submit your answers to This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it..

The correct answer will appear in Friday’s edition, along with the correct guesses. So, join us for this local adventure.

If you have a unique spot or icon around town that you think Stu News Newport readers would enjoy finding out about, please shoot it, share it and give us the answer, so we can challenge them! Happy Hunting.


Pacific Wine & Food Classic unveils featured chefs and wineries

PWFC glass

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Photo by Luis Esparza

Pacific Wine and Food Classic has announced the chefs, restaurants and wineries participating in the foodie event of the summer presented by Pacific Sales and powered by Southern Glazer’s Wine & Spirits. Celebrate the season with summer inspired culinary bites, wine pairings and refreshing libations in the picturesque atmosphere provided by Newport Dunes Waterfront Resort on Saturday, August 18 and Sunday, August 19.

Voted top 10 food and wine festivals in the world by the International Food, Wine and Travel Writer’s Association, Pacific Wine and Food Classic offers an unparalleled gourmet culinary experience completely inspired by summer. More than 60 of the region’s top chefs will create dishes reminiscent of their favorite summer memories offering guests the unique opportunity to sample an array of Southern California’s finest restaurants all in one weekend.

Among the celebrated culinary talents, these Newport Beach chefs will be appearing:

--Alejandra Padilla, Executive Chef, Five Crowns and SideDoor

--Andres Miramontes, Executive Chef, Sol Cocina

--Brian Huskey, Executive Chef, Tackle Box

--Cathy Pavlos, Owner & Executive Chef, Provenance Restaurant

--Cesar Sarmiento, Chef de Cuisine, CUCINA Enoteca

--Daniel Jimenez, Executive Chef, Back Bay Bistro

--David Man, Executive Chef, Island Hotel Newport Beach & Coastal Catering

--Elyssa Fournier, Pastry Chef & Owner, Mixed Bakery

--Francisco Ramirez, Chef, Rusty Pelican Restaurant​

--Ivan Rogelio Calderon, Chef, Taco Rosa & Taco Mesa

--Jason Mazur, Executive Chef, Bluewater Grill

--Peter Lai, Executive Chef, Oak Grill and Aqua Lounge

--Philip Tangonan, Chef, The Cannery Newport Beach

--Rich Mead, Owner and Executive Chef, Farmhouse at Roger’s Gardens

--Scott Goldberg, Chef, Fresh Brothers

Surrounded by music and a gentle ocean breeze, indulge in more than 100 wine, beer and cocktail stations. In addition to SoCal and Napa’s most decorated wineries, Stella Artois, Bacardi rum, Sauza Tequila, Sky Vodka, Aperol Spritz and the Maker’s Mark touring truck will be onsite pouring refreshing crafty cocktails. Guests will enjoy all new summer experiences including the Paella and Sangria Lounge by Villa Roma, the Summer Wine Garden featuring beautiful chilled wines to pair with bites by SideDoor and Haute Cuisine, Taco & Beer Lounge by Towne Park Brewery and Chela’s Mexican Restaurant, the debut of the official “Pacific Burger” by Burger Boss at the Lynx Backyard Grilling garden, Golden Spoon Café featuring summer gelatos and affogatos and more mouthwatering moments.

According to Pamela Waitt, President of OC Restaurant Association and Founder of the second annual classic, “We are thrilled to welcome guests back to the shores of Newport Dunes Waterfront Resort and highlight so many incredible winemakers and chefs. Orange County is home to some of the best restaurants in the world and it’s an honor to showcase the local talent.”

Single day general admission tickets are currently $115 for Saturday and $99 for Sunday which includes extended early bird pricing. Single day VIP tickets are $149 for Saturday and $139 for Sunday with extended early bird pricing. Purchase of a VIP ticket grants one hour early admission at 1 p.m. and access to the grassy waterfront VIP courtyard featuring the Hornitos lounge serving fresh summer margaritas, the Perrier Jouet Champagne Gazebo, aged Bacardi rum cocktails, premium wines and an exclusive culinary experience provided by Back Bay Bistro, Bluegold, Farmhouse at Roger’s Gardens, Filomena’s Italian Kitchen & Market, Lauren Lawless from Masterchef Season 8, Mix Mix, Mixed Bakery, Provenance, Sadie Rose Bread & Cabot Cheese and The Country Club. VIP tickets are very limited. Weekend two-day passes are sold out.

For more information on the Pacific Wine and Food Classic and to purchase tickets, visit www.pacificwineandfood.com.


Sign of the times

On Fridays we give you a partial glimpse of a sign around town. You guess what the overall name of the business is. 

This establishment nestled in Westcliff Court serves up breakfast, lunch and afternoon high tea.

A tough one...because only two readers guessed correctly! Congratulations to Ellen Trujillo and Jim Kaminsky, who correctly identified the W Café & Restaurant, located at 1703 Westcliff Road, Newport Beach. It’s worth the find!

If you’re a business and you want to play, you can send us a high-quality photo of your sign and we’ll take it from there and challenge our readers.

Let’s have some fun!

SOTT 7.3.18

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Speak Up Newport: Update from OC Sheriff Sandra Hutchens

Sheriff Sandra Hutchens

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Courtesy of Speak Up Newport

Orange County Sheriff-Coroner Sandra Hutchens

Speak Up Newport will present an update with Orange County Sheriff-Coroner Sandra Hutchens at their Wednesday, July 11 monthly program.

Sheriff Hutchens will discuss topics that are relevant to the community, including working on solutions to the local homeless population and the issue of sanctuary cities. Hear how her efforts have had a positive impact on Newport Beach and what the city’s future might look like. She has served as Sheriff-Coroner for Orange County since 2008, and is the first woman to hold this important elected County office. After more than 40 years in law enforcement, Sheriff Hutchens will be retiring in early 2019, when a new sheriff is sworn in.

The program will take place in the Newport Beach Civic Center, Community Room, at 100 Civic Center Drive, Newport Beach. The reception begins at 5:15 p.m. and the program with a Q&A runs from 6 - 7 p.m. There is no charge to attend and reservations are not necessary. 

For more information, call 949.224.2266 and visit Speak Up Newport’s website at www.speakupnewport.com.


NBPD issues bulletin on arrests and seizures of illegal fireworks

Fireworks with pocket rockets

Submitted photo

Over the past weeks, the Newport Beach Police Department’s Detectives have been conducting undercover operations to address the sale of illegal fireworks through Craigslist and other online classified ads. To date, the department has made three arrests and seized more than 630 pounds of Dangerous Fireworks. (The names and identities of these arrestees are currently being withheld, pending ongoing undercover activity.)

All fireworks are illegal to use, possess, buy or sell in the City of Newport Beach. All fireworks sold and used in California are required to have the state Fire Marshal Seal of Registration. It is a misdemeanor to possess, store or transport fireworks without this seal in the State of California. Possession of Dangerous Fireworks (e.g., Aerial Shells, Roman Candles, Firecrackers, Bottle Rockets, etc.) is also a crime; it is a misdemeanor to possess up to 100 pounds, and a felony to possess more than 100 pounds without a permit. Possession of Dangerous Fireworks can result in fines up to $5,000. It is important to note that Explosive Devices (e.g., M-80s, M-100s, M-1000s, Bottle Bombs, etc.) are not fireworks and are extremely dangerous. These devices should never be handled by untrained personnel. Possession of any Explosive Device is a felony.

In addition to the legal aspects listed above, illegal fireworks and explosives are a significant safety concern. Fireworks cause property damage, fire, injury and even death. As part of its commitment to keep the people and property of Newport Beach safe, NBPD will continue its pro-active fireworks enforcement efforts up through the 4th of July holiday. Additionally, officers will respond to reports of illegal fireworks activity throughout the City and take enforcement action as required. All residents and visitors should be aware that fireworks laws will be strictly enforced.

Residents and visitors with fireworks-related issues and concerns are encouraged to call the Police Department’s tip line at 1.800.550.NBPD. For a timely response to current firework activity, please contact NBPD’s business line at 949.644.3717 and provide any available information on the source of the activity.


Happy July 4!

By AMY SENK

American flag

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Photo by Amy Senk

Let’s start with one of the biggest burning questions on Corona del Mar residents’ minds as the July 4 holiday draws near: Will there be a private fireworks display visible from the CdM coastline?

The answer, officially as of only a couple days ago, is YES.

Since 2014, a resident has applied and been granted a permit for a July 4 display that lights up the sky over the CdM beaches. City spokeswoman Tara Finnigan confirmed that the same person applied for and received a permit for another display for this July 4, with city staff signing the document on Thursday.

According to the Special Event Permit, the fireworks may be set off from 9 - 9:30 p.m. Wednesday from a barge on the ocean off the Wedge. The permit, which cost $2,666, states that 45 people will be attending and requires that no alcohol be consumed on public property and that all boats be at least 1,000 feet from shore.

• • •

The Corona del Mar High School graduating class of 2018 may have helped launch a new tradition, the Senior Walk, where students returned to their elementary schools wearing caps and gowns just before the end of the school year.

Harbor View Elementary School Principal Todd Schmidt said the idea came after seeing it online through his professional learning network from a Wisconsin superintendent who wanted to celebrate seniors while inspiring younger students.

“Last year, I approached our five area elementary schools and CdMHS to see if we could arrange this during Senior Week,” Schmidt said. Everyone agreed, and CdMHS sent out the information and sign-ups for each public elementary school that feeds to the high school.

“Each student was announced and carried a small sign with their name, picture from 6th grade, and their plans for after graduation,” Schmidt said. “They then walked down each hallway giving students high fives and getting hugs from previous teachers. They then ended up in our music room for a small reception with their parents. Several teachers came in with memorabilia from their times with these students.” This year, 15 students participated, but Schmidt said they will continue the walk and try to grow it each year.

Dana Flood, a CdM resident and former CdMHS PTA president, said the students loved it. “Everyone seemed to have a lot of fun,” she said. “We think it’s a good new tradition.” 

~~~~~~~~

Amy Senk has lived in Corona del Mar for 18 years and was publisher of Corona del Mar Today, an online newspaper that ran daily for seven years. Senk, a graduate of the University of Missouri School of Journalism, is involved in the Corona del Mar Residents Association and the Corona del Mar High School PTA. She and her husband have two children.


Free summer events at Argyros Plaza

Carol Welsman

Submitted photo

Carol Welsman kicks off the Summer Jazz Series on July 6

Summer fun and free events await you on Segerstrom Center’s Julianne and George Argyros Plaza in July. Local movie buffs are invited to gather on the Argyros Plaza for a new slate of films on Movie Mondays presented by Macy’s, starting on July 9 with Back to the Future. Other features in the series include The Princess Bride on July 16, Moonrise Kingdom on July 23 and The Mask of Zorro on July 30. Don’t miss these crowd favorites – Yappy Hour returns on July 12 with tail-wagging fun and Summer Jazz on the Argyros Plaza takes place every Friday evening featuring Carol Welsman, Yolanda Johnson, Sweet Baby J’ai and the Tierney Sutton Band. 

Here’s a quick glance at the line-up:

Summer Jazz on the Argyros Plaza: Carol Welsman, Friday, July 6 from 7 - 9 p.m. 

Movie Mondays: Back to the Future, Monday, July 9. Set-up begins at 5:30 p.m. Movie starts approximately at 8 p.m.

Yappy Hour, Thursday, July 12 from 5:30 - 8:30 p.m. 

Summer Jazz on the Argyros Plaza: Yolanda Johnson & Her All Star Band with Bryan Cabrera Trio, Friday, July 13 from 7 - 9 p.m.

World Cup Viewing Parties, Saturday, July 14: Set-up begins at 6 a.m. Match starts at 7 a.m. Sunday, July 15: Set-up begins at 7 a.m. Match starts at 8 a.m. 

Movie Mondays: The Princess Bride, Monday, July 16. Set-up begins at 5:30 p.m. Movie starts approximately at 8 p.m.

Summer Jazz on the Argyros Plaza: Sweet Baby J’ai with Johnette Downing and Scott Billington, Friday, July 20 from 7 - 9 p.m.

Movie Mondays: Moonrise Kingdom, Monday, July 23. Set-up begins at 5:30 p.m. Movie starts approximately at 8 p.m.

Summer Jazz on the Argyros Plaza: Tierney Sutton Band, Friday, July 27 from 7 - 9 p.m.

National Dance Day 2018, Saturday, July 28 from 1 - 8 p.m.

Movie Mondays: The Mask of Zorro, Monday, July 30. Set-up begins at 5:30 p.m. Movie starts approximately at 8 p.m. 

For detailed information on these events, visit www.scfta.org.

Segerstrom Center for the Arts is located at 600 Town Center Drive, Costa Mesa.


Fair Game

By TOM JOHNSON

The do’s and don’ts of celebrating the Fourth in Newport Beach

TomJohnsonSo, are you ready for the Fourth? Here are some of the do’s and don’ts from around town.

First off, fireworks are a no-no. You can’t possess or use fireworks in the City limits, including the “safe and sane” ones they sell right across the border in Costa Mesa. 

Still, many of us will be bothered by fireworks, especially dog owners. Here’s what not to do. Do not call 911 to report “seeing” or “hearing” fireworks. That just clogs up the emergency lines for issues potentially far more important.

That all being said, if you know the exact location of a source of fireworks, you can call the Police Department on a non-emergency number (949.644.3717) and file a report.

Also, did you know that much of the West Newport area is a Safety Enhancement Zone effective from 12:01 a.m. on July 4 to 3 a.m. on July 5? What that means to you is that fines for wrongdoings are tripled during this time and could run up at high as $3,000. That can get expensive.

So, what are considered some of the problem issues?

No loud and unruly gatherings…seems simple enough. If the police have to get involved, you’ll probably pay. And just remember, the fines are increased each time the police return.

I remember as a kid how much fun water balloons, squirt guns and garden hoses were on a hot day. Now, in the Safety Enhancement Zone, these are all illegal. Bummer. You’ll actually face a citation or arrest. 

Boy...how times have changed. 

We haven’t even discussed alcohol, but remember open containers or drinking on streets, sidewalks, beaches and piers is illegal. 

And finally, stay off the rooftops. They’re considered a safety hazard and may violate building code ordinances.

Otherwise, get out there and enjoy yourself.

Great celebrations are planned as always at Mariners Park and in West Newport.

The Newport Dunes and Waterfront Resort also has a big day with their party starting at 2 p.m. They’ll feature music with Wild Child, Redneck Rodeo and Skynyrd Reloaded, followed by their usual extravagant fireworks show at 9 p.m. Add to that food trucks and all their bay activities and you can have a pretty fun day.

• • •

John Sturgess has joined Walter Johnson Yachts in Corona del Mar as “a business development, marketing and sales representative focusing on antique and classic yachts.”

Sturgess has lived and been involved in the community for years, particularly with Hoag Hospital.

He has sailed and raced for many years locally and he has owned several classic sailboats, including a 28’ Norwegian class racing sloop, Oslo 1.

He also owns a classic 1941 Chris Craft Deluxe Barrel-back Runabout that makes her home on the west shore of Lake Tahoe. This craft is a Concours d’Elegance and an International Antique and Classic Boat Society Award Winner.

John previously ran his own marketing, advertising and public relations firm named The Sturgess Company.


Express, create and be inspired at Kids Peaceful Painting workshops this summer

Kids painting

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Courtesy of Sherman Library & Gardens

Youngsters get creative during the painting workshop

Kids are invited to let their creative side shine by participating in Sherman Library & Gardens’ Kids Peaceful Painting workshops this summer.

Workshops will be held on Saturdays, July 14 and 28, and August 11 and 25, from 12 - 3 p.m. Join local artist Stacey Fetterman as she weaves together mindfulness and art from the heart through breath work, visualization and play on and off the canvas. Each youngster will complete his or her own canvas.

Class sizes are limited. The cost is $40 for Friends and $50 for Non-members. Pre-registration is required. For more information, email This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.. Register at www.slgardens.org.

Sherman Library & Gardens is located at 2647 East Coast Highway, Corona del Mar.


ENC hosts “Teachers Night Out” series

ENC Teachers

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Courtesy of ENC

The Environmental Nature Center (ENC) has scheduled its 2018-19 “Teachers Night Out!” series. Local educators are invited to tour the five-acre Center and participate in hands-on activities that connect Nature to the new Next Generation Science Standards (NGSS). Admission is $5 and free for ENC members.

Schedule of themes, dates and guest speakers for the series:

--September 27, 2018: State Pride – Michelle Tollett, Calflora Communications and Outreach Director

--October 18, 2018: Fear Factor – Skie Bender, Education Outreach Specialist –

California, Wolf Haven

--November 8, 2018: Water – Justin Finch, Water Use Efficiency Analyst from Mesa Water and Cindy Berglund, Rain Barrels Intl.

--December 13, 2018: Plastic Problems – Anika Ballent, Education Director, Algalita

--January 31, 2019: Food Science

--February 28, 2019: Weather

--March 28, 2019: Citizen Science

--April 25, 2019: Native Plants

--May 19, 2019: Share-a-thon

Online registration will be available by the beginning of the 2018-19 school year, but teachers are encouraged to mark their calendars now.

“’The Teachers Night Out’ series is one of my favorite events to present each month,” said ENC Outreach Coordinator Mindy Schwartz. “I love spending the afternoon with all kinds of educators, and seeing their enthusiasm as they learn exciting new hands-on ways to teach children about science and nature.”

The series welcomes all kids of educators, including classroom teachers, outdoor educators, scout leaders, homeschool parents – anyone who wants to be a better educator and acquire some new teaching techniques. Afterward, participants enjoy a light meal together and share some wine by the campfire before breaking out the skewers to make s’mores. Teachers who participate receive priority booking of school tours and Traveling Naturalist programs, and receive free curricular and instructional resources.

For more information and to register, visit www.encenter.org or call (949) 645-8489.

ENC is located at 1601 E. 16th St., Newport Beach.


Fair Game

By TOM JOHNSON

Should City Council tie the hands of future Councils on spending?

TomJohnsonThere are still council people upset with the costs related to the building of the Newport Beach Taj Mahal, aka city hall. In fact, one number thrown out at Tuesday night’s City Council meeting was a cost of some $22,000 a day to finance it over the long haul. 

I agree, that’s a lot of money. But hey, I was and still am a proponent of where it sits today for a variety of reasons.

All that being said, what some of the councilmembers are most concerned about is that some future council might make a similar error of over spending moving forward. So, they want to establish rules and regulations, potentially tying the hands of future councils, on borrowing.

Basically, the amendment would kick into place the “issuance or incurrence of $50 million in Certificates of Participation or Lease Revenue Bonds to finance capital projects greater than $50 million.”

This would then force a vote of the people, in which case 55 percent or more would be needed for approval.

Early on, it was particularly troublesome when the discussions of thresholds went as low as “$10 million” and requiring as much as “two-thirds of the vote.”

A point-of-fact, in recent times, only the City Hall project would have required a vote of the people at the $50 million level. 

Several future projects noted Tuesday that could potentially trigger this again would include the “sea walls and a new police station.”

Separately, no one could cite another city currently utilizing such regulations. 

November can’t come soon enough.

• • •

Speaking of council, I think we’re supposed to feel safer as a community moving forward following the adoption of Ordinance No. 2018-12, “to strengthen and protect the integrity of elections within the City of Newport Beach.”

This ordinance follows the fraudulent signatures discovered in the Recall of Scott Peotter effort. 

At the end of the day, best I can tell, is that the “ordinance” requires a signature on file at the City during a certain time requirement of “any person, company, candidate or committee” related to involvement in signature gathering. 

This document has been previously required on the state level, so it means an additional copy just needs to be forwarded to our city. 

I’m feeling safer already. Good governance I might add. 

Can’t wait to see how this will be used this November.

• • •

Anyone surprised that Line in the Sand is endorsing Joy Brenner (District 6) and Tim Stoaks (District 3) for City Council spots?

According to the Line in the Sand announcement, “Joy and Tim are long-time Newport Beach residents whose values and goals are aligned with those of Line in the Sand PAC. 

“The two candidates have track records of standing up for residents and working to prevent overdevelopment and traffic. Both worked actively to defeat Measure Y and the Museum House.”

• • •

And, in the watch what you wish for category, the newly appointed terms to Boards and Commissions in town are: Kurt Kost has been named to the Board of Library Trustees; Wayan Kaufman to the City Arts Commission; Sharon Wood, Civil Service Board; Ira Beer, William Kenney and Donald Yahn to the Harbor Commission; Hassan Archer and Diane Daruty to the Parks, Beaches & Recreation Commission and Peter Koetting to the Planning Commission.

We thank you for your time and commitment to improving our city.

• • •

A couple of notable changes on the Orange County Fair & Events Center Board of Directors. At Thursday’s board meeting (June 28), both Stan Tkaczyk and Nick Berardino tendered their resignations effective immediately.

Berardino has served since 2011 and was a key driver to the creation of the Heroes Hall exhibition facility. Tkaczyk joined the board in 2012.

Both joined the board at a tumultuous time when discussion of a potential sale of the Fair property followed.


Summer fun at the Newport-Mesa Family YMCA 

By CONRAD KRUEGER

Kids enjoying the obstacle course

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Photos courtesy of Newport-Mesa Family YMCA

Campers enjoying the obstacle course

Summer is in full effect and the local Newport-Mesa Family YMCA has a variety of activities for children of all ages. The camps officially began this past Monday, June 25 and will continue throughout the entire summer. The programs run daily 5:30 a.m. - 9 p.m. on weekdays and 7 a.m. - 4 p.m. on weekends with full time or part time schedules available. Newport-Mesa Family YMCA is a licensed and trustworthy organization that will keep children happy, active and challenged.

Highlights of the camp include character development, sport challenges, clubs such as cooking, art, coding and more, in addition to the summer service learning project called “100 Acts of Kindness.” The project involves children paying it forward by giving back to the great Orange County area through 100 acts of kindness, which vary weekly. On and off-site activities will include STEAM curriculum and inclusion support for special needs. 

This is a great place for every child to explore their interests and develop strong friendships along the way. Make sure to mark your calendars and not miss out on the great scheduled camps. It’s set to be another fantastic summer at the local Newport-Mesa Family YMCA.

2018 Summer Specialty Camps:

Explorers Camp: Hours 9:30 - 11:30 a.m. Hiking, science, music, sports, arts and crafts, nature awareness and more.

Swim and Sport Camp: Hours 12 - 2:30 p.m. Incorporates a daily 30-minute swim lesson with a YMCA swim instructor, sports clinic and craft. 

Swim Lesson Camp: Hours 9:30 - 11:30 a.m. Incorporates a daily 45-minute swim lesson with a YMCA swim instructor, pool and land games. 

Lunch Bunch: Held daily for any camper from 11:30 a.m. - 12 p.m. Stay for both camps and sign up for Lunch Bunch. Bring your own lunch, while enjoying it during board games and crafts. Cost: $10 per day per child or $45 per week for members/$50 per week for non-members.

Teaching basketball

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Youngsters learning how to spin a basketball 

Camp Rates:

Week of July 2, 9, 16, 23 and 30 (no camp on July 4): Morning Explorers Camp: $69 Members, $84 Non-Members. Morning Swim Lesson Camp: $74 Members, $89 Non-Members; Afternoon Swim & Sport Camp: $84 Members, $99 Non-Members

Week of August 6 and 13: Morning Explorers Camp: $69 Members, $84 Non-Members. Morning Swim Lesson Camp: $74 Members, $89 Non-Members; Afternoon Swim & Sport Camp: $84 Members, $99 Non-Members.

Week of August 20: Morning Explorers Camp: $69 Members, $84 Non-Members. Afternoon Swim & Sport Camp: $84 Members, $99 Non-Members.

Newport-Mesa Family YMCA is located at 2300 University Drive, Newport Beach.

For more information, visit www.ymcaoc.org/newport-mesa-family-ymca.


Stump the Stu

Artistic sand sculpture with a “porpoise”

Stump the Stu 6.29.18

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Many of you knew where these porpoises in the sand were frolicking, and several of you were also able to identify the artist, as well. So, if you got either one or both right...you know your “sandcastles.”

Congratulations to Betty Middleton, Bill Finster, Cathie Cook, Charles Dovey, Debbie Stevens, Debi Doolittle, Don Webb, Dorothy Larsen, Ellen Trujillo, Jessica Battioli, Jim Kaminsky, Kathleen Schwarz, Linda Oeth, Mary Ann Hemphill, Mary Pat Earl, Norm Witt and Rush Hill.

This sand sculpture is at Sherman Library & Gardens as part of the SandScapes exhibit on display now through September 3. The artist is Chris Crosson, who many know as “Mr. Sandcastle” around Balboa Island. If you haven’t had the opportunity to visit his work in the Gardens, go and check it out.

A special thank you to Beverly Morgan who snapped this photo to share with us.

Join us on Tuesdays as we try and stump you each week with a picture of something unique in our community, with answers and winners appearing on Fridays.

If you have a unique spot or icon around town that you think Stu News Newport readers would enjoy finding out about, please shoot it, share it and give us the answer, so we can challenge them!


“Where Have All the Flower Children Gone?”

By DUNCAN FORGEY

Gals on Boardwalk

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Submitted photos

Gals cruising the boardwalk in the 1950s

Grandma’s 1965 Lincoln Town Car was a perfect cruiser for the four sorority girls from USC. Doing a slow crawl down Balboa Boulevard, drawing whistles and hoots from young men...their smiles as big as bandanas. This was a typical occurrence and an integral part of Newport’s Bal Week celebration. Peaking in the 1960s, the weeklong street party packed the Balboa Peninsula each year with overly hormoned and under supervised adolescents. If you were under 30, drove a cool car, or wanted to meet people and party, Newport Beach was your April destination. Scenes were often reminiscent of Animal House or Gidget goes Gucci. The inmates were running the asylum for seven days during Spring.

With the hiring of tough Police Chief Jim Glavas in the mid-sixties, the Newport Beach City Council decided that “enough is enough.” The chief single handedly put an end to a tradition dating back to as early as 1935, which became an annual ritual for school age kids from all over Southern California. Every year was exciting with huge economic benefits for the city.

Prison of Socrates

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The Prison of Socrates, a popular coffee house, opened on Balboa in the 1950s. Popular headliners included Steve Martin, Pat Paulsen, Jose Feliciano and Hoyt Axton. B.J.’s Pizza is currently located on this site.

During a post WWII influx of new white-collar residents to the town sporting many young children, attitudes of Newport residents began to change. The chaos became overwhelming with over two-hour waits for Peninsula residents to get home. The 1965 Bal Week accounted for more than 1,000 arrests, 300 of which were minors. A barricade was used in a futile effort to stem the flow of kids, cars and craziness. Coincidentally, the Rendezvous Ballroom, a huge draw for young people, burnt down and was demolished in 1966, an appropriate mark ending an era. 

Rendezvous Ballroom

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Dick Dale and the Deltones were among the performers at the famous Rendezvous Ballroom

The heavy boots of the NBPD, the blockade and intolerance of misbehavior eventually put Newport Beach off limits for Easter. The celebration was instrumental in school districts adjusting their Easter Weeks, thus reducing the numbers of students free at the same time.

So, what happened next? Some groups of young people chose Mexico’s Ensenada and San Felipe, but crossing the border was a wee bit scary and forbidden by many parents. The Parker Dam at the Colorado River rose as an alternative, but did not have enough of a town. Eventually, the recipient of this tradition was the streets of Palm Springs.

As early California was discovered, settled and populated, Palm Springs was overlooked for centuries. The local Cahuilla Indians did not experience the presence of the Europeans until 1824. The Spanish Padres found the desert too hot, too forlorn and too mysterious. They eventually packed up and left the Indians to their legends along with their foul-tasting mineral springs. During this period, the Witch of Tahquitz Canyon was a spiritual protector of the Native Americans’ land. The witch can still be seen today, in the early morning light from Vista Chino and Farrell drives looking southwest into sun-cast shadows

Witch of Tahquitz Canyon

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Witch of Tahquitz Canyon

Generations before vacationers, Canadians, movie stars, gays and college kids fell in love with the city, Palm Springs was bypassed by the hundreds of thousands using the Banning Pass as the main route to Los Angeles. Railroad scouts visited the Cahuilla in 1853, but nothing evolved. When gold was discovered in Arizona mines, it didn’t affect the desert area south of the Pass. Some travelers wandered off course and visited the “oasis” of Agua Caliente, but they too were disappointed. Prospectors worked the area for valuable ore, but did not stay.

Palm Springs’ success finally began to evolve with a reputation as a healthy environment. Early Indian leaders Chief Cabezon and Pedro Chino lived to approximately 120 years old. Weather, lifestyle and mineral springs were the presumed reasons for this longevity. The first permanent non-native settlers, John McCallum and his family, moved to the area because their son suffered from tuberculosis. Living in an abandoned adobe cabin, McCallum purchased approximately 6,000 acres and planted fruit trees. He promoted the area to friends in San Francisco, raving about its beauty, economic potential and healing effects. This garnered attention to the area.

The first hotel came in the late 1800s, offering healing mineral waters and mud springs. The future for Palm Springs becoming an eclectic, stimulating and stylish resort was established. Like Newport Beach, Palm Springs developed its own unique personality attracting active and energetic people. 

Bacall and Bogart

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Lauren Bacall and Humphrey Bogart were among the Hollywood stars lured to Palm Springs

The movie industry was always one of Palm Springs’ biggest fans. Healthy lifestyles, horseback riding, tennis, golf, hot mineral baths and endless sun have lured Hollywood’s rich and famous for more than a century. The El Mirador Hotel was the first big draw for Hollywood stars and became a favorite haunt for Louella Parsons, Charlie Chaplin, Paulette Goddard, Clara Bow, Adolph Spreckels, Fatty Arbuckle and many, many more.

Hollywood’s next generation including Bob Hope, The Rat Pack, Clark Gable, Alan Ladd, Marilyn Monroe, Elizabeth Taylor and Liberace were all residents at one time. With the eastward development of La Quinta, Palm Desert, Rancho Mirage and Indian Wells, the wealthy pushed deeper into the valley creating countless new resorts and private neighborhoods. Each new city competed directly with what was becoming an aging Palm Springs.

The entire Coachella Valley is now open to a healthy, hot and stimulating lifestyle. Several decades ago the marketing campaign of P.S. I Love You, helped restore new energy to “old” Palm Springs. With an upgraded casino, a newly developed downtown and feeding off a renowned film festival, music concerts and venues in every genre, golf and tennis tournaments, and the White Party, the entire valley is rocking and rolling. Palm Springs is thriving as the cultural and entertainment center of the desert. 

Rooftop party

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A rooftop party scene on Balboa in 1965

Easter Week was a perfect time to enjoy the excitement of a party town in both Newport Beach or Palm Springs. Neither city lives up to old reputations. With today’s population throughout SoCal, beachgoers and traffic alike during Easter Week can be seen on almost any hot summer Sunday. Millions of the masses trek to their favorite beaches all the way from Santa Barbara to San Diego almost daily. The insanity of Newport’s partying is most demonstrable on the Fourth of July. If that is not enough, there is Fort Lauderdale, but you will need a plane ticket...not a cool car.

So, “Where Have All the Flower Children Gone?” They have all grown up – bought a home in Southern California with a second in Palm Springs. After complaining about traffic, they commute from home to the desert and back, spotlighting the “good life” of Southern California. 

~~~~~~~~

Duncan Forgey, a life-long resident of Newport Beach, now makes his home in Hawaii. He is a monthly contributor to StuNewsNewport.


Opening Day of Jr. Lifeguards is exciting day for local youth 

BY CONRAD KRUEGER

Opening Day 1

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Photos by Conrad Krueger

Jr. Lifeguards eagerly wait to meet their group instructors and fellow members

The Newport Beach Jr. Lifeguards program is in full throttle as of Tuesday, June 26. This Opening Day kicked off the 34th year in the popular summer camp’s history.

The ceremony began with an introduction from each of the camp’s instructors. Special guests Fire Chief Chip Duncan, Assistant City Manager Carol Jacobs and several members of the Newport Beach Fire Department were recognized for their efforts in establishing this program. And then every Jr. Lifeguard’s favorite moment came: They met their individual groups and played ice breaker games. Youngsters stick with the same group all summer, helping each other learn and progress together.

Opening Day 2

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It’s all smiles for these Jr. Lifeguards!

This year’s staff is a great mix of returning veterans along with rookies who are ready to get their feet wet. They all share the same objectives of having fun, but along the way teaching the Jr. Lifeguards valuable lessons in water safety and awareness, discipline, cooperation and perseverance.

The group leaders also made a cohesive effort to preach the program motto of the three R’s: respect, represent and responsibility. These are the key pillars that help mold Jr. Lifeguards into Cadets and then into smart and strong Lifeguards.

Parents, pay attention to your Jr. Lifeguard’s vocabulary, particularly when it comes to the “yes over yeah” rule. If the rule is broken, they must do 10 pushups on the spot for their mishap. This is something the Newport Beach Jr. Lifeguards program will continuously stress this summer. Overall, the guards got off to a great start…and everything is in place to make this summer at the beach the best one yet! 

Junior Lifeguard headquarters is located at 100 A St., near Balboa Pier. 

For more information, visit www.nbjg.net.

Check out more Jr. Lifeguard photos below

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OC Fair food is crazier, more inventive than ever

Pig legs

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Photos courtesy of OC Fair & Event Center

Five-pound barbecued pig legs

It’s a once-a-year experience, something that can only happen at the Fair – a food frenzy beyond compare. The midway magicians in mini kitchens are cooking up inventions like donut-shaped spaghetti, caramel-drizzled fries and floats made for mermaids.

Last year 51 percent of attendees surveyed said the only-at-the-Fair food was their favorite part of their visit, and the chefs have been working to move the needle even higher. 

A sampling of new food items for 2018:

--Peanut butter, jelly and Sriracha funnel cake – Dutchmen’s Funnel Cakes

--Deep-fried cheese curds, mac & cheese bites, shrimp & cheese jammers, and more at a new stand – Who Fried the Cheese?

--Deep-fried filet mignon on a stick – Chicken Charlie’s

--Spaghetti donut formed with pasta and topped with pesto, alfredo, carbonara or marinara – Pignotti’s

--The OC Crunch Cinnamon Roll featuring caramel, cinnamon crunch cereal and frosting – D&D Country Fair Cinnamon Buns

--Lasagna nachos with pasta chips and pesto, veggies, cheese, marinara and meats – Pignotti’s

--Pine and Swine sourdough bread with butter, garlic, cheddar and mozzarella cheese, pineapple and ham – Ten Pound Buns

--Caramel Crack Fries featuring French fries tossed in butter and sprinkled with cinnamon sugar then drizzled with salted caramel sauce and topped with whipping cream and sprinkles – Biggy’s

--Chili chamoy candy apple coated with sweet and spicy chili and tamarind flavors – Brander’s Candyland

--Unicorn cotton candy donut with sparkling strawberry glitter glaze, rainbow candy and bubble gum cotton candy – Texas Donuts

--Boba comes to the Fair and flavors include passion fruit, Thai, oolong, mango, jasmine and lychee at a new stand – Holy Cao’s Boba Tea

--Shrimp/chicken Ramen burritos, deep-fried pineapple on a stick – Chicken Charlie’s

Bacon wrapped Brussels sprouts

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Bacon-wrapped Brussels sprouts on a stick

Some returning favorites:

--BBQ chicken, grilled corn, tri-tip, burgers, hot dogs, tacos, turkey legs, Hawaiian chicken bowls, grilled vegetables, corn dogs, ice cream, shaved ice, smoothies, shakes, fruit bowls, waffles, crepes, flavored lemonade and more.

--Vendors including Pink’s Hot Dogs, Biggy’s, Juicy’s, Noel’s Mexican, Corn Star, Apollo’s Greek, Carmelot, Pepe’s Mariscos, Crutchee’s Ice Cream, Enzo’s Pizza, Fresh Frys, Fried Affair, Hussong’s Cantina, Hot Dog on a Stick, Planet Popcorn, Mucho Crazy Nachos, Mustards Café, Old West Cinnamon Rolls, Texas Donuts, Vinny’s Pizza and more.

Funnel cake

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Jumbo churro-style Mexican funnel cake

$3 Taste of Fair Food:

--Get a sampling of food and treats for only $3 each every Thursday from 12 - 4 p.m. Fun-sized samples include funnel cake, tri-tip, lemonade, cinnamon rolls, tacos, gelato, cotton candy and more.

--Unicorn, Orange Dream and Mermaid Floats featuring cotton candy and rainbow toppings – Candy Factory

--Big Skillet cookie, an oversize chocolate chip cookie topped with vanilla ice cream and drizzled with chocolate syrup – Totally Baked Cookie Joint

--Toppings bar for cinnamon buns including cherry pie filling, Mini M & M’s, salted caramel and maple bacon frosting - JP’s Old West Cinnamon Rolls

--Poke and sushi bowls, orange chicken burritos – Eddie’s Asian-Inspired Cuisine

The 2018 OC Fair, themed “Free Your Inner Farmer,” takes place July 13 - August 12 and offers 23 days and nights of entertainment, food, rides, shopping, exhibits and more. Hours are 12 p.m. - midnight Wednesdays through Fridays, and 11 a.m. to midnight Saturdays and Sundays. The Fair is closed Mondays and Tuesdays.

OC Fair is located off the 405 and 55 freeways at 88 Fair Drive in Costa Mesa. For more information, visit www.ocfair.com or call 714.708.1500.

Editor’s Note: Let us know your favorite Fair foods! Snap photos of you, your family and friends showing what you are eating at the Fair this year. Tell us who you are, where you’re from and why you enjoyed a particular “delicacy.” We will post them on StuNews! Email your pics to This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it..

Happy Indulgence...


Sign of the times

It’s another edition of Sign of the times, so put your thinking caps on. Stu thinks this might be a challenge...but worth discovering. It’s nestled in a favorite shopping destination, and one of the very few places in Newport Beach that offers high tea.

Good luck! Stu loves publishing the winning answers on Tuesday.

Send your guesses to This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it..

If you’re a business and you want to play, you can send us a high-quality photo of your sign and we’ll take it from there and challenge our readers.

Let’s have some fun!

SOTT 6.29.18

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Save the Date: NMUSD State of the Schools Breakfast, October 2

NMUSD Logo

Courtesy of NMUSD

Mark your calendar for Tuesday, Oct 2 when the Newport-Mesa Unified School District will hold its State of the Schools Breakfast beginning at 7 a.m.

The event will be held at Corona del Mat High School located at 2101 Eastbluff Drive, Newport Beach.

For more information, visit www.nmusd.net.


NBPD: Help us save lives this Fourth of July

Independence Day is a time for celebration, so let’s all work together to avoid tragedies on our roadways. The Newport Beach Police Department (NBPD) wants to remind everyone to stay safe behind the wheel, so please help us spread this life-saving message: DUI Doesn’t Just Mean Booze. Don’t drive under the influence of alcohol, marijuana, or drugs. Impaired driving puts you – and everyone else on the road – in danger.

Next week, officers from the NBPD will be deploying additional officers to arrest alcohol- and drug-impaired drivers. DUI Saturation Patrols will deploy Thursday through Sunday (July 5 - July 8) between the hours of 6 p.m. and 3 a.m. in areas with high frequencies of DUI collisions and/or arrests. When possible, specially trained officers will be available to evaluate those suspected of drug-impaired driving, which now accounts for a growing number of impaired driving crashes.

“We want everyone who lives in or visits our community to have a happy – and safe – Fourth of July,” said Chief Jon T. Lewis. “Let’s all work together to keep our roads accident-free during this holiday, and every day. Get a sober ride home, be a sober designated driver, and call 911 if you see someone driving under the influence. These actions may seem simple, but they could save a life.”

In recent years, California has seen a disturbing increase in drug-related impaired driving crashes. During the four-day Fourth of July holiday period in 2017, 17 people were killed and 430 people were injured in alcohol-involved crashes throughout the state of California. The NBPD supports the new effort from the Office of Traffic Safety to educate all drivers that “DUI Doesn’t Just Mean Booze.” If you take prescription drugs, particularly those with a warning about driving or operating machinery on the label, you might be impaired enough to be arrested for DUI. Marijuana can also be impairing (especially when used in combination with alcohol or other drugs) and can result in a DUI arrest.

Prepare for the Fourth of July Celebrations:

If you will be drinking, plan your sober ride home before the party begins. Remember these tips for a safe night on the road:

--Designate a sober driver, use public transportation, or use a ride-sharing service to get home safely.

--If a friend or family member is trying to drive while they’re impaired, take away their keys and make arrangements to get them home safely.

--If you see a drunk driver, call 911.

You can also do your part by volunteering to be a designated sober driver. Through the Office of Traffic Safety’s Designated Driver VIP program, or “DDVIP,” select bars and restaurants are offering a selection of promotions, including non-alcoholic specialty drinks for sober drivers. See http://bit.ly/OTSDDrinks for more information.

The Cost of Drunk Driving:

The cost of a ride home is cheap. Drivers caught driving impaired can expect the impact of a DUI arrest to include jail time, fines, fees, DUI classes, license suspensions and other expenses that can exceed $10,000.

Here is a final statistic to remember: Drunk-driving deaths are 100 percent preventable.

Funding for this DUI operation is provided to Newport Beach Police Department by a grant from the California Office of Traffic Safety, through the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration. Whether by bike, car, motorcycle, or walking, be a part of the solution and ‘Go Safely California’.

To learn more about DDVIP and other OTS awareness, education, and enforcement campaigns, visit www.ots.ca.gov, as well as OTS’s Facebook and Twitter pages: www.facebook.com/CaliforniaOTS and www.twitter.com/OTS_CA.


More than 80 craft beer favorites on tap for OC Brew Hee Haw 

Brew Hee Haw

Submitted photo

The 5th Annual OC Brew Hee Haw Craft Beer Roundup is set to showcase more than 80 regional favorites and rarely seen craft beers on Saturday, July 14 and Sunday, July 15 at the opening weekend of the world-famous OC Fair & Event Center.

During four hours of unlimited tastings, attendees will have the opportunity to sip a variety of beer styles from breweries across the west coast and southwest, including Bay Area-based Faction Brewing and New Glory Brewing from Sacramento, as well as local favorite breweries such as Artifex Brewing Company, Bottle Logic Brewing, Chapman Crafted Beer, Bootleggers Brewery, Barley Forge Brewing Co. and Three Weavers Brewing Company.

Located next to the scenic and spacious Pacific Amphitheatre, OC Brew Hee Haw will host three separate tasting sessions with two sessions on July 14 and one session on July 15. In addition to sampling beer in their commemorative tasting glass, guests can partake in exciting games, dancing, and mingling with craft beer lovers and expert tasters alike. Back by popular demand, attendees can continue pouring on the fun singing along to catchy tunes spun by DJ Eric Cahill from The Gig.

OC Brew Hee Haw was awarded First Place at the Western Fairs Association’s Annual Convention for “Best Event Within an Event.” For the fourth year in a row, the Big Brothers Big Sisters of Orange County & Inland Empire are partnering with the OC Brew Hee Haw team and will receive a portion of the proceeds.

Tickets to the 5th Annual OC Brew Hee Haw at the OC Fair are available for purchase at www.BrewHeeHaw.com. Regular ticket prices are $55 each and, if available, day-of prices are $65 each. The 5th Annual OC Brew Hee Haw is a 21 and over only event. IDs will be checked. The Brew Ha Ha Productions team reminds all attendees to drink responsibly.

For a complete list of participating breweries at the 5th Annual OC Brew Hee Haw Craft Beer Roundup, visit www.BrewHeeHaw.com.

Tickets also include free OC Fair admission so attendees can come for the beer and stay for the Fair. Guests can “Free Their Inner Farmer” with the piglet races, carnival games, unique fried foods, and spinning around on their favorite rides, all before, during, or after their tasting session at OC Brew Hee Haw. From sipping the region’s top craft beer to enjoying the OC Fair, attendees can experience additional OC Fair opening weekend activities like the exhilarating MMA Summerfist 11, Speedway Fair Derby at the Action Sport Arena, and live concerts in the Pacific Amphitheatre. The OC Fair is open Wednesday through Sunday, July 13 - August 12. Tickets are available for purchase at www.ocfair.com or from the on-site Box Office (limited hours).

Free parking and shuttle services are available on Saturdays and Sundays from the Experian parking structure located off the Bristol Street exit off the 405 freeway. OC Fair Express bus service runs on Saturdays and Sundays from July 14 - August 12 from approximately 10 a.m. - midnight. Departing from nine locations, OC Fair Express costs $2 each way, or 75 cents for seniors over the age of 60 and persons with disabilities.

The OC Fair & Event Center is located off the 405 and 55 freeways at 88 Fair Drive in Costa Mesa.


MOMS Orange County awarded $50,000 grant

MOMS Orange County, a nonprofit dedicated to helping at-risk mothers and their families have healthy babies, has received a $50,000 grant from the Ueberroth Family Foundation, based in Newport Beach. These funds will support MOMS Orange County’s Infant Health & Development Program, which assists 3,200 of families each year.

Home visitation

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Submitted photo

MOMS Orange County’s home visitation services is among the programs benefiting from the Ueberroth Family Foundation’s grant

The Infant Health & Development Program educates parents on vital developmental milestones for their infant, including information on early brain development, modeling positive play for brain stimulation, personal screening for infants of developmental milestones and medical intervention for infants with delays. Without this program, hundreds of underserved families in Orange County might go without such developmental screenings, education and home visitation.

“We know that early intervention and education of infant health can lead to positive results, and we are honored to receive this generous grant to continue moving families in a positive direction,” said MOMS Orange County CEO Pamela Pimentel, RN. “Families are changed, infants are impacted and Orange County as a whole is benefiting from this healthy family environment.”

Research from the American Psychological Association shows that living in poverty has a wide range of effects on the physical and mental health of our nation’s children, seriously impacting brain development. Early identification of developmental, physical and mental delays in infants is critical in obtaining immediate treatment, reducing their long-term impacts. Developmental and behavioral disorders that go undiagnosed have high costs for social systems, including health, education, welfare and justice systems.

MOMS Orange County offers formal screening for achievement of developmental milestones at four months, eight months and 12 months of age, until a baby’s first birthday. Monthly home visits include testing for skills like rolling over, grasping for a toy and taking a first step.

The Ueberroth Family Foundation’s $50,000 grant comes from the foundation’s commitment to assist organizations that are effectively impacting the community and improving quality of life. The foundation awards annual grants through a competitive application and review process. They support local organizations with a focus on programs for at-risk youth and vulnerable populations, quality education, health care and human services. Each year, the foundation assists more than 75 nonprofit agencies, exceeding $2 million in grant money.

MOMS Orange County serves more than 3,200 low-income families annually, directly influencing improvements in birth outcomes, maternal health and developmental indicators among infants within a highly disadvantaged population. As a result of this work, 98 percent of babies in the MOMS Orange County’s programs are on track for developmental milestones, 93 percent of babies are on track with immunizations, and more than 99 percent of babies have a medical home.

To learn more about MOMS Orange County, visit www.momsorangecounty.org.


Leading earthquake seismologist to speak at Central Library

Dr Lucy Jones

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Photo by Helen Berger,
Courtesy of NBPL

Dr. Lucy Jones, a foremost expert on earthquakes

Newport Beach Public Library will host a presentation by Dr. Lucy Jones, considered America’s leading earthquake expert, on Saturday, Sept 8 at 2 p.m. in the Central Library Friends Room, located at 1000 Avocado Ave., Newport Beach.

Dr. Jones will talk about her new book The Big Ones, in this special program following the 10th Annual Disaster Preparedness Expo (held in conjunction with the Green on Green Expo) on the Civic Center Green from 11 a.m. - 2 p.m.

Dr. Jones is the founder of the Dr. Lucy Jones Center for Science and Society and a Research Associate at the Seismological Laboratory of Caltech, a post she has held since 1984. With a Bachelor of Arts in Chinese language and literature from Brown University and a Ph.D. in geophysics from MIT, she has been active in earthquake research for decades, furthering earthquake risk reduction through seismological research and integrated disaster scenarios. She is the author of the recently released book The Big Ones (Doubleday, April 2018).

In The Big Ones, this leading seismologist offers a bracing look at some of the world’s greatest natural disasters – how they have shaped our cities, impacted governments and influenced the way we think. In her riveting and exhaustively researched book, Dr. Jones offers a look at our past and readies us to face down the “Big Ones” in our future.

This event is generously funded by the Friends of the Library. Admission is free.  Seating is limited and available on a first-come, first-served basis. Books will be available for purchase and signing.

The Newport Beach Public Library presents a variety of programs that foster education and cultural arts enrichment. For more information, call 949.717.3800 (option 2) or visit www.newportbeachlibrary.org.


ENC’s Living Green Series features “Going Solar”

Greenhouse gas emissions are reaching a new low while renewable sources of energy are continuing to grow and power our lives. However, with an increased focus on wind and solar energy, we are left with a lot of questions unanswered. How will this impact me and my family? How expensive will these energy changes be?

ENC Building solar panels

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Courtesy of ENC

The Living Greener Series will give you ideas to help build a more sustainable future.

The Environmental Nature Center (ENC) is presenting “The Living Greener Series: Going Solar” on Thursday, July 19 from 6 - 7:30 p.m. Join the discussion on the future of renewable energy and specifically how it will affect households and their energy budget. The energy market is changing, and the ENC is here to dispel the confusion and light the way for a greener future!

This Living Greener event is sponsored by Sunrun. 

The Living Greener Series helps individuals understand what it means to be “living green” in their own communities. Join ENC to learn strategies to implement in your life that will help you save money while conserving natural resources for future generations. We all make day-to-day decisions that impact our natural resources. These decisions ultimately determine the health of a community. The focus is to illustrate “green” practices that are easy to implement, which in many cases will also save you money. It is the hope to inspire you to take local action and make a difference.

The cost is free for ENC members and $5 for non-members. Register at www.encenter.org.

Environmental Nature Center is located at 1601 E. 16th St., Newport Beach.


What’s happening at this year’s OC Fair?

BY LANA JOHNSON

Kathy Kramer and goats

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Photos by Lana Johnson

OC Fair & Event Center CEO Kathy Kramer shares the spotlight with friendly goats

I had the pleasure of attending the Costa Mesa Chamber of Commerce’s luncheon on Thursday, June 21, which took place in Millennium Barn at Centennial Farm on the OC Fairgrounds.

Presented by Kathy Kramer, CEO, OC Fair & Event Center, the “farm to table” meal was a memorable one, in addition to providing guests a sneak peek at new additions to the Fair this year and insight into the many returning favorites.

The lunch fare was a ham frittata accompanied by a salad of field greens and strawberries which comprised the freshest ingredients, courtesy of Centennial Farm. Eggs for the frittata were harvested on site, as were the greens and strawberries. Lemon trees on the property provided the citrus for the fresh lemonade, as well as the lemon olive oil in the dessert. It truly was a delicious meal.

Luncheon attendees each received a goodie bag filled with helpful information, a Fair ticket redeemable for one free admission, a packet of watermelon seeds, a cello bag of herbs and an orange Fair bandana, among other fun treats.

This year’s Fair theme, “Free Your Inner Farmer,” touched on new and innovative fried foods; the entertainment lineup at the Pacific Amphitheatre, The Hangar and in the Action Sports Arena; happenings and interactive displays at Heroes Hall; Fair displays; food and wine competitions; special promotional days...and my favorite – Centennial Farm – where I enjoyed a personal tour of the animals and gardens, after we dined.

Sow and piggies

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A sow and her 4- to 5-week old piggies catch some nap time

Centennial Farm is a learning place with chickens, pigs, oxen, goats, kale and cabbage, corn, a salsa garden, citrus trees, and more. This three-acre working farm is home to fruits and vegetable and an array of livestock. Volunteer docents conduct tours throughout the year – from school field trips to family outings – all at no charge to the community. 

Fast facts about Centennial Farm:

--More than 50 animals representing a variety of livestock breeds and 100 seasonal crops are on display to advance agricultural education. Many of the crops during the OC Fair are harvested and available for purchase.

--Nearly $600,000 in grants have been received since 2011 with support from the Centennial Farm Foundation.

--One and one-quarter million students have toured Centennial Farm since 1989.

--Centennial Farm strongly relies on the 101 volunteers to keep this free community running.

--The Ranch Afternoon Program, which began 15 years ago and is held September - April, affords approximately 90 fourth through sixth graders in Newport-Mesa schools the opportunity to oversee a garden plot, where they plant, maintain and harvest crops such as broccoli, carrots, radishes and cabbages. In addition, youngsters learn about the livestock area – from terminology to the care and grooming of the animals – as well as participating in leatherwork projects.

--Weekend workshops are held in food preservation, container gardening and backyard beekeeping.

--The Table of Dignity is an homage to agricultural workers who contributed to the growth and prosperity of Orange County.

--Champion Moms and OC Kids Healthy nutrition programs empower low-income families to live better by eating more fruits and vegetables and being physically active.

--California Restaurant Foundation’s Pro-Start, a two-year culinary arts and hospitality management program, is geared to high school students.

Super salsa garden

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The Super Salsa Garden

The OC Fair takes place from July 13 - August 12 (with Opening Day admission and parking free from 12 - 3 p.m.). General admission is $12 on weekdays, $14 on weekends, $7 for kids and seniors, and youngsters 5 and under are free. Hours of operation are 12 p.m. - midnight on weekdays and 11 a.m. - midnight on weekends. The Fair is closed Mondays and Tuesdays.

For more information, visit www.ocfair.com.

Editor’s Note: Look for more information on how to “Free Your Inner Farmer” in Stu News Newport future editions.


Fourth of July activities in Newport Beach

Newport Dunes fireworks

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Courtesy of Newport Dunes Waterfront Resort

Fireworks over the Back Bay lagoon light up the sky

Enjoy these Fourth of July Activities in and around Newport Beach:

Old Glory Boat Parade. Parade takes place from 1 - 3 p.m. This Newport Harbor tradition starts off Collins Island and proceeds through Newport Harbor. Hosted by the American Legion Yacht Club and American Legion Post 291, this year’s theme is “Valor – Through the Generations.” Boaters are invited to decorate their boats and participate. Registration is free. Winners will be announced at the awards banquet on Sunday, July 22 at 6:30 p.m.

Schedule of events:

7 - 11 a.m. - Pancake Breakfast 

12 - 5 p.m. -Lunch Buffet

1 - 3:30 p.m. -Old Glory Boat Parade

1 - 5 p.m. - Rock music

5 - 9 p.m.- Jazz music

9 - 10 p.m. - Fireworks

Cost TBD for breakfast only (open to the public); lunch, dancing and fireworks; and breakfast, lunch, dancing and fireworks.

For more information, call 949.673.5002 and visit www.alyc.com for a parade map and to register.

Old Glory Boat Parade

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Courtesy of balboaisland.com

8th Annual 4th of July is for Families Newport Peninsula Bike Parade & Community Festival. At 9 a.m., the Bike Parade takes place at 36th Street Park. From 9:30 - 11:30 a.m., the Free Community Festival takes place at Channel Place Park, ending at a free festival with bounce houses, a dunk tank, arts & crafts, giant slides, carnival games, and food for sale. Participants are encouraged to decorate bikes, scooters, wagons and strollers, and to bring dogs on leashes. Presented by the City of Newport Beach. For more information, call 949.644.3151 or visit www.newportbeachca.gov.

July 4th decorated bike

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Submitted photo

Decorate your bike in red, white and blue for the Mariners Day Parade

46th Annual Mariners Park Independence Day Parade & Celebration. At 10:30 a.m., the Parade begins at the corner of Commodore and Mariners Drive. From 11 a.m. - 1:30 p.m., the Celebration takes place at Mariners Park, 1300 Irvine Ave., featuring carnival games, a rock wall, balloon burst, an opportunity drawing, face painting, DJ & Gamemaster, sports zone, free entertainment and arts & crafts. Food will be available for sale from Sgt. Pepperoni’s, Mau Ice, TK Burger, Pandor and Chronic Tacos. Presented by the Mariners School Foundation and the City of Newport Beach Recreation & Senior Services Department. Proceeds from the event support Mariners Elementary School. For more information, visit www.marinersfoundation.com or call 949.644.3151. Road Closures: From 6 a.m. - 12 p.m.: Dover Drive and Irvine Avenue, Mariners Drive and Dover Drive, Dover Drive and Sussex Lane, Commodore Road after Skylark Lane, and Santiago Drive and Mariners Drive. From 6 a.m. - 2 p.m.: Mariners Drive at Pembroke Lane.

Independence Day on the Back Bay. Takes place from 2 - 10 p.m. Enjoy sunshine, music and fireworks on the bay. Come early to set up your spot on the beach for the most spectacular pyrotechnics fireworks show in Orange County. Bring your beach chairs and umbrellas for a fun day in the sun with live entertainment, dancing, food trucks and a full bar. Please note, no pets are allowed.

Highlighted Schedule of Events:

8 a.m.: Newport Dunes’ gates open; there will be a $50 per car parking fee throughout the day.

9 a.m.: The Marketplace opens for rentals of pedal go-karts, surrey carts and bicycles.

10 a.m.: Free bounce house for children in Pavilion A, inflatable waterpark and watersports rentals open.

11 a.m.: Food trucks and full bar service available by the live music/stage area.

1 pm.: Horseshoe tournament at the stakes by Moe B’s Watersports.

2 p.m.: Live music begins featuring headliner Wild Child, Redneck Rodeo and Skynyrd Reloaded with host DJ David Bugenske of Go Country 105 Radio.

3 p.m.: Volleyball tournament.

5 p.m.: Back Bay Bistro opens for dinner buffet.

9 p.m.: Live fireworks show, co-sponsored by the City of Newport Beach. Newport Beach residents can walk into the fireworks for free.

10 p.m.: Barn dance at Back Bay Bistro hosted by David Bugenske.

Inflatable waterpark

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Submitted photo

For more information, call 949.729.DUNE (3863). The event takes place at Newport Dunes Waterfront Resort, 1131 Back Bay Drive, Newport Beach. For more information, visit www.newportdunes.com.

Fourth of July Coastal Flyover. Expected to take place over Newport Beach between 5:35 and 5:40 p.m. The Condor Squadron Officers’ and Airmen’s Association, a nonprofit organization founded by a group of WWII fighter pilots, will fly AT-6s over the coast. The City of San Clemente arranged this event.

Brass Transit: The Music of Chicago (with fireworks). Takes place at 8 p.m.

Celebrate the Fourth with the music of Chicago, known as the “rock and roll band with horns.” With hits like “You’re the Inspiration,” “If You Leave Me Now,” and “Hard to Say I’m Sorry,” you’ll be swept away by the melodies that make this band such a beloved classic. To cap off the evening, sing along to your favorite patriotic tunes when you salute our armed forces and thrill to a sizzling Fourth of July fireworks show. Features: Richard Kaufman, conductor; Brass Transit – Chicago Tribute Band; and Pacific Symphony. Takes place at Pacific Amphitheatre on the Orange County Fairgrounds, 88 Fair Drive, Costa Mesa.

Wild Goose

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Submitted photo

Enjoy a July 4th fireworks cruise aboard the Wild Goose

4th of July Hornblower Cruises. Choose from a two-hour Old Glory Boat Parade Brunch Cruise or a three-hour 4th of July Fireworks Dining Cruise. Enjoy a memorable holiday with a tempting buffet, festive music, and impeccable service long after the party ends. Brunch cruise boards at 12:30 p.m.; cruise from 1 - 3 p.m. Two dinner cruises: (1) boards at 6:30 p.m. with cruise from 7 - 10 p.m. and (2) boards (Wild Goose) at 7 p.m. with cruise from 7:30 - 10:30 p.m. The cost is $75 - $109.95 per person. Departs from Hornblower South, 2431 W. Coast Highway, Newport Beach. For more information, visit www.hornblowercruises.com.

4th of July Brunch Cruise. Brunch aboard The Ambassador Yacht, a three-level luxury yacht. Check in is at 10:30 a.m.; cruise is from 11 a.m. - 2 p.m. Get a front row seat to view the Old Glory Boat Parade. The cost is $54 - $87.50 per person. Guests will be served an amazing breakfast buffet, including an unlimited build-you-own bloody Mary bar with vodka and all the fixings, free-flowing mimosas, and live music, with a full bar available. Departs from 2901 W. Coast Highway, Newport Beach. For more information, visit www.annualyachtparties.com.


Fair Game

By TOM JOHNSON

It’s Rouda by a nose…Rohrabacher up next

TomJohnson

The question at election time is always, does my vote count? Well, ask Harley Rouda, or Hans Keirstead, for that matter. Their race to challenge incumbent Dana Rohrabacher this fall in the 48th Congressional District was decided by 125 votes. 

A total of nearly 175,000 votes were cast. Of those, 52,737 or 30.3 percent went to Rohrabacher. Assuming Dana gets most of Scott Baugh’s treasonous friends back, that adds in another 27,514 votes and that’s 46.1 percent. But remember, you need 50 percent, plus one in this race.

It’s going to be interesting to watch.

When the results were finally completed yesterday, Rouda issued the following statement: “I am deeply grateful for the confidence placed in our campaign by the voters of California’s 48th Congressional District. 

“I’d like to thank all of our supporters, volunteers, neighbors, elected leaders, working people, grassroots activists and those who joined our effort in this important election. This victory is a testament to the movement we have built around moving Orange County forward. 

“I congratulate all the fine candidates who ran hard-fought campaigns in this primary and look forward to working with them all to flip this seat in November. In the days and weeks ahead, I will continue fighting every day to hold Dana Rohrabacher accountable for his reckless, backward agenda that spans from Orange County all the way to Washington.”

• • •

The Newport Beach Foundation is celebrating their launch tomorrow, June 27, at the Lido House hotel. The great news is that Joe Stapleton has found more time in his very crowded calendar to take on another organization.

The Foundation has had a placeholder role at Newport Beach & Company for the last number of years.

Tomorrow’s event will have the Ben Carlson Foundation as their inaugural charity partner. It doesn’t get better than that.

I’m sure Joe will explain the future plans of the Foundation and how community partners may benefit.

• • •

Next, as a past recipient of the Newport Beach Citizen of the Year award, I’m automatically on the committee that meets annually to discuss new honorees. That luncheon is coming up. Here’s my question, who comes to mind when you think of our Citizen of the Year? 

If you think you have someone that should be considered, email me at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. and I may represent your voice.

Knowing a couple of my friends, they will probably nominate themselves…please guys, don’t put your return name on the outside of the envelope, it’s awkward.

• • •

The Newport Beach Chamber of Commerce has a cool venue set up for their Thursday evening June Sunset Mixer. It’s The LOT Fashion Island. That’s the new cinema with “high-quality dining and great service” inside the Fashion Island Mall.

The cinema has their “signature luxury leather recliners and full-service dining” in all seven auditoriums.

The Chamber event is 5:30 - 7:30 p.m., upstairs. There’s a no-host bar, raffle prizes and complimentary hor’s doeuvres. It’s free to members, but guests will have to fork over $35. Reservations are not required.


City of Newport Beach July 4th information

On Tuesday, July 3, the street sweeper will be making its normal scheduled rounds. The sweeper will go around parked vehicles and there will be no enforcement (ticketing) of these vehicles. Residential trash collection will follow its regular schedule.

On Wednesday, July 4, City Hall and most City facilities will be closed in observance of the Independence Day holiday. There will be no street sweeping or residential trash collection. For the remainder of the week, street sweeping will follow its regular schedule and residential trash collection will be delayed by one day.

The free, Balboa Peninsula Trolley will be operating on the Fourth of July holiday from 9:30 a.m. - 9:30 p.m.


City of Newport Beach and the NBPD provide road closures, guidelines for a safe July 4th

The City of Newport Beach is anticipating large crowds for the July 4th holiday, and is requesting the public’s cooperation to ensure a safe and enjoyable environment for residents and visitors. Though most residents and business owners are well versed in the City’s increased public safety efforts for the Fourth of July, the Newport Beach Police Department has some helpful reminders about what is allowed and not allowed.

Street Closures and Parking (All closure times are approximate.):

July 4th from 10:30 a.m. to the early morning hours of July 5th.

--Southbound Orange Street at West Coast Highway will be closed.

--Via Oporto from Via Lido to 32nd Street will be closed.

All streets on the Peninsula will be open to vehicle traffic, however the NBPD will be monitoring traffic conditions throughout the day and will facilitate additional street closures should the need arise. On-street and other public parking will be extremely limited in the West Newport area. All residents and visitors are cautioned to park in legal, public spaces or their own, private spaces or garages. Vehicles parked illegally will be issued parking citations and may be towed. On the July 4th, text NBJULY4TH to 888777 to receive updated road closure information, significant traffic advisories and community advisories. Visit www.NIXLE.com to sign up and receive crime alerts, traffic advisories and community updates year round from the NBPD.

SAFETY ENHANCEMENT ZONE

There will again be a Safety Enhancement Zone in the area bounded by the Pacific Ocean on the south, 32nd St. and Newport Blvd. on the east, W. Coast Hwy. on the north and 54th St. on the west. The Safety Zone designation is effective from 12:01 a.m. on July 4 to 3 a.m. on July 5. Mounted Unit: Members of the Orange County Regional Mounted Enforcement Unit will be on duty to help ensure a safe holiday.

Safety Enhancement Zone

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Courtesy of the NBPD

Fines within the Safety Enhancement Zone are triple the normal amount and can be as much as $3,000.

WHAT IS PROHIBITED?

--Alcoholic Beverages Prohibited in Public Areas

Possessing or drinking alcoholic beverages on streets, sidewalks, beaches, piers or other public areas is prohibited (this includes alcoholic beverages that have been poured into a cup). Violators are subject to citation or arrest.

--Fireworks

It is illegal to possess or use fireworks in Newport Beach. This includes “safe and sane” fireworks such as fountains and sparklers that can be purchased in nearby cities. Residents and visitors are encouraged to attend a public, professional fireworks show.

--Rooftop Gatherings

People gathering on rooftops is a safety hazard that may violate building code ordinances. City Building Dept. inspectors will be working with the Police Department to address those violations.

--Throwing Water Balloons, Spraying Water at Pedestrians, Bicyclists or Vehicles

Throwing water balloons or spraying water at pedestrians, bicyclists or vehicles is illegal. Violators are subject to citation or arrest.

LOUD AND UNRULY GATHERINGS

--Fines for Loud or Unruly Parties (Municipal Code Section 10.58.030).

Property owners and/or party hosts are responsible for the conduct of their guests. Loud and unruly parties requiring a police response could result in a citation or arrest for those present, and fines for property owners, tenants, renters and guests. If you plan to host a holiday party in West Newport, please follow these guidelines:

--Limit the number of guests invited and don’t allow strangers to attend uninvited. As the host, you are ultimately responsible for the conduct of everyone that attends your party.

--Be sure that no alcoholic beverages leave your property. Possession of open containers of alcoholic beverages or consumption of those beverages in public is illegal.

--Ensure that no minors consume alcoholic beverages while at your party.

--Limit noise and raucous behavior. Keep music volumes low and all speakers indoors.

--Do not allow any guest to throw water balloons or spray water at pedestrians or vehicles.

--Ask guests to limit their travel in and out of West Newport due to the traffic restrictions.

--Be courteous to your neighbors and take your party indoors after dark. Close doors and windows to prevent loud voices and music from disturbing others.

--Keep outdoor lights on – it helps deter criminal activity.

For more information on fines for Disturbance Advisement Cards and Loud or Unruly Gatherings, click here.

BEACH AND PIER INFORMATION

--All ocean and bay front beaches are open to the public from the hours of 6 a.m. until 10 p.m. (This includes the areas from the Santa Ana River Jetty to Crystal Cove State Park.)

--Crystal Cove beaches close at sunset.

--Please swim near a lifeguard tower as ocean currents and surf can be strong, shifting and dangerous.

--Portable barbecues are not allowed on any City beaches. For those who wish to barbecue, fire rings and public barbecues are available near the Balboa Pier and at Corona del Mar State Beach from 6 a.m. - 10 p.m. on a first-come, first-served basis.

--The Newport and Balboa Piers are open from 5 a.m. until midnight. Restaurants are located on both piers and their hours may vary. Public restroom facilities are available at the base of both piers.

Wishing everyone a safe and enjoyable Independence Day!


Abandoned vessels to be auctioned…maybe there’s something that floats your boat

The City of Newport Beach and the Orange County Sheriff Department’s Harbor Patrol will host an abandoned vessel auction on Friday, June 29 at Marina Park. Public viewing of the vessels will be open from 8 - 9 a.m. The cash-only auction begins promptly at 9 a.m. 

Vessels to be Auctioned:

1- 27’ Bayliner CF 9445 KH; 1- 35’ Wood Sailboat CF 9709 CT; 1- 25’ Sailboat CF 0670 EC; 1- 14’ Runabout CF 5605 AV; 1- 25’ Catalina CF 2269 KF; 1- 15’ Barge CF 7654 UF; 1- 27’ Sailboat CF 0144 FF; 1- 26’ Bayliner; 1- 10’ HovieScout yellow SUP; 1- 8’ Mainstream Jazz blue kayak; 1- 10’ West Marine green kayak; 1- Inflatable Kayak “Sea Eagle”; 2- 8’ Kayaks; 1- White two-seater kayak; 1- 8’ Grey inflatable dinghy; 1- 8’ Sabot; 1- 8’ Achilles inflatable; 1- 10’ Plastic Hull Skiff w/3HP Gamefisher Outboard; and 1- 14’ Yellow Kayak.

Marina Park is located at 1600 W. Balboa Blvd. Minimum opening bid varies with vessel; Vessels are sold as is and where is; Successful bidder must remove vessel by 5 p.m. on the day of auction; CF registered vessels are retained by the City of Newport Beach following the auction for a mandatory 10-day redemption period before the vessels are released to the successful bidder. The winning bidder is responsible to remove the vessel from by 5 p.m. the day following the end of the redemption period.

For questions about the auction, please contact Harbor Operations at 949.270.8159.


Seventh Annual Golden Foodie Awards calls for People’s Choice nominees

Golden Foodies

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Submitted photo

Leading up to the 7th annual Golden Foodie Awards on Sunday, Sept. 30, local Orange County foodies are invited to vote for their local culinary favorites during a two-week period from August 3 - 17. The Golden Foodie Awards are comprised of various categories, for which the public is tasked to vote for their favorite from the region’s independently owned and chef-driven Orange County restaurants.

“The Golden Foodie Awards has evolved into a celebration of Orange County’s rich culinary scene,” said Pamela Waitt, creator and producer of the Golden Foodie Awards, and president of the OC Restaurant Association. “Now in its 7th year, the Golden Foodie Awards have grown exponentially in reach and media attention. To enable us to continue to grow as an event, we have brought on the accounting firm of Moss Adams to audit votes and continue to attract sponsors who share a vision of highlighting those stand-out chefs and restaurants in Orange County.”

The Golden Foodie Awards is a people’s choice event that recognizes the best chefs, libations and cuisine at chef-driven and independent restaurants. With its focus on involving the Orange County community to serve as judges through their voting, the Golden Foodie Awards serve as the highest honor and is an indication of local culinary trends and consumer preferences.

Winners will be announced on September 30 at a red carpet awards gala. Connoisseurs of cuisine and lovers of libations will have a chance each week to vote for their favorites among 15 categories:

Voting Categories:

Voting period: August 3 - 9 ending August 9 at 10 p.m.

Bartender of the Year: This award recognizes excellence with the county’s best bartenders, one who showcases his or her craft through the art of cocktail creation. This person has excellent knowledge and skills with: the classics, creativity, innovation and hospitality.

Best Cocktails in Orange County: The best place to get delicious cocktails in Orange County, both innovative and classic.

Best Wine Program: The Best Wine Program Award is designed to recognize restaurants whose wine lists offer interesting selections and appeal to a variety of wine enthusiasts. A restaurant with an excellent wine program will have staff that can suggest wines that will work in harmony with the cuisine.

Best Beer Program: The Best Beer Program Award is designed to recognize restaurants whose beer lists offer interesting selections and appeal to a variety of beer enthusiasts. A restaurant with an excellent beer program will have staff that can suggest beers that will work in harmony with the cuisine.

Best Bar Program: An excellent bar program should be just as thoughtfully created as the dining menu. Many restaurants in Orange County have outstanding bar programs that offer knowledgeable food pairings, cocktail suggestions, and friendly service and well-rounded menus to suit all palates.

Best New Restaurant: A new restaurant must have been opened no longer than 12 months from the voting month, meaning it would have opened between August 2016 and August 2017. This restaurant has shown that it has made a great impact on the restaurant scene and offers excellent service and cuisine.

Best Lunch Spot in Orange County: This award recognizes the art of an excellent lunch. This eatery offers fresh and delicious options and is a restaurant that you suggest friends try for lunch.

Voting period: August 10 - 17 ending August 17 at 10 p.m.

Best Brunch in Orange County: Brunch, that beautiful late morning meal eaten instead of breakfast and lunch. There’s nothing better than a great brunch to kick off or end the weekend. What restaurant in Orange County offers the best brunch?

Rising Star Chef of the Year: This award recognizes an “up and coming” chef who has demonstrated outstanding talent, innovation and leadership.

Favorite Food Influencer in Orange County: Who do you turn to for food advice and suggestions? Vote for your favorite “Food Influencer” in Orange County. Influencers come in many different forms; they can be a food writer, radio host, or social media influencer. Share who you think does the best job in Orange County of keeping you informed on all things culinary.

Outstanding Community Service: This award recognizes outstanding community service. Please vote for who you think is deserving of this award and share why.

Restaurateur of the Year: The award recognizes a hard-working restaurateur that continually sets high standards and demonstrates originality, quality, and service.  He or she is very successful in the eyes of his or her fellow operators, employees, and customers. This talented individual has contributed a positive image of the local hospitality Industry.

Best Dessert Menu in Orange County: This award recognizes excellent dessert menus. This menu is seasonal, innovative and tempting. It offers a selection sure to satisfy everyone’s sweet tooth.

Best Entree in Orange County: This award recognizes cravability and food excellence. This entree is consistently delicious and is your favorite dish at an Orange County restaurant.

Best Service Award: Service can make the difference between a terrific meal and a terrible experience. Truly stellar service will make a restaurant unforgettable and have you clamoring to come back. What Orange County restaurant offers exceptional service?

Restaurant Industry Voting period: Begins August 3 for the Chef of the Year and Pastry Chef of the Year

Chef of the Year: This award recognizes an outstanding culinarian who stands out. This chef stands out among a crowd of excellent chefs. He or she not only possesses stellar culinary skills, but is also someone who gives back to the industry through time, training and/or inspiration.

Pastry Chef of the Year: This award recognizes excellence to a chef that specializes in the production of pastry work. They demonstrate style and innovation in what they produce. He or she is someone with not only stellar culinary skills, but they stand out among a crowd of excellent pastry chefs.

Voting Details:

Voting takes place online on the Golden Foodie Awards website at www.GoldenFoodieAwards.com. For each category, the top three individuals or restaurants with the most votes will be announced at the end of each voting week. Votes will be audited by the accounting firm of Moss Adams. The top winner in each category will be announced at the Red Carpet Ceremony for the Golden Foodie Awards, hosted by Simon Majumdar and Special Guest Neil Saavedra, on September 30 at the Newport Beach Marriott. For the complete rules and regulations, visit 

www.goldenfoodieawards.com/rules-and-regulations.html.

The Red Carpet Event:

As determined by the public, the chefs, bartenders and restaurants with the most votes will be announced at the Hollywood-esque Golden Foodies Award gala. Guests will nosh and imbibe creations from Orange County’s finest curators of taste trends.

Celebrity master of ceremonies, Simon Majumdar, will preside over the affair at the Newport Beach Marriott & Spa, 900 Newport Center Drive, Newport Beach. The culinary writer and Food Network personality will be joined by Special Guest Neil Saavedra to dole out awards to winners of the 17 categories, including the highly anticipated Chef of the Year and Pastry Chef of the Year honors. Each winner will receive a solid pewter Golden Foodie statue plated in 14k gold, along with other high-end prizes from event sponsors.


Philharmonic Society offers Mini Series concert packages

Mini All Stars

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Photos courtesy of Philharmonic Society 

of Orange County

Mini All-Stars Series

The Philharmonic Society of Orange County has just launched its Mini Series concert packages. All patrons will receive 20 percent off if they purchase tickets to a Mini Series, comprised of three concerts, before Tuesday, July 31.

Concert Lineup:

All-Stars: Renee and Henry Concert Hall, Segerstrom Center for the Arts

Features: 1. Czech Philharmonic & Kirill Gerstein, piano with Semyon Bychkov, conductor on November 8, 2018 at 8 p.m.; 2. Bell-Isserlis-Denk Trio with Joshua Bell, violin; Steven Isserlis, cello; and Jeremy Den, piano on May 9, 2019 at 8 p.m.; 3. Anne-Sophie Mutter & Ensemble Wien-Berlin (members of the Berlin and Vienna Philharmonic) on June 25, 2019 at 8 p.m. Tickets range from $100 - $644. Visit www.philharmonicsociety.org/miniseries/allstars for more information.

Big Orchestras: Renee and Henry Concert Hall, Segerstrom Center for the Arts

Features: 1. Mariinsky Orchestra with Valery Gergiev, conductor and Kristóf Baráti, violin on October 20, 2018 at 8 p.m.; 2. Czech Philharmonic & Alisa Weilerstein with Semyon Bychkov, conductor and Alisa Weilerstein, cello on November 7, 2018 at 8 p.m.; 3. Los Angeles Philharmonic & Jean-Yves Thibaudet with Susanna Mälkki, conductor and Jean-Yves Thibaudet, piano on January 20, 2019 at 3 p.m. For more information and tickets, which range from $116 - $644, visit www.philharmonicsociety.org/miniseries/bigorchestras

Mini Mozart

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Mini Mozart Series

Mozart: Renee and Henry Concert Hall, Segerstrom Center for the Arts

Features: 1. Philharmonia Baroque Orchestra & Chorale with Nicholas McGegan, conductor on October 4, 2108 at 8 p.m. 2. Australian Chamber Orchestra with Richard Tognetti, violin and director with Paul Lewis, piano on April 4, 2019 at 8 p.m.; 3. Anne-Sophie Mutter, violin with members of the Vienna & Berlin Philharmonic on June 25, 2019 at 8 p.m. Tickets range from $92 - $644. For tickets and more information, visit www.philharmonicsociety.org/miniseries/mozart

Chamber: Samueli Theater, Segerstrom Center for the Arts

Features: 1. Academy of St Martin in the Fields Chamber Ensemble on October 10, 2018 at 8 p.m.; 2. Dover Quartet on November 25, 2018 at 3 p.m.; 3. Johannes Moser, cello and Tiller Fellner, piano on February 17, 2019 at 8 p.m. For more information and tickets, which range from $76 - $124, visit www.philharmonicsociety.org/miniseries/chamber

Mini Strings

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Mini Strings Series

Strings: Renee and Henry Concert Hall, Segerstrom Center for the Arts

Features: 1. Mariinsky Orchestra with Valery Gergiev, conductor and Kristóf Baráti, violin on October 20, 2018 at 8 p.m.; 2. Itzhak Perlman “In the Fiddler’s House” with Itzhak Perlman, violin on January 17, 2019 at 8 p.m.; 3. Bell-Isserlis-Denk Trio with Joshua Bell, violin; Steven Isserlis, cello; and Jeremy Denk, piano on May 9, 2019 at 8 p.m. Tickets range from $108 - $644. For tickets and more information, visit 

www.philharmonicsociety.org/miniseries/strings

Piano: Renee and Henry Concert Hall, Segerstrom Center for the Arts

Features: 1. Marc-André Hamelin, piano on January 15, 2019 at 8 p.m.; 2. Beatrice Rana, piano on March 6, 2019 at 8 p.m.; 3. Murray Perahia, piano on April 18, 2019 at 8 p.m. Tickets range from $61 - $348. For tickets and more information, visit www.philharmonicsociety.org/miniseries/piano.

Concerto: Renee and Henry Concert Hall, Segerstrom Center for the Arts

Features: 1. Taiwan Philharmonic with Shao-Chia Lu, conductor and Stephen Hough, piano on October 30, 2018 at 8 p.m.; 2. Russian National Orchestra with Mikhail Pletnev, conductor and George Li, piano on February 28, 2019 at 8 p.m.; 3. Australian Chamber Orchestra with Richard Tognetti, violin and director with Paul Lewis, piano on April 4, 2019 at 8 p.m. For more information and tickets, which range from $100 - $644, visit www.philharmonicsociety.org/miniseries/concerto.

World: Two concerts take place at Renee and Henry Concert Hall; one takes place in Segerstrom Hall, Segerstrom Center for the Arts

Features: 1. Kodo - One Earth Tour on February 10, 2018 at 8 p.m.; 2. Zakir Hussain & Masters of Perfection with Zakir Hussain, tabla with additional artists to be announced on March 9, 2018 at 8 p.m.; 3. 20th Anniversary Tour: Silkroad Ensemble on April 30, 2019 at 8 p.m. Tickets range from $68 - $404. For tickets and more information, visit www.philharmonicsociety.org/miniseries/worldmusic

For more information, visit the Philharmonic Society of Orange County’s website at www.philharmonicsociety.org.


Shop Talk Shopping Bag

By LANA JOHNSON 

Come and celebrate J.McLaughlin’s fourth year at Corona del Mar Plaza at the retailer’s Sip & Shop event this Thursday, June 28 from 4 - 7 p.m.

Enjoy light snacks and refreshments while you shop their charming summer collection of prints, patterns and classic clothing. Plus, you might be the winner of one of their classic J.McLaughlin pieces!

JMcLaughlin

Click on photo for a larger image

Courtesy of The Irvine Company

It’s an Anniversary Party at J.McLaughlin

The company has partnered with Seneca Orange County, a nonprofit mental health agency, for this event, and will be donating 15 percent of all sales toward this initiative.

Corona del Mar Plaza is located at 972 Avocado Ave., Newport Beach.

Editor’s Note: If you or someone you know operates a Newport Beach-based business that you would like to see featured in Shop Talk, please send the information to This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it..


Stump the Stu

Sand sculpture has an artistic “porpoise”

Stump the Stu 6.26.18

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These frolicking porpoises in the sand certainly look like they are enjoying summer. Where would you find this artistic sculpture? Extra kudos if you can name the creator of these cetaceans. An interesting fact is that during the Middle Ages, porpoises were known as merswines or “sea pigs.”

Take the challenge and submit your answers to This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it..

The correct answer will appear in Friday’s edition, along with the correct guesses. So, join us for this local adventure.

If you have a unique spot or icon around town that you think Stu News Newport readers would enjoy finding out about, please shoot it, share it and give us the answer, so we can challenge them!


Segerstrom Center for the Arts welcomes back award-winning jazz singer Diana Krall

Diana Krall

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Courtesy of scfta.org

Multiple Grammy Award-winning jazz pianist and world-renowned singer Diana Krall is returning to the Segerstrom Center for the Arts on November 4 at 7 p.m. This will be part of the fourth North American leg of her international “Turn Up the Quiet World Tour.” 

Krall has been to more than 100 cities throughout Europe and North America on her tour. Recently, she announced that 21 additional U.S. concert dates have been added to her October and November schedule.

Tickets are on sale now, starting at $72.50, for her Segerstrom Hall performance at www.scfta.org.

Visit www.dianakrall.com for information regarding her tour, to listen to her music and to purchase merchandise.

Segerstrom Center for the Arts is located at 600 Town Center Drive, Costa Mesa.


UCI holds rowing clinic in the Back Bay

Rowers on water

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Submitted photos

Members of the UCI rowing team and coach AJ Brooks hosted a “Learn to Row” event for about 50 high school students in Santa Ana’s Nicholas Academic Centers (NAC) program on Friday morning, June 22 at the UCI rowing facility in Newport Beach’s Back Bay.

Part of NAC’s mission is to expose students from low income, underserved communities to college experiences and activities that enlarge their world view.

Closeup of students

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Dr. Henry T. Nicholas III has been a major donor to the UCI rowing program, and is the co-founder and major funder of the Nicholas Academic Centers. The “Learn to Row” clinic is part of NAC’s approach to integrating a broad range of cultural, college and professional experiences into NAC’s academic program. 


Pet of the Week Dog and Cat print

StuNewsNewport is delighted to be working with the Newport Beach Animal Shelter to help get the word out in search of loving homes for pets that deserve a warm, nurturing environment and a place to call “home.”

Colby

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Courtesy of Newport Beach 

Animal Shelter

MEET COLBY

Smiling Colby was posted about a week ago, but he’s actually just become available for adoption over the past few days. He’s a gorgeous, happy, little kitty cat with very strong features. He’s going to be a stand-out adult cat. His markings are astonishing and his energy exudes that he’s just one cool little dude.

At any given time, the shelter can have 4 - 5 dogs and 7 - 8 cats/kittens and other pets available for adoption. At times, they receive owner turn-ins that would do best adopted out together. 

Adoption costs at the shelter:

Dogs - $130

Puppies - $150

Cats - $90

Kittens - $110

If you are interested in finding out more about Colby, or any other animals up for adoption, the Newport Beach Animal Shelter is located at 20302 Riverside Drive, Newport Beach. It is open Tuesday through Sunday from 11 a.m. - 4 p.m. Call 949.644.3656. Email Valerie Schomburg at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it..

To find out how you can help support the shelter, visit www.nbpd.org and click on “Our Animal Shelter” to view the wish list. They can always use food & treats; new toys; grooming, hygiene & comfort products; as well as laundry soap, dish soap, paper towels, sponges & scrub pads and lint rollers. If you are interested in volunteering, you can fill out and sign the application on the website.


Newport Beach – A Look Back 

Photo series courtesy of Balboa Island Museum & Historical Society

A Look Back 6.26.18

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This house was built in 1925 by Louis Perry at 220 Onyx Ave. It was one of the first guest cottages on Balboa Island. It was torn down in 2014.

Visit Balboa Island Museum and the Museum Store located at 331 Marine Ave., Balboa Island. They are open Tuesdays - Sundays from 10 a.m. - 4 p.m. For more information, call 949.675.3952, visit www.balboaislandmuseum.orgor email This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it..


Living history, burglaries and an SCE project update

By AMY SENK

As the school year drew to an end, Corona del Mar High School sophomores participated in the annual Living History luncheon on June 14. The program introduces small groups of CdM students to veterans for interviews, and ends with a patriotic-themed lunch in the school gymnasium. More than 90 veterans attended this year’s lunch, which took place on Flag Day. District board members, Superintendent Dr. Fred Navarro, Newport Beach Police Chief Jon Lewis and Mayor Pro Tem Will O’Neill were also in attendance.

Jeter Ciampa Satchell cropped

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Photos by Amy Senk

(L-R) Georgia Jeter, George Ciampa and Maya Satchell at CdM High School’s Living History luncheon

“Newport Beach has long celebrated our veterans through our American Legion Post 291, adoption of the Marines 1/1, and the Field of Honor, just to name a few,” O’Neill said. “Kudos to Newport-Mesa and CdM High School for their commitment to ensuring that our students learn more about our veterans than just words in textbooks.”

Students Georgia Jeter and Maya Satchell worked with George Ciampa, a World War II veteran who had gathered bodies of fallen soldiers from the battlefield to help prepare them for burial.

“We learned so much,” Satchell said. “Hearing about the firsthand experiences of someone who fought in a war was very insightful and interesting,” Jeter said.

• • •

May brought burglars into town, with eight reported residential burglaries where the thieves took items including a safe, watches and jewelry, and in two cases, nothing at all. Detectives stopped by a couple of CdM homeowners’ association meetings, informing residents that some of the crimes appeared to be connected to a group from Los Angeles, and that police were working with other departments to make arrests.

“We have some very good leads,” said Lt. Keith Krallman, who spoke at the Thursday board meeting of the CdM Residents Association (CdMRA).

He also said that in the month of May, there were zero car break-ins in all of Corona del Mar, and that crime in the area was down 22 percent from last year with more than 200 arrests since January.

Chronic Tacos

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Chronic Tacos in Corona del Mar was the victim of a recent window smash

Chronic Tacos at 3601 E. Coast Highway also was the victim of a window smash, but details about that incident were not immediately available. 

• • •

City staff attended the CdMRA meeting, providing details about the 2018-2019 budget, which included funds for a full-time civilian fire marshal, a position that several residents who live along Buck Gully had requested be refilled. The presentation also outlined capital improvement projects for CdM, including a Marguerite Avenue pavement project that will affect portions of the road between Fifth Avenue and San Joaquin Hills Road, with construction scheduled for next winter.

Deputy Public Works Director Mark Vukojevic also gave an update on a planned Southern California Edison (SCE) project that will upgrade systems, causing occasional power outages for customers between Carnation Avenue and Hazel Drive, and from Seaview to Fifth avenues during construction. Residents and businesses will have two planned outages during the six-week project, each lasting about eight hours, and some traffic lanes and alleys will be closed, SCE officials told the CdMRA group earlier this year.

City staff is currently checking the plans and has asked SCE to physically mark in alleys and other areas where they plan to add new poles or guy wires, Vukojevic said.

“We think we need more information from them. Let’s get some information on the ground so the neighbors actually see what’s going on. If we need to put on the brakes, we will,” Vukojevic said. 

~~~~~~~~

Amy Senk has lived in Corona del Mar for 18 years and was publisher of Corona del Mar Today, an online newspaper that ran daily for seven years. Senk, a graduate of the University of Missouri School of Journalism, is involved in the Corona del Mar Residents Association and the Corona del Mar High School PTA. She and her husband have two children.


Sign of the times

On Fridays we give you a partial glimpse of a sign around town. You guess what the overall name of the business is. 

If you answered correctly, you might also know what pro golfer Patrick Cantlay, ATP player Mardy Fish and pro surfer Casey Brown all have in common. They’re a part of Team TravisMathew...which is the business we were going for. 

Congratulations to Angela Howley, D. Tustin, Jennifer Carey and Troy Davis, who correctly identified the TravisMathew sportswear store in Fashion Island at 1059 Newport Center Drive. This is the company’s first flagship retail location.

If you’re a business and you want to play, you can send us a high-quality photo of your sign and we’ll take it from there and challenge our readers.

Let’s have some fun!

SOTT 6.26.18

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Jr. Lifeguards signifies the start to Newport’s summer

Jr Guards

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Courtesy of Newport Beach Junior Lifeguards

Summer has arrived! That means you will be seeing lots of youngsters wearing long red shorts riding their bikes...all heading down to the beach to start their Junior Lifeguard training.

Today, Tuesday, June 26 is Opening Day, with the program running through August 9. There are two sessions Monday through Thursday – from 9 a.m. - 12 p.m. and 1 - 4 p.m. – with close to 1,500 - 2,000 youngsters heading out to the ocean, ages 9 - 15.

Participants are educated in topics such as the oceanic environment, first aid, mutual cooperation, competition techniques and lifesaving methods. Emphasis is placed on safety, respect, physical fitness, instruction and discipline. Junior Lifeguards participate in physical activities such as ocean swims, snorkeling, body surfing and beach runs.

Noteworthy, are these big events:

--Friday, July 6 from 10 a.m. - 1 p.m. is Ben Carlson Day

--Thursday, July 12 from 5:30 - 7:30 p.m. is Hot Dinner

--Thursday, August 2 from 10 a.m. - 1 p.m. is Monster Mile

--Thursday, August 9 from 5:30 - 7:30 p.m. is Graduation 

Junior Lifeguard headquarters is located at 100 A St., near Balboa Pier.

For more information, visit www.nbjg.net.

Editor’s Note: Check out this Friday’s edition to see photos from Opening Day!


Decorative Arts Society grants $200,000 to 12 OC nonprofits

As Decorative Arts Society embarks on its 24th annual reception and lecture series this fall, the organization is pleased to announce its 2018-2019 grant recipients. These recipients, announced at a formal luncheon this month at The Pacific Club in Newport Beach, are comprised of a highly dedicated and passionate group of Orange County-based nonprofit organizations and are a direct reflection of the mission of the Decorative Arts Society. Grant monies totaling $200,000 will be provided to these organizations to fund projects and other needed resources to support their cause.

DAS

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Courtesy of Decorative Arts Society

Representatives from the Orange County charitable organizations that received a grant

Since its inception, the Decorative Arts Society has distributed more than $2 million to Orange County nonprofit organizations that help and empower women, children and families to achieve their potential as responsible contributing members of our community. 

“We are proud to be supporting, through our membership and sponsorships, several areas of needed support in our own Orange County including counseling and support, life coaching, health, education and shelter care and housing,” said Adrienne Garrison, president of the Decorative Arts Society. “Our organization is somewhat unique in that our lecture series and receptions fuel the passion of the arts of our members, and our members, at the same time, are giving directly back to their community via their membership dues. It’s such a successful win-win for our community.”

Grants were awarded to these recipients:

--Breast Cancer Solutions

--Healthy Smiles

--Women Helping Women

--Environmental Nature Center

--Waymakers

--Casa Youth Shelter

--Illumination Foundation

--Taller San Jose/Hope Builders

--WTLC (Women’s Transitional Living Center)

--Families Forward

--SPIN (Serving People in Need)

--Fristers

The Decorative Arts Society, established in 1995, is a membership group of community-minded women and men who support the organization by participating in an annual lecture series presented by nationally and internationally known experts in the field of the decorative arts, including interior and fashion, architecture and landscape design. Through this series their members expand their knowledge of the decorative arts. Their subscriptions and donations to the Decorative Arts Society provide funds for projects and programs which benefit women and children in Orange County.

For more information and membership opportunities, contact Laraine Eggleston, membership chair at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. and visit www.decorativeartssociety.net.


Fair Housing Foundation to hold Certificate Management Training this Monday

The Fair Housing Foundation (FHF) will be holding a Fair Housing Certificate Management Training at the Newport Beach City Hall in the Corona del Mar Room from 12 - 4 p.m. on Monday, June 25.

This course is free and open to the public. The training is targeted towards property management professionals. The FHF will explain state and federal fair housing laws, discusses state and federally protected classes, advertising guidelines, and how to prevent allegations. Participants receive a Fair Housing Certificate upon successfully passing the course exam.

The FHF services residents of the city of Newport Beach. They are contracted by Newport Beach and receive funds through the Community Development Block Grants. They educate the public about fair housing rights and responsibilities through workshops, trainings and community events. FHF provides mediation and counseling services through the housing assistance hotline at 1.800.446.FAIR (3247) and walk-in clinics. They also investigate issues of discrimination related to housing.

For more information or to RSVP for the Fair Housing Certification Management Training, call 1.800.446.FAIR (3247). An RSVP is required for management trainings.


Fair Game

By TOM JOHNSON

Rouda and Keirstead fighting for Rohrabacher shot…and panga boat hits Crystal Cove, again!

TomJohnsonOkay, we already know most or many of this fall’s local political races. One that’s still hanging out there is the U.S. Representative’s 48th District

We know incumbent Dana Rohrabacher is in with 52,674 votes or 30+ percent. 

The big question is...who’s facing him? 

As of last night, here’s the way things stand. Harley Rouda (Dem), 30,016 votes, is second and Hans Keirstead (Dem), 29,919 votes, is third.

That’s a difference of only 97 votes. 

Only one gets in to run against Rohrabacher.

Following Election Day, there were some 265,507 ballots yet to be processed for all of Orange County by the Orange County Registrar’s office. Most of those don’t impact this race, so we’re getting down to the nitty-gritty.

Only 10,688 ballots remain to be counted. I guess we’ll see soon.

• • •

Went into Hoag Hospital this week for a surprise visit and tune-up…and just when I thought that golf was going to dominate my future.

Okay, a little scare, but we’re back at it.

A couple of observations following the visit: 1) Hoag has an amazing emergency room…so many people with so many problems and yet they, Hoag staff, work through all of it flawlessly. 2) The Hoag nurses are spectacular, period. I couldn’t have possibly received better care anywhere else. And finally, 3) The doctors associated with Hoag to me, are the best of the best. I always feel that if a doctor has a relationship with Hoag, they’re better than most.

Once again, like many of you, lucky to have Hoag in town.

• • •

I keep having a dream that goes something like this: “Ladies and gentlemen on the Crystal Cove State Beach…the 4:45 a.m. panga boat from (pick a location south of the border) will be arriving shortly. Please meet passengers on the sand…and then run like heck!”

What in the heck is going on?

Panga boat

Courtesy of Laguna Beach PD

Click on photo for a larger image

Here’s what we know, another panga boat came ashore in Crystal Cove State Park early Tuesday morning, June 19. That’s two in just over a week. Four Mexican national men were arrested, and authorities are searching for five others. 

• • •

This in from former Newport Beach City Manager and 1/1 Marine Foundation supporter Homer Bludau: “Could the Newport Beach 1/1 Marine Foundation get a mention in your Stu News next week relating to the car wash fundraiser we are having on Saturday, June 23, from 10 a.m. - 2 p.m., at the Newport Dunes? We will have a group of Marines washing cars in order to earn donations to write down the costs of the annual Marine Corp Ball later this year. A $20 donation is requested. Our 1/1 Marines have just returned from an overseas deployment and will regroup before going into their next deployment training.”

Thanks, Homer. I couldn’t have said it better myself. Let’s support our Marines.


Spectra employees come together to raise funds for relief efforts in Guatemala

Spectra staff and community group, Fe y Esperanza, came together to host a private fundraiser event at the Orange County Market Place managed Hussong’s Cantina. This event was a passion project of William Morales, a chef with Spectra, whose family was personally affected by the volcanic disaster in Guatemala earlier this month.

Spectra, managers of the Orange County Market Place, donated the space for the gathering, while Miss Guatemala emceed the evening and Morales and others donated retail items for opportunity drawings, and their culinary skills to make food. All proceeds were by donation from family and friends attending the event. More than $2,300 was collected in this single evening.

William Morales

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Submitted photo

Spectra Chef William Morales

According to Morales, “Every little bit helps and this is just the start.” Their plan is to host several more events to continue to raise funds to send to Guatemalan families in need of money, supplies, clothing and food.

According to Spectra General Manager Adela Generally, “We were pleased to be able to donate resources to a cause clearly close to the hearts of several of our employees. We value community at the Orange County Market Place, and that definitely extends to the employees working here.”

In addition to this private fundraiser, Spectra has hosted other community groups for fundraising opportunities during the Orange County Market Place operating days like the Community Outreach Alliance and other nonprofit groups at the OSB Old Fashioned Ice Cream Stand. Community engagement and supporting the greater Orange County area is a pillar of focus for the management team at Orange County Market Place. Groups interested in holding fundraisers are encouraged to apply for future dates.

For more information, visit www.ocmarketplace.com.


Stump the Stu

Holy Cow!

Stump the Stu 6.22.18

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This colorful cow wandered from its pasture and Stu had several correct guesses where it ended up this week!

Congratulations to Carol Reinhold, Don Webb, Kent Elliott, Lynn Selich and Mary Pat Earl who identified this cow grazing leisurely in a garden on Bayside Drive, just southeast of Harbor Island Drive.

A special thank you to Paul Blank who snapped this photo and sent it in.

Join us on Tuesdays as we try and stump you each week with a picture of something unique in our community, with answers and winners appearing on Fridays.

If you have a unique spot or icon around town that you think Stu News Newport readers would enjoy finding out about, please shoot it, share it and give us the answer, so we can challenge them!


Unique aviation photography at John Wayne Airport

While Greg Sullivan has photographed the Chino Air Show and the Blue Angels, his exhibit at John Wayne Airport Community Space from June 14 - July 16 has a flying theme without aircraft. Instead, traveling guests will have the opportunity to view Sullivan’s local and exotic bird photography.

Flamingo

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Courtesy of John Wayne Airport

“Pink Fireworks” by photographer Greg Sullivan

“Mr. Sullivan’s work is motivated by the observation of what is around us,” said Orange County Board of Supervisors Chairman Andrew Do. “Take a moment to appreciate his unique perspective as you travel through John Wayne Airport.”

Sullivan turned an interest in art and photography into an opportunity to enjoy and share visual experiences. With a background in aviation as a U.S. Air Force and FAA Air Traffic Controller and then as an employee of United Airlines, Sullivan was inspired by events related to travel and seeing the world. He graduated with a bachelor’s degree in journalism from California State University, Long Beach. He decided to attend law school, but found more interest, pleasure and excitement in seeing the world and photographing his experiences. Indeed, he was named Global Traveler of the Year in 2007 by Global Traveler magazine and Alitalia Airlines.

Over the last several years Sullivan has devoted time and emphasis to furthering the development of his photographic interests and skills, particularly as a visual art form. As a result, he has won numerous awards in photography and participated in several significant art and photography exhibitions. His work has also been frequently published in many prominent and well-circulated national publications.

Sullivan’s photography exhibit can be viewed on the Departure (upper) Level near security screening areas in Terminals A, B and C, and on the Arrival (lower) Level adjacent to Baggage Carousels 1 and 4.

To learn more about Mr. Sullivan’s work, visit his websites at www.earthwidephotgraphy.com and www.sullipix.com.

Upcoming Community Focus Space Program artists include photographer Douglas Turner (July 16 - August 14) and mixed-media artist Steve Want (August 14 - September 13).

To learn more about JWA’s Art Programs, visit www.ocair.com/terminal/artexhibits.


Sign of the times

It’s another edition of Sign of the times, so put your thinking caps on. Stu thinks the sportsman out there will recognize this portion of the business sign. Tell us where you can find this “logo” and you’ll chalk up a win.

Good luck! Stu loves publishing the winning answers on Tuesday.

Send your guesses to This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it..

If you’re a business and you want to play, you can send us a high-quality photo of your sign and we’ll take it from there and challenge our readers.

Let’s have some fun!

SOTT 6.22.18 

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Tickets on sale now for Pacific Symphony’s SummerFest 2018

July 4th fireworks show at SummerFest

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Photos courtesy of Pacific Symphony

Spectators enjoy the July 4th fireworks show during SummerFest

Pacific Symphony has once again put together an entertaining SummerFest program for 2018 at Pacific Amphitheatre, located on the Orange County Fairgrounds at 88 Fair Drive, Costa Mesa. Pop open a bottle of wine, kick back, relax and enjoy the perfect soundtrack for summer evenings under the stars.

This season features the classic rock ’n’ roll energy of “Brass Transit: The Music of Chicago” (July 4); the thrilling soundtrack of “E.T. The Extra-Terrestrial in Concert” performed live to film (August 18); and everyone’s favorite summer finale – “Tchaikovsky Spectacular” (September 8), with guest pianist Vadym Kholodenko, winner of the coveted gold medal at the 2013 Van Cliburn International Piano Competition.

Tickets for SummerFest 2018 are on sale now. Subscriptions for the three-concert series range from $63 - $252 with boxes and front-row packages also available. Single tickets begin at $25. All concerts take place at 8 p.m.

With a variety of vendor options onsite to serve up delicious selections from a gourmet menu for pre-concert dining, your evening of great music in the great outdoors is sure to be memorable. Dine on the Plaza Pacifica pre-concert or in the seats during the performance. Gates open at 6 p.m. for picnicking.

The season sponsors include PBS SoCal, K-Earth 101, KPCC 89.3FM and Classical KUSC 91.5 and the Westin South Coast Plaza. SummerFest 2018 is generously supported by the OC Fair & Event Center.

The concert lineup includes:

Brass Transit: The Music of Chicago (with fireworks)

Wednesday, July 4, 2018 at 8 p.m.

Richard Kaufman, conductor

Brass Transit - Chicago Tribute Band

Pacific Symphony

Celebrate the Fourth of July with the music of Chicago, known as the “rock and roll band with horns.” With hits like “You’re the Inspiration,” “If You Leave Me Now,” and “Hard to Say I’m Sorry,” you’ll be swept away by the melodies that make this band such a beloved classic. To cap off the evening, sing along to your favorite patriotic tunes during the salute to our armed forces and thrill to a sizzling fireworks show.

E.T. The Extra-Terrestrial in Concert

Saturday, Aug. 18, 2018 at 8 p.m.

Richard Kaufman, conductor

E.T. The Extra-Terrestrial

Pacific Symphony

Experience “E.T. the Extra-Terrestrial” as never before when Pacific Symphony performs John Williams’ Academy Award®-winning score live, while the classic film is projected on a giant high definition screen. Filled with unparalleled magic and imagination, “E.T. the Extra-Terrestrial” follows the moving story of a little lost alien who befriends a 10-year-old boy named Elliott.

Carl St Clair

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Pacific Symphony Conductor Carl St.Clair

Tchaikovsky Spectacular (with fireworks)

Saturday, Sept. 8, 2018 at 8 p.m.

Carl St.Clair, conductor

Vadym Kholodenko, piano

Pacific Symphony

Shostakovich: Festive Overture

Tchaikovsky: Piano Concerto No. 1

Rimsky-Korsakov: “Procession of the Nobles”

Rimsky-Korsakov: “Russian Easter “Overture

Borodin: “Polovtsian Dances” from Prince Igor

Tchaikovsky: “1812” Overture

No SummerFest is complete without Pacific Symphony performing Tchaikovsky’s thrilling “1812” overture, complete with live cannons and brilliant fireworks. You’ll enjoy this famous romantic composer’s greatest hits along with his memorable Piano Concerto No. 1, performed by the First Prize Winner of the 14th Tchaikovsky Competition, Vadym Kholodenko. In 2013, the young Ukrainian pianist captured the attention of the competition jury, audience and critics alike for “mesmerizing and exhilarating” performances that brought the crowd to their feet, “cheering him like a rock star,” according to the Cincinnati Enquirer.

For more information or to purchase tickets, call 714.755.5799 or visit www.PacificSymphony.org.


Newport Beach Art Exhibition winners announced

The Newport Beach City Arts Commission hosted the 54th Annual Newport Beach Art Exhibition on Saturday, June 16, attracting art lovers from all over to view the impressive collection of more than 250 pieces of fine art, including paintings, sculpture, mixed media and photography. The one-day juried show was held at the Newport Beach Civic Center, with the light and airy Community Room and surrounding grounds transformed into a beautiful gallery space showcasing original works of art from 135 artists, including innovative emerging talent and established professionals. The addition of a festive wine, beer & food pavilion, hosted by The Bungalow Restaurant, live jazz music and children’s art activities added to the vibrant art scene.

Nila Fredriksen with Mary

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Photos by Ryan Miller/Capture Imaging

Artist Nila Frederiksen with her pen & ink painting titled “Mary” won first place in the watercolors category

David Kidde, professor at the Wilkinson College of Art, Chapman University, served as juror for the exhibition selecting first, second and third place winners in the categories of watercolors, oils & acrylics, 3D art and photography, as well as his personal favorite, “New Hoover Convertible” by Timothy Bakthy, which was presented with the Juror’s Choice Award.

Attendees at the exhibition were also given the opportunity to vote for “People’s Choice.” The attendees selected “Last Title Defense,” a bronze sculpture by artist Dino Mehaffie as their favorite. The same piece also received a First Place Award in the 3D Art category.

Dino Mehaffie with Last Title Defense

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Sculptor Dino Mehaffie won the People’s Choice Award and first place in the 3D art/sculpture category for his “Last Title Defense”

City Arts Commission Vice Chair Arlene Greer presented the following artists with awards:

Painting: watercolors (includes, pen & ink, charcoal and pastels)

First Place: Nila Frederiksen, Mary

Second Place: Mary Kay Wilson, Making Arrangements

Third Place: Nancy Byrnes, Escape

Painting: oils & acrylics

First Place: Elena Kealy, Hollywood Dream

Second Place: James Gerrard, Candlelighting

Third Place: Carol Colin, Yard Party, Night

3D art/sculpture

First Place: Dino Mehaffie, Last Title Defense

Second Place: Tom Borusky, Keepsake Box 127-Parota

Third Place: Gail Glikmann, Winged Torso

Photography

First Place: Cathy Immordino, Mother Earth

Second Place: Anne Oechsli, Sun Flowers

Third Place: Carol Cohn, Launching an Alien

Judges Choice Award:

Timothy Bakthy, New Hoover Convertible

People’s Choice Award:

Dino Mehaffie, Last Title Defense

Group shot of award winners

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This year’s Newport Beach Art Exhibition award winners

The Newport Beach Art Exhibition is an annual event presented by the Newport Beach City Arts Commission. Dates for next year’s event and the Call for Artists will be announced on the City’s Cultural Arts webpage at www.newportbeachca.gov/culturalarts and Facebook page at www.facebook.com/newportbeacharts

For more information, email This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it..


Orange County comes together to salute local veterans while raising record-breaking funds

Eleven local nonprofit organizations partnered with the Orange County Community Foundation (OCCF) to host “Stand and Salute, a Giving Day” to honor OC veterans and military families, on June 14, raising $91,068 with participation from more than 283 donors.

OCCF launched this bold initiative to boost the capacity of local nonprofits to meet our community’s needs through a series of Collaborative Giving Days over the coming year. Nonprofits with shared missions are invited to come together to boost collective giving for their causes. 

Group shot

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Submitted photo

Representatives from 11 nonprofit organizations partnered with the Orange County Community Foundation to host the Stand and Salute Giving Day

“We have a longstanding commitment to creating positive futures for our military veterans and their families through the Orange County Veterans Initiative (OCVI),” said Shelley Hoss, president, OCCF. “The success of this campaign is a testament to our community’s generosity and the vision of local nonprofit leaders. We are proud to support exemplary local nonprofits who came together based on a shared mission to tackle the most important issues facing our county.”

OCCF first challenged Orange County residents to “give where their heart lives” during the inaugural iheartoc Giving Day in 2015, raising more than $1.8 million through 6,000 gifts to 347 participating nonprofits in just 30 hours. OCCF nearly doubled those results in 2016 during the second annual iheartoc Giving Day, receiving 7,000 contributions totaling $3.2 million for 418 participating nonprofits. In 2017, OCCF re-envisioned iheartoc as an expanded opportunity for nonprofits to connect with one another in support of their shared missions.

This year, OCCF is inviting local nonprofits to come together for collaborative online giving events on the day of their choosing.

The 11 participating organizations in the Stand and Salute Giving Day included 211 Orange County, Bob Hope USO, Easter Seals, Honoring Our Fallen, Lestonnac Free Clinic, Patriots and Paws, Strength in Support, Strong Families Strong Children, Support the Enlisted Project (STEP), Veterans Legal Institute and Zero8hundred.

Additional collaborative Giving Days will be announced throughout the remainder of 2018. For more information, visit oc-cf.org/change-your-community-overview/iheartoc-giving-day


Rotary Club of Newport-Balboa enjoys transition party

The Rotary Club of Newport-Balboa recently enjoyed a fabulous homemade Mexican “fiesta” prepared by Helen and Pete Maxwell, along with Steve Speer’s Margarita pot, plus wine, beer, soft drinks, water, chips, salsa and dessert in the Maxwells’ inviting home overlooking the bay.

Those fortunate enough to attend were Helen and Pete Maxwell, DG Elect Marc Aarons and Sam, Jo Holman and Jay, Ann and Andy Campbell, Eleanor and Dick Dickson, Nanette, Mike and son Andrew McDonough, Charlie Barr, Betty DeKovner, Stephen Williams, AG Jan Horton, Heather and Steve Speer, Sasha and Vince Priolo, April and Dan Cregg, Tony Sayegh, AJ Thelien, Mike Saidi, Gary Myers, Tom Walley, Bob Kelly along with Joann Copp, daughter Laurie, grandchildren Emilie and Kelly Jo, and son-in-law John.

After reflecting on the more than 15 events, projects and donations the Newport-Balboa Rotary Club participated in this year including their successful fundraiser, Bob Kelly announced next year’s board: President: Bob Kelly, Secretary: Jo Holman, Treasurer: Helen Maxwell, Membership: Vince Priolo/Betty Dekovner, Programs: Courtney Rowley, Club Service: Steve Speer, Ethics: Mike McDonough, Rotary Foundation: Roger McGonegal, International: Pete Maxwell, Community Service: Charlie Barr, Vocational: Richard Oberreiter and Youth Services: Mike McDonough/Bob Kelly. The Sergeant-at-Arms is Hal Barstow. Their official induction will be at the next Rotary meeting.

Kelly Speer

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Courtesy of Rotary Club of Newport-Balboa

(L-R) Rotary Club President Bob Kelly and Past President Steve Speer

Kelly departed with tradition by announcing that he would be honoring five club members as Outstanding Rotarians along with their significant others. They are: Jo Holman and Jay Prenta, Helen and Pete Maxwell, Steve and Heather Speer, Mike and Nanette McDonough, and Roger and Sheila McGonegal (who were absent on a cruise to Alaska). Each couple received a gift card to their favorite restaurant along with a movie gift card to be used on a well-deserved night out. Kelly described their contributions to the club this year as being above and beyond expectation.

After the recognition, attendees hit the buffet line and enjoyed the fabulous dinner Helen prepared. While members were enjoying their desserts, Kelly went back up to the Speakers Stand in an area above the pool and spa, and gave out awards to the non-members who gave of their time, talent and treasury this year to make events and projects so successful. The honorees were: Laurie Bishop (Bob’s daughter), Heather Speer (Steve’s wife) and Jay Prenta (Jo’s guest). They all received a Rotary International Foundation plaque naming them each a Paul Harris Fellow, the points for these coming from club members. Also, Laurie and Heather each received a bouquet of flowers.

Kelly also recognized Jan Horton, the assistant governor assigned to the club, who has worked behind the scenes as a liaison with the district to ensure the club met the necessary deadlines.

Culminating the evening, Kelly called up the party hostess and presented her with a lovely floral bouquet as a token of thanks for hosting this event and preparing the fabulous food. After recognizing the honorees, attendees continued to enjoy the Maxwells’ hospitality and each other’s company throughout the night.


Kick off NBPL Summer Reading Program with Kids Imagine Nation

Kids Imagine Nation singers

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Courtesy of NBPL

Newport Beach Public Library (NBPL) kicks off the 2018 Summer Reading Program on Saturday, June 23 at 11 a.m. with an interactive music and dance show at Central Library, 1000 Avocado Ave., Newport Beach. The special opening day celebration will feature “Kids Imagine Nation,” with original songs and stories that entertain and inspire kids to use their imagination. Admission is free.

The Children’s Summer Reading Program will run from June 23 through August 11 with the theme “Reading Takes You Everywhere!” Children can pick up game sheets at all of the Newport Beach libraries. Participants are encouraged to read throughout the summer and can earn prizes by turning in their game sheets and book reviews at the library. Other special programs, including magic shows, science programs, live animal encounters and other creative craft & activity programs, are scheduled weekly at Newport Beach Public Library locations: Central Library, 1000 Avocado Ave.; Mariners Branch Library, 1300 Irvine Ave.; and Balboa Branch Library, 100 E. Balboa Blvd.

A complete calendar of events is available online at www.newportbeachlibrary.org.

The library also offers Summer Reading Programs for teens and adults. For more information, contact children’s services at the Central Library, 949.717.3830.

Summer Reading Program Line-up:

Newport Beach Summer Reading Program Kick Off Event with Kids Imagine Nation

Saturday, June 23, 11 a.m., Central Library Friends Room, 1000 Avocado Ave.

Party with “Kids Imagine Nation” at this interactive musical show for the entire family. Don’t forget to pick up your Summer Reading game sheet and start your reading adventure. Bon voyage!

Billy Bonkers

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Courtesy of NBPL

Billy Bonker’s magic will entertain children of all ages

Billy Bonkers Magic

Monday, June 25, 2 and 4 p.m., Mariners Branch Library, 1300 Irvine Ave.

Tuesday, June 26, 10 a.m. and 12 p.m., Central Library, 1000 Avocado Ave.

Thursday, June 28, 11 a.m., Balboa Branch Library, 100 E. Balboa Blvd.\

Go bonkers with Billy Bonkers’ Magic show! Billy’s silly magic presentation will delight children of all ages. Begin the Summer Reading Program of “Reading Takes You Everywhere” with this fun event. 

Let’s Go to Asia Crafts

Monday, July 2, 2 p.m., Mariners Branch Library, 1300 Irvine Ave.

Tuesday, July 3, 10 a.m., Central Library, 1000 Avocado Ave.

Thursday, July 5, 11 a.m., Balboa Branch Library, 100 E. Balboa Blvd.

Explore the continent of Asia through a variety of crafts. There will be activities for every skill level, so the whole family can enjoy making them together.

Polynesian Paradise Dancers

Courtesy of NBPL

Polynesian Polynesian Dancers share the spirit of the islands through dance

Polynesian Paradise Dancers

Monday, July 9, 2 and 4 p.m., Mariners Branch Library, 1300 Irvine Ave.

Tuesday, July 10, 10 a.m. and 12 p.m., Central Library, 1000 Avocado Ave.

Thursday, July 12, 11 a.m., Balboa Branch Library, 100 E. Balboa Blvd.

Feel the rhythm of Hawai’i and the Polynesian islands as you experience island culture through dance. All ages will enjoy watching the dancers perform in their gorgeous costumes. Families can also participate in a hula lesson, using dance to create a story of Hawai’i’s history and tropical landscape. 

Let’s Go to Africa Crafts

Monday, July 16, 2 p.m., Mariners Branch Library, 1300 Irvine Ave.

Tuesday, July 17, 10 a.m., Central Library, 1000 Avocado Ave. 

Thursday, July 19, 11 a.m., Balboa Branch Library, 100 E. Balboa Blvd.

Explore various regions and tribes of the continent of Africa through a variety of crafts. There will be activities for every skill level, so children of all ages will enjoy these.

Flights of Fantasy Story Theater

Monday, July 23, 2 and 4 p.m., Mariners Branch Library, 1300 Irvine Ave.

Tuesday, July 24, 10 a.m. and 12 p.m., Central Library, 1000 Avocado Ave.

Thursday, July 26, 11 a.m., Balboa Branch Library, 100 E. Balboa Blvd.

Watch “From the Page to the Stage,” folktales from around the world come to life with memorable characters, props and costumes. This unique interactive storytelling experience captivates all ages, so bring the whole family.

Let’s Go to South America Crafts

Monday, July 30, 2 p.m., Mariners Branch Library, 1300 Irvine Ave.

Tuesday, July 31, 10 a.m., Central Library, 1000 Avocado Ave.

Thursday, August 2, 11 a.m., Balboa Branch Library, 100 E. Balboa Blvd.

Explore the continent of South America through a variety of crafts. There will be activities for every skill level.

Australias Great Barrier Reef

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Submitted photo

Australia’s Great Barrier Reef

The Ocean Adventure

Monday, August 6, 2 and 4 p.m., Mariners Branch, 1300 Irvine Ave.

Tuesday, August 7, 10 a.m. and 12 p.m., Central Library, 1000 Avocado Ave.

Thursday, August 9, 11 a.m., Balboa Branch Library, 100 E. Balboa Blvd.

Visit the home of Nemo the fish – in Australia’s Great Barrier Reef! Join Wayne and Karen Brown, naturalists and award-winning underwater photographers, as they share the wonders of their Australian expeditions through videos, storytelling and life-sized props. 

Pacific Animal Productions

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Submitted photo

Pacific Animal Productions will bring their live animal show

Pacific Animal Productions & SRP Finishers’ Party

Saturday, August 11, 11 a.m., Central Library, 1000 Avocado Ave.

You won’t want to miss this live animal show and finishers’ party at Central Library! Pacific Animal Productions will take you on one last adventure as you meet animals from around the world Summer Reading participants from every branch are invited to attend, and all finishers from every branch will be honored. Afterward, share a special treat with in the Bamboo Courtyard to celebrate your accomplishments.

HAPPY READING!


Letter to the Editor:

This is what Koll looks like from up here?

I couldn’t believe it when I looked at the “Birdseye Perspective” of the Koll Center Residences on the City of Newport Beach website. In addition to the other problems with this massive project, it is completely out of character with the surrounding buildings with its size and height. 

Is this the first step towards the Koll Business Park becoming a high-rise, high-density area? I thought there was an agreement that low impact housing was going to be built at this site. What has happened to that? I do hope the city council remembers this compromise and keeps these buildings to a moderate size.

Joan McCauley

Newport Beach


Newport Beach Foundation to hold launch event

NB Foundation logo

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Young professionals are invited to the first Newport Beach Foundation launch event taking place on Wednesday, June 27 from 6 - 8 p.m. at the Lido House hotel.

The Newport Beach Foundation is a nonprofit philanthropic organization (501c3) strengthening the current and future community leadership through education, research and advocacy thereby enhancing the quality of life for all residents and visitors. If you are a young professional looking to connect and make a difference in our community, the group welcomes you to join them. Their charity partner is the Ben Carlson Foundation.

Light hors d’oeuvres will be served and refreshments will be hosted. The dress attire is business casual.

If you would like to RSVP, visit www.nb-foundation.org/events.

Lido House hotel is located at 3300 Newport Blvd., Newport Beach.


NMUSD announces Lincoln School principal

Newport-Mesa Unified School District (NMUSD) has named Dr. Kristin DeMicco as the principal of Lincoln Elementary School. Dr. DeMicco has served as acting principal since January 2018.

Dr. DeMicco has 13 years of experience in education, serving NMUSD since 2016 as the assistant principal of Lincoln and Kaiser elementary schools. In the fall of 2017, she also served as interim principal at Newport Coast Elementary School.

While serving as acting principal of Lincoln Elementary the past six months, Dr. DeMicco has led the Positive Behavior and Support (PBIS) team, supported teachers through two new curriculum adoptions, and developed positive and lasting relationships with the Lincoln community.

“I have truly enjoyed getting to know the Lincoln school community and am excited and honored to continue to achieve great success,” Dr. Kristin DeMicco said.

Dr. DeMicco received her bachelor of arts in Liberal Studies from California State University, Long Beach, her masters of arts in Curriculum and Instruction from National University, and her Ph.D. in Cultural and Curricular Studies from Chapman University. She has her multiple subjects teaching credential, Supplemental Authorization in English and preliminary Administrative Services Credential.

Carrie Gammel, who served as the principal at Lincoln for five years, will be returning to the district after enjoying time with her newborn daughter.

“I will cherish the wonderful memories and time I spent working side by side with our Lincoln staff, parents, community and most importantly our students,” Gammel said. “I will hold the Lincoln community and all our children past and present, dear to my heart.” Gammel is looking forward to new challenges in another leadership position within the district, which has not yet been determined.


On the Harbor: Catching up with sailor Tom Corkett aka TC

By LEN BOSE

The year was 1988, and I had just started my career in yacht sales. One day while gazing out the window, a large off-green BMW pulled up in front of the office with the initials TC on the license plate. My broker noticed where I looking and said with an envious tone in his voice “That’s Tom Corkett.” Ever since that time, I thought that’s the person I want to emulate.

Tom Corkett – T.C. – hope you don’t mind, but I am going to use his initials because that’s how I have always greeted him from the time we used to work together at Ardell Yachts in the ‘90s until the present day as we cross tacks in the Harbor 20 fleet.

Tom Corkett with his trophy

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Photos, courtesy of Tom Corkett

Tom Corkett with his trophy – War Canoe – for winning the Transpac overall in 1963

TC was born in Pasadena. His family purchased a home on the harbor in 1947, and then they made it their full-time residence in 1954. At that time, the active racing fleet in the harbor were the 11-foot Snowbirds. TC crewed for his sister, Nancy, in Snowbirds, until he wanted his own boat. He recalled the 1954 “Flight of the Snowbirds,” where 200 boats would show up at the starting line. He finished mid-fleet, yet went on to describe how Nancy won the pin end of the starting line with Tom O’Keefe, and the two of them punched out in front of the fleet. Nancy finished a close second to O’Keefe. TC also recalled that they would close down the harbor for the Flight, and other boaters would line up around the outside of the race course to spectate, as well as watch the powerboat races down the Lido Channel: those were the two big events of the summer. “We used to have power boats going 50 mph down the harbor. It was great,” TC recalled.

At the age of 21, TC started the sailing club at Ardell Yachts, where he would give sailing lessons on new fiberglass sailboats, and then after the lessons, sell students those boats. Cal, Pearson and Hinckley sailboats were the product lines that Ardell Yachts represented in the early ‘60s. During the ‘70s, interest rates jumped up and Ardell Yachts turned to brokerage boats. By the time TC was 32, he had hooked into a deal, representing both buyer and seller of a 180-foot steel motor yacht, “Pegasus II.” “That really got me going...that was the start of it all,” TC said. He described the interior with ornate furniture and chandeliers – more like a hillside mansion on the water. The vessel had 16 crew members.” TC said.

For as long as I have known TC, he is not one to tell you about his recent deals. I was always left in awe with the amount of traffic in and out of his office. From the Ardell copy room, I would constantly hear: “Hi Tom, I need another boat.” One time, I noticed a very well-known movie studio CEO come into the office unannounced, and after about 30 minutes, TC was headed out to show an 80-foot Alloy sailboat via executive jet to some far-off land. I remember him walking past the copy room and noticing me, then coming back and telling me he was not going to make twilights that night, and it was okay if I wanted to take the boat out.

Transpac race

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Tom Corkett and his crew after the 1963 Transpac race

TC has spent his time at sea. At the age of 21, he put a crew together for the 1963 Transpac aboard the family boat “Islander.” This boat was designed by Kirk Uhlman, and built in 1958 by Joh de Good & Sohn in Germany. “The boat did not sail to weather very well, but it could sail to its rating downwind,” TC said. TC knew how to put together a winning team with Dr. Jack Paschall as navigator, Gary L. Myers, William Cook, a rigor from Lido Shipyard by the name of Mark Von Mills and Burke Mooney. The crew was very young, and TC was the youngest skipper to enter and win a Transpac. He had a young crew. Three were in their 20s and two in their early 40s. What they lacked in age, they made up with experience. Four of the six of them had sailed in Transpacs before, and all had done plenty of offshore sailing.

They only had one serious problem during the 14-day run. On the fourth day, their steering unit began to cause trouble. “Islander’s” wheel, mounted on a pedestal in the cockpit, was connected to the rudder mechanism by a bicycle chain working the sprockets. When two of the sprockets popped the chain, it developed so much slack, that there was far too much play in the wheel to steer efficiently. After seven hours of handiwork, the crew completed a gadget called an Idler consisting of a metal wheel at the end of a plywood handle which could be wedged from the chain to keep it taut, which held up for the remainder of the race. “We sailed rhumb line and the great circle; we sailed the shortest course and ended up winning the race,” TC said. He went on to describe that they had blown out all their spinnakers, and finished the race with wung out jibe. “We should have had new sails. We purchased used sails before the race and they were tired before they even got on the boat. I found out really quickly, you cannot sail that race with used sails,” TC said.

Islander cropped 6.22

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TC’s “Islander” approaching the finish line in 1963

Another offshore event that TC participated in was the 1992 Pacific Cup from San Francisco to Kaneohe. He and his longtime friend Scott Abrams double-handed the 68-foot Nelson Marek “Peregrine.” In that race, they faced the hottest navigator of our time, Stan Honey, aboard a Santa Cruz 70 named “Mongoose.” He was also sailing double handed with the owner. TC and Abrams won on corrected time.

Over the years, TC has taken home some of the most prestigious awards that can be given out on our harbor by winning the Newport Harbor Yacht Club’s Burgee of Merit and Don Vaughn Memorial Trophy, but my favorite and maybe even TC’s is the War Canoe he won for winning the Transpac overall in 1963.

Today, you can find TC at the start of this year’s Pacific Cup aboard “Runaway” or racing a Harbor 20 with one of his 10 grandchildren.

When I ended my interview, I thanked TC and he said: I’ll sea ya on the water. 

~~~~~~~~

Len Bose is a yachting enthusiast, yacht broker and harbor columnist for StuNewsNewport.


Junior League of Orange County elects new president

Junior League of Orange County (JLOCC), located in Newport Beach, recently announced that Jennifer Watkins, a resident of Orange, has been elected president of the nonprofit organization for the 2018-2019 year. She takes over the reins of the organization from Maria de Vera-Suarez, who served as president for the 2017-2018 year.

Jennifer Watkins

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Jennifer Watkins named new president of Junior League of Orange County

Watkins addressed League members recently in her acceptance speech, “Junior League of Orange County’s 62-year history is evidence that when women are developed as leaders we can – and continue to – make lasting change in the world. We are the women our community turns to when they have a problem to solve. We are hands on with our community. We are intelligent, trained volunteers. We have provided millions of hours of service. We are women who deal with the real issues in our society. We nurture women to fulfill their potential. We believe that volunteer service is an essential part of responsible, engaged citizenship. We are a network of female civic leaders working with our community partners to address and solve pressing issues in Orange County, like foster youth and human trafficking. And through our advocacy and training, we not only strive to improve lives – but to change the way people think. And while our League has evolved over the last 62 years, we are still the same at our core – unstoppable women.”

Her previous experience with JLOCC includes serving as president-elect, 2017-2018; operations manager, The Christmas Company, 2016-2017; executive secretary, board of directors, 2015-2016; and external advocate, public affairs committee, 2014-2015.

When she’s not volunteering with JLOCC, Watkins works as a senior litigation paralegal with the Neshanian Law Firm, Inc. of Irvine.

For more information on JLOCC, visit www.jlocc.org.


InsideEdge presents “Falling in Love with the Camera” at upcoming monthly meeting

Zenna and Wolfe

Submitted photo

Kate Zenna and David Wolfe are the featured speakers

Learn how a CPA/software guy living in Texas joined forces with a Hollywood actress and formed a business aimed at helping people feel comfortable in front of the camera.

You’re invited to the InsideEdge monthly meeting, taking place on Wednesday, June 27 at The Pacific Club, to find out the answer. Doors open, registration and the buffet line starts at 6:45 a.m., with the meeting starting promptly at 7 a.m.

Kate Zenna and David Wolfe are the featured speakers who will share some key presentation tactics with the audience – the same ones used by working actors who must reveal their best selves despite nerves and extreme pressure.

Zenna is an established actress, singer for electro-pop band Pointe Claire and a Canadian Academy Award nominee who has worked with many of the entertainment industry’s most recognizable stars. Her broad talents have been seen in such film and TV series as Chicago, A&E’s Nero Wolfe, Showtime’s Queer as Folk and Street Time, ABC’s Brothers and Sisters, CBS’ Eleventh Hour, Steven Spielberg’s series Extant and ABC Family/Freeform’s hit drama The Fosters. She is also the star of CBC/EOne’s family drama Port Hope. Zenna has co-authored two books with David Wolfe – Falling in Love with the Camera and The Responsible Artist. She is the host of the upcoming The Good Life radio show with Kate Zenna heard at 11 a.m. on Sundays on iHubRadio.com.

Wolfe, who is a CPA, is the founder and president of the software consulting firm Lupine Partners. He formed ZennaWolfe Media with Zenna in 2014. He is the author of five books on topics ranging from ERP software implementation to guiding artists to be more responsible with their money and their life.

The cost is $35 for first time guests and $45 for returning guests. Pre-registration is required to assist with food and seating needs. There is free and valet parking. (Have your gate ticket validated at the front desk when you leave.)

The Pacific Club is located at 4110 MacArthur Blvd., Newport Beach.

InsideEdge meetings take place on the second and fourth Wednesday mornings of the month.

Visit www.insideedge.org to register and for more information.


Goodwill of OC scores with successful golf outing

Tierney Center

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Goodwill of Orange County hosted its annual Goodwill Golf Invitational on Monday, June 11 at Pelican Hill Golf Club in Newport Coast. More than $185,000 was raised to support Goodwill’s Tierney Center for Veteran Services, a comprehensive resource connecting veterans and their families to services that enhance their lives.

More than 140 golfers participated in the golf tournament and evening festivities in support of Goodwill’s local model for impacting veterans in need.

“This is the fifth year that our golf fundraising event is dedicated to supporting our veterans’ services and programs,” said Ret. Army Col. Denton Knapp, a Bronze Star with Valor recipient and new director of the Tierney Center for Veteran Services. “The money raised allows us to expand our critical services and programs offered to veterans and their families at no cost, including job placement and career counseling services.”

The Tierney Center, located in Tustin, offers a holistic, simple approach with no hoops to jump through and all services are provided to veterans at no cost. With hundreds of services, partners and resources in the community, the Tierney Center is the conduit to meet any and all veterans’ unique needs, including job placement, financial education, housing assistance and more.


Fudge Family Acute Rehabilitation Center opens at Hoag

Acute Rehab Center

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The Fudge Family Acute Rehabilitation Center

Hoag Memorial Hospital Presbyterian recently announced the opening of the Fudge Family Acute Rehabilitation Center to serve adults who have been treated for neurological and orthopedic issues, as well as traumatic brain injury or stroke, providing a streamlined and comprehensive continuum of care to these recovering patients.

Acute rehabilitation follows hospitalization for a major health impact to prepare a patient to reintegrate into community living, by offering patient-specific daily intensive rehabilitation focused on any residual disabilities in a residential setting.

Hospital co-located acute rehabilitation centers are rare in Orange County, with patients relying on a patchwork of private centers to help them regain motor, cognitive and functional skills following a major health event. By opening the Fudge Family Acute Rehabilitation Center at its Newport Beach campus, Hoag is bridging and guiding the continuum of care, using advanced technology and evidenced-based practices to a population that, while recovering, needs a personalized, high quality level of care.

“Immediately following a major health event, patients receive intensive medical care. But in the weeks and months after a stroke, heart attack, car accident or other event, many patients still require expert rehabilitation. Hoag clinical team’s quality care offers oversight beyond hospitalization, by handing the patient off to its rehabilitation partners” said Michael Brant-Zawadzki, M.D., F.A.C.R., senior physician executive and the Ron & Sandi Simon Executive Medical Director Endowed Chair of the Pickup Family Neurosciences Institute at Hoag. “We emphasize a combination of physical, occupational and cognitive treatments, within a homelike environment, with family support to maximize personal independence and improve patients’ outcomes.”

While patients stay overnight in the 18-bed center, the facility is very different than a hospital. Patients wear “street clothes” and eat together in an open dining room. Therapies and state-of-the-art equipment help patients maximize their independence and reintegrate into community living.

“Because we built this facility from the ground up, the entire center is designed to maximize rehabilitation and improve functional outcomes,” said Mark Glavinic, Hoag’s director of Rehabilitation. “In addition to state-of-the-art equipment, we have assembled a ‘super team’ of the best of the best in acute rehabilitative care.”

Hoag’s expert team hails from stroke centers, neurological institutes and other specialized treatment fields. The team includes physicians, rehabilitation nurses, physical therapists, occupational therapists, speech-language pathologists, a nurse navigator and a recreational therapist. The recreational therapist is particularly unique in helping patients reclaim those aspects of their life that they love such as golfing or gardening, by working with patients in the Center’s outdoor “therapy garden” and putting green.

Patients treated at the Fudge Family Acute Rehabilitation Center will include those who have experienced:

--Amputation

--Brain Injury

--Brain Tumor Surgery

--Cardiac Dysfunction and Disorders

--Neurologic Disorders

--Oncology Diagnoses

--Orthopedic Injuries and Surgery

--Pulmonary Dysfunction and Disorders 

--Spinal Cord Injury and SurgerStroke

In addition to physical, occupational and speech therapy several times a day, patients also have access to respiratory therapy, dietary services and dietitian consults, laboratory services, pharmacy, radiology, chaplain services and case management.

“We understand that a healing environment promotes rehabilitation, and with the generous support of Gary Fudge and others, we have created a center that will help people heal and maximize their independence and quality of life,” Glavinic said.

To learn more, visit www.hoag.org/FFARC


Congratulations to our 2018 Newport Beach and Corona del Mar high school and middle school graduates!

By CONRAD KRUEGER

CDM High School

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Photos by Conrad Krueger

A group of Sea King alumni smile and celebrate on their special day

Corona del Mar High School Class of 2018

Corona del Mar High School honored the Class of 2018 at a ceremony held on Thursday, June 21. On their home field for the final time, student speakers reflected on their joyous four years as Sea Kings and Queens. A wide margin of the graduates are set to attend an array of prestigious colleges across the nation.

Graduation speakers included ASB President Maxwell Johnson, Corona del Mar Principal Kathy Scott, Valedictorian Zachary Glabman, student speaker Dolce Sutton, and NMUSD board member Karen Yelsey.

The national anthem was performed by Brandon Getter, Alexandra King, Malia Shapiro and Jasper Ying. Next, was the alma mater by Harrison Dill, Ryan Elmajian and Victoria Sawa.  Finally, the seven vocalists came together to perform the Senior Song.

Corona del Mar High School is located at 2101 Eastbluff Drive, Newport Beach. For more information, visit www.cdm.nmusd.us.

NH High School

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It was a full house to reflect on the Class of 2018’s journey through Newport Harbor High School

Newport Harbor High School Class of 2018

Newport Harbor High School celebrated its distinguished Class of 2018 at Davidson Field on Thursday, June 21. The 500 graduates came together to celebrate one last time before they venture off into the world. Many of them will attend universities and junior colleges, while others are poised to join the workforce and military.

Graduation speakers included Newport Harbor Principal Dr. Sean Boulton, Senior Class President Shannon White, Senior Class Vice President Dane Newton, student speakers Stephanie Ramirez Garcia and Isabelle Williams, and Science teacher Jason Lynch. Musical performances were also made by the NHHS Vocal Ensemble, Katelin Beuglet, NHHS Choirs and Libby Larner.

Newport Harbor High School is located at 600 Irvine Ave, Newport Beach. For more information, visit www.nhhs.nmusd.us.

CdM Middle School

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A few rising freshmen eagerly await their next four years as Sea Kings

Corona del Mar Middle School Class of 2018

Corona del Mar Middle School held their annual promotion ceremony at Davidson Field on Wednesday, June 20, welcoming the 500-student Class of 2018 with open arms to the next four years of high school as mighty Sea Kings and Queens.

Ceremony speakers included Middle School Principal Dr. Rebecca Gogel, ASB President Katie Barnes, keynote speakers Leilah Sutton and Emily Valentine and High School Principal Kathy Scott. Two performances were made as Libby Miller sang “Food Good” from Wicked and Thomas Eastmond sang “My Way” by Frank Sinatra.

Corona del Mar Middle School is located at 2101 Eastbluff Drive, Newport Beach. For more information, visit www.cdm.nmusd.us.

Ensign School

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Ensign Intermediate graduates rise as they are welcomed into high school

Ensign Intermediate School Class of 2018

Ensign Intermediate School celebrated their promoting Class of 2018 at a ceremony held on Wednesday, June 20. The class of more than 600 students are the 92nd graduating class and first to be recognized on Newport Harbor’s newly renovated Davidson Field.

Promotion speakers included ASB President Mason Hunt, Newport Harbor Principal Dr. Sean Boulton, student speaker Olivia Boreland, Ensign Intermediate Principal Michael Sciacca and NMUSD board member Martha Floor. The Ensign “12 Tones” group also shared a performance.

There was a special thank you to Judy Franco for her 39 years of service with NMUSD, and her final year at Ensign Intermediate School.

Ensign Intermediate School is located at 2000 Cliff Drive, Newport Beach. For more information, visit www.ensign.nmusd.us.

Editor’s Note: Parents! If you would like to share your children’s graduation photos with us, please send them to This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. with identifying captions and photo credits. We would welcome pics for elementary and middle school promotions, as well as high school graduations – from all of our terrific Newport Beach schools.


Build your network at NBCC’s upcoming sunset mixer at THE LOT

Interior shot of THE LOT

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On Thursday, June 28, join the Newport Beach Chamber of Commerce (NBCC) for their lively Sunset Mixer at The LOT in Fashion Island from 5:30 - 7:30 p.m. Come discover new business relationships while enjoying a great atmosphere.

Enjoy a no-host bar, opportunity drawing prizes and complimentary hors d’ oeuvres, along with free self parking.

The cost is free for NBCC; guests are $35. Reservations are not required.

Located inside Fashion Island, THE LOT provides guests the perfect spot to grab a coffee or freshly baked pastry at the café, a cocktail or drink at the trendy bar, or breakfast, lunch or dinner at their fine dining establishment.

For more information on the Sunset Mixer, call Membership Services Director Pam Smith at the Newport Beach Chamber of Commerce at 949.729.4411 or email This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it..

THE LOT is located 999 Newport Center Drive, Newport Beach.


“ON YOUR FEET!” graces the Segerstrom stage

ON YOUR FEET

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Photo by Matthew Murphy,

Courtesy of scta.org

The Broadway hit “ON YOUR FEET!” comes to Segerstrom Center

Segerstrom Center for the Arts announces that the Orange County engagement of the hit Broadway musical “ON YOUR FEET!” – based on the life story of seven-time GRAMMY-winning international superstar Gloria Estefan and her husband, 19-time GRAMMY-winning producer/musician/entrepreneur Emilio Estefan – will hit the Segerstrom Hall stage from August 21 through September 2. Thirteen of the 28-member cast joins directly from Broadway!

The performance stars Cuban-American Broadway actress Christie Prades as Gloria Estefan, and acclaimed stage and television actor Mauricio Martinez, playing Emilio Estefan. The cast also stars Broadway veteran Nancy Ticotin (West Side Story, In the Heights) as Gloria’s mother; Gloria Fajardo; Debra Cardona (TV’s “Crazy Ex-Girlfriend” as Hector’s Mom, Mary Poppins, In the Heights) as Gloria’s grandmother, Consuelo; Jason Martinez (Jersey Boys, The Capeman) as Gloria’s father, José Fajardo; Ana-Sofia Rodriguez and Carmen Sanchez as Little Gloria; and Carlos Carreras and Jordan Vergara as Nayib/Young Emilio.

Rounding out the ensemble are Anthony Alfaro, Michelle Alves, Jonathan Arana, Skizzo Arnedillo, Danny Burgos, Sarita Colón, Shadia Fairuz, Adriel Flete, Devon Goffman, Ilda Mason, Claudia Mulet, Eddie Noel, Marina Pires, Jeremey Adam Rey, Gabriel Reyes, Joseph Rivera, Maria Rodriguez, Shani Talmor and Claudia Yanez. 

Multiple Grammy Award-winning musicians from Miami Sound Machine are also on the road with the National Tour, including Music Director Clay Ostwald (keyboards), who is Assistant Music Director of Miami Sound Machine; Mike Scaglione (reeds); Teddy Mulet (trombone); Jorge Casas (bass), who is Music Director of Miami Sound Machine; and Edwin Bonilla (percussion). The other members of the orchestra include Emmanuel Schvartzman (Associate Music Director/keyboards), Jose Ruiz (trumpet), Stephen Flakus (guitar), Jean-Christophe Leroy (percussion) and Colin Taylor (drums). 

Tickets for “ON YOUR FEET!” start at $29, and are on sale now. They can be purchased online at www.scfta.org, at the Box Office at 600 Town Center Drive in Costa Mesa or by calling 714.556.2787. For inquiries about group ticket savings for 10 or more, call the Group Services office at 714.755.0236. The 2 p.m. performance on Saturday, Sept 1 will include audio description, open captioning and sign-language interpretation

Segerstrom Center is located at 600 Town Center Drive, Costa Mesa.


You Must Remember This: John Lusk

By NANCY GARDNER

Looking back, it’s surprising how many of the developers that shaped Southern California lived in our area. John Lusk was one of those. Locally, he built Spyglass, Harbor View Hills and Eastbluff, but he had developments throughout Southern California – something like 40,000 homes over the years.

Lusk was a friend of my father’s. They played golf and bridge, and it seems I was occasionally a topic of conversation. Knowing my father’s propensity for mythologizing, heaven only knows how I was described, but whatever magic words he used, one day – without ever meeting me – I was offered a job with his company. I was ready for a change, so after appropriate notice to my current employer, I showed up at Lusk headquarters on Gillette. The receptionist gave me a friendly smile. I gave her my name. When that didn’t register, I explained that I was a new employee. It wasn’t particularly surprising that the receptionist wasn’t aware of my coming, but when I was ushered into the office of the fellow who functioned as chief operating officer and he was equally blank, it was a trifle unsettling.

John Lusk

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Courtesy of Nancy Gardner

John Lusk, who built the Lusk Homes empire

Apparently, Lusk hadn’t said much – if anything – about my arrival, not that that was a problem. If he wanted something...it was done. The company’s org chart was probably like the one Louis XIV would have drawn: the sun (John) at the center with rays shooting out in every direction – and shooting back to him. If he hired me, that was it. What to do with me, however...I probably could have found a desk and sat there and read novels for the next four years and nobody would have said a word, but I try to give value. Since I had worked as a paralegal for several years, I presented myself to the head of the legal department, and he welcomed the assistance. In my previous job, I had been in the marketing department, so I introduced myself to the head of marketing and began working with them, and then I was scooped up by the group producing affordable housing, not because of any particular background I had, but probably because they had seen me wandering the halls and could use another body.

In all the time I was with the company, I never knew who my immediate boss was, and when I asked once if I should expect to be reviewed I was met with a perplexed stare. Given this, it would be easy to think that the company was poorly run. It certainly wasn’t run along traditional lines, but poorly? In 1987, Lusk was 375th on Forbes’ list of the wealthiest 400, so he was obviously doing something right. A big reason for his success is that he intuited the demand for housing post WWII. So firmly did he trust his intuition, that in 1946 he left his job at an S&L and started building homes. He also bought a lot of land early on, so as the company progressed, they often didn’t have to contend with the constantly rising land values that the competition faced. Another reason for his success was that he had a maxim that he followed: Take the profits from the good years in residential sales and invest in commercial real estate to tide you through the lean periods.

While I was there, Mira Mesa in San Diego was just one of the commercial areas that were developed. This served the company well during the period of sky-high interest rates, which pretty much dried up home loans. Developers were going belly up all over the place, but not Lusk. It was tough, but it was his company. He didn’t have shareholders to worry about, and he made it through his way. All the top executives took a 10 percent pay cut, and the rest of us got no raises, but we kept our jobs. I don’t know if there were any layoffs, but if there were, it was nothing compared to what other companies were experiencing.

Lusk wasn’t the only family member in the company. His son, Bill, was very much a part of the company story: the long-time vice chair of the company and a major contributor to the design of Lusk products. He was also an early foodie. If he stuck his head in your office and asked if you wanted to have lunch, you cancelled any previous lunch plans, because with Bill you knew you were going to have an exceptional meal. 

      The Lusk boat was kept at the BBC for years, and Bill served as chair of the Christmas Boat Parade for 15 years. Speaking of service, both father and son believed strongly in giving back. The Lusk Center for Real Estate Development at USC and the Lusk Research Campus at Scripps attest to that, as do numerous other groups that benefited from their largesse. 

       They had a great deal to be proud of, but I think both of them, John in particular, would be proudest of their company providing so many families with well-designed, well-built houses over the years – despite, or perhaps because of, his idiosyncratic org chart.

~~~~~~~~

Nancy Gardner, former Mayor of Newport Beach, long-time resident and daughter of Judge Robert Gardner, is a regular contributor to StuNewsNewport.


Winners of the 2018 California Friendly® Garden Contest announced

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Courtesy of Roger’s Gardens

Ethington garden in San Clemente was awarded the Grand Prize

Winners of the Roger’s Gardens 2018 California Friendly® Garden Contest have been announced. Congratulations to Kris & Dave Ethington of San Clemente as the Grand Prize California Friendly Garden winner.

According to Ron Vanderhoff, the contest creator, “At a time when so many homeowners are making changes to their landscapes, these gardens stand out as shining examples of great California Friendly gardens. The Ethingtons’ garden is beautiful, one that any homeowner would aspire to have. But it is more than a beautiful garden, it is an environmentally correct garden. The first thing a visitor might notice is the flurry of life in the garden: pollinators, butterflies, birds, honeybees and insects are everywhere. The garden is incredibly water and resource efficient, which is perhaps foremost on people’s minds. Additionally, it limits run-off by returning rainwater to the soil, does not pollute and generates little green waste.”

The plants in Kris and Dave’s garden are almost all California natives, perfectly adapted to our warm, summer dry Mediterranean climate.

 “The garden is an extraordinary example of a low-water, climate-appropriate and wildlife-friendly garden,” Vanderhoff said. “Gardens like this, especially when combined with other California Friendly gardens in a community, increase biodiversity and support an improved urban ecology,”

Kris Ethington adds, “We entered the contest in 2006 or 2007 and won the “Best DIY” category with our former home in San Clemente. We had only a little experience with CA natives at the time. Our CA Friendly gardening experience has evolved over the years. When we remodeled our current home, we chose to have a clean start in the landscape and replanted with nearly all natives while incorporating ocean/California Friendly design practices. We wanted to again participate with the hope we help inspire others to consider planting waterwise CA natives that benefit pollinators and wildlife.

“We removed a lawn and an ivy/juniper bank and replanted with CA natives selected for their dryness in a coastal environment that benefit pollinators and wildlife. We incorporated a roof gutter fed drywell with overflow in the site drainage. This temporarily captures dew and rain from the porch roof in a 2 ft. x 3 ft. reserve, deepening the water table accessible for nearby natives. It also helps to filter pollutants and reduce water entering storm drains. We irrigate by hand, every three or four weeks depending on season or rain events.”

Simpson

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Simpson garden, Huntington Beach

The contest organizers are hoping to raise public awareness about water conservation and habitat enrichment by showcasing the best of these home gardens in Orange County.

Underlining its popularity, this year’s contest was one of the largest in its 11-year history. The Ethingtons will receive a $1,500 award, a certificate and a handsome engraved stone to add to their garden and commemorate their achievement.

Now in its 11th year, this year’s contest was launched in February at Roger’s Gardens, a retail home and garden center in Newport Beach that has become a leader in California Friendly gardening. The goals of the contest are to acknowledge those homeowners who are gardening leaders in their communities and to inspire others to make their own changes to conserve and protect our natural resources.

Orland

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Orland garden, Brea

“People need to see that a California Friendly garden looks beautiful, is easy to maintain and features a wide selection of dazzling plants. These gardens use about half as much water as a typical garden. But most people that see these gardens aren’t even aware of their water use. They are just beautiful gardens,” said Vanderhoff, who created the contest and organized a coalition of local and regional water suppliers, university researchers, local governments, non-profit organizations and other experts.

Tran

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Tran garden, Huntington Beach

“Given the current importance of conserving our natural resources and the need for more habitat, this is an opportune time to be promoting California Friendly practices,” Vanderhoff shared. The California Friendly Garden Contest is open to all residents of Orange County with a front garden that has been established at least one month.

The Grand Prize winner, the Ethingtons, received $1,500, a certificate and an engraved stone to be displayed in their garden – “Best California Friendly Garden in Orange County 2018.

Four additional awards were given to these winning California Friendly gardeners:

Simpson Garden – Huntington Beach ($350 prize and certificate)

Orland Garden – Brea ($350 prize and certificate)

Tran Garden – Huntington Beach ($350 prize and certificate)

Richard Hodge Garden – Seal Beach ($350 prize and certificate)

Hodge

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Hodge garden, Seal Beach

Judges, who are experts in gardening, water conservation and landscaping, visited the top 10 gardens. The final results, with photos have been posted on the contest website at www.rogersgardens.com.

The California Friendly® Garden Contest is sponsored by Roger’s Gardens and supported by the Metropolitan Water District of Southern California, the Municipal Water District of Orange County, the Irvine Ranch Water District, the City of Newport Beach, the Surfrider Foundation, the California Native Plant Society, Monrovia Growers, Gardner and Bloome and the UC Cooperative Extension.


Stump the Stu

Holy Cow!

Stump the Stu 6.19.18

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This colorful cow wandered from its pasture and ended up here. Where is it grazing now?

Take the challenge and submit your answers to This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it..

The correct answer will appear in Friday’s edition, along with the correct guesses. So, join us for this local adventure.

If you have a unique spot or icon around town that you think Stu News Newport readers would enjoy finding out about, please shoot it, share it and give us the answer, so we can challenge them!


Sign of the times

On Fridays we give you a partial glimpse of a sign around town. You guess what the overall name of the business is. 

This Chef’s Toque proved to be tough one. We received a number of guesses, but only one was correct. Congratulations to Stefanie Stamiers who knew where to dine for both the sweet and savory...Pacific Whey Cafe, located in the Newport Hills Shopping Center at 2622 San Miguel Drive, Newport Beach. “Whey” to go, Stefanie!! 

If you’re a business and you want to play, you can send us a high-quality photo of your sign and we’ll take it from there and challenge our readers.

Let’s have some fun!

SOTT 6.19.18

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Segerstrom to host World Premiere of Isadora, featuring world-famous Russian ballerina

Natalia Osipova

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Courtesy of scfta.org

Ballerina Natalia Osipova in Isadora

Segerstrom Center for the Arts is showcasing the world premiere of Isadora, in four performances only, August 10 - 12. The performances take place in Segerstrom Hall beginning at 7:30 p.m.

According to Segerstrom Center for the Arts’ website, a new full-length work has been created specifically for brilliant Russian ballerina Natalia Osipova, principal dancer of the Royal Ballet, former principal dancer with both the Bolshoi and Mikhailovsky ballets and a guest artist with American Ballet Theatre. She has been to the Center many times, creating new works and performing classics.

The original choreography and direction is by Vladimir Varnava, with music performed live by the Mikhailovsky Orchestra. Veronika Part has the featured role of The Ballerina. There will also be a cast of 20 international dancers. You do not want to miss out on this special performance.

For tickets, which start at $29, contact the Box Office at 714.556.2787. For inquiries about group ticket savings for 10 or more, call the Group Services office at 714.755.0236.

Segerstrom Center for the Arts is located at 600 Town Center Drive, Costa Mesa. For more information, visit www.scfta.org.


MDA presents Summer Home at Back Bay Bistro

BBB sunset

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Submitted photo

MDA Events (Modern Disco Ambassadors) is presenting the third installment of Summer Home, a monthly summer series highlighting the best in music, at Back Bay Bistro on Sunday, July 8 from 3 - 8 p.m.

Dance waterside with special MDA DJs & Friends including Thomas Garcia, Dagz Bros, Double D’s, Michael Vegh and Diamond Heist. Indulge in food and specialty cocktails courtesy of Back Bay Bistro while enjoying a picturesque day on the bay. Satisfy all of your senses with Summer Home at Back Bay Bistro – the quintessential backdrop for the perfect Sunday soirée.

The cost to attend is $5 - $10. Food and beverages are sold separately. The event is for those 21 years of age and older. For tickets, visit www.followmda.com.

Back Bay Bistro is located at the Newport Dunes Waterfront Resort, 1131 Back Bay Drive, Newport Beach.


JWA releases 2017 annual report, is ranked highest in customer satisfaction among large airports in North America

JWA Exterior

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Submitted photo

John Wayne Airport (JWA) recently released its 2017 annual report, highlighted by a 94 percent customer satisfaction rating and numerous national awards.

“John Wayne Airport was ranked highest in customer satisfaction among large airports in North America in the 2017 J.D. Power Customer Satisfaction Survey, based on responses from 34,695 North American travelers,” stated a company release. “This study measured overall traveler satisfaction based on six factors: terminal facilities; airport accessibility; security check; baggage claim; check-in/baggage check; and food, beverage and retail.”

Also, Travel & Leisure magazine ranked JWA one of the “Top 10 Best Domestic Airports.” Obviously, the people who voted are not all from Orange County; therefore, its ideal location was not a factor when it came down to achieving this award. 

For those who are glued to their laptops, JWA recently improved the speed of Wi-Fi throughout the airport by 300 percent. There are no excuses to not getting your work done now.

Recently, JWA elevated curbside convenience to the next level with FlashValet, an enhanced valet parking system that provides a faster check-in and check-out process, and new amenities for guests utilizing the valet parking service.

The FlashValet system offers vehicle drop-off and pick-up via text request, convenient payment options including mobile payment, and an intuitive easy-to-use mobile application. But, the convenience doesn’t stop at the curb. Additional amenities available through valet parking include paintless dent removal, fuel refilling and ultimate detailing and hand car wash services. Curbside valet parking is available on the Departure (upper) Level in front of the Riley Terminal. The two valet parking locations are located curbside between Terminals A and B, and curbside between Terminals B and C.

For more information on JWA’s 2017 annual report, including a video from Airport Director Barry A. Rodinella, visit www.ocair.com/annualreport/2017.


Crystal Cove summer programs, shows beckon

Crystal Cove Conservancy (CCC) is offering a variety of programs this summer. Local residents are encouraged to sign up quickly before registrations are full.

Every Wednesday between 10 a.m. - 4 p.m., now through August 29, CCC is offering fun and historical activities for the whole family at Community Days in the Education Commons. From watercolors to sea glass, participants will tap into their “inner artists” in Crystal Cove’s serene surroundings. Attendees will also learn about the unique history of Crystal Cove through a guided tour of the historic district, or explore the science of Crystal Cove State Park. Best of all...this is a free event. 

Local families are also encouraged to sign up for CCC’s Family Plein Art Workshop on Monday, July 30. During the three-hour program, family teams will explore the basics of plein air painting, and then work together to design a fun still life arrangement that captures the summer spirit of the Cove, as each family member creates their own masterpiece. These workshops are intended for parents, grandparents and children ages 8 and up. Laura Rosenkranz will be the instructor.

Crystal Cove summer

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Courtesy of Crystal Cove Conservancy

Family Plein Air Art Exploration

Crystal Cove State Park has a long history of plein air artists painting and preserving its beautiful landscapes. Now, every summer, you can be a part of this 100-year-old tradition during the Great Plein Air Art Experience. Spend a relaxing day with one of Crystal Cove State Park’s plein air artists while capturing the beauty of the Cove on canvas. No experience is required; this introductory class is recommended for novices only. Available dates that are still open are July 17, and August 23 and 30. Alan Nowell will be the instructor.

Crystal Cove Conservancy also hosts Movie Nights on the Beach. This year, CCC is showing Alice in Wonderland (July 19), Beach Blanket Bingo (August 2) and Casablanca (August 16) on a giant inflatable screen outside the Historic District’s “Beaches” Film & Media Center (Cottage #13). Learn about Crystal Cove’s role in the early film industry, relax on the sand and enjoy a one-of-a-kind movie experience. All films start at 8 p.m. and are free to the public with a $15 day-use parking fee.

Last but not least, don’t miss the Summer Art Show – Diamonds in the Sand – where more than 50 works by 35 local artists will be presented. An Artist Reception takes place on Friday, July 27 from 5 - 7:30 p.m. with live music, food, and beverages amid a picturesque beachfront location. The cost is $10 for members and $20 for the general public. Tickets are available for purchase at www.crystalcove.org/ArtShow. The Public Show takes place on Friday, July 28 through Saturday, July 29 from 10 a.m. - 4 p.m. in the Education Commons with a $15 day-use parking fee.

Check out www.crystalcove.org for more information regarding these events or call 949.376.6200.

Crystal Cove Conservancy is located at #5 Crystal Cove, Newport Coast.


Crystal Cove Cottages restoration more than halfway complete; donations needed to finish the job

Crystal Cove Cottages

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Courtesy of Crystal Cove Conservancy

The cottage restoration process at Crystal Cove is more than halfway complete. With 29 of the 46 cottages already restored, Crystal Cove Conservancy officials have announced the need for more money to finish the project.

The total remaining cost for restoration is estimated to be around $35 million. With a goal to fundraise $5 million before the start of September, the group has raised about $1.1 million. Luckily, on Friday, June 8, the Packard Foundation approved a low-interest $10 million construction loan. This will make the final stages of the restoration process go by even faster!

This project has not been an easy one. From unstable cliffs to sewage systems, it has been hard to obtain the financial and physical means needed for completion. However, the cottages have a special place in peoples’ hearts, for some of them have been around since 1940. It is the history and memories that matter, not necessarily how fancy they look.

The workers are looking at a five-year timeline for the final completion of the cottages. Once finished, we will all want to check them out! 

For more information regarding the cottages and how to support the project, visit www.crystalcove.org.


Sign up for Summer Nature Camp at the ENC

ENC

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Courtesy of ENC

The Environmental Nature Center (ENC) is hosting its 2018 Summer Nature Camp, with one-week sessions from June 25 - August 16. The camp runs from either 9 a.m. - 1 or 3 p.m. for children ages 3 through grade 8. There are only a few spots left so sign up now!

The ENC has had Summer Nature Camps since 1977. Its goal is to provide science education through fun and interactive learning sessions. According to their website, “Campers spend most of their time outside, having a great time observing nature close up using tools like binoculars, magnifying lenses and microscopes.”

While summer is a break from school, it should not be a break from learning. Instead of being stuck in a classroom, your child will have fun participating in games and crafts that revolve around the environment. 

For more information, visit www.enccenter.org. There is a 10 percent discount for ENC members. 

ENC is located at 1601 16th St., Newport Beach.


Race for the Cure scheduled for Sept. 23

Be bold

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Photos courtesy of Susan G. Komen

BE MORE THAN PINK ®and join Susan G. Komen Orange County for the 27th Annual Race for the Cure on Sunday, Sept 23 at Fashion Island in Newport Beach from 6:30 a.m. – 12 p.m.

The Susan G. Komen Orange County Race for the Cure has been the largest, most powerful, and beautiful event uniting the community to celebrate and honor breast cancer survivors in a fun-filled day for the whole family. The event raises funds and awareness for the breast cancer movement, commemorates breast cancer survivorship, and honors those who have lost their battle to the disease.

Seventy-five percent of the net proceeds raised stays in our community to help fund vital breast cancer health education, and breast cancer screening and treatment programs. The remaining 25 percent supports the Susan G. Komen® Grants Program in funding research for the cure.

Memory of Mom Nana

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Event Day Schedule:

6:30 a.m.: Registration

6:30 - 8:30 a.m.: Survivor Complimentary Breakfast

6:30 a.m. - 12 p.m.: Wellness Expo

7:15 a.m.: First 5K Run/Walk

9 a.m.: Breast Cancer Survivors’ Tribute

9:45 a.m.: Second 5K Run/Walk

Tickets are $35 for adults; $30 for breast cancer survivors or those living with metastatic cancer; $15 for youth; and $45 for virtual participants. Register by Wednesday, July 4 and receive a special discounted rate of $25.

For more information and to register, visit www.komenoc.org/race.

The race takes place at the Pacific Life building, 700 Newport Center Dr., Fashion Island, Newport Beach.


Sandcastles take over the Gardens

Chris and whale

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Courtesy of Sherman Library & Gardens

Sandcastles will take over the Gardens this Thursday, June 21 at 6 p.m., as Sherman Library & Gardens presents its Fusions Sandcastle Lounge!

Having just completed Sherman Gardens’ 2018 sculpture exhibit Sandscapes, Chris Crosson (“Mr. Sandcastle”) will host the second installment of Garden Fusions. Crosson will share his experiences on becoming and being a professional sand sculptor. It’s not all just a day at the beach!

His passion for sandcastles has taken the Crosson family all over the country to compete in competitions. The family’s favorite competition is the Newport Beach Sandcastle Contest at Corona del Mar’s Main Beach. The Crossons have participated in this annual event with friends, neighbors and family members every year since 1994.

When the beach meets the kitchen, you can count on Chef Pascal Olhats to create a menu that is classic California coastal cuisine. Upon hearing the theme, Chef Pascal joked, “I guess I’ll need to keep some sand in the clams!”

The evening begins with a reception featuring California BBQ hors d’oeuvres with beer pairings from Towne Park Brewery.

The Menu includes:

Dinner

Local heirloom tomato salad with Sonoma goat cheese

Orange wood smoked brisket with homemade chipotle sauce on grilled local citrus

California beach-style clam bake with Manassero Farms sweet corn

Dessert

Pineapple upside down pie with “sandy” macadamia nut crust

The cost is $75 per person. Additional beverages, gratuity and tax are not included. To keep the experience intimate, seating is limited to 50 guests. Reservations are required. Call Cafe Jardin to make reservations at 949.673.0033.

Garden Fusions is a unique interactive gourmet dining experience. Every dinner has a theme featuring a special host. The host will share knowledge and advice on the evening’s topic. Chef Pascal Olhats, Executive Chef of Cafe Jardin, is challenged to create a multi-course gourmet dinner to complement the theme. This fusion creates one-of-a-kind experiences. The series runs from May through October, and features six different fusion experiences.

Future Garden Fusion Dinners include:

Wednesday, July 18 – Food, Fiber and Love: The Heart of a Palm

Wednesday, Aug. 15 – Eat Your Flowers!

Wednesday, Sept. 19 – Pineapple: Crown of the Caribbean

Wednesday, Oct. 17 – Harvest Celebration

Sherman Library & Gardens is located at 2647 E. Coast Highway, Corona del Mar. For more information, visit www.slgardens.org.


A muralist on a mission: Creating a vibrant culture of support

BY LANA JOHNSON

“Americans do not understand that artists are different from ordinary people. That this does not make them insane. This is what makes them artists.” 
– B.A. ShapiroThe Muralist

Imagine the words “You Are Loved” covering the wall of a school for students to see throughout each day and the empowering message it sends. The same youngsters who are surrounded and bombarded by belittling messages of bullying, hate, gender and race bashing, and violence – face to face, on the Internet, via the TV screen, and in the palm of their hands on their mobiles daily.

According to Wikipedia, “a mural is any piece of artwork painted or applied directly on a wall, ceiling or other permanent surface. A distinguishing characteristic of mural painting is that the architectural elements of the given space are harmoniously incorporated into the picture.” That may be the “definition,” but what happens when it takes shape, becomes “alive” and arouses the mind and senses to new and positive possibilities?

That is the mission of muralist Alex Cook.

Alex Cook Painting

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Photo by Lana Johnson

Muralist Alex Cook painting the mural on the brick wall at Lincoln Elementary School

I caught up with Cook last Wednesday as he was painting one of his “You Are Loved” murals on the wall at Lincoln Elementary School. He had recently finished one over at Harbor View.

The message he imparts is five-fold:

You Are Loved

You Are Needed

You Are Important

You Are Beautiful

You Can Do It

Cook has been painting for 21 years and graduated with a fine arts degree from the University of Massachusetts. He resides in Boston...so how did he come out to Newport Beach to spread his message of worth, hope and value? There was an article on Cook’s work in the Christian Science Monitor and a school in LA loved what his paintings imparted. Facebook played a role and a GoFundMe account brought him out to Southern California in 2015. A ministry in Santa Ana reached out to him in Fall 2016 which led him to complete a prison mural. And soon the message spread to Newport Beach.

“My pieces, which I have painted throughout the country in prisons and jails, homeless shelters, drug rehabs, church campuses and faith communities, served and underserved schools...a spectrum of public places...all send a universal message. It doesn’t matter whether you’re poor, homeless or affluent, ‘You Are Loved’ inspires all of us and makes us feel that we have purpose in life.”

Cook’s first “You Are Loved” mural started four and a half years ago at a school in New Mexico, where his sister lives. The one at Lincoln School is his 46th, which took about a week to complete.

Integral to the artistic process is that wherever Cook sets out his paints, the participants are invited and encouraged to pick up a brush and assist in creating the art.

Lincoln panoramic mural view

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Courtesy of Alex Cook

The finished “You Are Loved” mural at Lincoln Elementary School

At Lincoln School, approximately 70 students contributed to the inspirational message that adorns the wall in the quad area, which is 8 feet x 40 feet. They will always be a part of it...and can pass their story down.

The day before the event begins, Cook creates a “coloring book” on the wall so that when his contributing artists arrive the design is clear. No two designs are the same, and color palettes differ.

“I really looked inward to discover how a mural can serve as a tool in someone’s life. I wanted to communicate the message that each of our lives is worth living,” Cook said. “And why do you have to be subtle about things that mean something?”

Harbor View mural

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Courtesy of Alex Cook

The “You Are Loved” mural at Harbor View Elementary School

For more information about Alex Cook and to view other “You Are Loved” murals, visit www.stonebalancer.com and www.youarelovedmurals.com.


2018 is the Year of the Harbor

By DAVID GIRLING
Harbor Commissioner and Vice Chairman

Part Two in a Two-Part Series

The Harbor Commission, Harbor Resources and the Harbor Operations Division work closely together to ensure that the Harbor is operating efficiently and smoothly. I have listed some examples of Harbor projects and initiatives below that are the responsibility of the Harbor Commission, Harbor Resources and now the Harbor Operations Division.

--Public piers oversight and vessel sewage pump-out station maintenance: There are 13 public piers in Newport Harbor and 10 publicly available pump-out stations. 

Pump out stations graphic

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Courtesy of Dave Girling

Public Pump-Out Stations and Public Piers in Newport Harbor

--Mooring Management: There are 10 mooring fields within City jurisdiction totaling approximately 1,200 moorings (800+ offshore and 400+ onshore). The City also allows approximately 50 liveaboards throughout the offshore mooring fields.

--Ongoing sand replenishment throughout the Harbor (Balboa Island, China Cove, various street ends, etc.).

--Balboa Island Grand Canal dredging: Currently securing permits and hoping to dredge the section from Park Avenue bridge north in the fall.

--Balboa Island sea walls: The bulkhead cap along portions of Balboa Island is currently being raised.

--Development of the ongoing dredging program, which is much like the one that is administered in Santa Cruz Harbor, whereby sediment can be removed on a more regular basis.

--Water wheel: Proposed to be located adjacent to the Jamboree Bridge immediately above the Upper Newport Bay, and designed to filter debris before it enters the Upper and Lower Newport Bays (currently seeking grant opportunities). 

--Lower Castaways: The Harbor Commission has been tasked with finding the highest and best use for the last undeveloped waterfront parcel owned by the City (ongoing).

Harbor Area Accomplishments 

--Marina Park: A state-of-the-art marina serving visitors for up to 30 days, with a sailing center, recreation facility, community rooms, restaurant and park.

--Central Avenue Public Pier at Lido Marina Village: This new pier will help to promote the newly renovated Lido Marina Village by accommodating a number and variety of dinghies and smaller boats arriving from the adjacent anchorages and surrounding residents and businesses.

--Harbor Dredging

a. 2011 Rhine Channel Cleanup: Removed approximately 100,000 cubic yards of contaminated sediment that was disposed and permanently encapsulated at the Port of Long Beach.

b. Lower Bay Dredging project: Phase I removed approximately 600,000 cubic yards of material, achieving the goal of partially deepening the channels.

c. Lower Bay Dredging project: Phase II is designed to complete the dredging to deepen the channels to their federally authorized depths. Currently focusing on funding and coordination with the Army Corps of Engineers, the entity that is responsible for maintaining depths, and our federal legislatures.

--RGP-54 Dredging Permits: In an effort to simplify the process for permitting maintenance dredging projects for waterfront homes and marinas, the City manages the permitting process to allow small maintenance dredging projects within designated areas of Newport Harbor.

--Temporary Anchorage at the west end of Lido: Successfully implemented three trial anchorages over the past three summers. The Harbor Commission recommended a permanent anchorage and will ask City Council for approval for the fourth trial this summer (Labor Day until Memorial Day).

--SUP Safety: Initiated new safety guidelines for SUP and other human-powered watercraft operators to ensure greater safety throughout the Harbor.

Newport Harbor is a one-of-a-kind place and, as residents of Newport Beach, we sometimes take it for granted. Hopefully this article will enable you to more fully utilize and appreciate the Harbor’s many amenities. Make sure to get out and enjoy Newport’s greatest asset.

For a more information on the Newport Harbor Commission, visit the City website at www.newportbeachca.gov/harborcommission.

~~~~~~~~

Dave Girling has been a Newport Beach Harbor Commissioner since 2012 and will term out in 2021. He currently serves as its Vice Chairman and served as its Chairman from 2015 to 2016. Dave is a Realtor in Newport Beach, with more than 30 years of financial services industry knowledge and experience.


OC Press Club honors outstanding journalist achievements

Bud Miller

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Photos by Lana Johnson

(L-R) Charles “Bud” Little received the Sky Dunlap award

The Orange County Press Club has a rich history dating to the 1950s and gathers each year for an annual event to acknowledge their peers.

The 2018 Annual OC Press Club Awards dinner gala took place Thursday, June 14 at the Newport Beach Marriott Hotel & Spa in Fashion Island.

Reiff and Reisman

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 (L-R) Rick Reiff, who received the Lifetime Achievement Award, with Richard Reisman, publisher and CEO of the Orange County Business Journal

The club honored two men for their outstanding achievements in journalism: Rick Reiff and Charles “Bud” Little.

Reiff, editor at large of the Orange County Business Journal, received the Lifetime Achievement Award. He is a Pulitzer Prize and Gold Mike Award winner, and three-time Emmy nominee. He authors the popular Orange County Business Journal OC Insider column, and hosts and produces “Inside OC with Rick Reiff” on PBS SoCal.

Little, a professor and journalism adviser at Santa Ana College, was bestowed the Sky Dunlap Award for life achievement and community service. The award is named for John William “Sky” Dunlap (1912-1968), who owned and published the Globe, an independent newspaper. Past recipients include Frank Mickadeit, formerly of the OC Register; Gustavo Arellano, former editor of OC Weekly; Steve Churm, former chief executive of Churm Media; and Tom Johnson, publisher, Stu News Newport. The award was presented by Tom Johnson, last year’s award recipient.

The event was hosted by Barbara Venezia, an opinion columnist, and Roger Bloom, OC Press Club treasurer, who also served as the evening’s co-chairs. Gary Sherwin, president and CEO of Newport Beach and Company, delivered a warm welcome to all the guests.

Here is a wrap up of the evening’s award winners. 

Best Blog

First Place: Behind the Badge

Best Sports Broadcast or Video - First place: Rick Reiff, “Inside OC with Rick Reiff” (for “After the Fall” with Todd Marinovich)

Best Feature Broadcast or Video

First: Anthony Porrazzo, Spotlight Video (for story on Father Damien, JSerra High School Chaplain)

Second: Rick Reiff, “Inside OC with Rick Reiff” (for the episode “He Writes the Songs”)

Third: Shawn Price, Halloween Every Night (for coverage of Night of the Living Dead)

Best News Broadcast or Video

First Place: Anthony Porrazzo, Spotlight Video (for coverage of a mock DUI event at Santa Margarita Catholic High School)

Second Place: Rick Reiff, “Inside OC with Rick Reiff” (for the episode “Campus Conflict”)

Best TV News Program

First place: Rick Reiff, “Inside OC with Rick Reiff”

Best Use of Multimedia

First place: OC Speakly podcast (submitted by OC Weekly)

Best Graphic 

First Place: Jeff Goertzen, “Shark Tech” published by Orange County Register

Judges’ comments: All really well-designed graphics like Shark Tech have some common characteristics. Often, the reader is never aware of these traits, and that’s even better.

Best Page Design

First Place: Denise Smaldino Rainey, “Fairy Tale Manor”

Second Place: Dustin Ames, “Away & Home Summer Guide 2017”

Third Place: Denise Smaldino Rainey, “Make a Splash This Summer!” 

Judges’ comments: “This is just a wonderful, active layout. It flows nicely from the activity shots to the more posed ‘reclining on the beach’ shots and then, products.”

Best Illustration

First Place: Leslie Again, “Angels in the outpatient room” published by OC Weekly

Best Political Cartoon

Leslie Again, “Snitch Trap” published by OC Weekly

Best Cover

First Place: Dustin Ames, Sept. 8 cover of OC Weekly

Second Place: John Cheresh, the Story of OCSA

Third place (TIE): Denise Smaldino Rainey, July cover of OC Family

Third Place (TIE): Dustin Ames, OC Weekly Best of 2017

Best Food/Restaurant Story or Review
First Place: Shawn Price, “Chow Time with Anaheim Fire & Rescue: Coq au vin” in Behind the Badge

Best Feature Story

First Place: Liz Goldner, “Sarah Rafael García Captures Santa Ana’s History and Gentrification through Fairy Tales” in KCET Art bound
Second Place: Shawn Price, “Anaheim Fire & Rescue strike teams: ready for the long haul” in Behind the Badge
Third Place: Jessica Peralta, “OCSD’s human remains detection dog, Cinder, is hard at work in training” in Behind the Badge

Best Music or Entertainment Story or Review

First Place: Jessica Peralta, “‘Lavender’ Highlights the Horror of the Mind” in Halloween Every Night

Best News Feature Story

First Place: Greg Hardesty, “OCSD deputies recount terror in Las Vegas: ‘I had never felt that close to death before’” in Behind the Badge

Second Place: Jessica Peralta, “OCSD’s TSA K9s are federally trained dogs at the ready to sniff out explosives” in Behind the Badge

Third Place: Greg Hardesty, “Nearly killed by DUI suspect, Orange police officer is humbled by outpouring of support” in Behind the Badge

Best Arts/Culture Story or Review

First Place: Liz Goldner, “Deconstructing Liberty: A Destiny Manifested” in Art and Cake

Best Feature Photo

First: Steven Georges for photo of a tiny police driver

Second Place: Steven Georges for photo of a fire & rescue team member

Third Place: Christopher Trela for photo of Moulin in Newport Beach Independent

Best Slideshow (online)

First Place: Brian Feinzimer for photos of the Anaheim Hills Blaze on OCWeekly.com

Second Place: Steven Georges for his series of homeless in OC

Best Photo Essay (print)

First Place: Dustin Ames, “With 18 Bajillion Things to Do, See and Eat, No Single Trip to Tokyo Will Leave You Satisfied” in OC Weekly

Best News Photo

First Place: Richard Koehler, Mercedes vs. Semi published in Orange County Register

Second Place: Jeff Antenore, Sheriffs patrolling homeless camp in Voice of OC

Third Place: Brian Feinzimer, photo used for the OC Weekly cover “Fill ‘em up”

Best Public Affairs Story

First Place: Mary Carreon, “Orange County’s First Needle Exchange Tries to Bring Hope to a Wretched Situation” in OC Weekly

Second Place: Jordan Graham, “Orange County homeless deaths hit all-time high” in Orange County Register

Third Place: Jeff Collins, “Eviction decline is no solace for thousands of renters losing their homes” in Orange County Register

Best Feature Story

First Place: Chris Haire, “Is time running out on Holy Jim Canyon? Nature, feds are threatening” in Orange County Register

Second Place: Mary Carreon, “Tree of Life Nursery Is Saving Our Ecosystem One Seed at a Time” in OC Weekly

Third Place: Donia Moore, “San Clemente Island Got Your Goat?” in San Clemente Journal

Best Education Story

First Place: Roxana Kopetman, “Pink slips lead to a special court hearing for hundreds of local teachers facing possible layoffs” in Orange County Register

Second Place: Roxana Kopetman, “Anaheim Union denying hundreds of school transfer requests, sparking tears and appeals” in Orange County Register

Best Series

First place: Teri Sforza, “Twins Divided” for Orange County Register

Second place: Denisse Salazar, “Gang Victims: A Program Aimed at Helping and Healing” for Orange County Register

Third place: Barbara Venezia, Newport Beach and Costa Mesa should do Background Checks on Commission Applicants for Daily Pilot

Best Sports Columnist

David Jerome, Mr. Bucket list in Orange County Register

Best Sports Story

First place: Ryan Kartje, “Inside the unregulated world of recruiting consulting services” in Orange County Register

Second place: Mirin Fader, “California doesn’t regulate athletic trainers. Here’s why that’s bad for high school athletes” in Orange County Register

Third place: Chris Haire, “On Saturday, a rematch will play out in Little Saigon” in Orange County Register

Best Business Story

First Place: Margot Roosevelt, “Is it fair that the amount of bonding time you get with your baby hinges on the size of your employer?” in Orange County Register 

Second Place: Jeff Collins, “Investor demand for SoCal apartments contributes to rising rents” in Orange County Register

Third Place (TIE): Jeff Collins, “Meet YIMBY: Pro-development groups join the battle in California housing wars” in Orange County Register

Third Place (TIE): Gabriel San Román, “Will Buena Park’s New Retail Center the Source Put It on the Map – Or Be Its Biggest Boondoggle?” in OC Weekly

Best Cannabis Coverage

First Place: Brooke Edwards Staggs

Best Religion Story

First Place: Gabriel San Román, “A Gay Pastor Leaves His Santa Ana Flock, Exposing the United Methodist Church’s LGBT Rift” in OC Weekly

Second Place: Deepa Bharath, “A Bible and a gun? How churches, temples, mosques are rethinking security” in Orange County Register

Third Place: Cindy Carcamo, “Like an invisibility cloak, Latina Muslims find the hijab hides their ethnicity – from Latinos” in LA Times

Best Environmental News Story

First Place: Amy DePaul, “To Desalinate or Not to Desalinate: UCI Debate over controversial Huntington Beach Plant” in Voice of OC

Second Place: Mary Carreon, “Activists Protest Plans to Bury Nuclear Waste at San Onofre State Beach” in OC Weekly

Best Arts or Culture Story

First Place: Gabriel San Román, “El Centro Cultural de Mexico finally gets a Home but will Next Generation of Activists Come” in OC Weekly

Second Place: Cynthia Rebolledo, “Frederico Medina Captures Life and Culture in the Golden City” in OC Weekly

Best Arts or Culture Review

First Place: Dave Barton, “William Wray’s Seemingly Straightforward Building Portraits Tell a Deeper Story” in OC Weekly

Second Place: Christopher Trela, “Artscapes: Backhausdance Premieres Quartet of New Works at The Barclay” in Newport Beach Independent

Third Place: Dave Barton, “Laguna Art Museum Celebrates the Legendary Beginnings of the California School of Fine Arts” in OC Weekly

Best Travel Story

First Place: Edwin Goei, “Montreal Has Poutine, Yes, But Go With the Jewish Food First” in OC Weekly

Second Place: Anne Valdespino, “Touring Castle Country in Scotland” in Orange County Register

Third Place: Kedric Francis, “Road trips for a realist” in Orange County Register

David McQuay Award for Best Columnist

First place: Norberto Santana Jr., Voice of OC

Second place: Kedric Francis, Orange County Register

Third place: Joe Vargas, Behind the Badge

Best Profile

First Place: Ryan Kartje, “The Ballfather: Lavar Ball and his three sons intend to change basketball forever” in Orange County Register 

Second Place: Keith Sharon, “Would you kill if ordered? Orange County resident and WWII Navy survivor of Port Chicago disaster faced that question” in Orange County Register

Third Place: Margot Roosevelt, “July 4th fireworks: Meet the Orange County maestro who lights the nation’s skies” in Orange County Register

Best Music or Entertainment Story

First Place: Gabriel San Román, “After Her Mother’s Death, Turntables Brought DJ Lala Out of Depression and Into the Spotlight” in OC Weekly

Second Place: Nate Jackson, “Meet Lorne Conner: The Happy Coachella Guy” in OC Weekly

Third Place (TIE):  Patrice Marsters, “Izabella Alvarez Is Only 13, But Has Already Appeared on Westworld, Shameless – With More to Come” in OC Weekly

Third Place (TIE): Kathleen Luppi, “Pat Boone” in Daily Pilot 

Best Music or Entertainment Review

First Place: Liz Goldner, “The Monster Builder: Amy Freed’s Take on Architecture as a Metaphor for Life” in Artillery

Best Political Columnist

Norberto Santana Jr., Voice of OC

Best Food or Restaurant Story

First Place: Caitlin Yoskiko Kandil, “Little Saigon’s restaurant scene revives as second-generation Vietnamese Americans mix it up” in LA Times

Best Food/Restaurant Review

First Place: Edwin Goei, “Tin Vuong’s LSXO Combines Hip-Hop and the Best Vietnamese Food Outside of Little Saigon” in OC Weekly

Second Place: Edwin Goei, “The New Northgate González Market in Anaheim Is Like a Mexican-Food Disneyland” in OC Weekly

Third Place: Brad A. Johnson, “Pacific Hideaway channels a rebellious surfer vibe” in Orange County Register

Best Round-Up or Best Of

First place: Edwin Goei, “Korean Fried Chicken Is Becoming a Thing in Orange County. Here Are Three New Spots” in OC Weekly

Second place: Brad A. Johnson, “These are Orange County’s 20 Best Mexican Restaurants” in Orange County Register

Best Beat Reporting

First Place: Nick Gerda, Voice of OC

Second Place: Deepa Bharath, Orange County Register

Third Place: Meghann Cuniff, Daily Journal

Best Breaking News Story

First place: Hannah Fry, “Man shot and killed by H.B. officer was homeless Navy veteran, mother says; new video surfaces” in Daily Pilot

Second place: Alma Fausto, Tony Saavedra and Sean Emery, “Serial killings: 5th victim identified in cases of men accused of murdering 4 women” in Orange County Register

Third place: Luke Money, “Costa Mesa council unseats Katrina Foley as mayor and names Sandy Genis to replace her” in Daily Pilot

Best News Feature Story

First Place: Cindy Carcamo, “At Napa vineyards untouched by wildfires, the grapes must still be picked” in LA Times

Second Place: Margot Roosevelt, “Is Social Security cheating the disabled? The wait time to get a hearing is nearly 2 years” in Orange County Register

Third Place: Denisse Salazar, “Here’s one Santa Ana family’s story of generational gang violence. Can the city’s latest efforts break the cycle in Orange County Register

Best News Story

First Place: Roxana Kopetman, “Same visa Trump uses at his hotel helps bring workers to Southern California fairs” in Orange County Register

Second Place: Hannah Fry, “‘It’s been a night from hell’: Homeless pushed out of Santa Ana River face uncertain futures” in Daily Pilot

Third Place: Nick Gerda, “Airport Controversy Heats Up as Supervisors Award Contract to Low-Ranked Firm” in Voice of OC

Best Investigative Story

First Place: Jordan Graham and Tony Saavedra, “Southern California jailers are injuring inmates with abusive ‘chicken winging’ holds” in Orange County Register

Second Place: R. Scott Moxley, “Orange County’s Informant Scandal Yields Evidence of Forensic Science Deception in Murder Trials” in OC Weekly

Third Place: Nick Gerda, “Hundreds of Dollars in ‘Gifts’ From Contractors to Supervisor Nelson Raise Legal Questions” in Voice of OC    

Watchdog Award

First Place: Orange County Register Staff

Marjorie Freeman Award for Best Humorous Story

First place: Kedric Francis, “Women of Influence” in Orange County Register    

Second Place: Anne Valdespino, “These are the worst restaurant and food trends of 2017” in Orange County Register

Third place (TIE): David Jerome, “Scattered Thoughts for Your April Fool’s Day” in Orange County Register

Third place: Luke Money, “Christmas is the most pun-derful time of the year for this Costa Mesa family” in Daily Pilot    

The Real O.C. Award

First place: Deepa Bharath, “Most Influential 2017: Rida Hamida and Benjamin Vazquez bring halal tacos, cultural mingling, to mosques throughout Southern California” in Orange County Register

Second place: Brooke Edwards Staggs, “senior’s board ‘cannabis’ for trip to medical marijuana dispensary” in the Cannifornian

Third place: Caitlin Yoshiko Kandil, “Latino Muslims find home at mosque led by Cambodian refugees” for NBC News

Congratulations to all the winners!


Fair Game

By TOM JOHNSON

Former Irvine Co. exec Larry Thomas passes at 70

TomJohnson

Former long-time Irvine Company executive and political aide Larry Thomas died Monday at 70.

“L-T” as his friends called him, was a senior vice president of corporate communications for the Irvine Co. and broke off several times to work with politicians, including former Governor Pete Wilson.

Following a serious battle with cancer, Thomas spent the past number of years traveling and enjoying family.

Many of Orange County’s most successful journalists and publicists have a path that leads back to L-T’s influence.

He counseled many during trying times and will be missed.

Larry’s daughter Leigh Thomas Beach posted the following on social media, “While I’m not sure how to carry on without him here physically, I take great comfort in knowing he’s no longer in pain. I assume he sauntered through Heaven’s gates and asked for a glass of wine. God knows he deserved one or two.”

• • •

Final totals in the Dana Rohrabacher race for the 48th Congressional District are still being counted. Latest totals still show Hans Keistad in second with a lead of just under 400 votes over Harley Rouda

Scott Baugh appears out at this point.

One of the two appear to be headed to a November runoff with Rohrabacher.

Another Orange County runoff is in the 74th Assembly District where incumbent Matt Harper received 35,116 votes or 41.9 percent. He’ll face off in November against Cottie Petrie-Norris who received 23,686 votes or 28.3 percent.

At the County level, Michelle Steel easily won the 2nd District Supervisor race with 62,292 votes or 64 percent. Brendon Perkins finished a distant second with 23,568 votes or 24.2 percent.

• • •

Okay, it’s the best car wash in town. The Newport Beach 1/1 Marine Foundation will be holding a car wash fundraiser on Saturday, June 23 from 10 a.m. - 2 p.m. at Newport Dunes.

What’s the money go to you ask? The monies earned offset the cost of their annual Marine Corp Ball. The requested donation is $20, but feel free to dig deeper. 

Heck, I’d suggest just driving up and donating $20 and forget the car wash. It’s an easy way to say thank you.

B-t-w, our 1/1 Marines have just returned from an overseas deployment and are now here in So Cal to regroup before their next deployment training.

• • •

Congrats to Daniel Valenzuela who has been selected as the new assistant principal of TeWinkle Intermediate School in Costa Mesa.

Valenzuela, who’s been with the Newport-Mesa Unified School District for 10 years, most recently served as assistant principal of Corona del Mar High School.


Today is National Lobster Day...a reminder to save the date for the 10th Annual Lobsterfest on August 5

Today is National Lobster Day, a day to pay homage to the delicious and mouthwatering crustacean that so many of us love.

If you savor the freshest Maine lobster, the 10th Annual Lobsterfest at Newport Dunes Waterfront Resort, held on Sunday, August 5 from 3 - 8 p.m., is definitely a must.

This annual celebration of summer centers around a fresh whole Maine lobster dinner with dancing to live music, an opportunity drawing for a big screen TV, and fun on the beach for the entire family.

Live whole Maine lobster flown in fresh on the morning of the event is prepared on-site alongside a buffet that includes New York strip steak, corn-on-the-cob, red potatoes, salad, freshly baked sourdough rolls and dessert. In addition to serving a whole Maine lobster dinner and all its complements, the event features a full bar with spirits, craft beer and premium wine. “West Coast Party Crashers,” the high-energy four-piece dance band that was a huge hit last year, will supply the live entertainment, covering everything from Contemporary Rock to Hip Hop, ‘90s Alternative, ‘70s Disco/Funk and ‘80s New Wave/Rock...guaranteed to keep the party rolling.

Lobster Plate for middle

Click on photo for a larger image

Courtesy of Lobsterfest

All proceeds from the event will benefit Make-A-Wish® – Orange County and Inland Empire and Leadership Tomorrow – Orange County. Make-A-Wish® grants the wishes of children with life-threatening medical conditions to enrich the human experience with hope, strength, and joy. Leadership Tomorrow – Orange County is a nine-month program designed for informed citizens committed to learning more about their communities.

General Admission tickets include one-pound whole Maine lobster (additional lobsters can be purchased in advance), Grilled New York steak, salad, red potatoes, corn-on-the-cob, drawn butter, freshly baked rolls and dessert. There is a no-host full-service bar available. GA tickets are $75 per person in advance or $100 at the door (very limited number sold at the door on a first come first served basis. Not available if the event sells out before August 5). Additional whole lobsters can be purchased for $30 each. VIP Tickets include reserved stage-front seating for the day, all-you-can-eat whole Maine lobster, New York strip steak, corn-on-the-cob, red potatoes, salad, drawn butter, freshly baked rolls, dessert, Essentia bottled water and two glasses of complimentary craft beer or premium wine. VIP Tickets are $150 and available for purchase in advance only at www.LobsterfestAtNewportBeach.com. Kids Meal – A special box meal for children under 12 is available for $25 in advance only (includes a turkey sandwich, chips, fruit and a cookie. VIP Tables (advance purchase only) are $1,500 and include table seating for 10 people with signs of your company or personal name on your reserved table. Your logo or name will also be on the Lobster Fest website year-round and the event will include you periodically in their social media. VIP Tables includeall-you-can-eat whole Maine lobster, New York strip steak, corn-on-the-cob, red potatoes, salad, drawn butter, freshly baked rolls, dessert, Essentia bottled water and two glasses of complimentary craft beer or premium wine.

For tickets and more information, visit www.lobsterfestatnewportbeach.com.

Newport Dunes Waterfront Resort is located at 1131 W. Coast Highway, Newport Beach (enter via Bayside Drive).


Letter to the Editor:

A Good Day for Residents

As someone who is occasionally critical of the city council, I think it is appropriate to offer a word of thanks when it is due. On Tuesday, the council rejected Councilman Scott Peotter’s proposal to implement the City of Irvine political patronage model for the City Finance Committee. This 6-1 vote ensures that the Finance Committee will continue to enjoy the strong participation of experienced members of the city council and not become a place to use political appointees to wage surrogate battles in backrooms.

More importantly, the closed session report indicates that the council has put to rest efforts to sell the old city hall/Lido House Hotel site. This project will generate tens of millions of revenue for the benefit of Newport residents in the years ahead. Selling the property has been a longstanding objective of Councilman Peotter.

Third, the council adopted a sound budget. I give the council credit for finding ways to expand needed public safety services, improve the harbor and fund capital improvement projects. 

Councilmembers Will O’Neill and Diane Dixon made special note of our efforts to accelerate the pay down of our unfunded pension liability. This continues the efforts begun by the prior council and is to be commended. Here again, on a 6-1 vote, the council decisively rejected a last-minute effort by Councilmember Peotter to divert $8 million of our pension pay down into a  separate investment fund. In essence, he believed the city could “beat the stock market” on our own. The city gets no credit on reducing its pension liability and the liabilities continue to accrue interest at 7.25 percent unless and until we pay down the money with CalPERS. The council was right in rejecting this reckless proposal by Peotter who alone, voted against the budget.

Finally, the council decided to send the Peotter proposal to require a vote on lease obligation debt to the Finance Committee for fiscal review. 

I expect there will be an effort to provide emergency exemptions, raise the threshold level for a vote and otherwise address the many problems of this proposal. At the end of the day, you cannot fix bad legislation with cosmetic changes. Hopefully the council will continue to separate itself from Peotter on these financially costly and misguided ideas. The last council meeting was a good start

 

Keith Curry, Former Mayor

Newport Beach


Sign of the times

It’s another edition of Sign of the times, so put your thinking caps on. Stu is feeling chefy today and wanted to explore the culinary arts, because who doesn’t love sweets? Tell us where you can find this chef’s toque and you will come up with the perfect recipe...ah...answer.

Good luck! Stu loves publishing the winning answers on Tuesday.

Send your guesses to This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it..

If you’re a business and you want to play, you can send us a high-quality photo of your sign and we’ll take it from there and challenge our readers.

Let’s have some fun!

SOTT 6.15.18

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Roy Emerson Adoption Guild Tennis Classic brings out record crowd

Joy Emerson et al

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Photos by John Ridgely and Frank Berry

(L-R) Joy Emerson, Libby Doughty (tournament co-chair), Roy Emerson and Katie Richardson (tournament co-chair)

For more than a half-century, Southern California tennis aficionados have gathered over Memorial Day weekend to participate in a celebrated tradition of tournament tennis fronted by Australian-born tennis champion, Roy Emerson. A two-time Wimbledon victor in 1964 and 1965, Emerson, along with his tennis-pro wife Joy, have fronted the Adoption Guild Classic for more than two decades. “It’s a labor of love,” offers the couple adding, “We believe in the fine work of the Adoption Guild in support of Holy Family Services (HFS). What’s more important than caring for children?”

Tennis Classic organizers, led by Adoption Guild event chairs Katie Richardson and Libby Doughty, along with president, Chris Garber, report that overall attendance and revenues hit record levels this season, up more than 20 percent over previous high-water marks. The tournament attracted 416 entries participating in events including men’s and women’s open singles, men’s and women’s open doubles, mixed open doubles, as well as a series of NTRP men’s and women’s 3.5, 4.0, 4.5, and 5.0 singles, doubles and mixed competitions. The “over 50” players had their own division this year. Matches were held over the long weekend at multiple venues in the area including The Tennis Club at Newport Beach Country Club, Mesa Verde Country Club and The Racquet Club of Irvine, with final play unfolding at the host site, Palisades Tennis Club, Newport Beach. Spectators, family and guests witnessed great tennis over four days of play and participated in social events created to foster a sense of greater community interaction.

Spotted on the men’s and women’s courts competing at the open level were local tennis players Annika Bassey, Cornel Catrina, Susan Devens, Art Hernandez, Bjorn Hoffman, Shahin Khaledan and Riley McQuaid.

Sean Abdali et al pic with check

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(L-R) Sean Abdali, Roy Emerson, Jenson Brooksby (Men’s Open Singles Winner) and Ken Stuart

More than 200 players and guests joined in celebration at the Tournament Party, held on Saturday night at The Tennis Club at Newport Beach Country Club and chaired by Sue Podany. Area restaurants hosted food and beverage stations as the crowd enjoyed the sunset over the coast.Participating bistros included Authentic & Organic Italian, Bluewater Grill, California Pizza Kitchen, Garduno’s, Hi-Time Wine Cellar, Ho Sum Bistro, Meyer Natural Foods, Newport Rib Company, Nothing Bundt Cakes, Ruth’s Chris Steak House and Sapori Ristorante. All proceeds from the party were earmarked for Holy Family Services.

Finals day on Monday, May 28 welcomed the crowd to center court at Palisades Tennis Club. VIP guests enjoyed a Champagne brunch in the Sponsor Garden, chaired by Maria Zucht, while viewing final play on Ken Stuart’s celebrated courts. Final play was interspersed with the drawing for opportunity drawing items that contributed to the fundraising efforts for HFS.

During the presentations, Roy Emerson shared a bit of history with players and guests on his lifelong love of the sport, as well as his observation on the growth of tennis worldwide today.

Jeannie Hidley et al

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(L-R) Jeannie Hidey, Pam Selber, Chris Garber and Patrice Werschmidt

As play concluded, the lively crowd applauded tournament winners. The Roy Emerson 2018 Adoption Guild Tennis Classic Open Champions shared prize money amounting to $15,000 donated by Orange County Breakers, a professional world team tennis organization.

The 2018 Open Winners:

Men’s Open SinglesJ. Brooksby

Women’s Open SinglesJ. Sherif

Men’s Open Doubles – B. Hoffman and J. Gresh

Women’s Open DoublesH. Ritterova and I. Masarova

Mixed Open Doubles – B. Walker and J. Ventura-Cruess

Holy Family Services strongly embraces the values of diversity and inclusion as they strive to provide caring, non-judgmental support for birth parents considering adoption, to unite children and infants in need of a home with hopeful adoptive parents, and to create strong, loving families of all shapes and sizes.

To learn more, visit www.AdoptionGuild.org. Donations can be made and mailed to Adoption Guild, P.O. Box 95, Corona del Mar, CA 92625.


Peat lands, petroleum and finally...prestige

By DUNCAN FORGEY

HB Bathing Beach

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Submitted photos

Huntington Beach lauds its bathing beaches

Our sister city to the north, Huntington Beach, has been a magnet to beachgoers for more than a century. Known as Pacific City or Shell Beach, for its abundance of collectibles on the shoreline, and Gospel Swamp for its countryside religious gatherings, this oceanfront hamlet had it all. In its earliest days, the landscape was as picturesque as a Rogers and Hammerstein musical. “Oh What a Beautiful Morning,” could be sung to eight-foot cornstalks, fields of potatoes, green celery and the pastoral serenity of beachside farmland. In those days, the Santa Ana Blade called the area a “poor man’s paradise.”

Developer P.A. Stanton wanted to develop a resort rivaling Jersey’s Atlantic City. His Huntington Beach Company subdivided large segments of land into 25’ x 117.5’ lots and sold them for $100 in 1901. By 1902 the first wooden pier was built, and by 1904 the Red Cars arrived from Los Angeles. The resort was outfitted with power lines, streets and even a grammar school. In 1909, the town was incorporated with less than three square miles of land. By 1920, Huntington Beach had 1,687 residents. Huntington Beach, named after industrialist and businessman Henry E. Huntington, was on the map.

Red Car

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A Red Car above the beach

However, great changes loomed over the horizon with the discovery of Bolsa Chica No. 1 known affectionally as the “Wonder Well.” This ushered in decades of petroleum production, with the well producing 1,742 barrels of oil a day. Unprepared locals could not stop the onslaught of crude oil as it flooded local farms. They called in 500 emergency workers to build a reservoir to corral excess oil. Standard Oil quickly pounced on this opportunity and became a caretaker of 2.5 miles of oceanfront property.

With a virtual forest of oil wells, 47,000 barrels a day production turned out to be a double-edged sword for the city. Low taxes were a positive, but the blight of an oil field stifled growth and expansion for ocean-related homes and businesses. The resort vanished and in its place was truly a “poor man’s paradise.” Even many oil workers chose to live in Newport Heights and on the Balboa Peninsula and commute a few miles north.   

PCH

With oil wells in the background, business flourishes along PCH

As World War II approached, came and went, Huntington Beach with its open space became a haven for industrial, manufacturing and commercial real estate, further strengthening the common man’s image for the town.

It was not until 1963, with the development of Huntington Harbour, that the city moved into the higher-end real estate market. Downtown remained quaint and desirable for a few, but this new 875 acres north of town was touted to become “America’s most luxurious marina.” This became a master planned, water-oriented community centered around executive homes ranging from $40,000 to $100,000. The idea was that Huntington Harbour could compete with Newport Harbor, all the while closer to LA and Long Beach.

The design included 18 miles of waterfront real estate, with yacht anchorages that accommodated about 2,000 boats. Some key historical areas were incorporated into Huntington Harbour’s new master plan, funded by Christiana Oil Company and designed by noted architect William Pereira.

Bolsa Chica wetlands and the once famous Lomita Gun Club stood proudly on the bluff above the Bolsa Chica Reserve. It was famous for entertaining Hollywood’s elite with their duck hunting and high lifestyles. The infamous Tin Can Beach and its squatters drove a wedge between Huntington Beach for years, whereby Huntington Harbour forced the cleanup of the homeless community. 

Tin Can Beach

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Tin Can Beach, 1957

With the advent of slant drilling and the building of offshore oil wells, the oil forest was cut back and mostly disappeared. This encouraged individuals and small developers to buy remaining lots and build new. Homes and condos sprouted up in the 1980s and 1990s after a dedicated city council and aggressive police department pushed hard to eliminate a hardened party crowd that was hurting the town’s reputation. Police, armed with new ordinances, calmed the crowds, and “Surf City” re-awoke as a family beach town with accommodations for locals, tourists and businesses. New hotels and retail stores spread quickly around its legitimate Main Street. With the recent completion of Pacific City and adjoining hotels, an upscale touch has been added.

Whether it is the surf, the endless sandy beaches, the restaurants or the downtown, Huntington Beach became a destination resort. This beach city provides fun and activities for the entire family: from donuts to fine dining, flip flops to fancy apparel, coffee to cocktails and surf attire to ice cream, downtown Huntington Beach is open for business and thriving.

Surfers at Pier

Huntington Pier lured these competitive surfers in 1962

Huntington Beach has leaped into the 21st century with an eclectic group of surfers, skateboarders, volleyballers, youth, conventioneers, corporate soldiers and CEOs.

Sunset Pier

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A surfer near the pier heads out to catch the “perfect” wave

So, next time you leave the pristine beauty of Newport Beach and head north, preferably by bike, take a minute to reflect on salty old fishermen who once worked the pier, the last of the saltwater plunges, roustabouts with their oily black faces, drinking warm beer at a local saloon, and groups of religious revivalists praising God with loud hallelujahs in the swampy waters surrounding old Highway 39.

Images of Hawaii’s David Nuuhiwa nose riding all alone has morphed into gigantic crowds of onlookers and partiers watching the best surfers in the world surf some of the most inconsistent waves on the tour. One hundred years of music emanates from the cracks and crevices of long-forgotten structures. And when it returns to a blur, walk the new shops along Coast Highway, and you’ll realize that Stanton’s east coast resort has finally come to fruition. 

~~~~~~~~

Duncan Forgey, a life-long resident of Newport Beach, now makes his home in Hawaii. He is a monthly contributor to StuNewsNewport.


Stump the Stu

Take a seat...

Stump the Stu Answer 6.15.18

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Stu had several guesses this week, but this was a tough one. Where would you find this charming wooden bench? It is located outside of Bear Flag Fish Company at 3421 Via Lido. We received only two correct answers from David Pittman and Diane Dixon...so readers, with summer nearly here, get out and explore our community!

Thank you so much to our dear friend Mike Villani for sending in this photo.

Join us on Tuesdays as we try and stump you each week with a picture of something unique in our community, with answers and winners appearing on Fridays.

If you have a unique spot or icon around town that you think Stu News Newport readers would enjoy finding out about, please shoot it, share it and give us the answer, so we can challenge them!


Six seniors recognized in the Superintendent Character Trait Awards Program

Newport-Mesa Unified School District (NMUSD) recognized six high school seniors for their exceptional character leadership traits. Now in its sixth year, the program recognizes six graduating seniors from high schools throughout our district who exemplify one of the six pillars of character: caring, citizenship, fairness, respect, responsibility, and trustworthiness.

Miranda McCormick

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Photos courtesy of NMUSD

Miranda McCormick with NHHS Principal Sean Boulton

Miranda McCormick: Caring - Newport Harbor High School

Miranda McCormick cares about her community beyond the walls of the classroom. She works tirelessly in her community to help those in need and improve the lives of others. For six years, she spent her summers volunteering at NMUSD sponsored Camp Friendship helping younger children with autism develop social skills. McCormick patiently and effectively connects with young people to bring out their best with her kindness that requires no acknowledgement. She also worked to ease pain for children in life-threatening situations and their families as second year in a row president for the on campus Make-A-Wish Foundation. 

Ryan Hamilton

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Ryan Hamilton in class at Corona del Mar

Ryan Hamilton: Trustworthiness - Corona del Mar High School

Ryan has gained the trust of the staff on campus by working as an office teacher assistant. Ryan takes his job seriously and listens well to directions. He understands the importance of his job and ensures that he is ready to serve at any moment. If the office staff has something very important to be delivered or needs something done right, they make sure they give it to him or they will wait until they know he is working to get it done. School staff trusts him and knows that he will be responsible for any task given.

James Brown

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James Brown in front of the Big “E” at Estancia High School

James Brown: Citizenship - Estancia High School

James Brown is a peer mentor to ninth grade students as a Link Crew Leader and has participated in Estancia’s Youth and Government program for three years, where he currently serves as delegation president. He is an ambassador of Estancia High School’s student delegate of the Australia Sister City Education Exchange Program, and is a member of Estancia’s Leo Club through Lions International and Interact Club through Rotary International, which promotes leadership and responsible citizenship. He also serves as a tutor and volunteers at local homeless shelters to help coordinate food and clothing donation campaigns.

Emily Kubisty

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Emily Kubisty is congratulated in class by NMUSD Superintendent Dr. Fred Navarro

Emily Kubisty: Fairness - Estancia High School

Emily Kubisty consistently models fairness by listening to all points of view during activities and lessons, and she upholds the expectations of leadership and collaboration within the classroom. She is a Link Crew Leader at Estancia and works daily with a group of 12 freshmen leading teambuilding activities. She actively encourages all students to equally participate and share thoughts in a positive manner. When freshmen students experience disagreement, Kubisty facilitates communication and understanding between all parties to resolve potential conflicts. She pursues positive solutions to problems, and has built strong relationships as a result. Her ability to be fair and play by the rules also extends to the softball field, where she exemplifies the C.I.F. Victory with Honor Principles.

Zaid Batarseh

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Zaid Batarseh (left) is a proud Costa Mesa High School Mustang

Zaid Batarseh: Responsibility - Costa Mesa High School

Zaid Batarseh responsibly runs regular meetings with his peers and organizes students in various roles to implement community and fundraising projects. He has taken his school leadership roles seriously, whether as a mentor, running community events or fundraising. He works closely with parents on various band events, attends parent meetings, does monthly reports, advocates for his peers, and works closely with his teachers. Batarseh mentors younger members of the middle school and volunteers to work with elementary students during the summer. Due to his responsible work ethic, he was asked to assist teachers with various organizational duties during the district’s elementary summer music program.

Alexander Johnson

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Alexander Johnson (middle) demonstrates the high ideals of respect at Early College High School

Alexander Johnson: Respect - Early College High School

Alexander Johnson is known for showing consideration toward classmates, staff, and anyone that he meets. He firmly believes in accepting differences in others and practices tolerance of differing ideas in the classroom, and in his daily interactions with others. He consistently demonstrates the ability to be an active listener and genuinely cares about other people’s points of view. When communicating with his classmates, Johnson is respectful in his speech and actions towards others. He is a balanced thinker who is easy-going and mild-mannered.

In May, the selected students received a surprise visit from Superintendent Dr. Fred Navarro and were presented a letter of recognition and an invitation to be recognized by the Board of Education at the June 12 board meeting. A banner with a photo of each student, name of their high school, and their character trait will be displayed in the district lobby throughout the 2018-19 school year.

Congratulations to each of these seniors for their exemplary achievements!

For more information, visit www.mnusd.us.


Newport Beach Woman’s Democratic Club announces monthly meeting featuring Assembly Member Quirk-Silva

The Newport Beach Women’s Democratic Club (NBWCD) will hold its monthly meeting on Tuesday, June 19 at OASIS Senior Center. Sharon Quirk-Silva, California State Assembly Member, District 65, will be the featured speaker.

As a former councilwoman and mayor, Quirk-Silva earned a reputation for solving problems and working collaboratively as a part of a team. That’s what teachers do with their students, and that’s how she approaches public service. She knows it doesn’t take a democrat or a republican to pave a street, fix a pothole or rebuild an aging bridge. It takes people working together, regardless of party, to find common ground when solving the state’s challenges.

Quirk Silva

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Submitted photo

Her history of local service guides her philosophy on how state government should operate. She believes strongly in transparency, innovation and collaboration. An advocate for reaching out to citizens, Quirk-Silva created the popular “Walk and Talk” program in Fullerton, in which she led citizens on walks through specific areas of the community and discussed issues of concern.

Quirk-Silva’s priorities are simple: 

--Use constituent feedback to prioritize the issues important to our community.

--Focus on finding and adopting solutions, not scoring political points. 

--Work across party lines to move our state forward.

--Demand Orange County be treated fairly by state government.

Quirk-Silva is a mother, teacher and former mayor of Fullerton. She has deep ties to Orange County, and has lived in Fullerton since she was two years old. Educated in Fullerton’s public schools, she went on to earn her associate of arts degree from Fullerton College, received her bachelor’s degree from UCLA and secured her California Teacher Credential from California State University, Fullerton, which named her one of its 50 leading Latina graduates.

She found her passion for education helping her community as a college student, and has been teaching for 31 years. Quirk-Silva is currently teaching at Golden Hill Elementary School. Education is a family affair. Her husband, Jesus Silva teaches math at Nicolas Junior High School, and her four children, Molly, Catherine, Patrick and Jack Ryan, all attended local public schools.

The meeting will be held at the OASIS Senior Center Room #1, 801 Narcissus Ave., Corona del Mar. Ample and convenient free parking is available. There is a nominal admission fee and light refreshments will be provided. The meeting begins at 6:30 p.m. Seating is limited, so RSVPs are required.

For additional information and to RSVP, call 949.423.6468 and visit www.NBWDC.org.


Join the Primitive Skills Society at the ENC

Primitive skills society

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Courtesy of ENC

Before doctors and man-made medicine existed, people depended on plants for their healing abilities. Interested in learning more? Join the Primitive Skills Society at the Environmental Nature Center (ENC) on Friday, June 29.

Each monthly class discusses the medicinal uses of plants. The first one is from 5:30 - 8:30 p.m., and it will also bring in the topic of plants being consumed as food. Meetings end with a small meal cooked over a campfire. 

From navigation to arrow making, this society goes above and beyond the average lecture. It is the instructor’s goal to establish those primitive skills back into people’s everyday lifestyles. 

If you are already a Primitive Skills Society member, then this will be absolutely free! For ENC members, it will cost $20. For non-members, it will be $30.

For more information visit www.encenter.org/blog/events/primitive-skills-society-2.

ENC is located at 1601 16th St., Newport Beach.


School Notes

District

NMUSD Board of Education Meeting – Tuesday, June 26, 6 - 8 p.m., Boardroom, NMUSD.

NHHS 

Graduation – Thursday, June 21, 4:30 - 6:30 p.m. at NHHS.

Grad Night – Thursday, June 21, 8:30 p.m. through Friday, June 22, 2:30 a.m.

CdMHS/MS

12th Grade:

Senior Breakfast – Monday, June 18, 8:30 - 10:30 a.m. in the Small Gym.

Disneyland – Tuesday, June 19 - Leaving CdM at 8:30 a.m. Leaving Disneyland at 7 p.m.

Senior Lunch – Wednesday, June 20, 11:30 a.m. - 1 p.m. in the Small Gym.

Graduation Practice – Thursday, June 21, 10:30 a.m. at the Track.

Graduation – 6 p.m. Students report to tennis courts at 5 p.m.

8th Grade:

Knott’s Berry Farm Trip – Tuesday, June 19. Bus leaves CdM at 1 p.m.; leaves Knott’s at 8 p.m. 

Promotion Ceremony – Wednesday, June 20 (no classes) at 4 p.m. on Newport Harbor High School Davidson Field. Students report by 3:15 p.m.

ENSIGN

Promotion Party – Friday, June 15, 6:30 - 9 p.m. at Ensign Gym.


Former CdM High assistant principal named to help lead TeWinkle Intermediate

Danny Valenzuela

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Submitted photo

Daniel Valenzuela has been named the new Assistant Principal of TeWinkle Intermediate School. Serving most recently as Assistant Principal of Corona del Mar High School, he has been with the Newport-Mesa Unified School District for 10 years.

Prior to his role at CdM High, he served as interim assistant principal and administrative intern to CdM High as a teacher at Estancia High School.

One of the things that attracted Valenzuela to his new position at TeWinkle was the opportunity to return to the Estancia school zone, where he has built positive staff and community relationships.

While at Estancia High School, he served as the World Language Department Chair and taught several Spanish courses. He leverages instructional strategies and the use of technology to engage students and reinforce learning. His dedication at Estancia resulted in his recognition in the district’s Super Star Award program and earned him a Teacher of the Year Award.

In his administrative roles at CdM High School, Valenzuela gained experience working alongside administrators, counselors and teachers at both the high school and middle school levels. He is knowledgeable about school operations, curriculum and instruction, attendance, discipline through restorative measures, security and facilities and disaster preparedness. He is also a member of the Positive Behavior Intervention and Support (PBIS) team, fostering a positive school climate.

“As assistant principal, I hope to aid in establishing a school culture that maximizes student learning and promotes a positive educational environment,” Valenzuela said.

Valenzuela obtained his master’s degree in educational administration through Concordia University and his bachelor of arts degree in Spanish language and culture, with a minor in educational studies from UC Irvine.

Valenzuela’s appointment is scheduled for Board of Education approval at the June 26 Board of Education meeting. 


Find out what’s new at the OC Fair during upcoming luncheon

Mime

Courtesy of OC Fair & Event Center

Enjoy a special farm to table luncheon at OC Fair’s Millennium Barn at Centennial Farm on Thursday, June 24 from 11:30 a.m. - 1 p.m. Guests will learn about the OC Fair & Event Center’s education and community programs, then stay for a guided tour of Centennial Farm. 

Luncheon attendees will each receive one free ticket to the 2018 OC Fair. The OC Fair takes place July 13 - August 12.

The luncheon is sponsored by the Costa Mesa Chamber of Commerce and presented by Kathy Kramer, CEO, OC Fair & Event Center. This cost is $30 for Costa Mesa Chamber members and $40 for non-members. Parking for the luncheon is free. To park, enter the main gate on Fair Drive and proceed through the gate into parking lot B on the left-hand side. Enter the fairgrounds through the blue gate.

To make a reservation, visit www.costamesachamber.com.

OC Fair & Event Center is located at 88 Fair Drive, Costa Mesa. For more information, visit www.ocfair.com.


Farm to Fork: A Foodie’s Point of View Fork

By LANA JOHNSON

Celebrate Father’s Day by taking Dad out for a wonderful meal

There’s still time to make a reservation and take Dad out to one of these venues to celebrate Father’s Day this weekend! Here’s a lineup that any Dad will surely enjoy.

Back Bay Bistro

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Submitted photo

Back Bay Bistro

Back Bay Bistro – Celebrate Father’s Day with a gourmet brunch buffet, a complimentary draft beer or Bloody Mary for Dad, bottomless champagne and mimosas, and an unforgettable waterfront atmosphere on Sunday, June 17 from 9 a.m. - 3 p.m. The main buffet includes applewood smoked bacon, country sausage links, eggs Benedict, muffins, bagels, pancakes and waffles. Seatings are at 9 a.m., 11 a.m. and 1:30 p.m. Cost: $70 for adults (includes bottomless champagne and mimosas); $28 for children (12 years and under). Call 949.729.1144 for reservations. 1131 Back Bay Drive, Newport Beach. www.newportdunes.com/back-bay-bistro

Bayside Restaurant – Revel in a two-course brunch menu that will include complimentary bottomless champagne, mimosa or draft beer (choice of Stella, Goose Island IPA or Kona Big Wave). Cost: $49 for adults; $22 for children (12 years and under menu). Call 949.721.1222 for reservations. 900 Bayside Drive, Newport Beach. www.baysiderestaurant.com

Billy’s at the Beach – Come celebrate Dad with Billy’s at the Beach’s special Father’s Day menu all day long. Brunch is served from 10 a.m. - 1 p.m. or lunch from 10 a.m. - 1 p.m., and features great harbor views. For reservations, call 949.722.1100. www.billysatthebeach.net

Fig & Olive – Take Dad on a getaway to the French Riviera. Fig & Olive will be celebrating Dad with a Father’s Day brunch and dinner menu. Cost: brunch, $42 per person; dinner, $62; wine pairing, $30. For reservations, ball 949.877.3005. 151 Newport Center Drive, Fashion Island. www.figandolive.com

Five Crowns

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Submitted photo

Five Crowns

Five Crowns – Step inside this iconic English Country Inn and be greeted by warm hospitality and a convivial atmosphere for the perfect summer celebration. Offering brunch from 10 a.m. - 3 p.m. and dinner from 4 - 8 p.m. Savor special prix-fixe menus of seasonal favorites, Crown Classics and traditional accompaniments, courtesy of Executive Chef Alejandra Padilla. Call 949.760.0331 for reservations. 3801 E. Coast Highway, Corona del Mar. www.lawrysonline.com

Fleming’s Prime Steakhouse – Your love for Dad is big. Like 35-oz. big. This Father’s Day weekend, June 15 - 17, treat Dad to a three-course prix-fixe dinner featuring Fleming’s 35-oz. prime tomahawk steak. For a drink as strong as he is – enjoy a premium bourbon tasting experience of Buffalo Trace, Basil Hayden’s and Knob Creek. If Dad prefers the signature eggs Benedict, they’re opening early at 10 a.m. for brunch on June 17. Call 949.720.9633 for reservations. 455 Newport Center Drive, Fashion Island. www.flemingssteakhouse.com

Great Maple – Here are just a few the of many plates Great Maple is offering this Father’s Day: Dad’s buttermilk biscuits & gravy, steak & eggs and short rib sweet potato hash. Toast to Dad with a maple bacon old fashioned, clean margarita or blackberry cobbler adult libation. A kids menu is also available. For reservations, call 949.706.8282. 1133 Newport Center Drive, Fashion Island.

Harborside – Spend the day with Dad at the beach! A buffet brunch will be served upstairs in the Grand Ballroom from 10 a.m. - 1:30 p.m. Cost: $34 Adults; $16 Kids. A bottle of champagne is $6. Large parties are welcome. The regular dinner menu is available from 3:30 - 9 p.m. For reservations (required), call 949.673.4633. 400 Main St., Newport Beach. www.harborside-pavilion.ocm 

Hornblower Father’s Day Beer Brunch & Supper Cruises – Hornblower’s Father’s Day Beer Brunch Cruise includes all of Dad’s favorite dishes in a hearty buffet, as well as free-flowing beer and champagne. The Father’s Day Beer Supper Cruise includes a four-course seated dinner on a 2 1/2 hour yacht cruise with scenic coastal views. If the enticing menu, spectacular scenery and quality family time aren’t enough, Dad gets to take home a souvenir pint glass! Cost: Brunch for adults – $80.95 per person; Supper for adults – $95 per person. Tax, service charge and landing fee are additional. Discounts are available for seniors, military and children. See website for boarding and cruising times. Reservations are required at 1.888.Hornblower. 2431 W. Coast Highway, Newport Beach. www.hornblower.com/NewportBeach

Lighthouse Bayview Café – Celebrate Dad with brunch and great views of the harbor. Reserve your spot on the Lighthouse’s open-air patio in Marina Park – soak up the sun and feast on delicious eats, compliments of Chef Ryan Sumner. The exclusive brunch menu features options catered especially to Dads. For reservations, call 949.933.1001. 1600 W. Balboa Blvd., Newport Beach. www.thelighhousecafe.net

Muldoons

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Muldoon’s

Muldoon’s – Offering some of the best burgers in the OC, an epic beer list, hand-cut pub fries, BBQ salmon, Muldoon’s signature Reuben sandwich, and much more. No prix-fixe menu, so you can order exactly what you like. Serving brunch and dinner. From 2 - 4 p.m., take in a live concert by Shana Morrison, who blends pop with a side of rock & blues, a dash of country/R&B and a sprinkle of jazz. She is the daughter of the legendary artist and Irishman, Van Morrison. Call 949.640.4110 for reservations. 202 Newport Center Drive, Newport Beach. www.muldoonspub.com

Newport Landing – Come for the brunch and picturesque bay views! The restaurant will be offering an omelet station, prime rib carving station, a dessert station and more from 10 a.m. - 1:30 p.m. Cost: Adults, $40; Kids 10 and under, $16. A glass of champagne is $3. To make your reservations, visit the website or call 949.675.2373. 503 East Edgewater, Newport Beach. www.newport-landing.com

Oak Grill

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Oak Grill at the Fashion Island

Oak Grill – Show Dad how much you love him with dinner specials he’ll crave. Bring him to Oak Grill this Father’s Day, where Chef Peter Lai is serving up a four-course prix-fixe dinner. Dad can take a break from the grilling today, and enjoy these offerings: Course One: cauliflower leek soup; Course Two: slow-braised pork belly with baby kale, candied pecans, roasted pears and balsamic dressing; and Course Three: a surf and turf with tomahawk steak, herb butter lobster tail, roasted asparagus and demi sauce. To satisfy his sweet tooth, the decadent Old-Fashioned Drumstick is vanilla ice cream, candied peanuts and hot fudge. Cost: Adults – $75; regular children’s menu is also available. Prices exclude tax and gratuity. Call 949.760.4920 for reservations. Fashion Island Hotel, 690 Newport Center Drive, Newport Beach. www.FashionIslandHotel.com

Provenance – Your local farmhouse eatery specializing in seasonal, local fare will be serving brunch from 10 a.m. - 3 p.m. with selections such as a wild soft shell crab BLT, filet mignon eggs Benedict and breakfast tacos. Dinner served from 5 - 9 p.m. will feature entrees such as wild local halibut, wild branzino, BBQ beef tri trip, pork tenderloin and beef shortribs. Call 949.718.0477 for reservations. 2531 Eastbluff Drive, Newport Beach. www.provenanceoc.com

Red O – The restaurant’s Father’s Day Brunch Buffet is being served 10 a.m. - 2:30 p.m. Cost: $49 per adult; $15 for children under 12. Children 6 and under are free. Enjoy $20 endless drinks including mimosas, Bloody Mary’s, sangria, house margaritas and tequila sunrises. Dinner with the regular menu available is being served 5 - 10 p.m. Call 718.0300 for reservations. 143 Newport Center Drive, Fashion Island. www.redorestaurant.com

Rockin’ Baja Lobster – Treat Dad to the Baja Bucket he wants the most. Bring the family in and enjoy this Big Baja seafood bucket that’s made to share! The bucket includes Canadian lobster tails, a snow crab cluster, shrimp, grilled chicken, grilled corn on the cob, “All You Can Eat” ranchero beans, citrus rice, warm tortillas, Rockin’ Baja’s famous honey chili butter & world-class fresh salsa bar. Cost: $49.99 for two. This is available all Father’s Day weekend, starting Friday, June 15 and going through Sunday, June 17. For reservations, call 949.723.0606. 2104 W. Oceanfront, Newport Beach. www.rockinbaja.com

Roy’s – This Father’s Day, give Dad the gift of a warm family gathering at Roy’s.

Brunch begins at 9 a.m. with an enticing two-course brunch. The menu includes the one-of-a-kind Roy’s filet mignon Benedict and lobster & shrimp omelet, among other delightful choices. Starting at 3 p.m., the restaurant will be serving a special menu of classics including their fresh-from-Hawaii blackened island ahi, misoyaki “butterfish” and new creations like their USDA prime New York strip steak. A children’s menu will also be offered. Plus, to celebrate the restaurant’s 30th anniversary, each table receives a $30 Dining Card to enjoy on a future visit (Valid 6/19 - 7/31/18). Call 949.640.7697 for reservations. 453 Newport Center Drive, Fashion Island. www.roysrestaurant.com

Sol Mexican Cocina – For a taste of south of the border, treat Dad to a memorable meal. The special menu includes grilled Kobe steak, beer-batter shrimp tacos, crab & shrimp Benedicto, and beer and tequila. Reservations are recommended, so visit the website or call 949.675.9800 to schedule a seating. 251 E. Coast Highway, Newport Beach. www.solcocina.com

The Beachcomber

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The Beachcomber Cafe

The Beachcomber Cafe – Take Dad on a daycation on the sand and enjoy this special Father’s Day Beer and Brunch fixed menu. With a choice of craft beer, paired with beignets and ambrosia, followed by a choice of eight delicious entrées featuring surf and turf, grilled steak and eggs, Maine lobster enchiladas and giant BBQ Beef ribs, Dad’s appetite might finally be satiated. Served from 7 a.m. - 4:30 p.m. Cost: $46.95 adults; children’s menu at $16.95. The restaurant only accepts reservations online. 15 Crystal Cove, Newport Coast. www.thebeachcombercafe.com

The Bungalow From 3 - 9 p.m., enjoy a special BBQ menu for $39 per guest, featuring mesquite smoked baby back ribs, grilled king salmon, half BBQ chicken, grilled flat iron steak and mixed grill kabob. To all the Dads joining The Bungalow on Father’s Day, your first cocktail, beer or wine (from their special Father’s Day cocktail menu) is on the house! Call 949.673.6585 for reservations. 2441 E. Coast Highway, Corona del Mar. www.thebungalowrestaurant.com

The Village Inn – Take Dad to the Island for Father’s Day specials, including South of the VI (homemade carnitas), Back Yard (combo of sliders, beef, chicken BBQ pork and a meatball served with French fries) and King of the House (slow-cooked ribs with coleslaw, BBQ baked beans, mashed potatoes, green beans and corn on the cob). Prices range from $18 - $27. Each special includes a choice of a 16-oz. beer or a specialty cocktail. Call 949.675.8300 for reservations. www.vibalboaisland.com

The Winery Restaurant & Wine Bar – Offering brunch from 11 a.m. - 2 p.m., and dinner from 4:30 p.m. to close. For reservations, call 949.999.6622. 3131 W. Coast Highway, Newport Beach. www.thewinerynewport.com

W Café & Restaurant – The restaurant will be open for breakfast and brunch. Chef Wais Omar has created a unique brunch menu to celebrate all fathers and the wonderful things they do. W Café’s special brunch menu includes the very popular Cave Man breakfast, tiramisu dessert and their own Bloody Mary. W Café invites you to bring the whole family. Call 949.873.5242 or book online to make reservations. 1703 Westcliff Drive, Newport Beach. www.caferestaurant.com

Editor’s Note: Kicking back with Dad and barbecuing at home always makes for a great family get together, as well! Put on a slab of ribs, or some flavorful steaks and sweet corn, and just hang out in the backyard, poolside, or watching the U.S. Open golf tournament at Shinnecock Hills, New York. Blissful!

Happy Father’s Day to all you deserving Dads...

Ciao Vincenza!


CodeREV ultimate summer camps: from Bots to Minecraft

CodeREV camp

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CodeREV’s summer tech camp will keep kids engaged and busy this summer by encouraging them to explore and develop their multimedia STEM skills.

Young campers will be enthralled in a variety of indoor and outdoor activities, including: Adventures in Coding, Robotics & Engineering, Modding in Minecraft, Virtual Reality & 3D Game Design and Creator Bots, to name just a few of the classes.

Weeklong sessions from Monday through Friday are taking place now through August 3 and are geared to ages 6 - 10 and 10 - 14. The cost of a full day is $549 per week. The curriculum has been created by education tech experts from Harvard, Stanford and MIT.

Classes take place at Newport Christian School, located at 100 Bison Ave., Newport Beach.

For more information or to register, call 844.490.TECH (8324) or visit www.coderevkids.com.


Catch “The Really Big Show” at the Dunes

The Really Big Show surfer

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Photo by Bob Sergeant Photography, 2016

On Saturday, June 23 from 12 - 6 p.m., the Jimmy Miller Memorial Foundation is presenting “The Really Big Show” at Newport Dunes Waterfront Resort.

Festivities highlighting the day include these four great bands: Side Deal, Swingin’ Tikis, Electric Cool-Aide and Superdelux, with special guests. There will be food trucks, beer & wine and parking is available onsite. The inflatable waterpark will be out, too!

Tickets are $50. Proceeds from the show will benefit the Jimmy Miller Memorial Foundation in support of wounded military men and women with surf therapy. Tickets for admission, drinks and the opportunity drawing can be purchased online at www.TheReallyBig.Show.

Get out there and support a great cause!

Newport Dunes Waterfront Resort is located at 1131 Back Bay Drive, Newport Beach.


Fair Game

By TOM JOHNSON

Should “we” sell the Lido House Hotel property…and what about a proposed Charter amendment?

TomJohnson

I received an email last evening from City Manager Dave Kiff noting two items on tonight’s City Council agenda that may have gone somewhat under the radar.

First of all, Dave’s intent was to have one of the items moved to later in the month but blames that failure on a “backpacking trip to the Sierras with zero cell phone coverage for miles.”

Oh Dave, welcome to the sounds of retirement.

The first item is the Lido House Hotel (LHH) planned for a Closed Session discussion. According to Kiff, he and staff met with LHH ownership following rumors they (LHH) were interested in purchasing the hotel’s site.

“No commitments were made by Bob (Olson) or by me and this matter is on the Closed Session agenda at our City staff’s request,” Kiff said.

The second item is a proposed Charter amendment debate “to discuss a possible City Charter amendment that would require voter approval of certain debt, like lease-revenue bonds and Certificates of Participation (COPs),” Kiff added.

According to Kiff’s email, he still plans to try and push this one back to the June 26 council meeting.

Both items can dramatically alter City financial paths moving forward and should be watched and understood.

• • •

On a more fun note, are you a fan of golfer Rickie Fowler? Well, you might be seeing more of him around town when he’s not out playing golf worldwide.

Last Friday, Fowler proposed to his girlfriend Allison Stokke, of Newport Beach fame. Stokke is a graduate of Newport Harbor High School, where she excelled nationally in pole vaulting. 

She continued her athletics and education at the University of California, Berkeley, and still continues to vault and model.

Friday was National Best Friend Day and Fowler posted a picture on Instagram with a caption of, “Today is National Best Friend Day so I wanted to lock mine down…I WON!!”

The accompanying photo with the Instagram post showed Fowler on bended knee proposing to Stokke on a beach in the Hamptons. 

Fowler plays in the U.S. Open beginning this Thursday at Shinnecock Hills Golf Club in New York.

• • •

Speaking of golf, I wrote in these lines last week that I was playing in a golf tournament in South Carolina, with a hope of just “returning home alive.”

Well, we won the whole thing! That’s right, my partner Jeff Rhodenbaugh and I won the second flight in a match play championship format. From there we moved on to an alternate shot Horse Race with all other flight winners and won it all in a three-team sudden death playoff.

Best shot of the day: Rhody’s 125-yard approach shot to eight feet in sudden death at the 18th hole. Luckiest shot of the day: I roll in that downhill eight-footer.

Best week in a long time.


Surterre Properties ranks among top 10 percent of U.S. brokerages

Surterre Properties, a leading luxury real estate brokerage in Orange County, has been named among the top eight percent of brokerages nationwide – with a ranking of 72 on the just-released T3 Sixty Swanepoel Mega 1000 list. The prestigious list is the most thorough and accurate ranking of the largest real estate brokerages in the country.

Considered benchmarks in quality research in the residential real estate brokerage industry, T3 Sixty’s reports provide objective data and analysis from a neutral and trusted source to tens of thousands of real estate leaders and professionals. The high ranking for Surterre Properties solidifies the company’s long-held reputation as an industry leader in sales, marketing, client service, technological innovation and community engagement. 

Surterre logo RGB

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 “Surterre Properties built its reputation on the guiding principle of offering our agents, and clients, the best and most advanced luxury real estate sales and marketing platform available,” said Gary Legrand, president of Surterre Properties. “Our placement on the Swanepoel Mega 1000 List is powerful acknowledgment of the effectiveness of our model, which is powered by the best agents and most talented marketing and technology professionals in the business.”

According to T3 Sixty, the $1.4 trillion residential real estate brokerage industry, “remains fragmented and fiercely independent,” making it difficult to determine which claims of size and rank are legitimate and which are exaggerated. For the past 13 years, T3 Sixty has produced reliable, objective reports, data and analysis including the SP200 (Swanepoel Power 200), considered to be the definitive ranking of the leaders and executives in the residential real estate brokerage industry. The Swanepoel Mega 1000 is a new report to present the T3 Sixty’s annual analysis of brokerages, franchisors and real estate holding companies.

“We are pleased to be recognized by T3 Sixty as among the leading and best residential real estate brokerages in the country in this prestigious new report,” Legrand said. “But the ranking that means the most to us is our No. 1 status with our clients, agents and the community. Orange County is our home and every day, we strive to make it a place others can call ‘Home’ as well.” 


2018 is the Year of the Harbor

By DAVID GIRLING
Harbor Commissioner and Vice Chairman

Part One in a Two-Part Series

Newport Beach is a special place to live, and I make sure to take stock of that fact every day. There are many aspects to Newport Beach that make it great, but without a doubt its greatest asset is the Harbor. And, 2018 promises to be a year where Newport Harbor will receive a great deal of attention with Mayor Marshall “Duffy” Duffield at the helm. Duffy has spent most of his life on, around and in the Harbor and with his love for the Harbor, Newport’s greatest asset stands to be a direct beneficiary.

As a Harbor Commissioner for six years, I have been honored to serve at the direction of our City Council, and to work with the City’s Harbor Resources Division within the Public Works Department. I am very proud of the accomplishments of the Harbor Commission over the years, and look forward to more successes in the years to come.

In this article, I will attempt to give you a brief overview of the mandate of the Harbor Commission, the Harbor Resources Division and the Harbor Operations Division led by the City’s new Harbormaster Dennis Durgan. I will then summarize and list some of the projects and accomplishments throughout Newport Harbor.

The Harbor Commission consists of seven Harbor Commissioners that are appointed. We meet on the second Wednesday of each month in the City Council Chambers. Make sure to watch for the next Harbor Commission Harbor Tour conducted on one of the Balboa Island Ferryies, which are open to the public. It’s a great way to learn about the Harbor Commission and it’s always spectacular to be out on the Harbor.

Harbor Commission

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Courtesy of Dave Girling

Newport Beach Harbor Commission

Newport Harbor supports numerous recreational and commercial activities, waterfront residential communities and scenic and biological resources. The purpose of the Harbor Commission is to provide the City of Newport Beach with an advisory body representing these diverse uses of Newport Harbor and its waterfront. For a more detailed list of the responsibilities of the Harbor Commission, visit the City website at www.newportbeachca.gov/harborcommission.

In 2014, the Harbor Commission commenced an annual process for establishing its Goals and Objectives that are ultimately submitted to the City Council for approval.  The 2018 Objectives fall under the following six distinct functional areas:

--Harbor Dredging

--Harbor Operations and Management

--Harbor Amenities and Capital Improvements (Mooring Fields, Shore Facilities, Docks)

--Harbor Policies, Codes and Regulations

--Commercial, Recreational and Educational Activities

--Long-Term Vision for the Harbor

For a more detailed list of the objectives that fall under each of the functional areas, see the Harbor Commission’s webpage listed above.

The Harbor Commission works closely with and receives input from the Harbor Resources Division led by Chris Miller of the Public Works Department. Harbor Resources is responsible for the protection and improvement of the resources of Newport Harbor and Upper Newport Bay to ensure their proper use and enjoyment by all things that derive life, recreation or commerce. Some responsibilities of Harbor Resources include maintaining public piers and public vessel pump-out stations, dock and pier construction, dredging, and maintaining or improving water quality.  For more information about Harbor Resources visit www.newportbeachca.gov/HarborResources.

Additionally, on July 1, 2017, the newly formed Harbor Operations Division led by City Harbormaster Dennis Durgan, assumed many of the Harbor Patrol responsibilities (mooring management, guest moorings and anchorages, sea lion management, harbor oversight, etc.) that had previously been administered by the Orange County Sheriff’s Harbor Patrol. The Orange County Sheriff still has a presence on the Harbor with responsibility for law enforcement on the Harbor in conjunction with the NBPD. 

For more information about the Harbor Operations Division, visit www.newportharbor.org.

~~~~~~~~

Dave Girling has been a Newport Beach Harbor Commissioner since 2012 and will term out in 2021. He currently serves as its Vice Chairman and served as its Chairman from 2015 to 2016. Dave is a Realtor in Newport Beach, with more than 30 years of financial services industry knowledge and experience.


SCAPE gallery to hold artist reception

On Saturday, June 16 from 6 - 8 p.m., stop by SCAPE gallery in Corona del Mar to meet four artists who are exhibiting their work in “ARCHIPELAGO, an Island POP-UP.” The artists include David Kuraoka, Tim Lieber, Lila Roo and Bruna Stude.

Kuraoka art

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Photos courtesy of SCAPE

“Blue Hapu’u” by Ceramicist David Kuraoka

David Kuraoka

This American ceramic artist was born in Lihue, Hawaii and grew up in Kauai. He received Bachelor of Arts and master’s degrees from San Jose State University. Selected collections include the Hawaii State Art Museum; Hillary Rodham Clinton, The White House, Washington, D.C.; and SFMOMA Artist’s Gallery, San Francisco.

Red Ochre Vessel Tom Lieber 36x36 2018

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“Red Ochre Vessel” by painter Tom Lieber

Tom Lieber

A painter of large abstractions, Lieber is, according to writer Carter Ratcliff, an artist whose work “invites us to note how complex the act of looking becomes when we attend carefully to its pleasures.” His paintings are in the collections of the Tate, Guggenheim, MOCA and the Metropolitan Museum of Art.

Roo art

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“Onyx Pierce” by artist Lila Roo

Lila Roo

She creates art pieces made entirely from refuse materials, primarily plastic. Roo hand collects, braids and binds these materials, the remnants of global capitalism, and brings them to life in the communities in which she lives throughout the world. She works intimately with people and places to create portraits, and performance & installations that are transformative and empowering.

Stude art

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“Squid Ink No. 2” by photographer Bruna Stude

Bruna Stude

Born and raised in the port town of Split on the Dalmatian Coast, Stude was given her first 35 mm camera at age of 10. She graduated from the Law University in Split, Croatia, then left in 1987 to pursue a life at sea. Her current work results from her interest in the conceptual question of “presence of absence” in relation to the use of light within a photograph and “the tension between that which is and that which is not disrupts our assumptions about photographic narrative and representation.”

The “ARCHIPELAGO” exhibit is on display from June 11 through July 28.

SCAPE gallery is located at 2859 E. Coast Highway, Corona del Mar. For more information, visit www.scapesite.com.


Letters to the Editor

Don’t Be Fooled by Political Ploy

Once again, without proper fiscal or public review, the Newport Beach City Council is considering a Charter Amendment to require lease obligation debt, which by legal definition does not involve an increase in taxes, to be submitted to the voters. 

No other city in California, nor to my knowledge in the entire country has this requirement. That should tell us something. This is a bad idea from Scott Peotter. Currently there is no projected need for lease debt for more than 50 years. Some of the council members who will consider the next debt issue have not yet been born. The city currently has the highest bond ratings of any city in the nation and our current lease debt service is less than the annual budget surplus and very affordable.

Election requirements cause debt proposals to be larger, not smaller as they are increased to involve multiple projects to broaden political support. It prevents the timely award of construction bids because bids will either be padded by 30 percent or will expire before an election can be held. Alternatively, it requires going to the voters without a sound basis of a project’s cost. Of course, there is the added cost of an election itself and the sequencing of projects into the season immediately following a biannual election date will cause project costs to rise.

It will prevent future city councils from responding to natural disasters such as an earthquake, fire, tsunami or landside where critical infrastructure could be destroyed. Puerto Rico shows us what happens when a jurisdiction does not have immediate capital markets access after a disaster. Depending on wording and limits, it could require our next police car replacements to be voted on.

It will pit neighbors against each other as the council will pay cash for projects favored by a majority while requiring others to seek voter approval, irrespective of actual financial analysis.

What is truly disappointing is that the real reason for this proposal is to allow council members in the November election to evade the campaign spending limits by using a committee formed to support this measure. Remember the “Team Newport 2016” signs from the last election paid for by Measure MM donors? Don’t you think this council would pay more attention to following our campaign laws?

Don’t be fooled by this cynical effort to create a phony issue by people who have actually accomplished nothing for the good of the community. 

Keith Curry, Former Mayor 

Newport Beach

 

Want to support Koll Center Residences but canceled workshops prevent that

I have been looking forward to expressing my support for the Koll Center Residences at a Planning Commission workshop on two separate occasions now. This is a General Plan compatible project that will generate tens of millions of dollars in fees for the City. 

It won’t affect traffic in my neighborhood – Eastbluff – or any of the other established neighborhoods in our town. I understand there was an issue about a quorum, but I’m wondering is something else up? Why is this taking so long to be heard? 

Lisa Fogarty

Eastbluff Community

Newport Beach

 

Former mayor says potential financial moves bad for city

I spent a 40-year career as Chief Financial Officer of publicly held companies, and 9 1/2 years in service to the residents of Newport Beach, first on the planning commission and then on City Council where I chaired the Finance Committee for several years.

I am intimately familiar with the workings of the City’s budget and the City’s financial standing. There is no need whatsoever for the proposal to require a vote prior to issuance of COP’s. It will hamstring future Council decisions to properly move forward with large projects or financing of potential catastrophic events afflicting our City. It is not necessary, since our City has ample financial flexibility to budget for costs of necessary large-project financings. Is the City’s Finance Director recommending this action? This proposal is a very bad financial policy for our City. Please reject this idea, or, at the very least, refer it to your Finance Committee for careful study before you consider it.

Similarly, there is no need to sell City assets, including the Lido House land. What is the proposed need that drives this idea? It certainly can’t be a budgetary need. It certainly can’t be a need to make extra payments on our pension obligations…we are already doing that in steady, meaningful amounts, which is the proper dollar-averaging approach to do it. I believe this is a slippery slope to embark on. Why stop at Lido House? The City has many assets it could sell, but I believe it’s bad policy to do so and curb the City’s flexibility to manage those assets over time. Please reject this idea.

Mike Henn, former Mayor City of Newport Beach

Newport Beach


Heal the Bay releases Beach Report Card

Heal the Bay just released its 28th annual Beach Report Card (2017-2018), which assigns yearly A to F water-quality grades for more than 400 beaches statewide based on levels of harmful bacteria.

Pier

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To earn a spot on the Honor Roll, a beach must be monitored weekly year-round and have received only exceptional (A+) grades during all seasons and weather conditions.

Newport Beach’s beaches that made the Honor Roll are: Balboa Beach at 15th/16th Street, Balboa Beach Pier, Corona del Mar and Crystal Cove.

Orange County-wide, summer and winter dry grades were on par with the five- year average, with 98 percent A or B grades for the summer and 91 percent A or B grades for the winter. Lack of rain dramatically improved the grades. According to the report, bacterial pollution at our local beaches dipped dramatically in 2017-18. Some 95 percent of the beaches monitored in Southern California earned A grades during the busy summer season, a five percent uptick from the reporting period’s five-year average.

For summer beachgoers, some 94 percent of Orange County’s 121 monitored beaches notched A grades in summer dry weather.

To view the Beach Report Card in its entirety, visit https://healthebay.org/beach-report-card-2018.


Guest Column

Dave Kiff

An insider’s look at what’s going on in and around City Hall

Dave Kiff

Newport Beach City Manager Dave Kiff   

There is a busy afternoon and evening planned for the Newport Beach City Council when it meets this coming Tuesday, June 12. Here is the Insider’s Guide for that meeting. The Guide is not an attempt to summarize every item on the agenda – just the ones that seem of specific interest to me. I encourage you to read the full agenda if you wish. 

In the afternoon session starting at 4 p.m., we will talk about three things: Learning about advances in earthquake warning systems. They won’t give any of us a lot of time, but maybe just a short time to get away from windows and old buildings, and to electronically send signals to elevators to stop and open at the nearest floor. Technology can be a good friend here. Council Member Muldoon asked for this to appear on the agenda.

Going deep into undergrounding. We’ll talk about costs for current and planned undergrounding districts, as well as some strategies to reduce those costs. Folks in the pending CdM District (near Avocado), on the Peninsula along Balboa Boulevard in the 30s-50s, and other neighborhoods interested in undergrounding may want to listen in.

An update to the Council on a proposed Harbor Department, further stepping up some of our efforts to make the Harbor even more customer-friendly.

The Regular Session at 7 p.m. has a whole bunch of items, but not all are Guide-worthy. The ones that are include Sunshining a tentative agreement with our good colleagues represented by the Newport Beach Police Association. The NBPA represents both rank-and-file officers as well as non-sworn folks in records, the jail, dispatch, and more. Hard work on both sides brought an agreement forward that I think respects the interests of the community, the Association members, taxpayers and the city government.

A few parents from Carden Hall have written to the Council in recent weeks concerned about a planned mobile needle exchange program that could route its way through western Costa Mesa, not far from our city limits. A couple of Council members asked me to bring a statement of concern forward for consideration that the Police Chief would later send to the State agency that reviews the program’s certification. 

The proposed Fiscal Year 2018-19 City Budget is up for adoption. The budget process here is a tad unique – to get a good grasp of it, you would review the Budget that I proposed back in April and then layer on a document called the “Budget Checklist” over it. The Checklist, if adopted along with the Budget, is the late catch-up and correction items that came up between April and today. All in all, and in my biased eyes, this is a fairly conservative budget that adds no new full-time positions from what we have right now, while still accommodating new needs for the Harbor and safety in our schools. And while continuing our very aggressive pension paydown program – where we pay more (nearly $9 million more) than we have to pay to get ahead of the unfunded pension liability. A nostalgic note: this is my last budget that I’ll prepare here, and I am pretty proud of it. I am even more proud of the staff from our Finance Department and our Department Heads and budget analysts that help wade through it with me – in meeting after meeting, and mind-change after mind-change. 

A big dollar item is up after that (all within the Budget’s parameters) that would award a contract to a private sector provider to manage our parking infrastructure. That’s meters, pay stations, on-street parking spaces, and our big beach and other parking lots. We’ve contracted that out for about 6-7 years now, and it’s gone OK with some bumps. I think people are still surprised to see the “KGB Car” (as I call it) that goes around using License Plate Recognition (LPR) to see if folks are current with their meter payments and pay stations.

Council Member Peotter asked his colleagues to consider changing the structure of the Finance Committee to an all-citizen body, so that’s up for discussion Tuesday night. Today, three Council members and four non-elected citizens sit on the Committee, which advises the Council on a number of things involving the City’s finances (pensions, audits, budgets, more).    

Thank you for reading. Please forward this Guide to family, friends and members of your HOA if you represent one. I always like hearing from you, too, so please don’t hesitate to ask a question or offer a comment. 

 

Sincerely,

Dave Kiff

City Manager

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949.644.3001