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Letters to the Editor:

We Can’t Afford Scott Peotter

Scott Peotter is soon to be recalled by the residents of Newport Beach. Rather than offer any defense for his irresponsible behavior and ideas on the city council, Peotter and the puppet masters behind him offer only the argument that the recall would result in a cost estimated by the county to be $272,885-$303,385. How does this cost compare with some of Peotter’s other ideas?

$273,000 – The cost of a special election for the Museum House which Peotter advocated rather than simply to rescind project approvals.

$480,000 – The amount of road improvement funds Peotter proposed to turn down in order to “make a point”. This amount would have risen to $1.9 million annually had he succeeded.

$355,000 – The amount of taxpayer dollars paid out to the owners of Woody’s Wharf, major Peotter donors.

$500,000 – The amount of the fee cut given to mooring holders, 60 percent of which do not live in Newport Beach.

$300,000 – The cost of the politically motivated “audit” of city hall which has never been actually completed and was settled with no finding of any wrong doing.

$3.5 million – The amount of the irresponsible fee cut proposed by Peotter for the licenses of large businesses in the city. This would have created a huge budget deficit and was not even supported by the business community.

$719,000 – The amount of additional annual debt service if Peotter’s policies had been followed in the financing of the civic center. 

$300,000 – The amount of funding Peotter attempted to delete from Diane Dixon’s efforts to improve police services on the Peninsula.

$70 million – The amount the city’s unfunded pension liability has risen since Peotter took office.

When Peotter says we cannot afford the recall, I say we cannot afford not to recall him. Let’s take back our city from the out of town special interests.

Lynn Swain

Committee to Recall Scott Peotter

Newport Beach

76 Station expansion - is this a good investment for West NB?

This letter is in regard to the 76 Station Expansion (Superior Ave. and Placentia Ave.) that was presented to the Planning Commission meeting on November 9, 2017, this business should facilitate its operation as a “dusk to dawn” operation.

During the presentation, the Newport Beach Police Department made it quite clear that this particular area of West Newport has the highest crime rate within the City’s parameters. 

As a stakeholder of one of the adjacent properties, I can assure you that their statistics are accurate. Our community has been working very hard with the Police and Code Enforcement to clean up this area and make it a better place to live. This area borderlines Costa Mesa and has had a propensity to channel more crime and transient activity into Newport Beach.

According to the National Association of Convenience Stores, (NACS), Crime and Convenience store hold-ups account for about 6 percent of all robberies in the nation. Additional studies found an increasing trend as the number of alcohol outlets in an area rose and had a direct impact on neighborhood violence. For example, the following convenience stores are located within 300 feet of each other from property line to property line: Minute King, 7-Eleven and 76 Gas Station.

Recently, developers have been investing millions of dollars to revitalize this area of West Newport Beach. This is the case of the Ebb & Tide development located at 1560 Placentia Ave., Newport Beach; MBK Homes has recently completed 81 detached luxury homes that begin at approximately $1,000,000. According to the developer these homes are almost sold-out and there is a residual waiting list of 121 applicants.

We need to ask ourselves, if we are doing an injustice to the developers and the new homeowners by adding another convenience store that will be selling alcohol?

Ironically, one of the most trending “Hipster” or “Counter Culture” places to dine are referred to as Gourmet Gas Stations, or also known as, “Park, Pump & Pig-Out.” An example of this concept is the 76 Gas Station in Fullerton. This particular station has a deli that makes cold and hot food and they also have a mini-express spa onsite. It is located across the street from St. Jude Hospital and is enjoyed by the employees and visitors from the hospital who want to leave the hospital for fresh air and a quick lunch in a pleasant outdoor setting.

Visit the website at: http://www.sunnyhillscarwash.com.

“Let’s challenge the applicant to bring added value to the community, by meeting the needs of the residents and in so doing provide a better quality of life for West Newport Beach.”

“I personally, I think that a good cup of “Joe” yields more profits and less problems than a bottle of hooch.”

Peggy V. Palmer

Newport Beach

More additions to columnist Duncan Forgey’s “grab bag”

(In response to Monday’s Boozin’ in Balboa column by Duncan Forgey)

Restaurants to jog your memory:

Ok, I know you couldn’t do’em all, but leaving out Tale of the Whale (crock of spreadable cheddar cheese), the Galley (best greasy spoon in the country), the Alley (2nd only to Arches as local hangout) and Sid’s?  

Matt Clabaugh

Newport Beach


Farm to Fork: A Foodie’s Point of ViewFork

By LANA JOHNSON

Dining out for Thanksgiving? Here are some great feast suggestions

LanaJohnsonSMIt is the time of year to give thanks and embrace the joys of the holiday season with friends and family. For most of us, Thanksgiving is a favorite, because we get to eat so many wonderful foods that just somehow taste better all on the same plate.

If you love to cook, the kitchen is your playground. If not, but still want that traditional feast and all the yummy sides and mouth-watering desserts, look no further, because many Newport Beach restaurants will prepare a memorable meal for you (and you don’t have to do the dishes!). Just relax and gather around the table to share what you are most thankful for. Read on for some dining out suggestions, and don’t forget to make reservations!

Back Bay Bistro - Thanksgiving Buffet and Holiday To Go

The gourmet buffet features a carved-to-order station with slow roasted turkey breast, New York strip and confit turkey dark meat with walnut stuffing, cranberry relish and au jus, herb gravy; the hot sides selections include grilled salmon, lamb navarin (stew), rice pilaf, shallot boursin mashed potatoes, green beans almandine, cornbread/rolls and more. There are also fresh salads and soups. Desserts include pies, bread pudding and a chocolate fountain. You can also order a to go menu showcasing chef custom-rubbed whole turkey, sides such as mashed potatoes and gravy, yams, cranberry relish, walnut stuffing and cream corn; and pumpkin or apple pie for dessert.

The buffet is served Thursday, Nov. 23 from 10:30 a.m. - 3 p.m. Cost: $50 for adults; $25 for children 10 years and under. The Thanksgiving To Go costs $150 for a complete dinner and serves 4 - 6. Call by Nov. 22 to reserve your to-go meal.

Back Bay Bistro, 1131 Back Bay Drive, Newport Beach. For buffet reservations, call 949.729.1144; for the to-go meal, call 949.729.3800. www.newportdunes.com/bistro

Back Bay Bistro

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Courtesy of Back Bay Bistro

A Back Bay Bistro gourmet buffet plate

Five Crowns and SideDoor - Seasonal Menu Offerings in the Restaurant or at Home

The menu features classic oven roasted free range turkey with stuffing, mashed potatoes, gravy, buttered Blue Lake green beans, and house made cranberry compote. Prime rib of beef is served with au jus. Round out the meal with Yorkshire pudding, organic whipped cream horseradish and a choice of side. Indulge with the “Best of Both” for a portion of prime rib and side of turkey with all the seasonal accompaniments.

Reservations are currently available with seating from 11 a.m. until close. A Royal Feast holiday children’s menu caters to youngsters 12 years and younger, and offers junior portions of signature entrees.

For those spending the holidays at home, Five Crowns offers the traditional prime rib dinner to-go. Select from roasted prime rib of beef, classic accompaniments, sides and desserts. To make reservations and for more information, call 949.760.0331 for Five Crowns; 949.717.4322 for SideDoor.

Five Crowns and Side Door, 3801 E. Coast Highway, Corona del Mar. www.lawrysonline.come/five-crowns; www.sidedoorcdm.com

Five Crowns

Submitted photo

Comforting and traditional holiday fare at Five Crowns/SideDoor

Fleming’s Prime Steakhouse & Wine Bar - A Prix Fixe Menu

Inspired by traditional favorites, the three-course dinner starts with biscuits and pumpkin butter & honey for the table. Choose either a Fleming’s salad or creamy lobster bisque. A hearty main course follows, with juicy herb roasted turkey breast; house-made sage and brioche bread stuffing; fresh cranberry sauce; bacon, onion and almond green beans; and Yukon gold mashed potatoes. Dessert choices include pumpkin cheesecake with Chantilly cream or carrot cake with dark-rum caramel drizzle. A kid-friendly meal features mixed berries, turkey with sides, dessert and a beverage. Patrons can also order off the full a la carte menu all day. On Thursday, Nov. 23, Thanksgiving menus are offered 11 a.m. - 11 p.m. Cost: $50 for adults; $20 for children 12 years and under.

Fleming’s, 455 Newport Center Drive. www.flemingssteakhouse.com

Hornblower – Thanksgiving on the Harbor

Celebrate your day of thanks during a two-hour brunch or three-hour supper cruise, which includes unlimited Champagne (brunch) or a boarding glass of Champagne (supper), a traditional Thanksgiving buffet, live music with a solo entertainer and your own private table on a festively decorated yacht.

Brunch Cruise: Boards, 11:30 a.m.; Cruise, 12 - 2 p.m. Cost: $68.95 per person

Buffet Supper Cruise: Boards, 4 p.m.; Cruise, 4:30 - 7:30 p.m. Cost: $92.95 per person

Buffet Supper Cruise aboard the historic Wild Goose: Boards, 3:30 p.m.; Cruise, 4 - 7 p.m. Cost: $92.95 per person

Tax, service charge and landing fee may apply.

All cruises on Thursday, Nov. 23 depart from Hornblower South, 2431 W. Coast Highway. www.hornblower.com

Island Hotel Newport Beach - Bountiful Brunch

Held in the Island Hotel Ballroom, enjoy farmer’s market salads, free-range turkey, carved-to-order prime rib, slow roasted pork loin and wood plank roasted salmon. There will be a seafood station, biscuit bar, Thanksgiving desserts and assorted individual pies and Champagne. Live music and children’s crafts make this a day for the whole family. Cost: $80 per adult, $20 per child ages five to 12, including tax and gratuities; Free for children four and under. Serving Thursday, Nov 23, from 11 a.m. - 3 p.m. Call 949.760.4913 for reservations.

Island Hotel, 690 Newport Center Drive. www.IslandHotel.com

Island Hotel

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Submitted photo

Free-range turkey highlights the Thanksgiving menu

Oak Grill at the Island Hotel Newport Beach - A Four-Course Dinner

The feast includes choices of white wine steamed clams or pumpkin ricotta gnudi. For entrées, it is serving a traditional turkey plate, grilled filet mignon, pan seared branzino, or slow roasted pork chop, all with seasonal accompaniments. Classic desserts are created by Pastry Chef Andy de la Cruz. Cost: $90 per adult, $35 per child ages five to 12, excluding tax and gratuities; Free for children four and under. Serving Thursday, Nov. 23, from 4 - 9 p.m. Reservations can be made by calling 949.760.4920 or on the web site. 

Oak Grill, 690 Newport Center Drive. www.OakGrillNB.com

The Resort at Pelican Hill - A Decadent Brunch

With breathtaking Pacific Ocean views, enjoy brunch at this luxurious resort. Executive Chef Jean-Pierre Dubray will create a brunch buffet with classic dishes, accompanied by live entertainment and children’s activities. Reservations are recommended. Cost: $125 per adult and $65 per child under age 12, prices exclude tax and service charge. Serving Thursday, Nov. 23 from 10:30 a.m. - 4 p.m.

The Resort at Pelican Hill, 22701 Pelican Hill Road South, Newport Coast. www.pelicanhill.com

Pelican Hill pie

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Courtesy of Pelican Hill

A perfect ending to the quintessential autumnal meal … sweet!

The Bungalow - A Three-Course Meal

The first course selections include corn chowder, Caesar salad, lobster bisque soup, butternut squash raviolis or Bungalow salad.

Entrees are offered at three different tiers:

Tier 1 - Pan roasted turkey breast, blackened wild king salmon; grilled vegetable “tart”. Cost: $45 per guest.

Tier 2 - Prime rib of beef; prime rib of beef & pan roasted turkey breast combination; prime filet mignon; miso marinated Chilean sea bass. Cost: $55 per guest.

Tier 3 - Prime bone-in rib eye; Northern Australian lobster tail. Cost: $65 per guest.

Dessert selections include berries and ice cream, vanilla crème brulee, pumpkin pie or chocolate soufflé cake.

A Thanksgiving kids’ menu is available for youngsters age 11 and under. Served Thursday, Nov. 23 from 1 - 9 p.m.

The Bungalow, 2441 E. Coast Highway, Corona del Mar. www.thebungalowrestaurant.com

WISHING YOU A VERY HAPPY THANKSGIVING!

Ciao Vincenza!


Fair Game

By TOM JOHNSON

 You too can ride aboard the Duffield 58’…for a Peotter fundraiser

TomJohnsonCity Councilman Scott Peotter is giving you an opportunity to get a jump on the Christmas Boat Parade and it’ll be aboard the very first Duffield 58’ Coastal Cruiser.

A host committee, that includes Mayor Pro Tem Duffy Duffield, Ralph Nudo, Chris Pappas, Greg Pappas and Mark Serventi, is planning the Holiday Reception & Harbor Cruise as a fundraiser To Oppose the Recall Election of Peotter.

It all takes place Wednesday, Dec. 6, with a reception at where else but Woody’s Wharf beginning at 5 p.m. The harbor cruise follows at 7 p.m.

Oh yes, it’s a fundraiser. Sponsor levels begin at $500 and go up to

$2,200. Individual tickets for the reception are $125 and $250 to include the cruise.

You can visit www.duffieldyachts.com to check it out.

• • •

Newport Beach Council Member Brad Avery is holding a Town Hall meeting tonight (Thursday, Nov. 16), at 7 p.m. to talk about a variety of subjects concerning an upcoming traffic study focused on the activities surrounding the Newport Heights neighborhood schools, including pick up & drop off, parking, pedestrian & bicycle counts, crossing guards, speed data, signage and more. 

The meeting will be held at the Mariners Branch Library, 1300 Irvine Ave., and it is free to the community. 

• • •

Everyone seems to love television celebrity Mario Lopez and he’ll be in town this weekend to host the Fashion Island classic tree lighting. The ceremony will take place in the Neiman MarcusBloomingdale’s Courtyard, Friday, Nov. 17 and Saturday, Nov. 18, from 6 - 6:30 p.m.

Additionally, Ellen K from KOST 103.5 will join Lopez.

There’ll also be a live musical show performed by The Young Americans, Santa will make an appearance and we hear that snow is forecasted oddly enough by Fashion Island.

The Irvine Company always does it right.

• • •

The next time someone complains to you about tourism, consider this: the Orange County Visitors Association (OCVA), of which Visit Newport Beach is a member, just completed a survey that says tourism “is an important driver in OC generating more than $20.5 billion in economic benefit last year alone.”

That’s billion with a “B.”

The study, conducted by Tourism Economics, found that “tourism sustained more than 175,000 jobs in 2016 and that 1 in 13 jobs in Orange County is associated with tourism.”


Big Brothers Big Sisters announces largest gift in its history

Big Brothers Big Sisters of Orange County and the Inland Empire announced the largest gift in agency history, a home in Laguna Beach valued at $8.5 million donated by the estate of late Newport Beach businessman William D. Ray. The grant deed with remainder interest recorded October 27 with First American Title.

Ray, who chaired the parent company of the Balboa Bay Club before his death in 1991, was born in South Dakota and grew up in an orphanage after his mother was killed in a gun accident when he was 2 years old. Following high school, he joined the U.S. Army and became a paratrooper in the 82nd Airborne Division.

“What a wonderful thing it would have been for him to have had a Big Brother at some time in his lonely life,” said Ray’s widow, Beverly Ray Parkhurst. “Luckily, his sergeant saw something in the young recruit and urged him to go to college,” Beverly Ray shared. “What a blessing that Army man was to Bill’s life, the first who ever saw him as something more than another mouth to feed. I honor William D. Ray through Big Brothers Big Sisters with something that meant so much to both of us: his first real home and my greatest treasure, the house of our dreams. I hope it will serve the highest purpose, one Bill would have been part of, making a young man’s life much better and more meaningful.”

Ranked third in the nation for number of children served, the local Big Brothers Big Sisters agency provides more than 3,300 youth facing adversity with professionally supported, one-to-one youth mentoring relationships. The property donation will help secure the nonprofit’s financial security as its program expands year over year.

Melissa Beck

Submitted photo

Melissa Beck, CEO of Big Brothers Big Sisters of Orange County and the Inland Empire

“There are thousands of youth in our community who, like William Ray, face incredible challenges and are too quickly written off by society,” said Melissa Beck, CEO of Big Brothers Big Sisters of Orange County and the Inland Empire. “We are so thankful for this generous gift and will honor William’s memory with our ever-growing commitment to provide mentors to more of these children who desperately need a role model to help them realize their full potential.”

Big Brothers Big Sisters believes that with the support of a caring mentor, every child has the ability to achieve his or her full potential. It is the nation’s largest donor- and volunteer-supported mentoring organization, serving a quarter-million children annually.

For more information, visit www.ocbigs.org.


Salute to Veterans brings in nearly 10 tons of food

More than 5,000 attended Salute to Veterans on Saturday, Nov. 11, an annual community event hosted by OC Fair & Event Center in collaboration with California labor unions and the Orange County Market Place.

Attendees donated a record 9.7 tons of food to Disabled American Veterans, a charity that helps disabled military veterans and their families, as well as $1,000 for care packages to be sent to troops overseas.

“When men and women make the ultimate commitment to serve our country, they should never go hungry when they return home, and we should be there for them the way they’ve been there for us,” said Jennifer Beuthin, general manager for the Orange County Employees Association. 

“We are proud to have a venue where the community can come together to make a direct impact on the lives of veterans and their families,” said Kathy Kramer, OC Fair & Event Center CEO. “We look forward to continuing this Veterans Day tradition as just one of the ways in which we celebrate, honor and thank those who serve.”

The event also featured live entertainment, a postcard project for kids and about 70 booths with information on services for veterans, including free health screenings, job access and resources. There were also several military vehicles on display.

At Heroes Hall, more than 1,100 visitors had a chance to view the new photography exhibit Kimberly Millett’s Operation Iraqi Freedom. In the Medal of Honor Courtyard, three new plaques were unveiled, honoring local veterans.


Want to learn how to tango? Here’s your chance…

Tango Buenos Aires

Click photo for a larger image

Courtesy of CAMI/scfta.org

Join in the fun of free tango lessons on the Julianne and George Argyros Plaza at Segerstrom Center for the Arts on Thursday, Nov. 16 from 5:30 to 7:30 p.m. Then on Saturday, Nov. 18, it’s time to dance at the free Tango Dance Party from 5:30 to 7:30 p.m., just before the 8 p.m. performance of The Spirit of Argentina by Tango Buenos Aires.

Award-winning Argentine tango champion Marcelo Rivero will teach the essential techniques and movements of ‘the tango’. All levels of experience are welcome, so no experience necessary!

Performances of The Spirit of Argentina take place Nov. 18 and 19 at 2 and 8 p.m. in the Renee and Henry Segerstrom Concert Hall.

Segerstrom Center for the Arts is located at 600 Town Center Drive, Costa Mesa. For tickets and more information, visit www.scfta.org.


You Must Remember This: Muk McCallum and the Airdrome

By NANCY GARDNER

We have a number of commemorative plaques around town celebrating our history, but except for one at the site of the old Rendezvous they tend to celebrate the standard historical tropes, overlooking some of our more colorful past. To help remedy this, I propose a plaque in front of an apartment on Acacia which would read: Home of the Airdrome. If the name Airdrome conjures images of old airplanes for most people, it will bring a knowing wink from some others. To paraphrase Frank Loesser, at one point the Airdrome was the oldest established permanent non-floating party house in Corona del Mar. Neither the location, right across the alley from the Snack Shop (today’s Ruby’s), or its appearance – determinedly nondescript – gave a clue, but thanks to its dynamic hosts, on weekends, it was the place to be.

I was not of age to attend, but despite my youth, I did get to the Airdrome once.  My father always liked to expose me to new things, so I was allowed to accompany him just long enough to get a glimpse of Muk McCallum, one of those hosts. Years later, when I read about Neil Cassidy, that’s who I thought of, minus the drugs. Muk was good looking and charismatic, drawing people to him like a magnet. Within five minutes I was thinking that whatever the difference in our ages it shouldn’t signify – and about that time I was taken home.

Since I was there for such a short period, I didn’t get much of an overall impression, so I’ll pass on my father’s description: “No amplified music, no drugs, no fights...lots of conversation, lots of laughs and some drinking.” The “some” of that last part I question, particularly in view of a story my father related about one particular evening. It seems a young woman had imbibed enough alcohol to remove not just her  inhibitions but her top. This would probably have met with general approval except my mother was there, and all the guys were horrified at the thought that she would be exposed to such a sight. They quickly pulled the girl’s top back down, but no, she wanted to be free! She pulled her top up, they pulled it down, she pulled it up – it was  like a Keystone Kops routine. If the guys had known my mother better, they would have known to save their energy. It would take a lot more than a pair of bare breasts to make her leave a fun party.

The Airdrome eventually ended, not because the neighbors burned the house down or the police cordoned it off. It ended because of a trip. Muk and his fellow Airdrome mates Jay Carlyle and Hugh Kelley went to Tahiti, which in those days was still a pretty exotic destination. They fell in love with the place, and to what I am sure was the consternation of their families, decided to throw everything up and move there, leave the stateside hustle-bustle and bask in the languid beauty of the South Pacific. It didn’t quite turn out the way they anticipated. Almost by happenstance, they started a hotel, the Bali Hai Moorea, and soon they were working harder than they ever had at home, establishing a small network of resorts and pioneering such things as the first overwater resort rooms. I have a feeling that one thing that made them so successful was their experience at the Airdrome. From all those weekend parties they hosted they knew how to make sure people were having a good time.  

~~~~~~~~

Nancy Gardner, former Mayor of Newport Beach, long-time resident and daughter of Judge Robert Gardner, is a regular contributor to StuNewsNewport.


Stump the Stu

‘Shermy’ is more popular than one might think

Stump the Stu 111617

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We said this one might be tough…wrong! Fourteen correct guesses for “Shermy” the Otter hose holder at Sherman Gardens. Congrats to Angela Cortright, Brenda McCroskey, Shari Esayian, Barbara Peckenpaugh, Dorothy Larson, Bill Lobdell, Mary Ann Hemphill, Carol Strauss, Marcy Weinstein, Scott Lynch, Mike Smith, C. Scott Palmer, Shannon Carr and Ellen Trujillo.

You all receive the infamous “pat on the back” as your reward. Keep the guesses coming.

If you have a unique spot or icon around town that you think StuNewsNewport readers would enjoy finding out about, please shoot it, share it and give us the answer, so we can challenge them!


New exhibit highlights old images at JWA

Fashion Island

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Submitted photo

Newport Center/Fashion Island, June 14, 1968

“The Aerial Photography History of Newport Center/Fashion Island” exhibit is on display at John Wayne Airport’s ORANGE COUNTY: Destination Art & Culture exhibition space now through June 2018.

Featured as part of John Wayne Airport’s (JWA) Arts Program, the exhibit can be viewed pre-security along the pedestrian walkway connecting Riley Terminals B and C.

Fred L. Emmert and Richard N. Frost, co-authors of the book, “Newport Beach, California, Newport Center | Fashion Island, 50 Years in the Making” arranged the exhibit which will transport guests through a visual journey recollecting the 50-year history of Newport Center/Fashion Island.

“This exhibit chronicles an important segment of Newport Beach and Orange County history; capturing the transformation of the Fashion Island area from open space to a prominent center of business and entertainment,” said Board Chairwoman Michelle Steel. “I encourage John Wayne Airport guests to view this unique reflection of history from an aerial perspective.”

This chronological aerial photography exhibit begins with an Orange County archive image from July 1953 detailing the site of the Third National Boy Scout Jamboree, which is now the location of Newport Center/Fashion Island. The subsequent images are a progression of the planning, design and development of the Newport Center/ Fashion Island area from 1961 until January 2017. Each aerial image from the exhibit provides a different perspective, by identifying the direction the photograph was taken.

For more information on art displays at JWA, visit www.ocair.com/terminal/artexhibits.


Little Lido Kids Club to hold Harvest Delight

Harvest Delight

Courtesy of Lido Marina Village 

Come celebrate a time of giving and togetherness on Lido Marina Village’s main deck on Saturday, Nov. 18 from 1 to 3 p.m.

The fun includes designing a special Thanksgiving wreath, free face painting and twisted balloon animals.

For more information and to RSVP, visit bit.ly/LMVHarvestDelight.

Lido Marina Village is located at 3434 Via Lido, Newport Beach.


Karma Automotive chooses Newport Beach as brand-experience center location

Karma Automotive has announced that the location of its brand-experience center will be at 950 Pacific Coast Highway, Newport Beach. The 2,000-square-foot building will showcase the brand, serve as a vehicle showroom and also be a platform for testing and roll-out of new initiatives and processes. Locating in Newport Beach close to Karma’s headquarters and assembly plant, will provide an opportunity for Karma employees to gain critical consumer insights through direct interaction with customers.

“We originally planned to locate our experience center in our new Irvine headquarters, but determined that being on PCH among the other ultra-luxury brands was a more suitable location to introduce the Karma Brand and the new Revero,” said Jim Taylor, chief revenue officer.

Revero car

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Courtesy Karma Automotive

Originally hailed as one of the most beautiful vehicles ever conceived, the 2018 Karma Revero embodies the sensibilities of a passionate, charismatic, California-based company. The Revero redefines luxury automobiles and delivers a timeless design powered by electricity, fuel and the sun.

Karma Automotive took possession of the facility last week. Remodeling began November 11 with a soft opening planned for Monday, Nov. 20. When the full renovation has been completed, the brand-experience center will clearly show Karma’s identity as a Southern California auto company.

“I look forward to opening our store in one of the largest luxury markets in the country,” said Ehren Bragg, Karma OC general manager. “We are confident that the Revero has tremendous potential in a market where customers clearly appreciate beauty and technology.”


KidWorks Foundation for Success Luncheon raises more than $768,000 and honors Newport Beach philanthropist

The 2017 KidWorks’ Foundation for Success (FFS) Luncheon, held Thursday, Nov. 2 at the Doubletree Hotel in Santa Ana, again set a record by raising more than $768,000 to help fund after-school education and leadership development programs conducted by the nonprofit headquartered in central Santa Ana.

This is the largest sum raised since the inception of the luncheon in 2007 and represents the majority of the after-school program budget funding academic enrichment, tutoring, leadership development, and college readiness programs at the expanded KidWorks Dan Donahue Center.

4 men

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(L-R): Tom Schriber, co-founder & chairman emeritus, Donahue Schriber & long-time KidWorks supporter and former board member; Rachid Chamtieh, partner, Deloitte & KidWorks board member; David A. Pyle, founder & CEO of American Career College, shareholder of West Coast University; and Steve Craig, president & CEO, Craig Realty Group and luncheon co-chair

The prestigious 2017 Dan Donahue Leadership Award was presented to David A. Pyle, philanthropist, founder/chief executive officer of American Career College and shareholder of West Coast University. “This very special award recognizes Mr. Pyle’s fervent support for KidWorks’ youth and families,” said David Benavides, KidWorks’ Executive Director. “For decades, Mr. Pyle has been a leader and innovator in the private, postsecondary education community, and he is as passionate about the community as he is about supporting health care and educational programs that aid underserved children and families.”

“I have been a supporter of KidWorks because these young men and woman are being developed as our future leaders and will be making a difference in our communities,” Pyle said.  “Seeing firsthand the interaction of the kids, family members, staff and volunteers as they grow is inspiring and something I am proud to be a part of.”

The event’s keynote speaker Chad Williams, author of the bestselling book, “SEAL of God,” talked about his coming to terms with the direction of his life and his subsequent journey through the grueling Naval Ops training. He was one of only 13 to make it to graduation day and has served his country on multiple deployments to defend freedom. Also recognized at the event was Alfredo Padilla, one of KidWorks’ many amazing student success stories. He is a recent California State University, Northridge graduate, where he earned his degree in kinesiology.

The Foundation for Success luncheon would not be possible without the generosity of the presenting sponsors: American Career College, West Coast University, Heidi & Ruben Mendoza and Toyota Financial Services. Other key sponsors included Bank of America, Steven L. Craig of Craig Realty Group and Donahue Schriber Realty Group.

Since its inception in 2007, KidWorks’ annual Foundation for Success event has raised nearly $5.8 million to fund programs at the KidWorks Dan Donahue Center. The “Orange County Business Journal” has consistently named the KidWorks’ Foundation for Success event in the “Top Five Charity Luncheons in Orange County.”


JWA offers Thanksgiving holiday travel tips

Southwest plane

Submitted photo

The year-end holiday travel season is quickly approaching and airports across the country are anticipating another year of record passenger volume. The Thanksgiving holiday is one of the most heavily traveled holiday periods, and passengers traveling through John Wayne Airport (JWA) between Friday, Nov. 17 and Monday, Nov. 27 will experience higher-than-normal passenger traffic.

“During the busy holiday travel season, we are proud that John Wayne Airport provides friendly staff members and superior guest amenities for our visitors within a secure environment,” said Board Chairwoman Michele Steel. “As we gather to celebrate Thanksgiving with friends and family, we wish everyone safe and pleasant travels.”

Demand for parking over the holiday weekend is expected to be high. The Airport recommends passengers consider all parking options available: Terminal-adjacent Parking Structures A1, A2, B2 and C, as well as curbside Valet Parking and the Main Street Parking Lot with free shuttle to the Riley Terminal. Travelers should plan ahead and check real-time parking availability by calling 949.252.5200, or visiting Parking Availability on the Airport’s website (www.ocair.com). 

This season, JWA has continued its partnership with KeepOCSafe. Together, they encourage travelers to be aware of their surroundings and report questionable objects or activities. A Giant Red Backpack is on display in the Riley Terminal throughout the holidays to remind passengers and visitors, “If You See Something, Say Something™.”

JWA recommends the following travel tips:

All passengers flying out of JWA are encouraged to arrive 90 minutes to two hours before scheduled departure times for domestic flights and three hours for international flights to find parking, check luggage and go through the security screening checkpoint. Passengers who are members of TSA Precheck™ can expedite the screening process in Terminals A, B and C.

Passengers are allowed one small carry-on bag plus one personal item as long as the carry-on bag fits airline dimensions. Check with individual airlines for specifics. For helpful information about the 3-1-1 liquids rule for carry-on bags and other travel tips from the Transportation Security Administration (TSA), visit the TSA website.

“If You See Something, Say Something™”: To report a suspicious object or activity in the Riley Terminal, dial “0” from a White Courtesy Phone to reach an operator, or dial 2-5000 to reach Airport Police Services, or you can notify an Airport employee or a uniformed officer. Guests can also dial 949.252.5200 from a mobile device.

For more information, visit www.ocair.com.


Harley Rouda to hold Town Hall meeting

Harley Rouda

Submitted photo 

Tonight, Thursday, Nov. 16, Harley Rouda, who is running for Congressman in the 48th District, will hold a Town Hall meeting. 

The event takes place at Bonita Creek Community Center, 3010 La Vida Road, Newport Beach. Doors open at 5:45 p.m. and the meeting takes place from 6 to 7 p.m.

Come meet Rouda and discuss the issues that are important to our community.

To RSVP, visit www.harleyforcongress.com. For more information, contact Alicia Guiol at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it..


Adam Beer appointed GM of Lido House

Adam Beer

Submitted photo

Scheduled to open in March 2018, Lido House has announced the appointment of Adam Beer as General Manager. According to www.marriott.com, Lido House is at the nexus of Lido Isle, Lido Peninsula and Balboa Peninsula, and perfectly positioned to celebrate Newport Beach’s vibrant city, bustling marina and white-sand beaches.

Beer’s intention is to lure a new breed of travelers who prize “social vibe over traditional ratings.”

Debuting as an Autograph Collection hotel and legacy project by Newport Beach developer Robert D. Olson, Beer will oversee every aspect of Lido House’s 130 guest rooms, including suites and high-designed private cottages, as well as the signature restaurant Mayor’s Table and rooftop perch Topside.

Beer was most recently hotel manager at the 1,053-room Sheraton San Diego Hotel & Marina, and prior to that spent seven years at The Westin St. Francis Hotel perfecting day-to-day operations.


6th Annual fodada International Women’s Self Defense Day empowers women

Orange Theory

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Courtesy of Orange Theory Fitness

Instructor demonstrates self-defense move at Orange Theory Fitness

To raise awareness about protecting women and the importance of empowerment and safety, the 6th Annual fodada International Women’s Self Defense Day will be held Saturday, Nov. 18 nationwide. The event is free of charge.

Here in Newport Beach, the event will take place at the following two locations:

Orange Theory Fitness, 1040 Irvine Ave. from 2:15 - 3:15 p.m.

Harbor View Elementary, 900 Goldenrod from 1 - 3 p.m. Taught by Master Steve Ross.

Registration is open at: www.fodada.com/2017-international-womens-self-defense-day

The program’s vision this year is to bring self-defense seminars to more than 3,000 women in U.S. cities and 15 international locations.

For more information, visit www.fodada.com.

Editor’s Note: fodada stands “for dad.” Fodada clothing founder and Newport Beach resident Bobby Barzi was inspired by his two sons to start the apparel company that focuses on fostering relationships between fathers and their children. Among the programs he has launched are the annual free self-defense classes, realizing the importance of women to fathers and their children, and wanting women to take a stance against violence while being empowered.


Boozin’ in Balboa

By DUNCAN FORGEY

Main Street Balboa

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Submitted photos

Main Street Balboa, 1940

In the pioneer days of Newport Harbor, alcohol consumption was not all that common. The McFadden Brothers, our cityʻs most influential settlers, were prohibitionists. As their wharf and mercantile businesses grew, they employed about 100 people and controlled the lands surrounding the wharf. Many of the employees squatted on lands owned by the brothers. Because of the importance of a job in their lives, many respected the McFadden familyʻs staunch stand on drinking. These employees felt there was very little incentive to get intoxicated.

By 1894, with the completion of a rail line between Newport and Santa Ana, the wharf became instrumental in moving local grain, meat, eggs, fruit and farm animals to other parts of the California Coast via ships named Halcyon, American Girl and Queen of the Pacific. As an importer, the McFaddens specialized in lumber and building materials that went to support growth, not only in his fledgling village, but throughout Orange County.

After a secret corporate takeover of McFaddenʻs Landing by the hated Southern Pacific, the McFaddens sold their remaining holdings in 1902 for $70 an acre with a $5,000 down payment. This opened up development in all parts of the harbor and began the blossoming of Balboa. However, the McFaddensʻ dislike of drinking was now gone.

In 1906, Newport Beach incorporated and a newly formed board of trustees wrestled with this thorny issue. In a truly political two-faced decision, they drew up a new ordinance, both banning liquor sales and allowing for licenses in the city. A resident named Wilkinson was the first to apply and after long discussions and several votes, the board approved liquor with a limit of two licenses for the entire town. It did not take long to forget this limitation and several more bars soon opened up. This was the genesis of a long love affair between Newport Harbor and the restaurant/liquor industry.

With an intense debate on Prohibition raging throughout the country, Newport Beach put the issue on the ballot in 1912. Residents voted 172 to 69 in favor of a “wet” city. In April of 1916, with prohibition drawing near, most of Orange County did not allow drinking. Newport Beach again put it up for a vote. The tally was 233 to 176 outlawing liquor in the city. Newport Beach was “officially” dry.

This proved devastating to local businesses that sold liquor such as the Orange County Wine Company, the S&W Company, The Bay View Buffet and the Balboa Wine and Liquor Company. As the rest of Orange County looked for places to drink, Newport/Balboa went underground and spirits kept flowing. “Bootleggers” became the main source of liquor. Cases and cases of whiskey and other spirits were brought by boat. Late night rendezvous on darken beaches became the norm for the smugglers and their customers. Crystal Cove was a popular meeting place for these transactions due to its isolation and private property status.

Much of Newportʻs law enforcement turned a blind eye at drinking. Others, however, saw a need to stop the influence of the “serpent drink and the evil saloons.” Local resident Marshal Hermes, following in the footsteps of nationally famous Carrie Nation, hired detectives for the expressed purpose of “ferreting out these blind pigs.” Newportʻs own mini-version of Elliot Ness. Drinkers and establishments were forced to go deeper underground. Despite breaking laws, Balboa and Newport became Orange Countyʻs haven for drinkers, gamblers and pool players from the much more conservative rural areas of Anaheim, Santa Ana and Fullerton.

Parking lot at Newport Pier 1930s Click on photo for a larger image

Parking lot at Newport Pier in the 1930s

With the lifting of the ban with the 21st Amendment, Newport Beach began a concentrated marketing plan to bring people to town. This included liquor sales. There have been some efforts to ease the concentration of bars and punish individual violators for noise issues by modern city councils, but Newport Beach still remains a most popular place for weddings, birthdays, celebrations and parties due to its many venues. Whether it be a harbor cruise, sporting event, sailboat race, election, fundraiser, or simply end of a work week, friends meet and drink at their favorite watering holes.

Civic leaders and the Chamber of Commerce began creating promotions emphasizing this celebratory way of life. Events like the Fourth of July Character Boat Parade, Christmas Boat Parade, Beer Can Regattas, Ensenada Race, Taste of Newport, Newport Beach Film Festival, Bal-Week and bathing suit contest gatherings stemmed from a desire to celebrate and imbibe amongst friends.

Balboa Bay Club

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Balboa Bay Club

Where else could it be more fun to “party” than in the many drinking establishments of Newport Beach. There were the early saloons and the Pavilion, The Stag, Henry Starkʻs “Blue Beet,” Christianʻs Hut, Berkshires, Castaways, Blackies, The Quiet Woman, Lucky Lion, Village Inn, La Cave, or the infamous bar at the Balboa Bay Club where you could hook up with movie stars or your next spouse. For more than a century, Newport Beach has been home to thousands of eateries and drinking establishments, providing food and liquor for millions of residents and visitors.

Rooftop Party

Rooftop beach party, 1965

Local Restaurant lore:

The Stag Bar and Hotel opened in 1908. The historic two-story building has been its home ever since. Known for card games and gambling, legend says it also served as a brothel. During prohibition, beer was brewed and offered upstairs. It lengthened its bar to 100 feet and was remodeled into a martini bar after WWII.

The Blue Beet: Originally named after its owner Henry Stark, Starkʻs has been in operation for 105 years. Its wooden bar was originally brought form Cripple Creek, Colorado, giving the pub an authentic gold rush. feel. Blue Beet served liquor in both the “wet” and “dry” years. Sid Stoffer, one of Newportʻs most notable characters, bought the establishment in the 1960s. It is currently owned by Steve Lewis, a graduate of Newport Harbor High.

The Ritz Restaurant and Garden: The Ritz was a one-of-a-kind establishment when it first opened up at the foot of the Newport Pier. Chef Hans Prager, who learned his trade working with Scandia, LAʻs premier high-end establishment, The Waldorf Astoria in New York, the Army, MGM Studios and Lawryʻs where he was the executive chef in Corona del Marʻs Five Crowns Restaurant was its driving force. His move from the ocean front to Fashion Island helped establish the brand new development as an entertainment and business center. “The Ritz Brothers” group of business executives was a powerful force in the city.

John and Audrey McIntosh: Starting with a “casual dining” restaurant in Corona del Mar in 1948 called the Snack Shop, the company grew to include local favorites: Reubenʻs, CoCoʻs, and the Iconic Reuben E. Lee. McIntosh restaurants became staples for area diners and employed local youth for two generations.

Famous for food and its political meetings for 90 years, The Arches Restaurant closed unexpectedly in 2011. The Arches was the “center of town” since its opening in 1922. An old values restaurant with excellent food and strong drink it hosted generations of the same families, Hollywood elite, business executives and political leaders.

Villa Marina menu

Villa Marina menu

Here is a “Grab Bag” of names to jar your memory: Delaneyʻs, Berkshires, Castaways, Pavilion, Stuff Shirt, Stuff T-Shirt, Rusty Pelican, Blue Dolphin, Cannery, Ancient Mariner, Chart House, Karemʻs, Hurley Bell, Quiet Woman, Merleʻs Drive-In, Howardʻs, Golden Anchor, Felicianoʻs, Bobby McGeeʻs, Dilmanʻs, El Ranchito, Golden Dragon, Village Inn, Lucky Lion, Red Onion, Warehouse, Magic Island, Devilʻs Triangle, Steveʻs Original Pizza, Crab Cooker, Studio Cafe, Jolly Roger, El Ranchito, Cassidyʻs, Mutt Lynchʻs, Villa Nova…

Reuben E Lee Menu

Reuben E. Lee menu

What others can you come up with?

~~~~~~~~

Duncan Forgey, who made his home here in Newport Beach for many years, now resides in Hawaii. He is a monthly contributor to StuNewsNewport.


On the Harbor: From derelict boats to the Christmas Boat Parade

By LEN BOSE

Len Bose 11.13

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Photo by Len Bose

As we quickly approach the end of 2017, I thought I would head out to the harbor and take in some end of this year’s observations.

My first thought was an old question, “What is a derelict boat?” The best simplified interpretation of Title 17.25.020 Anchorage, Berthing and Mooring Regulations in the City Charter and Municipal Code was given to me by Deputy Kevin Webster in July 2016. “There are a whole lot of interpretations of what a derelict boat is,” Webster explained. “The boat has to be operable and in seaworthy condition. A derelict will have excessive debris that will be of concern as a fire hazard. It is a vessel that is uncared for, unsafe and poorly maintained. Other visible signs are excessive bird droppings, broken windows, or extreme marine growth attached to the hull of the vessel. Those are all signs of poorly maintained vessels and I would define as derelict.”

Now that Title 17 now falls under the jurisdiction of Harbor Operations, there is always a slight difference in the interpretation of Title 17.25.020 at every watch change. Should you wish to make your own interpretation of what is a derelict boat, go to my website at lenboseyachts.blogspot.com where I have the code posted.

Now, let’s say you notice a vessel that you feel meets the definition of a derelict vessel; you can gather your words and do your best to sell the idea to the vessel’s owner, that there is a way out for them to dispose of their problem with little to no cost.

You can inform them that the city has received a grant from the State for disposing of derelict, “owner- surrendered,” vessels in the harbor. It will be a tough sell for you to not come across the wrong way…you just need them to call the Harbor Master’s office at 949.270.8159 for more information about the Surrendered and Abandoned Vessel Exchange (SAVE) grant.

While out on the harbor, my thoughts then went to the upcoming Christmas Boat Parade taking place December 13-17. Checking on the dates at www.christmasboatparade.com, I noticed that the route has been changed and will be going counter clockwise this year. The parade starts at 18:30 and ends at 21:00, so I would suggest checking the website to get a better idea when the parade will be passing by your favorite viewing location.

I have a couple of ideas on how to watch the parade from a boat. If you have never done it before or you have not participated in a long time, I would strongly suggest that you enter the parade and make plans for each night to cruise the harbor with all your friends. The parade always gets me into the holiday spirit earlier than normal. Please note: This year you will be starting and finishing the parade almost in the anchorage, so take a good look around there before the start of the parade. Another idea is to call Harbor Services and request a mooring ball along the parade route and take your party to the mooring before sunset and just hang out, if you plan to spend the night. Make sure you have a designated dinghy driver to pick up your late arrivals or early departing guests. In past years, I have found plenty of room to jockey the boat around in the channel between Collins Island and Linda Isle, and also at the entrance into the Linda Isle lagoon. You should also find plenty of room just past the turning mark in the harbor entrance.

The good news is that the first king tides will be arriving a week before the parade on December 3, 4 and 5. Last year, this was a problem because the extreme low tide during the parade kept the late afternoon boats from launching at the Newport Dunes ramp. Note that the second round of King tides are January 1 and 2, 2018.  My next report will be on all the different harbor awards nights.

Sea ya.

~~~~~~~~

Len Bose is a yachting enthusiast, yacht broker and harbor columnist for StuNewsNewport.


Hoag in nation’s Top 50 for cardiovascular

Hoag

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Submitted photo

Hoag Memorial Presbyterian Hospital has again been named one of the nation’s “50 Top Cardiovascular Hospitals” by IBM Watson Health. The annual study, conducted by Truven Health Analytics, now part of IBM Watson Health, identifies the top U.S. hospitals for inpatient cardiovascular services. 

Hoag has received this national designation for three consecutive years, 2016, 2017 and 2018, and was the only California community hospital to make the list. 

“Hoag is honored to be recognized nationally as one of the top cardiovascular hospitals,” said Hoag President and Chief Executive Officer Robert T. Braithwaite. “This accolade is a true reflection of our team’s unwavering commitment to providing revolutionary patient-centered care to the communities we serve.” 

According to IBM Watson Health’s analysis, if all cardiovascular hospitals performed at the same level as the 50 Top Hospitals, 8,900 additional lives could be saved, nearly 3,700 more bypass and angioplasty patients could be complication-free, and more than $1.4 billion could be saved. 

The Watson Health 50 Top Cardiovascular Hospitals study measures attainment in key performance areas: risk-adjusted inpatient mortality, risk-adjusted complications, percentage of coronary bypass patients with internal mammary artery use, 30-day mortality rates, 30-day readmission rates, severity-adjusted average length of stay, wage- and severity-adjusted average cost per case and, new this year, CMS 30-day episode payment measures. The study has been conducted annually since 1999.


Guest Column

Dave Kiff

An insider’s look at what’s going on in and around City Hall

Dave Kiff

Newport Beach City Manager Dave Kiff

Here’s what might be of interest on the agenda for the Newport Beach City Council meeting planned for Tuesday, November 14, 2017. I don’t summarize every item, so make sure you look at the City Clerk’s agenda page to read the whole agenda if you’d like.

The study session begins at 4 p.m. with: (1) A preliminary, early, conceptual roll-out of how an update to the General Plan might work. Did I mention this was early? You want to pay attention to this one. A community’s General Plan is its most consequential document (the City budget is a close second). The General Plan tells all about how and where various land uses will be accommodated, how circulation and traffic will (or won’t) work, where parks and recreational amenities will go, and much more. Yes, much of Newport Beach is built out and things are set – but it doesn’t mean that we can’t improve upon and adjust what we have. Staff will present some ideas as to how to involve the community, the Council, and various commissions in ensuring that the next update to the General Plan reflects the community’s values.

(2) An update on our new Harbor adventure – that of taking on limited code enforcement and mooring administration. As you know, we’ve been doing this since July 1, 2017, when we transitioned from the County Harbor Patrol to having City crews both manage moorings and take on general on-water code enforcement. It’s been a fun adventure, especially for our new part-time staff who do that under direction of their fearless leader, Dennis Durgan. And I do mean fearless – there is virtually no problem that scares Dennis off. From illegal live-aboards to loud charter boats to miscreants jumping off the Lido Isle Bridge. Miscreant is such a good word. But isn’t it normal to be a miscreant once or twice or twelve times? I’m only asking hypothetically. Anyway, four-ish months in, it’s time to update the Council on how we’ve done with Harbor Operations and what our next phases might be.

Following closed session items, the evening’s Regular Session will start at 7 p.m. Again, it looks to be a bit quiet on the evening side. 

(1) Consideration of supporting the California Water Fix, aka the Delta Tunnel program. We haven’t waded into these waters (rim-shot here) previously in a formal way, but our City’s approach has always been to attempt to ensure that our current mix of Orange County Water District groundwater and purchased Metropolitan Water District water (right now, it’s split about 70 percent OCWD and 30 percent Met) is always fully safe and fully reliable. We believe that the Delta Tunnel project will continue this assurance of good clean Met water from the Sierras snowpack. 

(2) A lot of new ADA access ramps and other sidewalk improvements are coming to Harbor View, Spyglass, Eastbluff and the Port Streets. This is another $1.2M towards ensuring that our community is fully compliant with disabled access laws (and easier for strollers).

(3) Lastly, the Council may formalize the General Plan process ideas that it will have talked about in the afternoon’s session.

A few community notes:

(1) Anyone who wants to talk about any airport issue is invited to our first informal discussion group this coming Friday, November 17th, from 3 – 4:30 p.m. at City Hall. We’ll be in the City Council Chambers, but don’t assume it’s that formal. You can come in shorts and flip-flops. Anyone is welcome, and you are further welcome to ask any question you want. Council Member Jeff Herdman, as chairman of the Aviation Committee, is hosting this with me in order to facilitate good communication and awareness about all things JWA. This is not a formal meeting of the Aviation Committee. 

(2) The current sculpture exhibition in the Civic Center Park is fun to walk along and through. Some of the kinetic ones are quite interesting, and the “Burnt Matchstick” is rather dramatic. Please consider picking one of these nice fall weekend days to walk through the park. 

(3) November and December are both times when we (and other agencies) squeeze in important infrastructure projects that can impact your daily routes. For advanced notice of these, be sure to check out Public Works’ Traffic Advisories page. It is updated weekly.   

I hope that you have a good Thanksgiving, as I won’t be e-mailing before that. About (this past) Veterans Day, after much DVR-ing and in slow bites, I only recently completed the PBS documentary done by Ken Burns and Lynn Novick on the Vietnam War. It was a lot to digest and a lot of emotional material. With no slight to veterans of other wars, I left the documentary wanting to shake the hands of and thank every Vietnam veteran for their service, knowing that some of those thanks didn’t occur when they first came home. The series is very much worth watching.

Thank you for reading. Please forward this Guide to family, friends and members of your HOA if you represent one. I always like hearing from you, too, so please don’t hesitate to ask a question or offer a comment. 

 

Sincerely,

Dave Kiff

City Manager

This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

949-644-3001


City and CR&R will help you get shredded

Shredding

Submitted photo

The City of Newport Beach and CR&R, Inc. are offering free document shredding for CR&R’s Newport Beach customers on Saturday, Nov. 18 from 8 a.m. to 12 p.m. in the parking lot of Mariners Elementary School. The school is located at 2100 Mariners Drive, Newport Beach. 

Securely shredding old documents, records and items that contain personal or sensitive in formation can help prevent identity theft and fraud. Newport Beach residents are encouraged to round up and bring the following types of documents:

Bank and financial statements

Credit card statements or pre - approved credit card offers

Old IRS tax forms, checks or bills

Old credit cards & plastic/paper membership cards. 

Documents, including junk mail, of any size and color will be accepted and can be bound with staples or paper clips. Unfortunately, the shredder cannot accommodate x - rays or larger plastic items such as binders. 

For more information, contact CR&R Customer Service at 949.625.6735.


Christmas Boutique at Roger’s Gardens celebrates tradition

Angel statue with wreath

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Photo by Aimee Goodwin/

Courtesy of Roger’s Gardens

Come celebrate the diversity and richness of European Christmas traditions at Joyeux Noel, the Christmas Boutique at Roger’s Gardens, which is open now through Dec. 23.

Roger’s Gardens buyers have traveled over rooftops to bring you curated holiday gifts and decorations that showcase some of the oldest European craftsmanship, where families pass on traditional art forms from generation to generation. Glass ornaments are hand blown and hand decorated in family workshops in Poland, and Nutcrackers made in Germany accompany seasonal dinnerware from Portugal and Italy.

Whether you stay up to watch the first star in the night sky on Christmas Eve or leave a stocking for Santa or a shoe for St. Nicholas, Christmas is a time to celebrate traditions and create new memories.

Roger’s Gardens is located at 2302 San Joaquin Hills Road, Corona del Mar. For more information, call 949.640.5800 or visit www.rogersgardens.com.


Fair Game

By TOM JOHNSON

 Mayor takes new job; longest running triathlon is in the books and the Christmas season is upon us

TomJohnson

Sent an email over the weekend to congratulate Newport Beach Mayor Kevin Muldoon on his new gig. Muldoon is joining Consumer Brands, LLC, to lead their Business Development efforts.

Muldoon was elected to Council in 2014 and was named Mayor last December. Previously, before joining Consumer Bands, Muldoon worked with a wireless communications company as General Counsel.

• • •

Kirsten Schmidt, Deputy Director of External Affairs for the Orange County Museum of Art is off to new adventures. Schmidt is moving on to USC where she’ll manage communications for the Roski School of Art and Design

As my many SC friends would say, “Fight on!”

• • •

Congrats also to Jack Caress, Pacific Sports LLC, for yesterday’s 39th Newport Beach Triathlon.

This year hasn’t been easy, but Jack fought through multiple obstacles, including a forced delay, yet once again pulled off a successful event. And why not, it’s the longest running triathlon in the world.

The swim portion is around the bay in Newport Dunes Waterfront Resort, then the bike and the run is up the Back Bay.

U.C. Irvine Crew is the Official Charity for the event.

There were a number of different races throughout the morning, but the one that came out big locally was the Sprint Triathlon won by Newport Beach’s Nicholas Kerr. Kerr completed the half-mile swim (10:57), 15 mile bike (41:16) and 1.5 mile run (18:44) in 1:14:12.9.

Brian Kelly, Lakewood, finished second to Kerr at 1:16:25.6.

Both Kerr and Kelly were in the Men’s 35-39.

The top race of the day, the Mega Sprint Triathlon was won by Todd Corley, Westlake Village. The event included a half-mile swim (15:24), 22.5 mile bike (58:26) and the 1.5 mile run (16:48) that Corley finished in 1:33:49.2.

For complete results of all races go to http://www.newportbeachtriathlon.com.

• • •

The holidays officially roll in this week with the Fashion Island Tree Lighting Thursday and Friday evening, beginning at 6 p.m. Mario Lopez is co-hosting the event.

Then, next week it’s the 27th Annual Lighting of the Bay at the Newport Dunes Waterfront Resort the Friday after Thanksgiving, November 24.

Let’s just say there’ll be a lot going on there. Food, drink, entertainment, Santa’s arrival on a stand-up paddleboard (only in Newport Beach), the movie “Arthur Christmas,” and, with one flip of a switch, the lighting of more than 50 electric Christmas trees and holiday decorations. 

Things get underway at 3 p.m. and continue with the movie beginning at 6 p.m.

Admission? FREE!

It doesn’t get better than that.

• • •

Friday night I’m crossing the border and going to the Crack Shack. No, I know what you’re thinking, not that. Famous TV Chef Richard Blais, who was just in town for the recent Newport Wine & Food Festival, is opening a new restaurant in Costa Mesa at 17th Street and Orange Avenue.

It’s a pre-party. We’ll make sure to give you a peek next Monday.

I guess if I meet Blais, I’ll shake his hand and tell him to “break an egg!”


City Staff Honored by the Trauma Intervention Program

Monsoor and Thompson

Submitted photo

(L-R): Officer Kevin Monsoor and EMS Division Chief Kristin Thompson 

On Wednesday, Nov. 1, two City staff members were honored by the Trauma Intervention Program (TIP) of Orange County for their outstanding service to the community.  

EMS Division Chief Kristin Thompson received the TIP Founders Award. This award is not presented every year and is reserved for someone that notably puts in the extra time and effort to get a program up and running. Because of Thompson’s dedication, the TIP program has been extremely successful with the Newport Beach police, fire and lifeguards using the volunteer services.

Officer Kevin Monsoor received the Heroes with Heart award for going above the call of duty and providing compassionate service to Newport Beach community members. 

TIP coordinates and trains volunteers to respond as needed to offer emotional support after a tragic event. Their goal is to prevent what mental health professionals call the “second injury.” They step in to work with first responders and medical staff to provide assistance to family members who are emotionally processing the aftermath of a tragedy. 

To learn more about the TIP program or about becoming a volunteer, visit www.tiporangecounty.org.


City Councilmember Dixon to hold Town Hall

Diane Dixon

Submitted photo

Diane Dixon, Newport Beach City Councilmember 

On Thursday, Nov. 30, Newport Beach City Councilmember Diane Dixon (representing District #1) will hold a Town Hall at 6:30 p.m. in Marina Park. Please mark your calendars for this information meeting.

Residents can email topics they would like to see be discussed to This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it..

Marina Park is located at 1600 W. Balboa Blvd., Newport Beach.


You’re invited to a Day of Style

Come enjoy a Day of Style at Lido Marina Village’s Bailey44 on Thursday, Nov. 16 from 5 to 8 p.m.

Bailey44 and wardrobe stylist Mark-Alan Harmon will preview the Holiday Collection. Festivities include bubby, bites and a complimentary personal styling. Ten percent of the sales will benefit the Orange County Ronald McDonald House.

To RSVP, email This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. or call 949.612.7833.

Lido Marina Village is located at 3434 Via Lido, Newport Beach.


Want to learn how to tango? Here’s your chance…

Tango

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Courtesy of CAMI

Join in the fun of free tango lessons on the Julianne and George Argyros Plaza at Segerstrom Center for the Arts on Tuesday, Nov. 14 from 6:30 to 7:30 p.m. and Thursday, Nov. 16 from 5:30 to 7:30 p.m. Then on Saturday, Nov. 18, it’s time to dance at the free Tango Dance Party from 5:30 to 7:30 p.m., just before the 8 p.m. performance of The Spirit of Argentina by Tango Buenos Aires.

Award-winning Argentine tango champion Marcelo Rivero will teach the essential techniques and movements of ‘the tango’. All levels of experience are welcome, so no experience necessary!

Performances of The Spirit of Argentina take place Nov. 18 and 19 at 2 and 8 p.m. in the Renee and Henry Segerstrom Concert Hall.

Segerstrom Center for the Arts is located at 600 Town Center Drive, Costa Mesa. For tickets and more information, visit www.scfta.org.


Balboa Bay Club & Resort to hold annual Christmas tree lighting

BBC Club Tree Lighting

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Submitted photo

One of the most spectacular tree lightings you will ever see takes place Sunday, Dec. 3 at 6 p.m. at the Balboa Bay Club & Resort’s Entrance-Porte Cochere.

Orange County School of the Art’s premier student group MONTAGE! will help kick off the holiday season with an all-new musical revue, “Holiday Hullabaloo!” This grand, high-energy performance features Frosty, Rudolph, Santa and friends, holiday magic, live entertainment, and the lighting of the giant 20-foot Christmas Tree.

Open and free to the public, complimentary treats and beverages will be available.

Balboa Bay Club & Resort graciously asks you to donate one new, unwrapped toy per person, benefiting “Toys for Tots.” Reservations are not required.

The Balboa Bay Club & Resort is located at 1221 West Coast Highway, Newport Beach. For more information, visit www.BalboaBayClub.com, or www.BalboaBayResort.com. Call 949.645.5000.


Stump the Stu

You ‘otter’ know this

Stump the Stu 11.13.17

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This one could be a tough one. Where is it?

Good luck.  

Take the challenge, and submit your answers to: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.. The correct answers will be in Thursday’s edition.

If you have a unique spot or icon around town that you think StuNewsNewport readers would enjoy finding out about, please shoot it, share it and give us the answer, so we can challenge them!


Southern California authors commemorate Veterans’ sacrifices in first-hand accounts of the Pacific War

Counting The Days

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Courtesy of Craig B. Smith

From nuns to POWs, their survival depended on the sacrifices and brave actions of men and women in the Armed Forces. This theme is common to each of these first-hand accounts of the Pacific War: December 7, 1941: Letters from Hilltop House; Flying with Biscuit Bomber Bob; Trapped in Paradise; and Counting the Days: POWs, Internees, and Stragglers of World War II in the Pacific.

On December 7, 1941, Anne Powlison was cooking breakfast at her hilltop home in Kailua, Oahu. Hearing planes, she looked out her kitchen window and saw planes bombing Kaneohe Naval Air Station, and then turning to go to Pearl Harbor. A plane passed at eye level with her window. She saw the pilot staring at her from his cockpit. That day, and every day thereafter until New Year’s Day, 1942, she wrote to her son Peter who was at the University of Washington. Peter saved the letters, dropped out of school, and joined the Marines. The letters were lost for more than 70 years, but were found and published by Powlison’s granddaughter. They provide new insight into the horror of that day.

Bob Mosier, who lives in Laguna Beach, was in high school in December 1941, when two tragedies occurred: Pearl Harbor and the death of his father. When he graduated from high school at age 18, he enlisted in the Army Air Force and was sent to the South Pacific. He was one of the dozens of pilots who kept MacArthur’s troops supplied all the way from Guadalcanal to Tokyo. While shooting was going on in Manila, he landed his plane on a street near Santo Tomas University and took 60 American civilians to freedom from the prison camp.

Hedda Jaeger, a young nun trained as a nurse, along with three other nuns from the Sisters of Saint Joseph in Orange, Calif., volunteered to go to the South Pacific as missionaries in 1940. Their destination: Buka, a small island adjacent to Bougainville in the Solomon Islands. After Pearl Harbor, the Japanese captured Buka for an airbase, and the nuns fled and hid out in the jungles of Bougainville. After 13 months on the run, they were rescued by an American submarine in a daring midnight raid.

Garth Dunn was a 19-year-old Marine stationed on Guam in 1941. On December 7 (December 8 in Guam), the island was bombed. Two days later the Japanese captured the island and Dunn spent four years as a slave laborer in three different Japanese POW camps. He, and the five other POWs featured in Counting the Days, all had amazing survival stories before their release from captivity.

Dockside Sailing Press, located in Newport Beach, focuses on Southern California writers with unique stories to tell. Books are available at Lido Village Books, Newport Beach; Amazon.com; or from the publisher. www.docksidesailingpress.com


School Notes

NMUSD to research parents’ experiences with the District

Newport-Mesa Unified School District has partnered with Hanover Research, an independent research firm, to explore parents’ experiences with the district. The findings from this exploration will support the development of the district’s Local Control and Accountability Plan (LCAP).

As part of this exploration, Hanover Research will conduct a series of telephone interviews with parents. These conversations are designed to explore how parents engage with the district and their child’s school, and how parent engagement could be improved. 

Participants will be selected at random and participation in these interviews is voluntary. However, the District points out that it is important that members of the Newport-Mesa school community participate because only they can tell them about their perceptions and experiences. Please note that participation or non-participation will not affect any relationships you or your student(s) have with teachers, peers, or administrators. If you choose to participate, your responses will be kept anonymous.

Parents may be contacted by Hanover Research in the coming weeks to request your participation. If you have any questions or do not want to participate in these conversations, please email Hanover Research’s Content Director, Cate Keller at: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. or call 714.424.8919.

Free flu shots for NMUSD individuals

Newport-Mesa Unified School District will host a Flu Vaccine Clinic on Wednesday, Nov. 15. Vaccines are available at no cost for non-pregnant individuals four years and older at the HOPE Clinic, 2045 Meyer Place, Building C, Costa Mesa, from 1 to 5 p.m.

Vaccines will be distributed on a first come, first serve basis and will be given until posted time or until supplies run out. Please wear short sleeves or a sleeveless top. 

Suicide Education and Prevention Strategies for parent

The Newport-Mesa Unified School District will present Suicide Education and Prevention Strategies at local high schools in November. This workshop will focus on the principles of suicide prevention, outline NMUSD policies, procedures and provide guidance for parents. The discussion will include the identification of common myths, risk factors and warning signs as well as highlight protective factors, primary prevention, early identification, referral and available resources. Suicide prevention is an on-going, collaborative process and parents’ participation is urged.

Corona del Mar High School: already completed

Newport Harbor High School: Nov. 15, 6 p.m., NHHS Reading Room

Costa Mesa High School: Nov. 21, 6 p.m., CMHS Theater

Estancia High School: Nov. 29, 6 p.m., EHS Theater

Corona del Mar High School

CdM ORCHESIS DANCE COMPANY presents “Dancing with the Teacher” on Thursday, Nov. 16 at 7 p.m. in the Big Gym. Tickets are $5 pre-sale and $10 at the door.

Newport Harbor High School

Support NHHS and Ensign Middle school music programs by buying holiday Poinsettias.

The Newport Harbor Music Foundation offers the 15 – 17-inch plants wrapped in red foil for just $12.

Plants are on sale until Nov. 29 and will be available for pick up on Wednesday, Dec. 6 at NHHS in front of the Bell Tower between 12 and 6 p.m.

To order, go to http://shop.nhhsmusic.com.

• • •

An Audition Workshop for NHHS Drama will take place Friday, Nov. 17, from 3:30 to 6:30 p.m. in the NHHS Robert B. Wentz Theater.

Learn some songs for an upcoming performance, get a feel for the choreography and meet the directing team.

Bring water, comfortable shoes and closed-toe shoes.

You can sign up on the bulletin board of the Black Box Theater.


OCMA names four new trustees

Pivotal Heilmann

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Courtesy of OCMA

“Surfing On Acid” by Mary Heilmann, part of PIVOTAL | Highlights from the Collection on display at OCMA now through December 31

President Craig W. Wells and Director & CEO Todd D. Smith of the Orange County Museum of Art (OCMA) announce the appointment of four new business, art and philanthropic leaders from Orange County to the museum’s Board of Trustees. These additional trustees – above the eight supporters who joined the board in July of this year – takes the total number to 25. The new trustees have backgrounds in various businesses and have supported the museum for years. They began their tenure on Oct. 19, 2017. The new trustees are: James Bergener, Teri Kennady, Heidi Lynn and Curt Lyon.

“The museum leadership is grateful to see so many individuals step forward to support the museum as we develop and implement our plans for the future,” stated OCMA President Craig W. Wells. “OCMA’s next chapter will include exciting new directions in how we present modern and contemporary art from California and the whole of the Pacific Rim, and determine how we engage diverse audiences in these changes.”

The new trustees are united in supporting the museum’s future and their involvement, along with the museum’s current trustees, will certainly cement OCMA’s role as a leader in Southern California’s cultural landscape.

“This is one of the most exciting times for the trustees of OCMA,” continued Wells. “As we finalize our plans for the move to Costa Mesa, the museum has an opportunity to revisit how we serve our communities and all of our trustees are committed to the expansion of the museum’s program throughout the entire county and beyond.”

Orange County Museum of Art is located at 850 San Clemente Drive, Newport Beach. Museum hours: Wednesday - Sunday, 11 a.m. - 5 p.m.; Extended hours, Friday, 11 a.m. - 8 p.m. www.ocma.net.


SCAPE to hold artist reception

SCAPE

Submitted photo

Alex Couwenberg’s “Into the Sea,” 2016, an acrylic on canvas

On Saturday, Nov. 18 from 6 to 8 p.m., SCAPE in Corona del Mar will hold its first solo exhibition featuring artist Alex Couwenberg and his works. His exhibition, “Long Play,” on display now through Dec. 3, references the artist’s love for music and also his long, consistent dedication to making art.

SCAPE (Southern California Art Projects & Exhibitions) is located at 2859 E. Coast Highway, Corona del Mar. For more information call 949.723.3406 or visit www.scapesite.com.


NMUSD to hold Flu Vaccine Clinic

NMUSD Logo

Submitted photo

Newport-Mesa Unified School District (NMUSD) will host a Flu Vaccine Clinic on Wednesday, Nov. 15 from 1 to 5 p.m. Vaccines are available at no cost for non-pregnant individuals four years and older. Vaccines will be distributed on a first come, first serve basis and will be given until posted time or until supplies run out. Please wear short sleeves or a sleeveless top.

Vaccines will be available at HOPE Clinic, 2045 Meyer Place, Bldg. C, Costa Mesa. Call 949.515.6725 for more information.


Realtor John Stanaland sells Pelican Hill estate for record-setting $40 million

Aerial Shot of Vlla

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Photos courtesy of 

HOM Sotheby’s

Evoking the timeless feel of a European estate, Villa del Lago located at 1 Pelican Hill Road North, recently sold for $40 million, breaking Newport Beach’s city record and placing second all-time in Orange County. John Stanaland with HOM Sotheby’s International Realty was the listing real estate agent for the property.

Combining classic style with every conceivable state-of-the-art convenience, the 17,000+ square-foot villa was completed using exquisite materials sourced from Italy. With eight bedrooms and 17 baths, it is set on 12.47 acres, the largest estate parcel in coastal Orange County.

Hallway with Piano

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Less than a mile from the world-class Pelican Hill Resort and with no immediate neighbors, it is a self-contained secluded oasis, private and secure, with panoramic views of canyons, city lights and Pacific Ocean vistas.

Beyond the gatehouse entry is an elegantly landscaped world unto itself – a cascading lake of more than one acre, a tennis court, stable and riding ring, putting green, pool pavilion and an organic edible garden. Its sun-soaked slopes make it ideal for a vineyard; a wine cave along the lake awaits the villa’s first vintages.

Home Theater

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No detail has been overlooked in the fine custom finishes, including marble and limestone, intricate ceilings, gold leaf and ironwork. Features include formal and intimate entertaining areas, a professional kitchen, butler’s kitchen, china/silver room, conservatory dining, sumptuous guest accommodations, wood-paneled lounge with bar and boardroom, and a master wing with its own living and screening rooms. A caterer’s kitchen with a roll-up door is perfect for entertaining. Basement level amenities include an indoor pool, high-tech theater, gym and sauna, wine cellar and staff rooms. The 14-car garage is a collector’s dream.


Leadership Tomorrow alumni get reacquainted at mixer

Tracy Trudi Jenny

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Photos by David Kawashima

(L-R): Tracy Slayton, Trudy Naman and Jenny Roney

Graduates of the Leadership Tomorrow program, representing the cities of Newport Beach, Costa Mesa, Irvine and Tustin, mixed, mingled and reconnected at the alumni mixer, held Nov. 6 at the Lincoln Experience Center in Fashion Island.

Kristin Miller on the mic

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Kristin Miller (right), Chairman of Leadership Tomorrow, thanks the Lincoln Experience Center for hosting the event

In its 30th year, Leadership Tomorrow includes powerful leaders and citizens throughout Orange County that come together to learn more about the intricacies of the communities where they live and do business in.

LT Board Members

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Leadership Tomorrow board members

Amid tray passed hors d’oeuvres and a no-host bar, the Lincoln Experience Center, a gateway to vehicle demonstrations and exclusive events, provided the perfect backdrop for the get-together evening.

IAshley Lana Charlene

(L-R): Ashley Johnson and Lana Johnson catch up with Charlene Ashendorf

A special thanks to the Newport Beach Chamber of Commerce for organizing the event.


Interfaith Council to hold “Hearts & Hands”

On Saturday, Nov. 18 from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m., the Newport-Mesa-Irvine Interfaith Council will hold its 17th annual “Hearts & Hands,” a community service day at the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints, located at 801 Dover Drive, Newport Beach.

The theme, “What Are You Made Of? (And Who?)” will explore what makes you unique in mind, body and spirit, and why it matters.

Among the more than 15 hands-on projects that will take place: Freedom Pen Project, First Aid Kits, Coats and Shoes Collection, Handmade Wooden Toys, Adoption Tree, Cat Care Packages, and Survival Stockings. A CPR class will take place from 9 a.m. to 12 p.m., and free flu shots and a Red Cross Blood Drive will be occurring throughout the day. A family research specialist will be on hand to assist you in learning more about your family history. They request that you bring homemade baked goods, coats and shoes, and books and magazines. Students and Scouts will earn service credits.

To sign up for CPR, Blood Drive and to download the Family History Form, visit www.JustServe.org. For more information, email jThis email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.


Pet of the Week Dog and Cat print

StuNewsNewport is delighted to be working with the Newport Beach Animal Shelter to help get the word out in search of loving homes for pets that deserve a warm, nurturing environment and a place to call “home.”

Thor

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Courtesy of Newport Beach 

Animal Shelter

MEET THOR

Thor is a sweet, lap lover

Thor is a 3-year-old Lhasa Apso mix. He is sweet and loves to sit in your lap. He is good with adults, children and other dogs. Thor is neutered, microchipped and up to date on his vaccinations. He has also had his teeth cleaned. 

Adoption costs at the shelter:

Dogs - $130

Puppies - $150

Cats - $90

Kittens - $110

At any given time, the shelter can have 4 - 5 dogs and 7 - 8 cats/kittens available for adoption. At times, they receive owner turn-ins that would do best adopted out together. 

If you are interested in finding out more about Thor, or any other animals up for adoption, the Newport Beach Animal Shelter is located at 20302 Riverside Drive, Newport Beach. It is open daily from 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. Call 949.644.3656. Email Valerie Schomburg at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it..

To find out how you can help support the shelter, visit www.nbpd.org and click on “Our Animal Shelter” to view the wish list. They can always use food & treats; new toys; grooming, hygiene & comfort products; as well as laundry soap, dish soap, paper towels, sponges & scrub pads and lint rollers. If you are interested in volunteering, you can fill out and sign the application on the website.


Passenger counts down a smidge at JWA

JWA

Submitted photo

Airline passenger traffic at John Wayne Airport decreased in September 2017 as compared with September 2016. In September 2017, the airport served 853,545 passengers, a decrease of 1.6 percent when compared with the September 2016 passenger traffic count of 867,073.

Commercial aircraft operations increased 0.1 percent and commuter aircraft operations decreased 43.7 percent when compared with September 2016 levels.

Total aircraft operations increased in September 2017 as compared with the same month in 2016. In September 2017, there were 24,550 total aircraft operations (takeoffs and landings), a 1.7 percent increase compared to 24,128 total aircraft operations in September 2016.

General aviation activity, which accounted for 68.4 percent of the total aircraft operations during September 2017, increased 2.7 percent when compared with September 2016.

The top three airlines in September 2017 based on passenger count were Southwest Airlines (345,252), American Airlines (135,008) and United Airlines (119,982).


Segerstrom Center to hold Salute Our Veterans event

Segerstrom Flag Wall

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Photo by Doug Gifford

Segerstrom Center for the Arts will honor Orange County’s veterans during the Salute Our Veterans event on the Julianne and George Argyros Plaza on Saturday, Nov. 11 from 10:45 a.m. to 2 p.m.

The day begins with Presentation of Colors and National Anthem at 10:55 a.m. More than a dozen local organizations will be on hand to celebrate community spirit and encourage volunteerism. Families and friends will lend their hands to assemble care packages that will be sent to active service men and women by Operation Interdependence. Food and entertainment will be available throughout the day.

Participants include: Support the Enlisted Project, Veterans First OC, Honor Flight Southland, Patriots and Paws, Saddleback High School’s Jr. ROTC, Veterans Yoga Project, LA Muses, Patriot Brass Ensemble, Alzheimer’s Orange County and The Fresh Rhythm. Veteran stories will be told by heroes who lived them.

Segerstrom Center for the Arts - Julianne and George Argyros Plaza is located at 600 Town Center Drive, Costa Mesa. www.scfta.org


Salute to Veterans: free community event at OC Fair & Event Center

American Flag

Submitted photo

The OC Fair & Event Center is hosting a free community event, Salute to Veterans, this Saturday, Nov. 11, from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. The celebration will be presented in collaboration with California labor unions and the Orange County Market Place.

“It is an honor to host Salute to Veterans at OC Fair & Event Center,” said Kathy Kramer, OC Fair & Event Center CEO. “It is our goal to bring the community together to recognize our veterans and to thank them for their service.”

The Veterans Day celebration is free, and the community is invited to bring non-perishable items to donate to a food drive which will help veterans in need. Last year, 5.6 tons of food was collected at multiple sites.

“We look forward to partnering with California labor unions and the OC Market Place to offer important services to veterans as well as fun and food for the whole family,” Kramer said.

The day’s festivities will include:

Complimentary lunch

“Take Me Home Huey,” a Vietnam War-era helicopter exhibit

Bounce houses and postcard project for youngsters

Military vehicles and reenactments

Seventy booths with information on services for veterans, including free health screenings, job access and resources

Food drive for veterans

Swing Cats band and swing dancers

Pacific Symphony Brass Quintet

“California labor unions started this event five years ago to say thank you to 

veterans and connect them to the services and jobs they need when they come home from serving our great Country,” said Jennifer Beuthin, general manager of the Orange County Employees Association. “Working people are proud to stand with veterans in partnership with our communities to host this event, collect tons of food for homeless veterans in need, connect veterans to job training, and to honor their service to our country.”

Orange County Market Place will be open from 7 a.m. to 4 p.m., and will offer ice cream treats at 2 p.m., immediately following the Salute to Veterans event.

Heroes Hall at OC Fair & Event Center will be open and feature a new photography exhibit, Kimberly Millett’s Operation Iraqi Freedom, as well as the Veterans Story Booth, where vets can record and share their tales of service. Heroes Hall will present a plaque unveiling in the Medal of Honor Courtyard during the event.

OC Fair & Event Center is located at 88 Fair Drive, Costa Mesa. www.ocfair.com


Police Files

Police threaten to send in the dog, suspect emerges

Officers responded to a construction site in the 2000 block of Balboa Boulevard on Saturday morning at 12:45 a.m. A nearby resident believed he saw movement in the construction area and called the NBPD for the suspicious activity.  

Upon arrival, officers found a truck parked next to a hole in the chain link fence surrounding the site, leading them to believe that someone had entered the area.  

Although the subject did not initially respond to verbal commands from the officers, a man finally exited the construction area after announcements that a police canine was on-scene and available for a search.  

Police arrested Steve Alan Horbino, a 26-year-old student from Garden Grove.

A pair of bolt cutters was found in Horbino’s truck.  

After a thorough field investigation, officers formed the opinion that he was in the construction area to commit a burglary. He was arrested for residential burglary, with no forced entry and possession of burglary tools.

Bail was set at $50,000.

Three arrested in apparent early morning beat-down

Early Sunday morning, Nov. 5, Newport Beach Police officers responded to the area of 28th Street and Newport Blvd. in response to a report of a physical fight. They found a victim that was taken to a local trauma center for treatment of his injuries and three men were detained for further investigation.  

After a thorough field investigation, including several witness interviews, officers arrested the three men. Initial investigation indicates that the arrestees, who were previously unknown to the victim, engaged in a verbal altercation with him before the physical fight ensued.

Arrested were Christian Daniel Armendariz, 22, Yorba Linda; Ian Justin Padilla, 24, Downey; and Javio Perez, 24, Fontana.

Padilla and Perez were charged with assault with deadly force (hands and fists) and battery with serious bodily injury.

Armendariz was charged with battery with serious bodily injury and assault with a deadly weapon.

All were held on $25,000 bail each.

Scroll down to Police Beat for all arrests & crime reports


Stump the Stu

Oh what you find while you’re enjoying a cup of coffee

Stump the Stu 11917

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Dang, we thought we’d get you on this one. Lo and behold, we had a number of correct guesses: Marcy Weinstein, Sylvia Burnett, Ellen and Victor Trujillo, Lor Speach, Jim Coufos, Kim Crawford, Joe Stapleton and Jennifer Carey. 

And where is this Stairway to Heaven? Think Starbucks patio in Crystal Cove Shopping Center. There, at the base of the hill leading up to the Crystal Cove residences above is this fabulous gate to keep me and the other riffraff out. Need  key fob to enter.

Congrats to all. 

Oh, we always appreciate the guesses. 

If you have a unique spot or icon around town that you think StuNewsNewport readers would enjoy finding out about, please shoot it, share it and give us the answer, so we can challenge them!


Council Update

Will O’Neill

The people who make the OASIS Senior Center great

Will ONeill

Newport Beach City Councilmember Will O’Neill

In between scooping ice cream for a hundred root beer floats and dancing with my daughter to the Tijuana Dogs in the Evelyn Hart Event Center at the OASIS Senior Center, I observed yet again the incredible people that serve our City’s seniors.

Senior services will continue to grow as our demographics shift. According to a recent report from the Southern California Association of Governments, the 65+ age group added the most population to our City since 2000 (7,157 people). We still see 37.5 percent of our housing stock having been built before 1970. This means that as more people age in place and our senior population grows, our senior services become increasingly important.

Fortunately for our City, our senior population has been truly flourishing in activity and support. Volunteers have provided over 39,600 hours back into our community by serving as greeters, instructors, and home-delivered meals, to name just a few. These volunteers are often led by the incomparable dedication of the non-profit Friends of OASIS.  

The role of Friends has expanded in its 40 years of existence, with Friends providing travel services, gift shop, sailing club, monthly social gatherings, and fundraising events. Friends continues to provide substantial financial support to the transportation program and recreational activities. Their dedication encompasses Dale Carnegie’s belief that “[s]o the rare individual who unselfishly tries to serve others has an enormous advantage. He has little competition.”  

In addition to our core volunteers, our city spent over $3,000,000 last year on a mixture of excellent staff and maintenance and operations. Our city provides annually over 12,000 rides through our transportation services. Over 37,000 meals have been served at OASIS and through Meals on Wheels. Over 82,500 participants enjoyed recreational class. And, our OASIS fitness center received over 74,000 attendees last year alone! Our appreciation continues for our Senior Services Manager Celeste Jardine-Haug and her staff.

One final note, as we do experience increased numbers of seniors aging in place, Newport Beach has teamed up with Habitat for Humanity of Orange County to help low income seniors in need of critical home repairs. If you have any questions about the Senior Housing Assistance Repair Program (SHARP), please contact the OASIS Senior Center. Together we will continue to thrive. 

Will O’Neill is a Newport Beach City Council Member.


Help support the Third Annual Corona del Mar Village Food Drive 

Pedego bike

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     Submitted photo

(L-R): Michelle Brown and Cara Farley, Surterre Properties/Corona del Mar with Joe Carter, owner of Pedego Electric Bikes/Corona del Mar

Every person and pet need as least one meal a day. We are fortunate to live in an area where we enjoy each meal with barely a thought for those without food. With the holidays approaching, an effort is underway for all Corona del Mar, Newport Beach and Newport Coast residents to donate at least one non-perishable food and/or pet item as part of the Third Annual Corona del Mar Village Food Drive, from now through December 15.

All participating area residents will be eligible to win a Pedego electric bike, compliments of Pedego Electric Bikes and the BROWN and CHRISTENSEN group of Surterre Properties, Corona del Mar, valued at $2,300. 

The process of giving is very easy. Put your donation in a bag of choice, place the bag on your front porch and call or text Dana at 949.315.9720 with your name and address. They will pick up your donation the same day. You can also drop your bag off at Surterre Properties’ Corona del Mar office at 2515 E. Coast Highway, Ste. 5, or Pedego Electric Bikes, next door to Surterre Properties.

To be automatically registered, put your name, address and email on a separate piece of paper in your bag.

All items will be delivered to the Orange County Rescue Mission and local animal shelters.

For more information, contact Dana Christensen at 949.315.9720 or This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it..


The Exchange Club of Newport Harbor to present first run movie screening

Justice League

Submitted photo

The Exchange Club of Newport Harbor will present its 26th Annual Movie Event at the Lido Theater in Lido Village, on Wednesday, Nov. 15 with a screening of “Justice League.”

The Movie Event includes a food festival at 5:30 p.m. as well as a first- un movie showing at 7 p.m.

Tickets are $75 with $100 for VIP, which entitles preferred early seating. All ticket holders will receive a T-shirt, unlimited food samplings from sponsoring restaurants and admission to the movie.

Proceeds from this special event will benefit the Orange County Child Abuse Prevention Center and other local charities.

For more information and to order tickets, visit www.nbexchange.net, or write to P.O. Box 1022, Newport Beach, Calif. 92659, enclosing your check, payable to CA/NV Exchange Charitable Foundation. Tickets will be delivered to you by mail until November 11; after that, they will be held at the box office. Contributions are tax deductible.


Hoag Orthopedic Institute names Jennifer Mitzner CEO of Orthopedic Institute

Jennifer Mitzner

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     Courtesy of Hoag Hospital

Jennifer Mitzner, CEO, Hoag Orthopedic Institute

Jennifer Mitzner has been named CEO of Hoag Orthopedic Institute (HOI), which composes Newport Beach-based Orthopedic Surgery Center of Orange County, a specialty hospital in Irvine and a Main Street Specialty Surgery Center in Orange.

Most recently, Mitzner was the senior vice president and CFO of Orange County-based St. Joseph Hoag Health. She also served as the senior vice president of corporate services and CFO at Hoag Memorial Hospital Presbyterian, here in Newport Beach.

She succeeds Carlos Prietto, MD, founding partner at Hoag Orthopedic Institute.

According to Dr. Prietto, Mitzner has been a part of HOI since its inception, having been a valuable member of their board of directors, and knows and understands the operations and culture of HOI intimately.


Leadership in Heels speaker series presents final event of 2017

Scharrell Jackson

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Submitted photo

Scharrell Jackson, keynote speaker

The Leadership in Heels speaker series will host “Leadership is Not A Dress Rehearsal | The Show Starts Now!” on Thursday, Nov. 30 from 7 to 9 a.m. at the Center Club in Costa Mesa to motivate, inspire, educate and equip community members to see themselves as leaders.

With the goal to authentically pivot lives forward personally and professionally while stimulating the mind and penetrating the heart, Leadership in Heels Founder and CEO Scharrell Jackson, a full-time Partner, COO and CFO for Squar Milner in Newport Beach, one of the top 70 accounting firms in the nation, will keynote this last Leadership in Heels event of 2017. She will discuss what it takes to be a leader, “the cost” of leadership, how to find balance with the overwhelming responsibilities of leadership, the requirements and rewards of leadership, and how to sustain as a great leader.

“Each of us have individuals in our lives that we influence and we are all, therefore, leaders. It’s time we accept the responsibility of the role and learn how to be better leaders,” Jackson affirmed. “Leadership in Heels helps people to identify why and what may be stopping them from reaching their full potential. At our events, we provide tangible tools to add to your leadership toolbox.”

Jackson has overcome adversity and shares her story to give hope and courage to others. Her commitment to making a positive difference in the lives of others is the catalyst for Leadership in Heels and guides leaders on how to lead with confidence, courage and persuasive communication, yielding growth personally and within a team.

Each Leadership in Heels event has sold out. Attendees include c-suite executives, middle managers, entrepreneurs, community leaders, stay-at-home moms, those just beginning their careers or retiring out of their careers, and college students. Leadership in Heels is for everyone. Both men and women are invited to attend.

Tickets are $75 and can be purchased at https://lih-leadershipisnotadressrehearsal.eventbrite.com/. A portion of the net proceeds from “Leadership is Not A Dress Rehearsal” will benefit Irvine-based nonprofit Working Wardrobes, which empowers men, women, veterans and young adults overcoming difficult challenges to confidently enter the workforce and achieve success.

The Center Club is located at 650 Town Center Drive, Garden Level, Costa Mesa.

For more information about Leadership in Heels, visit

www.scharrelljackson.com/about-leadership-in-heels.


Letters to the Editor:

Peotter Recall – follow the money

As reported in the press, the campaign finance disclosures from the committees on both sides of the Scott Peotter recall have been submitted and they tell us much about who holds power in our city.

Dozens of Newport Beach residents contributed $78,672 to fund the pro recall efforts.

Two pro-Peotter committees were formed. “Newport Beach Residents Against Recalling Councilman Peotter” raised $27,000 from three donors. Howard Ahmanson and his affiliated Fieldstead Companies contributed $17,000 of the $27,000 (63 percent) with Larry Smith, giving another $8,000. Both Ahmanson and Smith are activists on social issue politics and Ahmanson is known for his extremist positions.

The other donor was Great Scott Tree Service who gave $2,000. On May 26, 2015, Peotter made the motion to reject unopened bids for trimming the city’s trees and to award the contract without bids to Great Scott. We will never know if they were the lowest cost provider because Peotter’s motion resulted in the bids being returned unopened. Once again, special interests donors are getting great return on their investment from Peotter.

The second pro-Peotter “Committee to Oppose the Recall” raised $14,125 from four donors including city developer John Saunders who gave $1,100. Peotter himself contributed 82 percent of this amount ($11,648) which was used to fund out of town “petition blockers” and to campaign against a fictitious “bunny tax”.

In addition to 10,688 residents calling for his recall, Peotter’s opponents raised more than twice as much money from a broad-based group of community leaders. Peotter raised money from politically aligned extremist activists and vendors doing business before the city. As the recall continues, we can expect Peotter to continue to shake down city vendors and developers to save his political scalp. It’s time to stop the “pay to play” and recall Peotter now.

Karl Kimme

Newport Beach

One more misstating of facts

One more misstating of facts from liberal (Susan) Skinner in her article. Twenty-two hundred units in Koll project is twice as big as Museum House? The Museum House was 100 units. Did she take any math classes? Once again, misleading public with fake facts.

Steve Roush

Newport Beach


Veterans Day barbeque planned on Balboa Island

Balboa Island American flag

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Submitted photo

On Saturday, Nov. 11 from 12 to 3 p.m., come enjoy a BBQ on Balboa Island in the park by the ferry on Agate Avenue. Food will be barbequed by the Balboa Island Fire Dept. and all Balboa Island veterans eat free (uniforms and caps encouraged)!

Sponsored by the Balboa Island Museum & Historical Society and Balboa Island Improvement Association, all donations are tax-deductible and benefit the Museum and its Veteran History Project.

The Balboa Island Museum Veteran History Project is administered by William Stewart, the museum’s Veteran History Project curator. The program is being designed to be available online, via the museum website, whereby every Balboa Island veteran’s name and information can be accessed. To date, more than 150 veterans on the Island have been located, the most famous being Audie Murphy, one of the most decorated veterans who served in WWII combat, who later became an actor and starred in films, including “To Hell and Back,” based on his own war accounts in the U.S. Army. He was awarded numerous medals including the distinguished Medal of Honor. Murphy kept his boat in Newport Harbor many years ago.

Cost: Adults, $5; Children, $2. For more information, visit www.balboaislandmuseum.org.


Newport Beach Women’s Democratic Club announces monthly meeting

NBWDC logoThe Newport Beach Women’s Democratic Club (NBWCD) will hold its monthly meeting on Tuesday, Nov. 14 at the Newport Beach Yacht Club. Doors open at 5:30 p.m. for a networking social; the meeting begins at 6 p.m. Seating is limited, so RSVPs are required. 

This month, NBWDC will present another energetic and informative workshop on Voter Outreach in preparation for the upcoming 2018 local, state and federal elections.  

Speaker Sara Holland worked as the assistant to the state field director for Obama for America in 2008. She interned in Senator Feinstein’s office, and worked on democracy and peace building issues at the Washington Institute for Near East Policy.  

Speaker Haley Horton is a NBWDC member who is actively involved in the Indivisible Movement which began following the 2016 election, and co-chairs NBWDC’s Voter Outreach Committee. She supports many local non-profits, is a current board member of the AIDS Services Foundation, and works with special needs children at a school in Mission Viejo.

NBWDC will also preview the upcoming Candidate Forum for Congressional District 48, scheduled for January 10, 2018. This is a collaborative effort among all Democratic Clubs within the 48th Congressional District. The objective is to highlight how candidates compare and contrast on policy issues. Time and location to be announced at a later date.

Newport Beach Yacht Club is located at 1099 Bayside Drive, Newport Beach. Visit www.NBWDC.org, or call 949.423.6468 to RSVP and for additional meeting information.


Free Wheelchair Mission seeks ‘1 million for 1 million’

Wheelchair

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Founder Don Schoendorfer talks with a happy recipient

Join Free Wheelchair Mission for snacks and an exclusive pre-release screening of the documentary Because No One Should Have to Crawl taking place on Thursday, Nov. 16. The film screening, followed by an intimate Q&A with Don Schoendorfer, founder and president of Free Wheelchair Mission, will be held at the Port Theater, 2905 E. Coast Highway, Corona del Mar. Doors open at 6 p.m.

The “1 Million for 1 Million” campaign invites individuals to transform the life of one of the world’s neediest people, those living with disabilities in the developing world. The PBS documentary is narrated by Sam Waterson, best-known for his role on the TV show “Law and Order.” The film is part of the award-winning public television series “Visionaries,” now in its 22nd season, which highlights rarely told stories of non-profit organizations around the world that make a positive difference in their community and beyond.

Schoendorfer believes that the dramatic, real-life stories showcased in the new documentary will inspire viewers to give the gift of mobility. The campaign is based on a simple premise: if one million individuals become inspired, they will be empowered to transform one million lives, one wheelchair at a time.

Free Wheelchair Mission celebrates the millionth milestone, distributing one million wheelchairs to people in need in 93 countries around the world since 2001. The goal is to deliver its next million wheelchairs by 2025, half the time it took to give out the first million.

Attendance is free to the public with RSVP to www.freewheelchairmission.org/NewportBeach.


Fashion Island to hold Tree Lighting Ceremony

Fashion Island

Submitted photo

The community is invited to the Fashion Island Tree Lighting Ceremony this holiday season, taking place at the Neiman Marcus/Bloomingdale’s Courtyard on November 17 and 18 from 6 to 6:30 p.m. Enjoy a performance of “The Magic of Christmas” starring The Young Americans, a visit from Santa Claus, a magical snowfall, and of course, the highly anticipated lighting of the tree!

Santa, along with celebrity co-hosts Mario Lopez of NBC TV Ch. 4’s “Extra” and KOST 103.5FM’s Ellen K, will bring the Christmas tree and spirit to Newport Beach this year.

For more information, call 949.721.2000 and visit www.shopfashionisland.com.


Presentation on Improving Water Quality in Newport Harbor slated for tonight, November 9

Newport Harbor

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An informative presentation on Improving Water Quality in Greater Newport Harbor is scheduled tonight, Thursday, Nov. 9 from 7 to 9 p.m. at OASIS Senior Center.

Presented by the City of Newport Beach, in collaboration with UCI’s Newkirk Center for Science and Society, the UCI Oceans Initiative and the Environmental Nature Center, the event focuses on mitigating the negative impacts of pollution and trash from the headwaters that drain into our Harbor from the inland region and other challenges to water quality and resilience.

The City of Newport Beach is inviting concerned citizens to begin a process of collaboration with Newport Beach City officials, ocean/water experts from UC Irvine and environmentalists on long-term regional sustainable solutions.

To RSVP, visit http://newkirkcenter.uci.edu.

OASIS Senior Center is located at 801 Narcissus Ave., Corona del Mar. Parking is available on site.


Farm to Fork: A Foodie’s Point of ViewFork

By LANA JOHNSON

FIFI’s BEST with BoD and Friends – Remembrance of an iconic OC culinary writer

Patrick and Fifi Chao

Submitted photo

Food writer Fifi Chao with her husband, Patrick

On Thursday, Nov. 30 at 6 p.m., members of OC’s culinary community are coming together to host a benefit dinner in remembrance of one of its most prolific food writers and supporters of the local food scene, Fifi Chao, who recently lost a battle with cancer.

Break of Dawn (BoD) in Laguna Hills will host the Pop-Up dinner, FIFI’S BEST. The restaurant, which serves breakfast and lunch, will host 66 guests for this special eight-course, pop-up dinner for $200 per guest with 100 percent of the ticket price donated to Fifi’s husband, Patrick, and his family.

Break of Dawn Chef/Owner Dee Nguyen will be joined by the following OC Chefs:

Yvon Goetz, The Winery Restaurant & Wine Bar

Joel Harrington, Lido Bottle Works

Amar Santana, Vaca

Rainer Schwarz, Hendrix/Driftwood Kitchen

Greg Daniels, Haven Gastropub

Dean Kim, OC Baking Company

Tarit Tanjasiri, Crema Artisan Bakers

“Fifi was the center of our OC culinary universe – there isn’t another person with a more thorough understanding and appreciation of the local food scene,” explained Chef Nguyen. “We want to show her family the same support she always showed to us.

Yvon Goetz

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Submitted photo

The Winery Restaurant & Wine Bar’s Chef Yvon Goetz is among culinary talent preparing a memorable dish

The menu:

Dean Kim

Bread: lardo, leek, maple, anchovy

Joel Harrington

Scallop: cauliflower, miso, truffle, yuzu

Greg Daniels

Foie Gras: huckleberry, matsutake, barley

Yvon Goetz

Black Cod: octopus, merguez, flageolet

Amar Santana

Duck: “bastille,” chestnut, kumquat

Rainer Schwartz

Snake River Farms Tenderloin: wild mushrooms, salsify, Napa wine love

Dee Nguyen

Cookie and Cream: corn, persimmon, enoki

Tarit Tanjasiri

Tarte Tatin: vanilla bean

Those interested in attending this special celebratory dinner can email Chef Dee Nguyen directly at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.. Special thanks to Sysco Foods for their product donation.

• • •

OLEA Cellar-Craft-Cook to open in Westcliff, Winter 2017

Russ Bendel

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Submitted photo

Restaurateur Russ Bendel to open OLEA with a European twist to Napa-Sonoma-inspired menu

Orange County-based restaurateur Russ Bendel is bringing a sister restaurant to his thriving wine country concepts, Vine and Ironwood, to the Newport Beach dining scene.

OLEA, named for a genus of trees that flourish in warm and tropical regions and scheduled to open by year’s end, will bring a European twist on the Napa/Sonoma-inspired cuisine and spirits at Vine, the restaurant Bendel assumed ownership of four years ago.

Bendel, his executive chef-partner Jared Cook, beverage director-partner Gabe Whorley, and operating partners Kyle Simpson, Kevin Franke, Paul Villa and Rion Edwards, compose the management team.

Specialties will include: Signature Crispy Meyer Lemon & Honey Duck Wings; Jumbo Lump Crab & Sea Salt Roasted Heirloom Beets; Chef’s Daily Market meat selection and fresh seafood; Jidori Chicken Schnitzel with Wild Mushrooms and Kabocha Squash Spaetzel, Duroc Pork Osso Bucco, 24-oz. Angus Bone-In Ribeye and Zinfandel Braised Napa Lamb Shank.

There will be a full bar with craft cocktails and beers and an extensive wine list. Patrons can enjoy the covered, heated patio, semi-private seating for 34, captain’s table accommodating 10 - 12 and ample self-parking.

OLEA is located at 2001 Westcliff Drive, Ste. 100, Newport Beach. www.oleanewportbeach.com

• • •

Savor The Impossible Burger at The Counter in Westcliff Plaza

The Impossible Burger

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The Counter is offering a “toppable” Impossible Burger 

The Counter is now offering the “toppable” Impossible Burger, a plant-based burger made by Impossible Foods. Touted as tasting, cooking, smelling and sizzling like a ground beef patty, it is produced without hormones, antibiotics, cholesterol or artificial flavors.

The on-menu signature burger includes herbed goat cheese, tomatoes, grilled red onions, mixed greens, spicy tomato jam and Dijon balsamic on an English Muffin (you can substitute your favorite bun), and also satisfy your build-your-own whims with specialty toppings. Cost starts at $16. It is also featured in a salad with mixed greens, lettuce blend, quinoa, alfalfa sprouts, toasted almonds, grilled red onions, roasted grape tomatoes and sesame ginger vinaigrette, beginning at $17.

The Impossible Burger is currently offered seasonally, but if it takes off, it could become a menu staple.

The Counter is located at 1104 Irvine Ave., Newport Beach. Call 949.642.0700. www.thecounter.com

Ciao Vincenza!


Fair Game

By TOM JOHNSON

Ivanka Trump comes to town to push Tax Plan

TomJohnsonThings are pretty quiet around town on the local political front. It’s signature-verifying time for or against the Recall. That should take us to close to the end of the month before we find out the next steps.

That being said, national politics was alive and well in town earlier this week as Ivanka Trump and United States Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin visited town to pitch the new Republican tax reform plan.

The event was hosted by wealth management firm Hightower Advisors/The Bahnsen Group and directed to Lincoln Club members.

The Tax Plan is rumored to assist people with tax cuts for making under $300,000 or so, and an increase for wealthier individuals making a million-plus.

Judging by the mission statement on The Bahnsen Group website front page, “We cater to affluent individuals, families, and institutions by identifying financial needs and matching them with solutions.”

Notice the “affluent.” I’m sure they’re not excited about the tax increases for the wealthy.

So, it was probably a good group to get an audience in front of for feedback.

I think everyone is expecting changes before this thing is brought before the public as a whole.

Ivanka

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Submitted Photo

(L-R): Joleen & David Bahnsen with Ivanka Trump

• • •

Big meeting before City Council next week, Tuesday, Nov. 14. At the Study Session, beginning at 4 p.m., an overview of the upcoming General Plan Update process will be provided. 

Then, at the Regular Council Meeting at 7 p.m., the Council will be asked to begin the process. 

They will then establish two committees and begin a process to collect applications for the General Plan Advisory Committee.

Get involved, as these updates don’t come along too frequently. Go to www.newportbeachca.gov/GPupdate for more information.

• • •

Sad to get the news this week that longtime Orange County Business Journal restaurant columnist Fifi Chao passed away at the age of 81.

According to the OCBJ, she was “born Shirley Jean Bernard, Shirley became ‘Fifi’ when her boss at Bank of America gave her the moniker because it just seemed to fit.”

She created a prolific personality locally and gathered a large following. 

Evidently, she was diagnosed with cancer several years ago and passed at her home, with her husband Patrick at her side.

She contributed to the OCBJ for more than 26 years.

Fifi, you will be missed!

• • •

Lastly, if you’re a Texas Hold’em poker player, I have a great local charity event on Friday, Nov. 17, beginning at 6 p.m., in a very cool local man cave. There’s also Bunko, for those that don’t player poker.

It’ll be fun, email me for details if you’re interested (This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.).


ENC hosts first ever Homeschool Day

Girl with twig

Courtesy of ENC 

The Environmental Nature Center (ENC) will be hosting the first ever Homeschool Day on Wednesday, Nov. 29 from 1:30 to 4:30 p.m. Join them for a series of programs at the nature center that have been exclusively designed to be engaging, but less structured to meet homeschool needs.

At the ENC, they believe that nature makes the best classroom. For their first program, they will be making multi-disciplinary connections to nature as participants explore different stations along the trails at their own pace. There will be various stations set up to make connections to social studies, science, language arts and mathematics.

The program is appropriate for students in first through third grade. Cost is $5 for ENC members and $8.50 for non-members. Visit www.encenter.org for more information on “Homeschool Day: Nature Connections.” For any questions, call 949.645.8489.

Environmental Nature Center is located at 1601 E. 16th St., Newport Beach.


CdM Highway of Flags needs your volunteerism

CdM Flag

Submitted photo

The Corona del Mar Flag Committee is looking for volunteers to help place the traditional American flags up and down Pacific Coast Highway in Corona del Mar for Veterans Day.

If you are able to assist in this patriotic effort, meet in front of the Corona del Mar Chamber office (between Starbucks and the Port Theater) at 2855 E. Coast Highway, Corona del Mar on Saturday, Nov.11 beginning at 6 a.m. and/or take-down at 4:30 p.m. at the same location.

They request you please arrive on time for instructions. For more information, call 949.300.3068 or This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it..


American Association of University Women presents “Time for Creativity”

Shop for unique holiday items at “Time for Creativity,” on Saturday, Nov. 18 from 1 to 3 p.m., sponsored by the American Association of University Women (AAUW), Newport-Mesa Irvine Branch.

Among the “finds” are homemade jams and jellies, handmade gift tags and quilts, crafts, flower arrangements, and books.

Author readings and book signings will take place with “Whimsical Warrior,” by Selma Mann and “A Hibernating Bear and a Holiday Hare: and What Mice Do When It’s Raining,” by M.A. Sutherland.

Cash contributions benefiting AAUW will be accepted at the door. Cookies and beverages will be served.

If you would like to attend, please RSVP to Selman Mann at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it., 949.760.6146, or Phyllis Sakioka at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it., or 714.721.9003.

The event takes place at Eastbluff Community Clubhouse, 2414 Vista del Oro, Newport Beach.


Sunday Musicale to feature husband-wife duo

On Sunday, Nov. 19 from 3 to 4 p.m., enjoy the melodic sounds of Duo Deak de Castera, a husband-wife musical duo. The performance will take place at Newport Beach Central Library.

During their careers as a professional pianist and violinist, Zachary Deak and Virginie d’Avezac de Castera have performed in many European countries as well as Morocco and California. They are committed to introducing the viola, this often misunderstood and little-known instrument, by exploring its rich and diverse repertory.

Castera and Deak

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Courtesy of NB Public Library

Virginie d’Avezac de Castera and Zachary Deak will perform at Sunday Musicale on Nov. 19

The performance takes place at Newport Beach Central Library’s Friends Meeting Room, 1000 Avocado, Ave., Newport Beach. The event is free of charge. www.newportbeachlibrary.org


Stump the Stu

Is this the Stairway to Heaven?

Stump the Stu 11617

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 “There’s a lady who’s sure all that glitters is gold, And she’s buying the stairway to heaven.” Thank you Jimmy Page of Led Zeppelin for composing one of my favorite songs of all-time. Perhaps you were singing about this gate and staircase. The only problem is that it didn’t exist way back then, but the song certainly fits today.

Where is it?

Good luck.  

Take the challenge, and submit your answers to: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.. The correct answers will be in Thursday’s edition.

If you have a unique spot or icon around town that you think StuNewsNewport readers would enjoy finding out about, please shoot it, share it and give us the answer, so we can challenge them!


Sherman Library & Gardens to hold holiday open house

Sherman Library Christmas Tree

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Submitted photo

On Thursday, Nov. 9 from 10:30 a.m. to 4 p.m., get into the holiday spirit during the Christmas Open House at Sherman Library & Gardens.

This annual holiday shopping event – Christmas Dreams – features specially chosen plants, handmade items and an array of unique holiday gifts. All shoppers will enjoy a 15 percent discount at this one-day only event. Complimentary handmade cookies, coffee and tea.

For more information, call 949.673.1880. Sherman Library & Gardens is located at 2647 E. Coast Highway, Corona del Mar. www.slgardens.org


Retaking the NMUSD collegiate calendar survey

NMUSD flag logo

Courtesy of NMUSD

Newport-Mesa Unified School District, in collaboration with Newport-Mesa Federation of Teachers (NMFT) and the Classified School Employees Association (CSEA), has decided to relaunch the online Collegiate Calendar Survey due to concerns expressed regarding the survey allowing for multiple entries.

If you have previously taken the online survey, please note that those responses will not be included. They ask you to retake the survey using the link previously provided or the link below. If you are a parent and have completed a hard copy of the survey, your input will be included and you will not need to retake the survey.

NMUSD sincerely apologizes for any inconvenience this may have caused. Please know that they truly value our school community’s input on this important topic, which is why they are moving to a more accurate survey platform. Collegiate Calendar Fact Sheet

Collegiate Calendar Survey


Letters to the Editor:

Good Neighbor Policy?

The NMUSD is changing its 50-year relationship with neighbors to its campuses.

It will transition CdMHS from a daytime-intensive use facility to a day and night intensive use facility. The District plans to install two lighted artificial turf fields at CdMHS where there have never been field lights before.

The District repeatedly refers to its “Good Neighbor Policy”. They say they want to be a good neighbor but they don’t want to follow host city rules. The District recommended the School Board to vote to exempt the district from City of Newport Beach regulations. Why? Because the city does not allow sports facility lighting installed within 200 feet of a residential zoned district. The lighting on this project will be 110 feet from residential structures.

The District walked away from negotiations with community groups for a binding field use agreement. Why? The District wants to have a fluid use policy whereby it can increase the nighttime field usage at any time for any reason with a School Board vote. 

Other communities have use agreements with their school districts that insure the facilities are being used as the Trustees intended. They stipulate hours of use, the maximum number of nighttime events to occur annually and state enforceable consequences for violations of the contract. Under these contracts, the District monitors the facility use. 

In the absence of a binding use agreement with the community, the new or current board could change hours of operation at will and may expand use to rent to outside groups. 

If the Trustees were sincere in their commitment to limit use, they would be eager to work with the community to come to a committed agreement.

Chuck Fry

Newport Beach

Peotter is Part of the Problem

As America reacts with disgust at the sexual harassment and assault record of Harvey Weinstein, the California Legislature, Fox News, and other political and media leaders, I have become exceedingly angry that our own City Council Member, Scott Peotter, was the only member of the city council to vote against the city’s Sexual Harassment Prevention Policy (September 13, 2016).  

What was he thinking? In light of the revelations of how wide spread sexual harassment and outright assault is in our nation, his vote becomes even more indefensible.

Further, Peotter claims to have recently worked for an organization whose leader, Ralph Drollinger “once counseled a group of Sacramento lawmakers that female politicians with young children had no business serving in the Legislature. In fact, he called them sinners.” (LA Times, August 3, 2017).   

Enough is enough for me, we need to eliminate the disrespect for women from our institutions and a good place to start is to support the recall of Scott Peotter. We owe it to our daughters.

Shannon Green

Corona del Mar

Skinner clarifies “drain the swamp” comment

Thank you for publishing my letter regarding the recall of Scott Peotter last Thursday. My last line referenced that the recall was a good first step toward ‘draining the swamp’ and restoring faith in city government, which you understood to mean that I was intent on removing the rest of the city council. I am not.

While I absolutely feel that Councilpersons Muldoon and Duffy (and to a lesser extent Dixon, who actually tried to remove some of the added pages to the petition) should be held accountable for their actions in undermining the constitutional rights of the residents with the 3,700 pages of the Museum House petition, there is a much larger swamp that needs to be drained. 

Much of that swamp revolves around political consultant Dave Ellis. While it is perfectly legal for him to elect candidates to the council and then immediately lobby them on behalf of large developers, it stinks to high heaven. Until this cycle is broken, we can expect more council decisions that disregard the best interests of the voters in favor of special interests. 

Add to that the total lack of transparency on the part of our city government. For example, the General Plan updates in 2006 and 2014 added extensive new development. Because the General Plan required a Greenlight vote, the city had to figure out a way to get it past the voters. The ballot question for both asked if voters wanted to “remove traffic and density from the General Plan”. In actual fact, the high-density apartments at Jamboree and San Joaquin Hills were approved in the 2006 General Plan as were the 2,200 dwelling units that will be used for the upcoming Koll Residences (twice as big as the Museum House) and were already used to approve Uptown Newport (1,244 units coming out of the ground right now). Even if you had wanted to find out what extra developments were being added, it was nowhere on the city’s website for the 2014 General Plan.

In 2012, the Planning Department pushed, and the City Council approved, the conversion of 79 hotel rooms into apartments (which were added to the number of new apartments in Newport Center). This shouldn’t have been allowed without a General Plan Amendment for a number of reasons, but the city allowed this to occur. Those 79 new apartments should have been counted in the Greenlight calculations for the Museum House (leaving 21 units left that could be approved without a vote), but even after having this called to their attention, the Planning Department chose to ignore this inconvenient fact.

The list goes on and on. My hope is that the combination of the Museum House referendum and the recall of Scott Peotter will drain some of this swamp. I would love to live in a place where I could trust that my government is acting in my best interests. 

Susan Skinner

Newport Beach

Koll project should be considered after General Plan Update

Newport Beach residents have spoken clearly and vocally that we do not want massive high-rise condominium towers degrading the quality of life and special character of our city.  

The three colossal luxury condominium towers proposed by the Shopoff Group are a perfect example of the high-rise, high-density development that Newport Beach residents have already strongly opposed. This project looms over the next-door existing businesses as if progress has a right to trample existing property rights.  

This project needs to be considered during the upcoming General Plan process. The City is about to launch a General Plan Update because the current document is outdated and legally inconsistent. The Update will correct its many problems and will more accurately reflect residents’ needs and sentiments.  

Consideration of the Shopoff project should be postponed until the General Plan update is completed so that the views of existing residents and businesses are properly considered.

Don Harvey

Newport Beach


General Plan update process to begin

General PlanOn Tuesday, Nov. 14 at 4 p.m., the Newport Beach City Council will hold a study session to provide an overview of the upcoming General Plan Update process. Topics will include:

What is the General Plan and why are we updating it?

A City Council-appointed Steering Committee

A resident-led General Plan Advisory Committee

Consultant assistance

Community Engagement, outreach and participation

An initial draft work program

A general timeline

Committees will provide an open and transparent forum for civic and community engagement and discussion to review the General Plan, and update it to reflect the community’s vision.

Then later during the regular evening session, starting at 7 p.m., the City Council will be asked to initiate the process; establish the two committees and direct the City Clerk to begin accepting applications for the General Plan Advisory Committee.

The public is highly encouraged to attend both sessions and participate in the discussion. This is the community’s General Plan, active participation is important, and it begins with this first meeting. 

Additional information can be found at www.newportbeachca.gov/GPupdate.

If you have any questions or suggestions, email Jim Campbell,

Deputy Community Development Director at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it..


Little Lido Kids Club = Turkey Trouble

Turkey

Submitted photo

You’re invited to the Lido Marina Village Kids Club on Thursday, Nov. 16 from 10 to 11 a.m. at Lido Village Books. Bring your children and enjoy a reading of “Turkey Trouble” by Wendi Silvano and Lee Harper.

Kids will enjoy creating a special turkey of their very own, and adults will love the opportunity drawings and specials from participating Lido Marina Village retailers including $25 off your purchase at Eberjey, 15 percent off your purchase at Bailey44, 10 percent off your book purchase at Lido Village Books, 10 percent off your purchase at Sweaty Betty (first-time customers only), 10 percent off any one item at YOLK and 15 percent off your purchase at Juice Served Here.

This event is free and open to the public, but Little Lido Kids Club asks that you RSVP by visiting https://bit.ly/LLturkeytrouble. Each person who RSVPs will receive one entry for a drawing for a copy of the book of the day from Lido Village Books, a free week at Curl Fitness, a gift certificate to Sweaty Betty, a $10 gift card to YOLK and free juices from Juice Served Here. You must register before 8 p.m. on November 15, 2017 and be present to win. 

Can’t make it? Don’t worry, the Little Lido Kids Club will be held the third Thursday of every month.

Lido Village Books is located at 3424 Via Oporto, # 102, Newport Beach.


Pedestrians try to stay safe on Corona del Mar, where traffic flow reigns supreme

By AMY SNIDER SENK

Ped Crosswalk in CdM

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Photo by Amy Snider Senk

Crosswalk at Orchid Avenue and East Coast Highway

Crossing the street in Corona del Mar, especially at an intersection with flashing yellow lights and huge overhead signs announcing a pedestrian crosswalk shouldn’t make you feel like you’re risking your life. But at Orchid Avenue and East Coast Highway, pedestrians like Josette Patterson know first-hand how dangerous it can be.

It was a perfectly fine October afternoon when Patterson headed to the post office from her shop, Mark Patterson Jewelry, two blocks away. Patterson pushed the button to activate the crosswalk lights, which also trigger a verbal warning to cross the street cautiously because vehicles don’t always stop.

“Two cars went through,” Patterson said. “I waited for them before crossing. Then this guy came from the post office side, turning left. I didn’t see him. He hit me, and I fell down.” Witnesses began taking photos, and the police arrived. Later, Patterson was treated at Hoag for leg injuries. She is still undergoing physical therapy and only last week was able to finish a complete day’s work.

Patterson recently launched a petition to ask for a traffic signal, instead of a flashing light, at the Orchid Avenue crosswalk.

“This is a business district, but the cars are driving 50 miles per hour,” Patterson said. “It needs a light. Are they going to wait for someone to die? A kid to die? New York City is safer. I crossed the street in New York City for 27 years with no problems. You think it’s safe because of the flashing light, but it’s not safe. They’re driving so fast.”

Patterson asked Linda Leonhard, president of the Corona del Mar Chamber of Commerce, to mention her concerns at the October board meeting of the CdM Business Improvement District. Members were generally concerned, but also expressed the sentiment that pedestrians can’t expect that cars automatically will stop when the crosswalk lights are activated. City Councilman Scott Peotter attended that meeting and said it was unlikely that the traffic flow required another light at that intersection, considering that there’s a light at Poppy Avenue a few blocks away.

In a later email, Peotter said that he sent information to Tony Brine, the city’s traffic engineer, who was evaluating the situation. He also suggested that the city might need to conduct a crosswalk study for Corona del Mar, as was recently completed for the Balboa Peninsula. Brine has been in email contact with Patterson, explaining that the flashing crosswalk was added in 2006 at the community’s request and has improved safety by making the location more visible. He also promised a follow up.

Police spokeswoman Jennifer Manzella said there were four collisions at the Orchid intersection over the past year, including Patterson’s. But the statistics don’t show close calls, including mothers with strollers, who watch as cars race through the flashing lights, Patterson said. Some parents won’t let their kids use the crosswalk, she said.

The city might be interested in the flow of traffic, but improving safety should be the priority, Patterson said. “I’m making it my mission. I don’t care how much hell I have to raise. I’m going to fight this.”

~~~~~~~~

Amy Snider Senk has lived in Corona del Mar for 17 years and was publisher of Corona del Mar Today, an online newspaper that ran daily for seven years. Senk, a graduate of the University of Missouri School of Journalism, is involved in the Corona del Mar Residents Association and the Corona del Mar High School PTA. She and her husband have two children.


Pet of the WeekDog and Cat print

StuNewsNewport is delighted to be working with the Newport Beach Animal Shelter to help get the word out in search of loving homes for pets that deserve a warm, nurturing environment and a place to call “home.”

Owl

Courtesy of Newport Beach 

Animal Shelter

MEET OWL

Owl is seeking a lovely, permanent home

Owl is a 10-week-old Main Coon kitten. He is neutered, microchipped and vaccinated. Owl is small and adorable, with huge eyes. 

Adoption costs at the shelter:

Dogs - $130

Puppies - $150

Cats - $90

Kittens - $110

At any given time, the shelter can have 4 - 5 dogs and 7 - 8 cats/kittens available for adoption. At times, they receive owner turn-ins that would do best adopted out together. 

If you are interested in finding out more about Owl, or any other animals up for adoption, the Newport Beach Animal Shelter is located at 20302 Riverside Drive, Newport Beach. It is open daily from 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. Call 949.644.3656. Email Valerie Schomburg at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it..

To find out how you can help support the shelter, visit www.nbpd.org and click on “Our Animal Shelter” to view the wish list. They can always use food & treats; new toys; grooming, hygiene & comfort products; as well as laundry soap, dish soap, paper towels, sponges & scrub pads and lint rollers. If you are interested in volunteering, you can fill out and sign the application on the website.


Reading in the Redwoods at ENC 

The Giving Tree

Submitted photo 

On Sunday, Nov. 12, join the Environmental Nature Center for a “Tree Hug Hike” out to the Redwood Forest with Valerie Bain, from 9:30 to 11 a.m. Bain will read the children’s beloved classic, “The Giving Tree,” by Shel Silverstein, under the canopy of the tallest trees, while your family relaxes together on a blanket or towel.

Afterward, children and their adults will take a tree/plant hike, help the ENC by pulling invasive plants, then launch seed balls fro, the meadow deck. Your family can even purchase a native plant it their Native Plant Sale the same day to plant in your yard to provide habitat for birds and butterflies.

Parents must remain with youngsters at all times. All ages are welcome. Bring your own blanket or towel. Cost is $5 per child, pre-registered member; $7 per child, pre-registered non-member; and $10 per child, unregistered walk-in. To register and pre-pay, visit their website. 

Environmental Nature Center is located at 1601 E. 16th St., Newport Beach. www.encenter.org.


Free Wheelchair Mission seeks ‘1 million for 1 million’

Wheelchair

Click on photo for a larger image

     Submitted photo

Founder Don Schoendorfer talks with a happy recipient

Join Free Wheelchair Mission for snacks and an exclusive pre-release screening of the documentary Visionaries Because No One Should Have to Crawl takes place on Thursday, Nov. 16. The film screening, followed by an intimate Q&A with Don Schoendorfer, founder and president of Free Wheelchair Mission, will be held at the Port Theater, 2905 E. Coast Highway, Corona del Mar. Doors open at 7 p.m. 

The “1 Million for 1 Million” campaign invites individuals to transform the life of one of the world’s neediest people, those living with disabilities in the developing world. 

Schoendorfer believes that the dramatic, real-life stories showcased in the new documentary will inspire viewers to give the gift of mobility. The campaign is based on a simple premise: if one million individuals become inspired, they will be empowered to transform one million lives, one wheelchair at a time.

Attendance is free to the public with RSVP to http://www.freewheelchairmission.org/NewportBeach.


Fair Game

By TOM JOHNSON

 City receives grant for removal of derelict vessels

TomJohnsonAccording to The Log Newspaper, which many consider the Southern California “Bible” for many boaters, the City of Newport recently was granted $125,000 for “the removal and disposition of abandoned and owner-surrendered vessels in the harbor.”

The grant comes from California’s Division of Boating and Waterways (DBW). 

The DBW offers two grant programs, the AWAF and VTIP programs designed to remove, reduce and prevent abandoned recreational vessels and marine debris. 

• • •

Very nice Citizen of the Year event last Friday evening (Nov. 3) at the Balboa Bay Resort. Former City Manager Homer Bludau was the well-deserved honoree.

A couple of observations: First, Homer’s comments following the award were as heart-felt as I’ve ever heard from a recipient.

Second, you could tell how much he loved his fellow City employees and them him.

His love for this community and its people were extremely passionate. And, his faith and love for his family were, well, just real emotions came through.

That was the good stuff. 

Then there was this: Homer is a person I enjoy sharing a love for University of Arizona sports with. Each and every time Homer and I see each other we talk Wildcat football or basketball. 

So, imagine his surprise, and my surprise for that matter, when they talked about Homer’s love for U of A sports on Friday night, only to display Arizona’s arch rival Arizona State Sun Devils’ logo on the big screens in the accompanying video presentation.

Really?

I booed. I looked over at Homer and he was booing. Joe Stapleton, another U of A grad in attendance, told me he, too, booed.

If you’re a true fan, you had to.

This is what it’s tantamount to: imagine honoring Paul Salata, Mr. Irrelevant creator and huge, huge, huge, USC fan, only instead of putting up the SC logo, you mistakenly insert the UCLA logo.

Somebody is in big, big trouble.

Forget the Peotter Recall, forget the Koll airport area project, forget airport noise, someone put that slide in there and I want to know who?

I demand a complete apology. 

I think that’s what Mike Glenn did a few weeks back, so I’m following his lead.

Seriously, congrats to Newport Beach Chamber of Commerce CEO Steve Rosansky on another great community event. 

I’m impressed with what they’re doing and suggest that if you’re a business in Newport Beach, you should consider the opportunities and support that both of our Chambers are bringing to their members.


Childhelp Studio 54 Gala – a huge success

The Orange County Chapter of Childhelp welcomed nearly 250 guests to the Studio 54 Gala on Saturday, Oct. 28 at the Balboa Bay Resort. The event co-chairs Julie Adams, Joy Estrada and Shan Vincent organized this 4th annual night soirée that included a silent and live auction, opportunity drawing, dinner, gambling and lots of boogie dancing. The event raised nearly $200,000!

The evening began with Childhelp President Julie Adams, welcoming all in attendance and reciting the Childhelp Prayer for the Children. Kristen James, event advisory chair, then presented Paulie Harraka with the Benevolent Heart Award. In 2008, Harraka began his commitment to Childhelp while racing NASCAR and attending Duke University. He became an ambassador and a voice for the children, and through his fundraising efforts has collectively raised more than $1 million for Childhelp.

Edwards and guy

Photos courtesy of Childhelp

(L-R): Jim and Patti Edwards with Paulie Harraka

Patti Edwards, Childhelp national board member and Orange County Chapter member, spoke of the programs offered to the abused and neglected children in their care, and shared a touching audio clip of a child calling the 1.800.4-A-Child Hotline begging for help while hiding in a closet to escape abuse from his father.

The event committee members were Linda Burns, Mary Allyn Dexter, Susan Earlabough, Gwen Forquer, Jill Glick, Kelly Haugen, Susan Hill, Christine Johnson, Jennifer Kite, Katherine Meredith, Diana Miner, Alison Moriarty, Pam Pharris, Joyce Simon, Tami Smith, Cheryl Van Ocker, Gina Van Ocker and Anna Wellman. The men’s committee was headed up by Mark Adams and Bud Pharris and the members were Jay Burns, Mike Haugen, David James, Paul McDonald, Chris Miner, Mark Simon, Brett Smith, Alix Vincent and Zlatko Zadro.

Some of the evening’s generous donors were Jacquie and Michael Casey, Rachel and Matthew Blake, Christine Bren, Cable Family Foundation, Patti and Jim Edwards, FNtech, the Minkoff Family, the Zfaty Family, and Becky and Gary Cooper. In addition, the Macallans were major contributors to the success of Studio 54.

four ladies

(L-R): Shan Vincent, Julie Adams, Joy Estrada and Kristen James

The live auction items consisted of a priceless NASCAR experience, a Catalina Island Adventure, a NYC stay in a luxury apartment, a Macallan Party for 10, a Vaca Restaurant experience with Top Chef Star Amar Santana personally overseeing the dinner, an exceptional Liquor Cabinet filled with a fabulous collection of more than 35 bottles of fine spirits, a Lime Truck party for 50, and a four-day Big Bear getaway at the lakefront Home of Becky and Zlatko Zadro. The grand prize opportunity drawing of a $2,500 shopping spree at South Coast Plaza went to Jackie Olstad.

Childhelp reports that for each dollar expended, more than 90 cents is invested into serving the children in need of their program services, which include three group homes in Costa Mesa and the Childhelp Merv Griffin Village in Beaumont, Calif.


Book signing at Lido Village Books 

Kaira Rouda

Submitted photo 

On Sunday, Nov. 19, Lido Village Books will hold a book signing with author Kaira Rouda from 5 to 7 p.m. Her new book, “Best Day Ever: A Psychological Thriller,” is a chilling suspense novel told from the point of view of a man with a perfect life, on a mission to take his wife away for a romantic weekend without the kids. As he narrates the road trip to their lake house, the reader gets intimations of something ugly beneath the ideal.

Rouda is a USA Today best-selling and award-winning author of contemporary fiction.

There will be a reading/discussion, Q&A and refreshments, with the book signing following the talk.

Lido Village Books is located at 3424 Via Oporto #102, Newport Beach. www.lidovillagebooks.com.


Balboa Island Museum and NB Public Library present Tom Stillwell

Surfing

Courtesy of Balboa Island Museum

On Wednesday, Nov. 8, the Balboa Island Museum and Newport Beach Public Library will present Tom Stillwell, the creator of “I grew up in Newport Beach BEFORE it was the OC.” 

The event takes place from 7 to 8 p.m. with a reception beginning at 6 p.m. at the Newport Beach Central Library’s Friends Room, 1000 Avocado Ave., Newport Beach.

“I grew up in Newport Beach BEFORE it was the OC, or NBB4OC, is a Facebook group of more than 14,000 people,” Stillwell said. “A few still live in Newport Beach, but the vast majority are spread across the United States and around the world. There are members on every continent except Antarctica.

“The one thing that binds this group together is that they all grew up in Newport as it made its transition from a sleepy little beach town at the end of the Red Car Line to being the center of wealth and commerce. They remember when you told people you were from Newport Beach they said, “Where’s that?” not “Ohhhh! You’re from the OC.”

If you would like to journey back – just for an evening – to the Newport Beach of days gone by, where you could visit the Buffalo Farm, ride a horse on the beach, eat ice cream at Wil Wrights, or go waterskiing in the Back Bay, don’t miss this Balboa Island Museum’s Speaker Event. Stillwell will present a lively collection of photographs, videos, and stories and lead a discussion that will transport you back to those wonderful days.

Seating is limited and a $10 donation is requested. To reserve your spot, visit www.balboaislandmuseum.org/stillwell.


Back Bay Bistro hosts “A Night of Miami Spice”

Terry Wollman

Click on photo for a larger image

Courtesy of Back Bay Bistro

Back Bay Bistro at Newport Dunes Waterfront Resort will welcome legendary musician, Terry Wollman, for an evening of Miami spice on Saturday, Nov. 11.

The menu features specially curated mango-infused South Beach Cuisine, courtesy of Executive Chef Daniel Jimenez. The dinner concert will feature Wollman’s Latin-inspired jazz/pop hits, a special three-course dinner with a curated wine pairing, and a panoramic view of the Back Bay. Dinner begins at 6 p.m.; concert at 7:30 p.m. All ages are welcome.

Menu:

Starter – Choice of Shrimp Mango Ceviche with Plantain Chips or Winter Green Salad with Julianne Mango, Jicama, Queso Fresco and Mango Vinaigrette.

Entrée – Choice of Surf and TurfPetite New York Steak with Chimichurri Sauce and Large Prawns in a Citrus Butter Sauce served with Roasted Marble Potatoes and Sautéed Broccolini; Cuban Mojo Chicken - Grilled Marinated Airline Chicken with Mango Salsa served with Roasted Marble Potatoes and Sautéed Broccolini; or Ravioli ai PorciniMushroom-Stuffed Ravioli in a Champagne Truffle Sauce.

Dessert – Choice of Mango Tart or Key Lime Pie.

Cost: General Admission Bar Seating: $15; Floor seating: $25; Dinner with Floor Seating: $60; VIP Dinner with Floor Seating: $100. VIP includes signed CD by Terry Wollman, band meet & greet and photo opportunity. Dinner package includes, per person: table reservation, reserved seating, and 3-course meal (starter, choice of entrée, dessert).

Notes: Two drink minimum per person, unless a dinner reservation is made. Dinner reservations guarantee priority seating, in front of general admission seating and with priority stage viewing. There is no additional cost for making a dinner reservation, but you are required to purchase a 3-course meal, per person, excluding beverage services. Dinner reservations to arrive no later than one hour after the doors open at 6 p.m.

To purchase tickets, visit http://bit.ly/2yNmApm. For dinner reservations, call 949.999.3121. For additional event information, visit www.newportdunes.com/event. Free validated parking when you enter from the second gate on Back Bay Drive.

Back Bay Bistro at Newport Dunes Waterfront Resort, 1131 Back Bay Drive, Newport Beach. www.newportdunes.com/bistro


You Must Remember This: Dorothy Jo

By NANCY GARDNER

For many years, if you were a resident of Newport Beach and wanted to learn to dance, you probably took lessons with Dorothy Jo Swanson. She taught for at least 60 years, dancing well past the point when many have moved to retirement villages, training decades of dancers in the process. Just in my own family, my mother took her tap class, I took classes as a child as did my sister, and when I decided to take a tap class about 15 years ago, the teacher, Rene Roseth, had been trained by Dorothy Jo.

Dorothy Jo was a very gentle teacher. Having seen The Red Shoes, I pictured myself spinning and leaping around the stage, poising on one toe – doing everything that Moira Shearer did (except throwing myself off that balcony. Even at that young age, there was no question in my mind that she should have listened to Boris Lermontov and danced, not wasted her time on that whiny husband of hers.) So, there I was in class with my very own ballet shoes ready to soar except for one small problem – I had no natural balletic qualities. Touching my toes was a push, and fifth position? Forget about it. All kindness, Dorothy Jo never mentioned those shortcomings, just suggested I might have more fun with tap which I did. You didn’t need much flexibility to do step shuffle ball change.

Most of her students were female, as is true in any dance school, but she recruited  the boys with her introduction of Swingsters. This was a casual version of Cotillion for junior high students. The girls wore dresses, but jackets weren’t required of the boys. It was more about the dance steps than manners, so the boys were more easily enticed, and she kept it light. Yes, we learned the waltz and the fox trot, but we also learned swing, and we closed every session with our very favorite, the bunny hop. For those of you who may not have learned this very sophisticated number, the lyrics were as follows: “Do the bunny hop, do the bunny hop, do the bunny hop, hop hop hop.” The steps were as intricate as the lyrics. You put your hands on the hips of the person in front of you, kicked out twice to the right, twice to the left, twice to the right and then hopped three times. You repeated this until everyone was screaming with laughter.  Even the worst dancers could do the bunny hop, so everyone left in a great mood, ready and eager for the next session.

It wasn’t too many years before we were doing the twist, the watusi and all those other dances that didn’t require a boy to lead, either of you to remember which foot to start with, or for you to even touch either, for that matter, but  Dorothy Jo’s lessons didn’t go for naught. Even if we never again did the bunny hop, there would always be those events when you had to partner up and do a “proper” dance, and we graduates of Dorothy Jo could step out onto the dance floor with perfect confidence. Step together step.  

~~~~~~~~

Nancy Gardner, former Mayor of Newport Beach, long-time resident and daughter of Judge Robert Gardner, is a regular contributor to StuNewsNewport.


Volunteers needed to help the CdM Christmas Walk become a wondrous success

Surfing Santa

Courtesy of CdM Chamber

Calling all human elves! Come meet new people in a festive atmosphere by volunteering at the 39th Annual Corona del Mar Christmas Walk, taking place Sunday, Dec. 3, with shifts from 11 a.m. -to 7 p.m.

Shifts/duties are available for: Event set-up; Hot Dog sales; Beer & Wine Garden servers; Beer & Wine Garden I.D. checks; Beer & Wine Garden ticket sales; and at the CdM Chamber booth to welcome and sell opportunity drawing tickets, as well as breakdown.

Location is the lower Bandera Restaurant parking lot at 3201 E. Coast Highway, Corona del Mar.

For more information, contact This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. or visit www.Cdmchamber.com to sign up (many shifts are available) and email it back to This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. or fax to 949.673.3940.


School Notes

District considering shift to collegiate calendar

Newport-Mesa Unified School District (NMUSD) is considering a shift to a collegiate calendar to more closely align with neighboring school districts and local colleges. This shift would start the school year up to three weeks prior to the Labor Day holiday and end the first semester prior to the winter break.

NMUSD is in the process of seeking input from the school community regarding the shift to a collegiate calendar, which most unified districts have adopted.

A traditional calendar for the 2018-19 has already been adopted.

If a collegiate calendar is approved, at the earliest it would take effect starting with the 2019-20 school year. 

NMUSD invites residents to take the Collegiate Calendar Survey between Nov. 1-15, 2017, and to attend the information meeting at Costa Mesa High School today, Nov. 2, from 4 to 5:30 p.m. in the Theater, 2650 Fairview Road, Costa Mesa, to learn more about the collegiate calendar and provide input. 

The calendar is developed by the Calendar Review Committee, which includes certificated and classified staff, parents, district administrators and employee bargaining units.

The Calendar Review Committee will develop, assess and evaluate possible calendar options prior to making a recommendation to the negotiation teams. The final decision is determined through the negotiations process and adopted by the Board of Education.

Suicide Education and Prevention Strategies for parents

NMUSD will present Suicide Education and Prevention Strategies at four local high schools in November. This workshop will focus on the principles of suicide prevention, outline NMUSD policies, procedures and provide guidance for parents. The discussion will include the identification of common myths, risk factors and warning signs as well as highlight protective factors, primary prevention, early identification, referral and available resources. Suicide prevention is an on-going, collaborative process and parents’ participation is urged.

Corona del Mar High School: Nov. 7, 6 p.m., CdM Theater

Costa Mesa High School: Nov. 21, 6 p.m., CMHS Theater

Estancia High School: Nov. 29, 6 p.m., EHS Theater

Newport Harbor High School: Nov. 15, 6 p.m., NHHS Reading Room

Corona del Mar High School

Corona del Mar High School’s Backstage and Performing Artists Company will present The Curious Savage by John Patrick in the CdMHS Seaking Theater. Curtain times are Thursday, Nov. 2 at 4 p.m., Friday and Saturday, Nov. 3 & 4 at 7 p.m.; and a Sunday, Nov. 5 matinee at 2 p.m. Tickets are available at www.bapaco.org, or at the door.

CdM High School ORCHESIS DANCE COMPANY presents “Dancing with the Teachers” on Thursday, Nov. 16 at 7 p.m. in the Big Gym. Tickets are $5 pre-sale and $10 at the door.ß

Newport Harbor High School

 Newport Harbor High School will participate in the San Clemente Band Competition this Saturday, Nov. 4, at a time to be determined.

An Audition Workshop for NHHS Drama will take place Friday, Nov. 17, from 3:30 to 6:30 p.m. in the NHHS Robert B. Wentz Theater.

Learn some songs for an upcoming performance, get a feel for the choreography and meet the directing team.

Bring water, comfortable shoes and closed-toe shoes.

You can sign up on the bulletin board of the Black Box Theater.


Robert Ford, PGA named Pelican Hill Golf Club general manager

Robert Ford

Click on photo for a larger image

Courtesy of Pelican Hill

Robert Ford, general manager of Pelican Hill Golf Club

The Resort at Pelican Hill® has announced the appointment of Robert Ford, PGA as general manager of Pelican Hill Golf Club®. More than 25 years after serving on the Golf Club’s opening leadership team, he returns to lead all aspects of golf and retail for the Resort’s two public 18-hole ocean view courses.

“As we welcome Robert Ford back to Pelican Hill, his 30 years of expertise will be instrumental in shaping the world-class golf experience that locals and resort guests enjoy here along the coast of sunny Southern California,” said Pelican Hill Managing Director Tom Donovan. “Guided by Robert’s proven leadership and long-time connection to these remarkable Fazio-designed courses, Pelican Hill will continue to serve the world’s and our local community’s most discerning golfers with memorable stay and play trips, regional charity and corporate golf events, and top instruction programs.”

Pelican Hill invites golf and travel enthusiasts to experience all the Resort has to offer with stay and play packages that include unlimited golf rounds on Ocean North and Ocean South courses with a two-night minimum Bungalow or Villa stay, plus complimentary forecaddie, golf cart and golf club rentals. For golfers looking to improve their game, Pelican Hill Golf Academy boasts award-winning programs including state-of-the-art 3D swing analysis, full- and half-day schools and family golf instruction led by Golf Magazine “Top 100 Teacher” Glenn Deck.

Ford will also oversee Pelican Hill’s Gold and Platinum Membership programs, which entitle members to unlimited complimentary golf and use of practice facilities, plus access to exclusive events. Members of Pelican Hill’s Preferred Program enjoy benefits such as advance access to tee times, and reduced fees for members and guests.

In 1997, Ford was promoted to director of golf for Pelican Hill and its sister course, Oak Creek Golf Club® in Irvine, Calif. He also headed golf operations and instruction programs as Pelican Hill’s head golf professional when the Golf Club originally opened in 1991.

Before returning to Pelican Hill, Ford spent 12 years as a corporate officer with Western Golf Properties, an Orange County, Calif.-based management and development company consulting for golf property clients worldwide. He most recently served as president for Western Golf Properties and was vice president of golf operations before that. Previously, he led Stonewall Golf Club in Gainesville, Va. as general manager. Ford holds a Bachelor of Science in Business with a major in marketing and professional golf management from Ferris State University in Big Rapids, Mich.


Local presented Spirit of Hope Award for outstanding service to United States

Dick Stone

Click on photo for a larger image

Photo courtesy of Cathy Jensen

(L - R): General Paul Selva, Richard (Dick) Stone, Brigadier Gen. Dennis A. Crall

The Bahia Corinthian Yacht Club is honored to announce that member Richard (Dick) Stone was named the recipient of the Spirit of Hope Award last Wednesday, Oct. 26, at the Pentagon. General Paul J. Selva, Vice Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, and Brigadier General Dennis A. Crall, Director, C4/Chief Information Officer of the US Marine Corps, presented the award. 

Since 2004, Dick Stone has headed up Bahia Corinthian Yacht Club’s Special Forces Home for Christmas Fund, received donations from BCYC members and arranged transportation to send 653 Marines home for the holidays. 

The Spirit of Hope Award is presented for outstanding service to the United States of America. 

It is awarded to men and women of the United States Armed Forces, entertainers and other distinguished Americans and organizations whose patriotism and service reflect that of Mr. Bob Hope. 

Hope was designated as the first honorary veteran by the United States Armed Forces for his decades of entertaining the troops, both in peacetime and in combat zones. This honor was bestowed by the United State Congress and signed into law by President Bill Clinton.

Bahia Corinthian Yacht Club was founded in 1958 and is celebrating its 59th anniversary this year. www.bcyc.org


Letters to the Editor:

Recallers spend $90k to submit signatures

On Friday (Oct. 27) the usual cast of characters that supported my opponent from 2014 showed up at City Hall to submit their signatures. They had until Monday, Oct. 30.

What happens next?

The petitions were sent to the Registrar of Voters Friday to perform the official verification for the City Clerk. The ROV will verify that the signors are indeed registered voters in Newport Beach. If there are 8,445 valid signatures it will come back to the Council to set an election.

What about the bunny tax petitions?

Very good question. I submitted 1,783 signatures to rescind their signatures from the recall Petition. The ROV will check my signatures and SUBTRACT the signatures that match on the recall petition.

Many people that signed told me that they were misled. They thought they were signing a petition to stop high-rise development. Of course, no one on this council has ever supported High Rise development anywhere near the coastal district. But since when does the truth matter in gutter politics?

Liberal Democrat, former U.S. Senator, Daniel Patrick Moynihan said, “Everyone is entitled to his own opinion, but not his own facts.” 

Join the Orange County Republican Party and others in endorsing against the recall!

Scott Peotter

City Councilmember, District 6

Voters want independent city council

In November 2014, Scott Peotter was barely elected to the Newport Beach City Council with 11,920 votes. On October 27, the signatures of 10,688 voters were submitted on a recall petition asking that he be removed from office. As I walked the city with my recall petition, I was impressed that our neighbors gave so many varied reasons for supporting his removal, ranging from his jaw dropping incivility to his total disregard of campaign finance laws. In August, his attempt to turn down $480,000 in gas tax funds due to our city brought him the scorn of residents as just one of the many poor financial decisions he has made in his tenure.  

By far, the biggest objection voiced to Mr. Peotter was his attempt to deny the residents their right to stop the Museum House project by adding 3700 pages to the referendum petition. This was an act of stunning legislative arrogance and it was the act of a bully. Democracy works best when democratic processes are respected and his attempt to undermine the constitutional rights of the residents failed when the project was stopped. His use of out of town “blockers” to harass recall petition signers, false and misleading mailers, and misrepresentation of the cost of the recall shows that he continues to hold the political rights of the public in contempt.

While I expected the public opposition to his strong support for high rise development, I was surprised by the number of residents who signed the petition because they resent the “boss style” government introduced by Team Newport and the men who got them elected: Dave Ellis and Bob McCaffery. The belief that Ellis and McCaffery control their candidate’s actions is strong, reinforced by the fact that Dave Ellis was a lobbyist for the Museum House and that every councilmember who voted for it had been elected with his help.

Voters want an independent city council and a level playing field, not backroom machinations that disregard the best interests of residents. They want civility and fairness. The recall of Scott Peotter is the first step toward draining the swamp and restoring our faith in government.

Susan Skinner

Newport Beach


Jadetiger Tea hosts Shop & Nibble at Five Crowns

teas and jewelry

Photos courtesy of Jadetiger Tea

Kick off the holiday season at Shop & Nibble, a pop-up marketplace featuring 10 of OC’s homegrown, most up-and-coming brands and products. Shop & Nibble is about bringing beautiful, affordable luxury into your daily lives and homes. The inaugural event is Thursday, Nov. 16 at 6 p.m.

Five Crowns is generously hosting a champagne toast at 6:30 pm with light tray-passed hors d’oeuvres in the greenhouse and garden. This is a free, ticketed event; RSVP required at www.eventbrite.com/e/s-h-o-p-n-i-b-b-l-e-tickets-38823025715

The 10 OC artisans and makers exhibiting include:

A Fabulous Fete – Brushed hand lettering, custom invitations, lifestyle & home décor

www.afabulousfete.com(Instagram: @afabulousfete)

Beautiful Savage Flowers – Floral arrangements, succulent and air plant pieces www.beautifulsavageflowers.com (Instagram: @beautifulsavageflowers)

Jade Tiger Tea – Craft teas and tea wares

www.jadetigertea.com (Instagram: @jadetigertea)

Mai Couture – Make-up line for the “on-the-go” lifestyle

www.maicouture.com (Instagram: @maicouture)

Miss Mini Donuts – Custom donuts, special events

www.facebook.com/missminidonuts (Instagram: @missminidonuts)

Morning Blossom Studio – Vegan body products

www.morningblossomstudio.com(Instagram: @morningblossomstudio)

Nu Soul Jewelry – Jewelry

www.nusouljewels.com(Instagram: @nusouljewelry)

Perverse Sunglasses – Sunglasses (note this company is based in Los Angeles, and local Julia Pham will be hosting a special trunk show for the evening)

www.perversesunglasses.com(Instagram: @perversesunglasses)

Ponder and Muse – Artful wine glasses, driftwood, cheeseboards and giftables. Hand-drawn stationery selection

www.etsy.com/shop/ponderandmuse (Instagram: @ponderandmuse)

RoughxTumbled – Macramé, handcrafted modern shelving

www.etsy.com/shop/RoughxTumbled (Instagram: @roughxtumbled)

glass plant and teas

Part of the evening’s proceeds will sponsor CASA of Orange County, Inc.’s (CASA) Foster Youth’s holiday wish lists. Every year, CASA hosts a meaningful holiday party where kids can reunite with their siblings for an afternoon of games, food and dancing. Each child is given three gift wishes that are granted by thoughtful donors throughout Orange County.  There are approximately 2,500 children and teens in the Dependency Court system in our county today. They have been displaced due to parental abuse, abandon or neglect.


Winter holiday fashion show benefits Adoption Guild

The passionate women of the Adoption Guild of Southern Orange County have joined forces with O.C. fashion icons, mother and daughter, designer Marie Gray and international model and designer, Kelly Gray, showcasing their exclusive line of couture fashion at an in-store event set for the evening of Nov. 9 at Grayse in Fashion Island.

Chaired by Adoption Guild champions, Christine Johnson and Maria Zucht, a committee of Adoption Guild members are working with Marie and Kelly Gray to produce an evening of high style, fabulous food and libation featuring “Lite Bites” and “Grayseful Grayhound Cocktails.” Adoption Guild members are slated to model the Grayse fashions for the holiday season.

Rachel of Grayse

Submitted photo

Rachel Breneman-Matthew, style specialist at Grayse

The highlight of the evening will be a $1,000 Grayse gift certificate raffle prize. Grayse will be donating 20 percent of in-store proceeds that day to the Adoption Guild, in support of Holy Family Services Adoption and Foster Care Agency in Southern California.

To support the Adoption Guild, learn more about the Grayse event and secure your reservation, contact Grayse at 949.640.0025 or This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it..


Input requested for The Newport Crossings Mixed Use Project

Project site

Submited photo 

The City of Newport Beach will conduct a public scoping meeting in conjunction with the Notice of Preparation for The Newport Crossings Mixed Use Project. The goal will be to present the project and the EIR process, and to receive public comments and suggestions. The meeting will be held on Thursday, Nov. 16, at 6 p.m. at the OASIS Senior Center, 801 Narcissus Ave., Corona del Mar.

The project applicant is Starboard MacArthur Square LP.

The Notice of Preparation Review Period is Nov. 1 - 30 (30 days).

The project site is located in the City’s “Airport Area” about 0.5 miles from John Wayne Airport. The site is generally bounded by Corinthian Way to the northeast, Martingale Way to the east, Scott Drive to the northwest, and Dove Street to the southwest.

The proposed project consists of 350 residential dwelling units, 2,000 square feet of casual-dining restaurant space, 5,500 square feet of commercial space, and a 0.5-acre public park that will replace the existing MacArthur Square shopping center. 

A six-story parking structure (one level subterranean and five levels above ground) is proposed in the center of the site and will be surrounded and screened from public views by the residential and commercial buildings on all sides. The project would provide a total of 740 parking stalls for its residential and retail uses.

The Notice of Preparation can be accessed online at: www.newportbeachca.gov/ceqadocuments.

The City requests your review and consideration of this notice, and it invites any and all input and comments from interested persons, organizations and agencies regarding the preparation of the EIR. All comments or other responses to this notice should be submitted in writing to: Rosalinh Ung, Associate Planner, at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it..


Harborside Restaurant hosts luncheon guild

Forget about “ladies who lunch.”

The 40 women who make up “Chew for Charity,” a group that raises funds and awareness for nonprofit Wayfinders (formerly Community Service Programs), has been meeting monthly since 2007 and has raised more than $80,000 for Wayfinders, a nonprofit dedicated to helping people of all ages find their way past conflict and crisis to strength and stability. And every contribution collected, lunch organized, detail buttoned down is all volunteer-driven.

On Oct. 17, members gathered at Harborside Restaurant in Newport Beach for the latest Chew for Charity luncheon, where they raised $300 for Wayfinders. The luncheon guild members enjoy gourmet meals and mingling with their cohorts. For nearly a decade, the guild has met monthly and has been known to raise up to $12,000 to $15,000 a year for Wayfinders. In addition to regular lunches, guild members also help to sell tickets for Wayfinders fundraising events, and advocate on behalf of Wayfinders throughout the Orange County community.

Two Ladies

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Submitted photo

(L-R): “Chew for Charity” lunch guild members, Mary Sullivan and Julianne Smith

Funds benefit Wayfinders and each of its programs. Wayfinders exists to strengthen and support individuals, families and communities during times of crisis. Wayfinders offers the steadiest, surest, safest pathways to promising outcomes. To clients, Wayfinders is the stable home they never had. Their voice when they’re too fragile to speak. Their alternative to the juvenile justice system. Their path away from gang life, substance abuse and other destructive behavior. Their counseling support at a time of greatest need.

The people of Wayfinders are committed to supporting clients on their journeys and fostering lasting change and positive impact throughout Orange County.

For more information on Wayfinders, visit www.WeAreWayfinders.org.


Full Moon Walk at ENC 

Full Moon Hike

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Submitted photo

Join Environmental Nature Center naturalist Fiorella Gardella for a nocturnal hike in the Center to learn about the full moon on Friday, Nov. 3 at 6 p.m. Flashlights are discouraged.

This program is for humans age 6 and up. Cost is $6 per participant ($5 for ENC members). Reservations are required, so visit www.encenter.org to sign up.

Environmental Nature Center is located at 1601 E. 16th St., Newport Beach.


Stump the Stu

Who’s calling who, what, a “dump”

Stump the Stu 103017

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“Dump the Stu” (as headlined in last issue) and four of you guess the Orange County Museum of Art? Correctly, I might add. 

Actually, the description of this artwork is Stucco vs. Stone, 2017 by Renee Lotenero. This site-specific installation was comprised of photos, wood, metal and rubble.

B-t-w, correct guessers included Bill Lobdell, Lynn Swain, Patricia Baugh and Joe Stapleton. Don’t wait by the mailbox for the prize to arrive.

If you have a unique spot or icon around town that you think StuNewsNewport readers would enjoy finding out about, please shoot it, send it to us (This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.) and give us the answer, so we can challenge them.


Shop Talk Shopping Bag

By LANA JOHNSON

What’s happening at local businesses around town?

LIDO courtyard

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Courtesy of Lido Marina Village

Today, Thursday, Nov. 2 from 2 to 7 p.m., Lido Marina Village is holding a Holiday Hiring Fair. The managers of these Village shops are looking for new talent and enthusiasm, so come meet them face to face: Black Optical, Broken English, Clare V, Eberjey, Faherty and TReSs Apothecary + Salon.

Meet outside of Eberjey at 3432 Via Oporto, Unit 105 with your resume in hand, for an opportunity to work at an exciting retail destination with great harbor views.

Lido Marina Village is located at 3400 Via Oporto, Newport Beach. www.lidomarinavillage.com

• • •

This Friday, Nov. 3, check out the Chef Demo Hour at baker & olive in Corona del Mar Plaza from 1 to 2 p.m.

Culinary creations by Chef Mary will include: Brussels sprouts with crispy chorizo and maple balsamic, garlic olive oil crushed potatoes and red apple balsamic cider.

While you’re there, check out their wonderful array of salts & spices, honeys, mustards & jams, olive oils, balsamic & specialty vinegars, and gift sets (just in time for the holidays).

RSVP is required. Call 949.759.1185 to reserve a spot.

Baker & olive is located at 923 Avocado Ave., Corona del Mar. www.bakerandolive.com

• • •

On Saturday, Nov. 18, Via Lido Drugs will be holding its Holiday Open House from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m., where you’ll encounter an array of unique gifts, and holiday décor, cards and paper goods.

You’ll find out new gift giving ideas and view floral design demonstrations. Door prizes and refreshments add to the merriment.

Via Lido Drugs is located at 3445 Via Lido, Newport Beach. Call 949.723.5858.

Editor’s Note: If you or someone you know operates a Newport Beach-based business that you would like to see featured in Shop Talk, please send the information to This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it..


Free document shredding on November 18

shredding

Submitted photo

On Saturday, Nov. 18 at 8 a.m., the City of Newport Beach and CR&R are offering free document shredding for Newport Beach residents, in the Mariners Elementary School parking lot, 2100 Marines Drive, Newport Beach.

Securely shredding old documents, records and items that contain personal or sensitive information can help protect you from identity theft and fraud.

Consider rounding up and bringing the following types of documents:

Bank and financial statements

Credit card statements or pre-approved credit card offers

Old IRS tax forms, checks or bills

Old credit cards and plastic-paper membership cards

Documents, including junk mail, of any size and color will be accepted and can be bound with staples or paper clips. Unfortunately, the shredder cannot accommodate X-rays or larger plastic items such as binders.

For more information, contact CR&R Customer Service at 949.625.6735.


Fair Game

By TOM JOHNSON

 Asking Newport to raise the level of decorum

TomJohnson

StuNewsNewport is running a letter today in our Letters to the Editor section from Susan Skinner. I like Susan and the letter certainly celebrates the Recall Scott Peotter team for their accomplishments after turning in 10,866 signatures to the City Clerk last week to move the effort.

If you’re in that camp, it’s hard to argue with most of her claims. They are the things people have been saying repeatedly since the recall effort began.

But there was one line in Susan’s letter that troubled me, “The recall of Scott Peotter is the first step toward draining the swamp and restoring our faith in government.”

“Draining the swamp” to me implies going after the remaining members of Team Newport still on the dais.

Here’s why I’m concerned, isn’t one of the concerns against Peotter his lack of decorum? To me, to imply that the five remaining Team Newport members on Council are something belonging in the swamp violates that same decorum.

I probably joined a lot of people early on with concerns over Team Newport. It was a very abrupt change. But to be honest, for the most part, I’ve liked what I’ve seen. 

To me, I think Mayor Kevin Muldoon has done a nice job in moving City business through. Under his watch we seem to be getting things done.

I think the same of Brad Avery and Will O’Neill. Avery knows our bay and O’Neill is the smartest guy up there. Plus, I believe they’re both community guys.

Diane Dixon, I like her, she’s just seemed to be the latest lightening rod on a couple of local issues and has somewhat done her own part to exacerbate them.

Marshall Duffy, well Duffy has been Duffy. He should have stayed away from the Peotter mess altogether, but it’s hard to argue his love for a city that his family has lived in for years, and he has other generations following him.

And Jeff Herdman, you’re always good in my book.

All that being said, we have more than one election next year. Shouldn’t we all demand a certain level of decorum from everyone running for office? Let’s argue the issues, but locally, let’s stay above the name-calling.

Politicians, start your engines!

• • •

Looking for a good place to enjoy an adult beverage tonight? Why not drink with Los Angeles Angels Chairman Dennis Kuhl and former Angels pitching great Chuck Finley.

Well, they’ll actually be pouring. It’s the Cheers for Literacy fundraiser for The Literacy Project tonight at The Winery, 3131 W. Coast Highway.

Here’s the deal, with a little help behind the bar, Kuhl and Finley will be pouring drinks and collecting tips. The tips are the fundraising portion. So, tip well!

And lastly, keep your eyes peeled for who else might show up.

• • •

Thank you, thank you, thank you to The Bungalow restaurant for their generous support of our Katie Ford. Jim Walker and Louis Feinstein, you guys are incredible.

I had some minor surgery that precluded me from attending, but I appreciate those who did.

I’ve known Walker for a while, he always supports Newport Beach. Do me a favor support him! And it’s not hard – the food is spectacular.

To support Katie go to www.gofundme.com/4mi7a2o.


Decorative Arts Society to meet November 14

Susanna Salk

On Nov. 14, the Decorative Arts Society will present the second of their five-lecture series. The honored speaker will be Susanna Salk with a special themed event of “Decorate Fearlessly.”

Salk is a designer, stylist, stager as well as the author of many best-selling design books. Her first was the unexpected hit, “A Privileged Life, Celebrating WASP Style” (Assouline) which stemmed from her upbringing on Boston’s North Shore. Her next books celebrated design, from the personal weekend spaces of style makers in “Weekend Retreats” to “Room for Children: Stylish Spaces for Sleep and Play,” which was the first book of its kind to explore design for the junior set.“Be Your Own Decorator: Taking Cues and Confidence from Today’s Leading Designers” (Rizzoli) followed, inspiring people to take design into their own hands. Her 2013 debut of “C.Z. Guest: American Style Icon,” (Rizzoli) was the first pictorial book on the iconic style of C.Z. Guest.

“Decorate Fearlessly! Using Whimsy, Confidence and a Dash of Surprise to Create Personal Spaces,” (Rizzoli, 2014) explored the power and panache that rooms can have when decorated with confidence instead of rules and “It’s the Little Things: Creating Big Moments In Your Home Through the Stylish Small Stuff” (Rizzoli, 2016) focused on the big power of the little moments in rooms.

Salk’s latest book “Dogs and Their Designers” (Rizzoli, 2017) is a pictorial celebration of the beloved dogs of some of the world’s top interior designers and the stylish life they share. She also hosts the monthly “At Home With” video series on the Quintessence blog, which captures her visiting the homes of top designers and style makers around the globe.

Salk lives in Connecticut with her husband and two boys.

The Decorative Arts Society, established in 1995, is a membership group of community-minded women and men who support the organization by participating in an annual lecture series presented by nationally and internationally known experts in the field of the decorative arts, including interior and fashion, architecture and landscape design.

Through this series, their members expand their knowledge of the decorative arts. Their subscriptions and donations to the Decorative Arts Society provide funds for projects and programs which benefit women and children in Orange County.

The upcoming lecture series will be held at Edwards Big Newport Theatre at 300 Newport Center Drive, Newport Beach. Breakfast buffet begins at 9:30 a.m. and the speaker is featured from 10 to 11:00 a.m. Non-members/guests are welcome to attend for a $75 fee payable at the door.

For more information and membership opportunities, contact Laraine Eggleston, Membership Chairman at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. and visit www.decorativeartssociety.net.


Citizen of the Year Gala to honor Homer Bludau

Homer Bludau

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Photo by Bleu Cotton Photography

The Newport Beach Chamber of Commerce and the City of Newport Beach invite you to the Citizen of the Year Gala honoring Homer Bludau this Friday, Nov. 3 at the Balboa Bay Resort.

A no-host cocktail reception with tray passed hors d’oeuvres kicks off the festivities at 6 p.m. Dinner and dancing begin at 7 p.m. Business or cocktail attire.

Tickets are $125 per person with tables of 10 at $1,250.

To secure your spot, visit www.newportbeach.com.

Balboa Bay Resort is located at 1221 W. Coast Highway, Newport Beach.


Aviation Committee vacancies need to be filled

The City of Newport Beach is currently accepting applications to fill the following unscheduled vacancies on the Aviation Committee (when term expires not settled):

District 2 Alternate Member (nominated by District Council Member)

District 6 Alternate Member (nominated by District Council Member)

The Aviation Committee meets quarterly on the last Monday of the month.

An application can be obtained from the City Clerk’s Office at 100 Civic Center Drive, or can be sent to you by calling 949.644.3005. The application and Committee information can also be accessed through the City’s website at www.newportbeachca.gov/vacancy.

Applications will be accepted until vacancies are filled.


Artist Chip Fesko exhibits abstract pixel geometrics

The Newport Beach City Arts Commission presents “Abstract Pixel Geometrics Patterns in Watercolors” by Chip Fesko, Nov. 6, 2017 – Jan. 5, 2018 at the Newport Beach Public Library, 1000 Avocado Ave., Newport Beach.

The exhibit will include 14 watercolors created using up to 10,000 quarter-inch squares per painting, all bursting with pixel-like squares of color. According to Fesko, “Each painting takes weeks and sometimes months to finish.” The series on exhibit took five years to complete.

Chip Fesko

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Courtesy of NB Public Library

Artist Chip Fesko with this watercolor pixeled art piece, “Fire”

Inspiration for Fesko’s artwork comes from many different directions. Awarded second place in the Watercolor Category at the 2017 Newport Beach Art Exhibition, Fesko’s “The Power of Gold,” was inspired by the accomplishments of Olympic athletes from the Summer Olympics. Another work on display, “Tibetan Prayer Flags,” is an abstract depiction of flags flying in the wind, representing the five elements: blue for sky, white for air, red for fire, green for water and yellow, symbolizing the earth.

The exhibition will be available for viewing during library operating hours, Monday through Thursday, 9 a.m. - 9 p.m.; Friday and Saturday, 9 a.m. - 6 p.m. and Sunday, 12 - 5 p.m.

For more information about cultural arts programs in the City of Newport Beach, go to the City’s Cultural Arts webpage at www.newportbeachca.gov/CulturalArts.


The Nutcracker returns to Segerstrom Center

The Nutcracker

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Photo by Gene Shiavone

American Ballet Theatre’s “The Nutcracker,” co-presented by Segerstrom Center for the Arts and ABT, will be performed 13 times at Segerstrom Center for the Arts, Dec. 7-17.

Misty Copeland and Daniil Simkin will lead the opening night cast on Dec. 7 dancing the roles of Clara, the Princess and Nutcracker, the Prince, respectively. 

Subsequent casts include Sarah Lane and Herman Cornejo, Gillian Murphy and James Whiteside, Stella Abrera and Alexandre Hammoudi, and Hee Seo and Cory Stearns in the leading roles. 

The Nutcracker is a beloved holiday story set to the magical score by Peter Ilyitch Tchaikovsky.

The Los Angeles Times declared, “Choreographer Alexei Ratmansky has made his own Christmas miracle: A joyful ‘Nutcracker’ ballet that is ravishing and clever enough to inspire multiple viewings.”

Costumes are by award-winning designer Richard Hudson and lighting is by Jennifer Tipton. Pacific Symphony performs the evocative holiday music. 

Select students from the American Ballet Theatre William J. Gillespie School at Segerstrom Center are afforded the opportunity to perform alongside the renowned ABT troupe in this classic tale that takes the young, romantic Clara and her Nutcracker Prince on a dreamlike journey. 

The engagement of The Nutcracker continues an ongoing relationship between Segerstrom Center and American Ballet Theatre. The Company has appeared at the Center since 1987. 

At the Center, ABT gave the world premiere of Mikhail Baryshnikov’s “Swan Lake” in 1988, the West Coast premiere of Kevin McKenzie’s new production of “The Sleeping Beauty” in 2007 and the world premiere of a new production of “Firebird” by Alexei Ratmansky in 2012. 

Single tickets for American Ballet Theatre’s “The Nutcracker” start at $29 are now available online at www.scfta.org, at the Box Office at 600 Town Center Drive in Costa Mesa or by calling 714.556.2787. 


Stump the Stu

Dump the Stu

Stump the Stu 103017

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I know what you’re thinking: Did they arrest the guy who illegally dumped some trash? You couldn’t be further than the truth. Someone who knows what he or she is doing put this in its current location. So, where is it and for one bonus point, who created it? Good luck.  

Take the challenge, and submit your answers to: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.. The correct answers will be in Thursday’s edition.

If you have a unique spot or icon around town that you think StuNewsNewport readers would enjoy finding out about, please shoot it, share it and give us the answer, so we can challenge them!


Take Five: Former City Manager Homer Bludau is celebrated this week as Newport Beach’s 2017 Citizen of the Year

By TOM JOHNSON

Homer BludauHomer Bludau grew up in rural Texas 60 miles outside of San Antonio. He attended college at Southwest Texas State University (now Texas State University). As a participant in the Air Force ROTC program, he entered the Air Force in February 1969, where he spent most of his five years of duty at Davis Monthan AFB in Tucson, Arizona, earning the rank of Captain. His tour completed in 1973; Homer earned a Master’s Degree in Urban Planning and a Master’s Degree in Public Administration, both from the University of Arizona.

Desiring a career in local government, Homer had a 29-year career as the City Manager in the California cities of Avenal, Rialto, Coronado and Newport Beach. Homer has the distinction of serving as President of both the San Diego County and Orange County City Managers’ Associations. After 10 years as the Newport Beach City Manager, he retired 2009.

Over the past 18 years Homer’s local civic involvement includes the following: Marine 1/1 Foundation current and founding member from 2003; Chamber of Commerce Commodores; initial Co-Chair of the first two American Cancer Society Relay for Life events in Newport Beach; Executive member of the 7 C’s; Executive Board member of the Environmental Nature Center for 15 years; Coast Community College District Foundation Board member for 12 years; Our Lady Queen of Angels Catholic Church Parish Council and Eucharistic Minister; Friends of OASIS Advocate Committee and Executive Committee member of both Visit Newport Beach and Newport Beach & Company.

Homer is married to Janet Bludau; they reside in Newport Beach. Homer has a son Brad (married to Heather) with a granddaughter Ryan and grandson Austin, who live in Corte Madera; plus daughter Aimee (married to Robert) who reside in Tucson. His siblings Owen, Colin and Becky all reside near Austin, Texas.

Q: Homer, your first reaction to being named Newport Beach Citizen of the Year?

A: One of total surprise! I never saw it coming. 

Q: What are the things you’re most proud of that were accomplished during your tenure as Newport Beach’s City Manager?

A: An extension of the JWA settlement agreement; annexation of the Newport Coast and Santa Ana Heights areas into the City; being able to build the General Fund reserves by $70 million and helping to shape a more customer-friendly City work force. 

Q: Okay, you leave the City Manager post and retire, but you continue to stay involved in the community. Why?

A: This community has been very good to me and now I have time to give back in different ways. Plus, I need the interaction with people and need the feeling that my life is still valuable to others outside of work. 

Q: We both like to go out hunting birds…me on the golf course…you in the wild. Tell us about your hobby, where it’s taken you and your biggest finds?

A: I grew up in the country and it gave me an appreciation for birds. I found them fascinating. I have birdied in Alaska (twice), Florida, Canada, Maine and lots of other places in the US. I have seen almost 650 different bird species. 

Q: What else do you do to enjoy life?

A: I am an avid University of Arizona sports nut. I love a good book and am usually working on one. I like traveling with my wife Janet, and I love family get-togethers. 

The Citizen of the Year Gala is this Friday, Nov. 3, at the Balboa Bay Resort from 6 - 9 p.m. For more information or to buy tickets, visit http://www.newportbeach.com/.


Police Files

Newport Beach resident arrested twice in two days

It was a bad week for Newport Beach resident Michael Charles McCallum, 49, who was arrested and charged twice in two days with serious crimes.

Newport Beach Police first encountered McCallum shortly after 2 a.m., on Wednesday, Oct. 25 on Coventry, and charged him with obstructing/resisting an executive officer, false imprisonment and an outstanding warrant for driving while suspended or revoked. 

His bail was set at $15,000.

The following evening, Thursday, October 26, at 10:33 p.m., NBPD again arrested McCallum in the same area for violating a court order to prevent domestic violence.

Another bail was set at $15,000.

Halloween safety tips for the NBPD

Although we hope that Halloween will be a safe and fun evening, the unfortunate reality is that every year, many children suffer from automobile accidents, falls, cuts, tampered “treats” and other unnecessary miseries. The Newport Beach Police Department would like to share the following tips with parents and Trick-or-Treaters of all ages:

Know Your Child’s Plans

If you will not be with your child, these items are important to discuss in advance:

Establish a specific route for trick-or-treating (so that you can find your child, if necessary).

Discuss who will be accompanying your child while he/she is trick-or-treating.

Establish a time that your child should return home.

Focus on Costume Safety

Makeup is safer than a mask (which can obscure vision).

Costumes and wigs should be flame-resistant.

Reflective strips and bright clothing will increase visibility, along with a flashlight.

Comfortable, well-fitting shoes prevent tripping and other hazards.

Props and accessories should be made of cardboard, so they won’t injure your child if he/she should fall down.

Follow Critical Safety Tips

Trick-or-Treat in your own neighborhood.

Trick-or-Treat in a group of two or more, accompanied by a parent or adult.

Stick to well-lighted areas.

Stay on sidewalks and look both ways when crossing the street.  Never cross the street between parked cars or mid-block.

Don’t allow your child to enter ANY house.

Parents must inspect all treats. Discard fruit or any candy in loose or torn wrappings.

Talk to your Child about Law Enforcement

Discuss the importance of respecting the property of others.

Advise your child that throwing eggs and water balloons, or spraying shaving cream, is inappropriate and could be illegal.

Curfew in Newport Beach is 10 p.m.

All fireworks are illegal in Newport Beach.

If you should discover anything wrong with the “treats” brought home, please call the NBPD at 949.644.3717 so other parents can be warned and those responsible can be caught.

For the last few of weeks, officers have been distributing glow-in-the-dark bracelets and safety tips to children throughout the community in preparation for Halloween. Additional bracelets are also available at our Front Desk.

Have a happy (and safe) Halloween!

Scroll down to Police Beat for all arrests & crime reports


Heidi Miller will donate a kidney, because, she says, “Saving a life? It doesn’t get any better than that”

Story by LYNETTE BRASFIELD

The expression “You’re beautiful on the outside and the inside” is usually meant to pay tribute to the attractiveness of a person and fine quality of his or her soul. 

In Heidi Miller’s case, the saying is both metaphorically and literally true. Not only is the local businesswoman gorgeous and generous, but her insides are also in stunningly good shape. 

She knows this because the doctors at Cedars Sinai have made sure to check out every organ in her body. 

They’ve done MRIs, ultrasounds, x-rays and a slew of blood and other tests – and Heidi, they have declared, is in the pink, her insides just as healthy if not healthier than those of most people 10, even 20 years younger.

Why undergo this rigorous testing when Heidi has been perfectly healthy all her life – has never, in fact, been hospitalized?

“Saving a life? It doesn’t get any better than that”

Because Heidi Miller is going to donate a kidney to someone who otherwise might die within the year. Someone whom she’s known for years, but only casually until now. 

And because, “Saving a life? It doesn’t get any better than that,” she says.

Heidi should know. Back in 1991, she was the first to be a bone marrow donor at Hoag Hospital. Because of her gift, a young woman lived another 22 years, became a mother and a grandmother, and led a full life.

Now, (I can tell as I talk to her), it is really irking Heidi that she has two kidneys but could live quite well with just one, and yet it isn’t quite time to do the transfer to someone who dearly needs one.

That someone is Bruce W Cook, well-known editor and publisher of The Bay Window in Newport Beach.

Heidi Miller and Cooks

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Submitted photos

(L-R): Cathy and Bruce Cook with Heidi Miller

Last May, an event was held at the Balboa Bay Club to raise awareness about the importance of organ donation, specifically kidney donations, because, as Heidi says, 22 people every day die waiting for a transplant. More than 117,000 patients are on the transplant list.

The event was also a not-so-subtle quest to find a kidney donor for Bruce. Heidi RSVPd but at the last minute could not attend.

Months later, she asked a friend about the event. “Four hundred and fifty people attended,” the friend said. “Nobody donated a kidney, though. Bruce is on dialysis three or four days a week and has been for five years now. He desperately needed a donor.”

Well, what might not be obvious to others, was obvious to Heidi. She called a friend, Cindy, who had been a kidney donor. “Would you do it again?” she asked. “Yes,” Cindy said. 

That was enough for Heidi. Immediately she called Bruce to find out his blood type. It was a match. “Give me your doctor’s number,” Heidi said.

Bruce, overwhelmed and grateful, did just that. Heidi researched organ donation. Numerous tests were done.

She and Bruce were medical matches in every way.

“I know exactly what I’m getting into,” she told me. “I know the potential size of the scar (small) and how quickly I am likely to heal (two to three days in the hospital, outpatient monitoring after that, back to full health within 60 days, probably less). I’ve researched every detail. It’s so great, though, kidneys from living donors last years longer in the recipient’s body, which is so good to know!” Her enthusiasm was palpable.

Heidi Miller Cedars Sinai

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Heidi Miller at the Cedars Sinai Transplant Center

Months of more tests followed Heidi’s decision – medical tests to ensure compatibility of donor and recipient, psychiatric tests to ensure that both knew what they were taking on, financial questionnaires to ensure that Heidi was in a strong enough position to be able to take time off work, and hearings before the Transplant Board of Cedars Sinai.

“Well, I’m single and I run my own business,” Heidi said. “So they were a little concerned about that. But I have the most amazing network of friends, so I knew I’d be fine, especially with the support of the community.”

I imagine that the doctors realized early on that Heidi was a force to be reckoned with – and indeed, her friends and family have rallied around, with none daring to question her decision, and all determined to make the path as easy as possible for her.

She was very touched by a voicemail she played to me from her father, an ethicist, who congratulated her: “Heidi, this is so you…it’s magnificent…you’re a wonderful human being,” he said.

There were some challenging moments along the way before the swap was finally fully approved, but Heidi says Cedars Sinai has been wonderful. “I feel very special when I’m there,” she said.

Hoping for a “multiplier effect”: Awareness event is planned

Heidi did wonder about the relative size of her kidney – how a man of six foot five inches would survive on a kidney taken from a woman of five foot three – but the doctors reassured her that the donated kidney would grow large enough to play its necessary role in Bruce, and that her remaining kidney would adjust to do its job in her body.

One of Heidi’s closest friends, Kelly Perkins, has lived with a donor heart for 22 years, another factor in Heidi’s passion for this project.

“I’m hoping there’ll be a multiplier effect if I donate my kidney, that it will increase awareness and maybe encourage others to donate organs, saving more lives than just one,” Heidi adds.

She’s already working a plan to develop an advocacy group that will explain the process to potential donors and make the possibility feel less intimidating.

Heidi’s surgery date is November 17. On November 9, she’ll be holding a wine and cheese “donation awareness” event at her store, Tight Assets, near the movie theatre on Coast Highway.

“Of course, I’m also hoping people will shop early for Christmas while they are here,” she says, with a sweeping gesture that takes in the eclectic range of clothing, jewelry and other items that make Tight Assets a wonder of a store. 

“But the main thing is to let people know that being a donor is a great, rewarding experience. It shouldn’t be an extraordinary thing to do! I mean, we have two kidneys, and we only need one!” 

Donating a kidney is an extraordinary thing to do though, especially for someone who is neither family nor close friend – Heidi is indeed beautiful inside and out.


“Howl-O-Ween” doggie costume contest had pups decked out in their best spooky decor 

BY LANA JOHNSON

Barbara

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Photos by Lana Johnson

FONBAS board member Barbara Venezia

The Friends of Newport Beach Animal Shelter (FONBAS) hosted its first ever event – a costume party for dogs! The “Howl-O-Ween” party was held Saturday, Oct. 28, 10 a.m. - 12 p.m., at Marina Park, and doggies came out dressed in their best Halloween ensembles!

Prizes were awarded for Scariest, Prettiest and Most Newport Beach costumes, Best owner/pet ensemble, Best Trick and Most Personality.

Congratulations to our pooch winners:

Scariest - Sammy, age 14, a Golden Retriever mix donned County Jail #4 Baddog for Life in his “stripes.” Owner is Michael Flynn.

Sammy

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Prettiest - Pumpkin, age 7, a Miniature Poodle and Chihuahua mix, decked out in her adorable pumpkin headpiece and costume.

Most Newport Beach Costume - Scott, the 11-year-old Labrador Retriever, was dressed up like a hotdog, complete with onions, mustard and ketchup. Owners, Tom and Kelly Fischbacher.

Scott

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Best Owner/Pet Ensemble - Jerrie Moody (owner) and Zoey, a rescued Golden Retriever, age 11, dressed up as friendly devils.

Best Trick - A talented little furry friend who dressed up as a shark (I wish we knew the little guy’s name).

Most Personality - Kolbie, a 3-year-old Labrador mix, dressed up as an adorable gnome, along with his costumed sidekick, Evan Norsoph, age 12.

Kolbie

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The free event featured Vlad Roypate, the Russian Dog Wizard, who after the costume contest, offered tips on pet obedience as well as answered owners’ questions. There were also adoption opportunities on-site featuring a 4-month-old-pup Cowboy, dressed up with a monkey on his back); and kitties, Zoey and Bear, both four months old, from the Newport Beach Animal Shelter as well as a pick-a-prize opportunity drawing with great “doggie items.” There were also lovely planted succulent gardens, available for sale, with a table manned by Monica Mazur and Anita Perkings.

FONBAS is a non-profit organization that raises funds to support the Newport Beach Animal Shelter, www.fonbas.org. For more information on the Newport Beach Animal Shelter, visit www.nbpd.org.

Valerie and Cowboy

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Valerie Schomburg, who operates the Newport Beach Animal Shelter, with Cowboy and his monkey rider, who is longing for a loving family to take him home

Editor’s Note: I had such fun (but it was a difficult decision to judge the winners) along with Barbara Venezia (FONBAS board member). Our StuNewsNewport columnist, Nancy Gardner, was instrumental in making the event go off without a hitch. A special thanks to Newport Beach Councilmember Jeff Herdman and Newport Beach City Manager Dave Kiff for their attendance, as well as FONBAS board members Tim Stoaks, Evelyn Hart, Jean Watt and Jonathan Langford for coming out and promoting this worthwhile community event. Monies raised augment the city-run animal shelter at 20302 Riverside Drive, to make animals more comfortable and adoptable, upgrade cages, and provide additional medical and dental care.

More photos of this year’s FONBAS “Howl-O-Ween” doggie costume contest! 

Click on photos for larger images


Letters to the Editor:

Committee to Recall Scott Peotter turns in 10,866 signatures

The Committee to Recall Scott Peotter submitted close to 11,000 signatures to the City Clerk demanding a recall of Newport Beach City Councilmember Scott Peotter. 

“Nearly as many people signed the recall petition as voted for Peotter in 2014,” said recall leader Lynn Swain. “These signatures represent a complete public repudiation of Peotter’s carpet bagging support for high rise development, partisan posturing, special interest favors, boss rule by political consultants and his un-civil attacks on his colleagues, the public and the city staff,” Swain continued.

The city in conjunction with the Register of Voters now has 30 business days to review and validate the petitions. 8,445 valid signatures are required.

“The success of the recall is all the more impressive given that Peotter employed out of town blockers to impede residents, sent out false and misleading mail citywide and consistently and falsely misrepresented the cost of a special election,” said recall supporter and community activist Susan Skinner. “Hundreds of residents from every part of the city participated in the signature gathering and residents were clear and forceful in their reasons for supporting the recall.”

The signature gathering process began in May and focused on several issues including Peotter’s support for high rise developments such as the Museum House, his efforts to undermine the citizen referendum for the Museum House project, his personal attacks on his colleagues and the public, and continued violations of the city’s campaign laws. In the face of strong public outrage, Peotter backed off his efforts to reject gas tax funds paid by city residents and reversed himself to support the Corona del Mar Library and Fire Station.

During the recall process, it was discovered that Peotter had defaulted on a $13 million loan in Irvine and lost his Newport Beach home due to financial mismanagement. Several charges regarding financial reporting irregularities are currently under investigation by the Fair Political Practices Commission.

Peotter moved into Newport Beach in March of 2014 in order to run in the November election. He was part of the so-called “Team Newport” elected with nearly a million dollars of support from special interests and directed by lobbyist/campaign manager Dave Ellis. Ellis was a lobbyist for the Museum House project.

“The recall is a clear message that the residents are tired of the political game playing, name calling, and special interest back room deals of the past three years. We need a city council member who will represent residents, not special interests. The rest of the city council should view this as a wakeup call,” Swain said. 

For more information on the many reasons to recall Peotter, go to: www.recallscottpeotter.com.

Issued by the Committee to Recall Scott Peotter

Peotter “violated his oath”

This morning (Friday, Oct. 27) the Committee to Recall Scott Peotter turned in almost 11,000 signatures to initiate the recall election of the 6th District Councilman representing Corona del Mar.  

From the beginning, Mr. Peotter has been out of step with the majority of Newport Beach residents. You can’t relocate, rent an apartment in a new area only nine months prior to an election, and expect to understand your new community and the people you are elected to represent.  

This is just the latest in a series of public rebukes for Scott Peotter and Political Consultant Dave Ellis. The recall represents the fact that our community wants a representative who listens to their constituents and is not committed to an outside special interest group. The community has made it clear that clean, honest and transparent government is what we in Newport Beach expect. 

We have to talk to each other about issues and every person in our community who has engaged in this discussion is to be congratulated. Lynn Swain and Susan Skinner deserve special appreciation for the dedicated community leaders they are. They, and the Recall Committee, gave of their time and resources in this grass roots effort. Now it is time for all of us to step up to the plate and become educated in order to protect this very special place we call home!

Joy Brenner

Newport Beach City Council Candidate, District 6


Holiday Boutique to open at Harbor High

Jewelry

Submitted photos

The Newport Harbor High School PTA Holiday Boutique will take place Sunday, Nov. 5 from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. at the Newport Harbor High School Small Gym & Courtyard.

Peruse these vendors:

NHHS Culinary Pies & NHHS Band Poinsettias

Coastal Cards by Kelly

Vintage Pepper handmade jewelry

Rancho Meladuco dates

R&F

Kind Tribe

M Street Artwork (woodwork)

Comay Studio Ceramics

Pacific & Rose Textiles

Hippy Slippy Love

Sunrun

Lolly Rose Bakery

Premier Designs Jewelry

Brenda Kristine bags

Newport Harbor Apothecary

…and many more!

Driftwood Tree

The boutique is just in time for your holiday gift giving. Admission is $3 per person.

Proceeds benefit the students of Newport Harbor High School. For more information, visit www.nhhs.schoolloop.com/Holidayboutique.

Newport Harbor High School is located at 600 Irvine Ave., Newport Beach.


Local attorney joins OC Bar Foundation

Shane CriquiStuart Kane LLP announces that partner Shane P. Criqui has been nominated and approved as a member of the Board of Directors of the Orange County Bar Foundation (OCBF). This impressive 40-plus member board is comprised of many of Orange County’s top legal professionals and business leaders. Criqui previously served for several years on the Associate Board of Directors for the OCBF. 

The OCBF is a nonprofit organization committed to keeping at-risk youth in school, healthy and drug-free through education, counseling, mentoring and family strengthening. The programs of OCBF, including SHORTSTOP, Higher Education Mentoring, STOP SHORT of Addiction, and Madres Unidas, empower Orange County youth and families to make positive choices, building the foundation for a lifetime of opportunity and success.

Criqui is a trial attorney whose legal practice focuses on employment litigation (employer-side), employment counseling and business litigation. Criqui engages in aggressive yet practical legal representation to achieve clients’ objectives in litigation, as well as providing accurate and thoughtful counseling to clients regarding their legal, business and employment needs. 

He has been selected as a 2015, 2016 and 2017 Southern California “Rising Stars” by Super Lawyers magazine.

Criqui graduated Loyola Law School, Los Angeles, J.D., 2008, after attending Brown University, where he earned a B.A. in Business Economics, 2000.

Other memberships and affiliations include the Orange County Bar Foundation, Board of Directors; Association of Business Trial Lawyers, Member; Orange County Bar Association, Member; and the Los Angeles County Bar Association, Member.


O.C. assessor to speak at Wake Up Newport

cup of latte

November’s Wake Up Newport meeting next week will feature Orange County Assessor Claude Parrish discussing taxes.

The Newport Beach Chamber of Commerce event will be held from 7:15 to 8:30 a.m., Thursday, Nov. 2 at the Newport Beach Public Library’s Friends Room, 1000 Avocado Ave., Newport Beach.

Admission is free. For more information, call 949.729.4400. www.newportbeach.com


On the Harbor: What’s happening in the coming months?

By LEN BOSE

2016 SDYC PV Race

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Photo by Joysailing.com

The end of October is the quiet time around the harbor with most boat owners rubbing their faces and cursing under their berth while completing their maintenance list to match the 2018 calendar.

Although, if you look close enough into the harbor you will notice two groups of yachtsmen with their maintenance lists nearly completed and are overwhelmed with excitement as the start of the BAJA-HA-HA on October 30 and the CUBAR November 11 with both events starting from San Diego then cruising down to Baja California.

The BAJA-HA-HA is for the sailboat cruiser looking for some company as they start their cruise to wherever their dreams will take them: 154 boats have entered this year’s cruise with 63 boats sailing down the California coast from north of Monterey. During this migration, close to 20 cruisers have stopped in Newport Harbor to anchor for the night or to spend a couple of weeks at Marina Park. For me it is always exciting to see so many people reach their goals and start on a new course.

The BAJA-HA-HA will be on the starting inside San Diego harbor with the crews in Halloween costume. I can only assume the Coast Guard will have the start listed in the Notice to Mariners and issue a security alert while all the ghouls sail out of San Diego Harbor. Let’s hope it is not that foggy that afternoon on October 30. The HA-HA has three legs to this cruise, the first from San Diego to Turtle Bay. Then to Bahia Santa Maria, then finish in Cabo San Lucas. The schedules include softball games to beach parties. The fun meter is pegged for 12 days during this event. This one is on my bucket list and I hope to be attending this time next year.

Now, the CUBAR is a power boat rally consisting of yachts, mostly all expedition-style with a few coastal cruisers. From the three boats that stayed with us at Marina Park these were all advanced yachtsmen and this is not their first rodeo.

This is a rally rather than a race with the participants paying close attention to their speed and course. There are scheduled stops in Ensenada, Turtle Bay, Magdalena Bay, Man of War Cove and finishing in San Jose del Cabo. Wine tasting, exploring and fishing are the main activities while at anchor. Good times will be had, and I will always be looking for an invitation to attend this event someday.

By this time, you might be asking why I am writing about something that has nothing to do with our harbor? That’s not true any longer with the addition of Marina Park and the updated mooring system along with our free anchorages. Each cruiser I meet truly enjoyed their stay in Newport Harbor. These cruisers must be telling their friends, because more and more of them are landing in our pond rather than flying by each season. It has been really exciting to be a part of this change and watch our harbor become more boater friendly.

Bringing it back closer to home, we have had the heat turned up around the harbor a couple of times this month and I am not just referring to the weather. If you are a regular reader of mine you might have noticed over the last month that I have mentioned that model coyotes have been the best deterrent to keep sea lions off your docks and boats. Some of you might have even heard the news reports on KNX 1070 news radio and NBC TV news reporting the use of the model coyotes by the City of Newport Beach in the harbor. The interesting fact is just about the same day the radio and TV news agencies reported how effective the coyotes are, the sea lions must have heard them, too. The sea lions have picked up on the stationary position of the coyotes and they are lying all over them now. Best to shift back to the SealStop system, and you can find more information on this at www.sealstop.com. For those of you that did purchase model coyotes, remember that you have to move them around to be effective.

Sea ya.

~~~~~~~~

Len Bose is a yachting enthusiast, yacht broker and harbor columnist for StuNewsNewport.


Pet of the WeekDog and Cat print

StuNewsNewport is delighted to be working with the Newport Beach Animal Shelter to help get the word out in search of loving homes for pets that deserve a warm, nurturing environment and a place to call “home.”

Zoey

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Courtesy of Newport Beach 

Animal Shelter

MEET ZOEY

Zoey and her Shelter friends are seeking loving homes

Zoey is a 10-week-old brown Tabby. She is ready for her own home and has many friends her own size at the Shelter looking for loving homes. 

Adoption costs at the shelter:

Dogs - $130

Puppies - $150

Cats - $90

Kittens - $110

At any given time, the shelter can have 4 - 5 dogs and 7 - 8 cats/kittens available for adoption. At times, they receive owner turn-ins that would do best adopted out together. 

If you are interested in finding out more about Zoey, or any other animals up for adoption, the Newport Beach Animal Shelter is located at 20302 Riverside Drive, Newport Beach. It is open daily from 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. Call 949.644.3656. Email Valerie Schomburg at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it..

To find out how you can help support the shelter, visit www.nbpd.org and click on “Our Animal Shelter” to view the wish list. They can always use food & treats; new toys; grooming, hygiene & comfort products; as well as laundry soap, dish soap, paper towels, sponges & scrub pads and lint rollers. If you are interested in volunteering, you can fill out and sign the application on the website.


Red Cars Push Open Balboa

By DUNCAN FORGEY

Newport Beachʻs phenomenal growth over the last century has been the result of many timely developments over the years. All of these were instrumental in the direction this city took toward the future. The establishment of McFaddenʻs Landing, creation and dredging of its many islands, the opening up of Irvine Ranch lands, Martin brothersʻ aviation, Hoag Hospital and a multitude of other changes and opportunities over the years have had major impacts on the city.

As soon as the newly discovered port began to be settled in the late 1800s, internal forces worked to expand Newport Beach into the world-famous metropolitan city that it is today.

One of the earliest and greatest boons to Newport Beach was the introduction of the Pacific Electric rail service (Red Cars) to Abbottʻs Landing (Balboa). By 1906, Red Cars allowed Los Angeles residents to access our beloved harbor in approximately an hour. A time shorter than some of todayʻs five oʻclock commutes.

Red Car

The story of the Red Car reads like a Whoʻs Who of the California wealthy. Entrepreneurial intrigue between railroad executives Collis and Henry Huntington, developer M. H. Sherman, banker Isaias Hellman and E.H. Harriman helped grow the system into one of the most historically successful rapid transit systems ever. By the 1920s, Pacific Electric was the worldʻs largest all electric people moving technology in the world. It served LA, Orange, San Bernardino and Riverside counties. The Pacific Electric Red Cars would later be dismantled in favor of the post-World War II freeway system, well designed, but unable to keep up with the exponential population growth of Southern California.

By 1902, McFaddenʻs Landing was a virtual ghost town because of its sale by the McFadden Brothers thus paralyzing the once lively shipping business. New owners W.S. Collins and A.C. Hanson would prove to be more developers than industrialists, setting a trend in Newport Beach that is still alive over a century later. These two real estate men started “selling” ocean front lots for $125, shocking the fishermen and wharf workers who had previously “squatted” on McFadden lands with their families.

By the winter of 1905, it was evident that the Pacific Electric would push from LA all the way to Balboa. But even with this opportunity, locals were afraid that the harbor area would not enjoy a boom like those following rails into Redondo and other seaside towns. It was felt Newport Harbor was simply too far away. But risky developers were not deterred. A major development by A.C. Hanson in Rocky Point (Corona del Mar) was created because of a plan to build an “extension of the rails” across the  entrance to the harbor. This was merely speculation and proved fatal to Corona del Mar’s early growth. 

Litterbug Tin Can Beach

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With confidence of the arrival of the Red Cars, Newport Beach incorporated into a city, Balboa expanded into a vibrant town, Balboa Island was planned and created by a dredger to make a brand new neighborhood, plus McFaddenʻs Landing and west Newport saw an increased interest in fishing, recreation and business opportunities.

New residents came to the belief that recreational and full-time ownership had come to Newport Harbor. The Balboa Pavilion was built 1906, John Scarpa established the first boat parade to help market the fledging town and shortly after the Red Car’s arrived, William S. Collins and Joe Beek were selling lots on “Snipe Island, now known as Balboa Island.”

Los Angeles physician Frank Miller typified those early investors in Newport Harbor coming via the Red Car. He described the rail trip as taking “a little more than an hour” and very “peaceful”. Once he arrived, he put 10 dollars down on the purchase of a $1,500 Bayfront lot. The allure of Newport Harbor and its amenities had begun.

From Its inception, the Pacific Electric Railway was a key factor in the development of all of Orange County for the next 40 years. Reaching Newport Beach in 1905, it came by the way of Long Beach, then traveled south along Coast Highway, passing the site of Tin Can Beach, through the oil fields of coastal OC and then over the bitterroot dam area and finally south along Balboa Boulevard to McFaddenʻs Wharf. It ended at the train station opposite 22nd Street until it was pushed through to Balboa.

As a result of this route, Red Cars helped transform Bay City into Seal Beach, Pacific City into Huntington Beach and Balboa into Newport Beach. These are only three examples of the growth resulting from this rail line which was definitely one of the major seeds leading to the highly populated and complex megalopolis that is now LA and the OC. Electric cars were probably the greatest single factor in coastal growth prior to post World War II relocation of a new generation of LA young people.

Between 1913 and 1928, passenger counts averaged approximately 500,000 passengers using the Balboa line of the Red Cars. This equated to 475,000 car miles and averaged annual revenues of $200,000. Because of the Great Depression and World War II, these numbers dropped significantly. However, in 1945, 2.5 million people used the Red Car Lines between Los Angeles and Santa Ana. An impressive figure noting the population of Southern California at that time. But there was a black cloud brewing for the greatest pollution-free rapid transit system of its time. Post WWII Southern Californians soon fell in love with the automobile and out of love with mass transit. Corporations representing gas, oil and rubber combined with political parties to create a new lifestyle that drove Red Car ridership down. It was replaced with a revolutionary mode of travel utilizing “freeways”.

Roger Rabbit

In the movie Who Framed Roger Rabbit, they explored this transition from Red Cars to Freeways and its antagonist Judge Doom is asked “What is a Freeway?” His classic answer rings only partially true to this day.

“Eight lanes of shimmering cement running from here to Pasadena!” he monologues in the film’s climax. “Smooth, straight, fast. Traffic jams will be a thing of the past.”

If only that last statement were true!!!

~~~~~~~~

Duncan Forgey, who made his home here in Newport Beach for many years, now resides in Hawaii. He is a monthly contributor to StuNewsNewport.


Aviation Update

Jeff Herdman

What can individuals do about concerns over JWA noise and departure issues?

Jeff Herdman

Newport Beach City Councilmember Jeff Herdman 

First, take a minute to make sure you are up-to-speed on these complex issues. A good way to do so might be to view the City Council’s September 26, 2017 Study Session on this topic.  

Second, we all need to agree upon where planes fly. Even a 300-400’ change in where planes fly can be viewed and heard differently depending on where your home is. I often hear, “It’s right over my home now,” or “It’s going over _____school now.” Our brains are a bit weak at perspective when things are at altitude. 

Remember, the City’s goal is and has been to ensure that planes departing JWA “split the Narrows” of the Upper Bay, then cross over Noise Monitor #7 (Back Bay Bistro in the Dunes). This is as close to the “middle of the bay” as planes can get right now.

Please respectfully consider doing this before you reach a conclusion as to where planes are flying. Pick a day without fog, and a day that’s not a “reverse flow” Santa Ana condition. If you live on the westside of the Upper Bay, go to Galaxy Park and determine if the planes are directly over you versus east or west of you. If you live on the east side, go to the Bluffs common area off of Vista Esperanza (this is directly at the Narrows - you’d expect the planes here to be west of you). Or you can watch the planes from the picnic tables at Back Bay View Park. If you want to make this even more meaningful, have a person at home (on the cell phone) who can discuss with you what they are seeing versus what you are seeing.   

Third, you can always note your concern about the NextGen departures on the City Website. Registered concerns are forwarded to the FAA.

Fourth, if you suspect a noise or curfew violation, contact John Wayne Airport’s noise office at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.. Remember that some late departures (usually departures between 10:00 p.m. and about 10:20 p.m.) are allowed per code under some circumstances - weather or air traffic control delays, among others.  

Fifth, you can always speak with our City Manager, Dave Kiff (This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.), about your concerns, or contact me. Hearing from you helps us understand what you are seeing and hearing. Additionally, if you e-mail Dave or me and ask, we can put you on our Aviation Update e-mail list (a monthly report about “All Things Aviation”). You can also find out when and where the next Citizen’s Aviation Committee meetings will be held (these are public meetings, and you are welcome to participate). The next meeting is scheduled for (Monday) October 30, 2017, 4 p.m. at the Civic Center Community Room.  

Thanks for reading, and hope the resources within help. As always, feel free to contact me with questions, concerns or opinions.

Jeff Herdman

Newport Beach City Council, District 5


Good Morning CdM to host Assemblyman Matthew Harper

Assemblyman Harper

Click on photo for a larger image

Submitted photo

Join the Corona del Mar Chamber of Commerce along with community friends and neighbors for a very informative monthly discussion group on Thursday, Nov. 9 from 7:30 to 9 a.m. at the Bahia Corinthian Yacht Club. Assemblyman Matthew Harper is the keynote speaker. Coffee and pastry will be served.

There is no charge for attendance and an RSVP is not required. For more information, visit www.cdmchamber.com.

The Bahia Corinthian Yacht club is located at 1601 Bayside Drive, Corona del Mar.


Fair Game

By TOM JOHNSON

Peotter recall is on!

TomJohnsonSo Friday, October 27, around 8 a.m., the team behind the Recall of Scott Peotter made their way to the Newport Beach City Clerk’s office to deliver 10,866 signatures to their effort.

This move is historical in that Newport Beach has never ventured through a recall effort.

Peotter, who was elected in 2014, was to stand for re-election next November in 2018. However, he now faces an obviously concerned citizenry.

Here’s how it’ll work. Those signatures now go to the Orange County Registrar of Voters for verification. Once that’s completed, the issue comes back to Newport Beach City Council where they have 14 days from receiving the certificate of sufficiency to “issue an order stating that an election will be held to determine whether or not the officer named in the petition shall be recalled.”

The Council has a window at that point to select an election date of not less than 88 days or more than 125 days for the recall.

During this same period of time, potential candidates to backfill Peotter’s seat will run a campaign vying for the seat should he be recalled. 

So far, two candidates have emerged to run, Mike Toerge, who ran against Peotter in 2014, and Joy Brenner.

And don’t expect political consultant Dave Ellis to take all this lying down. If it’s election time in Newport Beach, Ellis is always center stage.

I’m also expecting more candidates to potentially emerge; we’ll keep you posted here at StuNewsNewport.

There were a number of people behind the recall effort, but perhaps none more committed than Susan Skinner and Lynn Cucovich Swain.

• • •

I reported in the last issue of StuNewsNewport about designer Katie Ford’s terrible accident crashing into The Bungalow restaurant. So who are the first people to step up in the community to help? If you guessed the owners of The Bungalow, you’re right. Jim Walker and Louie Feinstein are holding a fundraiser this Wednesday, Nov. 1 throughout the day with 25 percent going to Katie’s fund. What a very, very kind gesture and certainly not a surprise one coming from them.

Unfortunately, at my last update, Katie is still in an induced coma. It will be a long road to recovery. As a single parent with two kids, you can imagine the upcoming challenges.

I hope to see you at The Bungalow on Wednesday night.

If you can’t attend but would still like to donate, A GoFundMe page has been set up to help Katie’s family, as she is their only source of income, at www.gofundme.com/4mi7a2o

• • •

Congrats to Judy Chang, Chair, Arlene Greer, Vice Chair, and the rest of the City Arts Commission who formally opened Sculpture in Civic Center Park Exhibition Phase III

Greer kicked off the festivities in the City Council Chambers.

• • •

So Newport Beach City Councilmember Will O’Neill sends me this, “A great charity started by three local high school ladies from CdM, Sage Hill and St. Margaret’s. Their charity is OC Books On The Run and is benefiting Girls Inc., City of Hope Hospital, Casa Teresa, and Someone Cares Soup Kitchen, with a goal of collecting 1000 books.

“The Council will be recognizing their efforts at the next Council meeting on November 14 and I have committed to collecting at least 100 books toward their cause, which will be presented to them at the meeting.

“I’m calling on our community to rally and donate, too. They can donate directly to the charity, contact info here: www.ocbooksontherun.com. Or they can contact me at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. and I will work it out with them.”

Okay Newport Beach, let’s help Councilmember O’Neill with this. Get rid of some of those old books gathering dust and get them in good hands so they can be enjoyed again by someone else.

• • •

I remember the excitement around Newport Beach; it was 1997, Silver Charm, owned by Newport Beach residents Bob and Beverly Lewis, had won the first two legs of horseracing’s Triple Crown. Everyone waited in anticipation only to see Silver Charm lose the Belmont Stakes finishing second to Touch Gold by only three-quarters of a length.

It was that close.

Well, according to Thoroughbred Daily News, Beverly passed away Friday, Oct. 20, of a lengthy illness at the age of 90. Her husband Bob preceded her in death in 2006. Thanks for the memories!


Citizen of the Year Gala on November 3

The Newport Beach Chamber of Commerce and the City of Newport Beach invite you to the Citizen of the Year Gala honoring Homer Bludau this Friday, Nov. 3 at the Balboa Bay Resort.

A no-host cocktail reception with tray passed hors d’oeuvres kicks off the festivities at 6 p.m. Dinner and dancing begin at 7 p.m. Business or cocktail attire.

Tickets are $125 per person with tables of 10 at $1,250.

To secure your spot, visit www.newportbeach.com.

Balboa Bay Resort is located at 1221 W. Coast Highway, Newport Beach.


Burr White Realty ribbon cutting celebrates 50 years

Burr White

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Photo by David Kawashima

Ribbon Cutting Ceremony and Open House at Burr White Realty on Balboa Peninsula to celebrate their 50th Anniversary

 (L - R): Newport Beach Mayor Kevin Muldoon; Newport Beach City Councilmember Diane Dixon; Joan Trout and Craig Batley, owners/partners of Burr White Realty; Newport Beach Chamber of Commerce President and CEO Steve Rosansky; and Orange County Supervisor Michelle Steel’s Representative, Tim Whitacre. The office is located at 2901 Newport Boulevard and was purchased by Trout and Batley in 1997. It is a full-service real estate office but specializes in vacation rentals and long-term property management.


Bungalow Restaurant to hold fundraiser for StuNews graphic artist

Katie FordThe Bungalow Restaurant will host a fundraiser on Wednesday, Nov. 1, donating 25 percent of the day’s sales of both lunch and dinner to support fundraising efforts benefiting Katie Ford, following an automobile accident on Oct. 24. The accident was the result of a medical emergency that sent Ford’s SUV crashing into the front of the restaurant. The restaurant was empty at the time and no employees or guests of the restaurant were harmed.

Ford, a small businesswoman residing in Laguna Beach, remains hospitalized with head and facial injuries but is expected to survive. She is the sole provider of two young daughters that are currently in the care of their grandparents.

“The entire Bungalow family is terribly upset by this unfortunate accident, and we want to do whatever we can to help get Katie on the road to recovery and help secure some financial support for her and her daughters during this trying time,” said co-owners Jim Walker and Louie Feinstein in a joint statement. “We’re all pulling for Katie and wishing her a speedy recovery.

“We hope to see all of Katie’s friends and family come out for this fundraiser at The Bungalow,” said friend Jeff Jerger. “Every donation helps when it comes to getting her on the road to recovery.”

The Bungalow Restaurant is located at 2441 East Coast Hwy in Corona del Mar. Reservations are recommended and can be made through OpenTable.

A GoFundMe page has also been set up to help Katie’s family, as she is their only source of income, at www.gofundme.com/4mi7a2o.


Balboa Island Home Tour to dazzle the holidays

Balboa Island Christmas

Click on photo for a larger image

Submitted photo

The 21st Annual Balboa Island Holiday Home Walking Tour will be held on Sunday, Dec. 10 from 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. One of Orange County’s most loved Holiday Home Walking Tours returns with seven uniquely holiday decorated island homes and cottages. 

Tickets are $35. You can purchase them online at www.balboaislandNB.org/new-events/hometour. They will also be available Nov. 10 at the following Balboa Island stores: etc. etc., Island Home, Persimmon Tree and Toss all located on Marine Avenue.

Will Call Tickets will be available for pick up at Balboa Island Museum located at 331 Marine Avenue at 9:30 a.m. on the day of the Home Tour. 

The Holiday Home Walking Tour is sponsored by the Balboa Island Improvement Association.


Haunted in CdM – Have you ever seen a Five Crowns ghost?

By AMY SNIDER SENK

5 Crowns

Photo by Amy Snider Senk

It’s late October, and Halloween traditions are underway in Corona del Mar. Children painted pumpkins and skeletons in the windows of Mark Patterson Jewelry, and the dolphin ladies added wreathes of autumn leaves to the topiaries at Marguerite. Even Corona del Mar’s resident ghosts are still roaming around Five Crowns Restaurant – the most haunted place (if not the oldest) in the village, according to local legend.

“There are so many nooks and crannies – it’s like an Escher painting in the back of the house,” said Kenyon Paar, general manager of Five Crowns and SideDoor. “It lends itself to that ‘woooohoooo’ feeling.”

Paar, who has been manager for a year, has not personally seen any of the Five Crowns ghosts, but she said her staff continues to have their run-ins, and she herself is a believer. “I hear things,” she said. “I’ll be upstairs in my office and would hear footsteps in the hallway, after close – but there would be nobody there.”

In the past, managers, chefs and other staff members have described seeing faces in powder room mirrors, seeing wine glasses shatter for no apparent reason while sitting on a trolley, and being locked in or out of rooms and hearing mysterious knocks.

Five Crowns was built in 1936 and modeled after an old English inn. Matilda MacCulloch and her daughter, Marguerite, lived there for four years, and then in the mid-1940s, it became a hideaway for Hollywood stars. After Matilda’s death, however, the place declined in reputation until reopening in the 1960s as Five Crowns.

Employees at Five Crowns have long believed that the ghosts tend to be most active around the holidays, as if they are enjoying the festive mood that the restaurants evoke. Once, an employee saw a male ghost holding a strand of Christmas lights in the air, but the bulbs between his outstretched hands were dark. Workers will hear a clinking sound, like someone tapping a glass to quiet a room, but they can never find the source.

There’s a nook with recurring electrical problems, but no electrician can diagnose the issue. A female ghost, possibly Matilda, will appear occasionally in a white gown, hair piled high like a Gibson Girl, Paar said, and prefers the upstairs rooms.

Another ghost – known as The Man in Black – hangs out in the upstairs Brighton Room.

“He can startle people sometimes,” Paar said. “They’ll see him with his arms crossed across his chest, floating in a back corner.” A worker will turn off lights at the end of the night, then notice someone in the dark, perhaps someone looking for a lost pair of glasses or cell phone. When they turn the lights on, there will be no one there. “It makes me wonder,” she said.

Five Crowns and SideDoor are located at 3801 E. Coast Highway, Corona del Mar. Thanksgiving reservations are currently being accepted, and Christmas Eve reservations will open at 9 a.m. on November 23. A holiday to-go menu also will be posted online soon at www.Lawrysonline.com/five-crowns

~~~~~~~~

Amy Snider Senk has lived in Corona del Mar for 17 years and was publisher of Corona del Mar Today, an online newspaper that ran daily for seven years. Senk, a graduate of the University of Missouri School of Journalism, is involved in the Corona del Mar Residents Association and the Corona del Mar High School PTA. She and her husband have two children.


Fair Game

By TOM JOHNSON

Did medical issue cause The Bungalow accident?

TomJohnson

I’m more than saddened about the accident being reported this week on the Chevy Tahoe crashing into The Bungalow restaurant. One of our StuNews staffers was the injured party in that accident. 

Katie Ford, a single mom and StuNews designer, was returning home after dropping her daughter off earlier at School. 

Katie Ford

It appears that Katie had a bad medical issue heading south of MacArthur Blvd. First, she hit the westbound curb, veered across all lanes of traffic and over the center median, before heading down MacArthur on the wrong side of the road, across Coast Highway and into The Bungalow.

Katie has very, very serious injuries. It appears it’s going to be a long road to recovery for this mother of two children.

According to the Newport Beach Police Department, “We are still in the preliminary stages of the investigation, but it does not appear that drugs or alcohol were contributing factors to the collision. Preliminarily, it appears that a medical episode may have preceded the collision.”

A GoFundMe page has been set up to help Katie’s family, as she is their only source of income, at www.gofundme.com/4mi7a2o.

Please consider helping.

• • •

Attended the Promotional Ceremony on Tuesday, Oct. 24, at City Hall to celebrate the Newport Beach Fire Department and their promotions.

First off, Chip Duncan was pinned with his new badge as the next Fire Chief of Newport Beach.

Duncan is the first NBFD personnel ever promoted to the rank of Fire Chief.

Next came Jeff Boyles who was promoted to Assistant Fire Chief.

Duncan and Boyles appear to make a strong leadership team. And, it’s fun to feel that positive vibe back in the department.

Other promotions were Nic Lucas to Battalion Chief, Matt Ambrose and Matt Reis to Fire Captain, Anthony Terzo to Fire Paramedic and John Mollica and Matt Skelly to Fire Engineers.

Congrats to all. It was the first-time in department history that every level of the organization had a promotion.

Newport Beach Chief Lifeguard Rob Williams led the swearing-in ceremony.

Swearing In

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Courtesy of NB Fire – Paramedic Ray Kang

• • •

Wow, gotta love the heat this week. Good for the City of Newport Beach to invite residents out of the potentially excessive conditions and into the Community Centers and Libraries throughout the City that are air-conditioned. 

So many homes in our beach community don’t have air-conditioning, so it’s a good reminder for all of us.

• • •

Testing 1,2,3…Linda Duffy, Linda Duffy? Villa Real Estate? Just kidding, I met Linda at the recent OASIS Senior Center Health Fair. Linda, of the Tim Carr Group at Villa, was one of the sponsors supporting the effort. 

It was good to see all who joined in.

It continually impresses me what OASIS does and at what cost. This week their new activities magazine came out with all of next month’s programming, included an ad promoting a $5 Thanksgiving lunch the day before Thanksgiving. Five bucks, amazing!

Our community is so fortunate when we can honorably take care of our seniors.

If you know a senior not involved, help get them there. You won’t regret it.

• • •

I know it’s late notice, but the funeral for Lisa Cosenza is today, Oct. 26 at 11 a.m. at Mission Lutheran Church, 24360 Yosemite Road, Laguna Niguel.

Lisa was a long-time employee of the Daily Pilot with me who began selling real estate advertising and eventually evolved into the Ad Director position.

She was murdered October 12 by 26-year-old Luke Ferguson, the son of her long-time boyfriend Doug Ferguson, who also died in the shooting rampage; two others were hurt.

The shootings occurred in Aliso Viejo.

Luke Ferguson faces life-in-prison without the possibility of parole.

About Town HR

44th annual CdM Home Tour themed “What’s Your Story?” is a huge success for our schools

Michele and Kameron

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Photos by Lana Johnson

(L- R): Corona del Mar Home Tour Co-Chairs Michele Caston and Kameron Radovanovic

The 44th Annual Corona del Mar Home Tour took place Tuesday, Oct. 24 to a sell- out crowd! For an $80 ticket, attendees were treated to breakfast at Le Pain Quotidien in Fashion Island, the opportunity to tour six exquisite homes throughout Corona del Mar and Newport Beach, lunch and boutique, and an end-of-the-day celebratory reception at Bliss Home & Design. According to Michele Caston, Tour co-chair, she estimates than nearly $200,000 was raised.

ribbon cutting

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The Home Tour kicked off with a ribbon-cutting ceremony at the Poinsettia Street residence. (L-R): Garrett Calacci, Waterpointe Custom Home Builders; Kameron Radovanovic, CdM Home Tour Co-Chair; Ray Langhammer, Creative Director, Barclay Butera Interiors; Barclay Butera, owner/principal, Barclay Butera Interiors; and Blair Chu, Designer, Barclay Butera Interiors

Gracious homeowners opened up their beautifully appointed residences to the public (which you could view in any order you chose), and these included:

The Flower Streets

Poinsettia Avenue. A stunning contemporary with a farmhouse style, spacious second floor multi-purpose room and rooftop deck, complete with elevator. It was built by Waterpointe Custom Builders and designed by Barclay Butera Interiors who chose a palette of soft blues and crisp whites. Guests enjoyed freshly baked cookies and mimosas.

Larkspur Avenue. A new, two story all glass home, it was inspired by the Western seaboard with a modern coastal feel. Metal barn doors opened to a charming Murphy bed. Tucked under the staircase is a pint-sized Surf Shack…made for the visiting grandkids. A three-story elevator takes you to the rooftop to relax in the hot tub at sunset. Built by Patterson Custom Homes; interior design by Lindye Galloway Interiors.

Upper Buck Gully

Hazel Drive. This quaint 1939 bungalow was remodeled in the 1980 and again last autumn. Eye-catching artwork was created, curated and collected by the owner, with collectibles throughout from the couple’s global travels. Builder, Lee B. Marston; interiors, Raili Clasen/Penny Smith.

Port Streets

Port Barmouth Place. This home reflects comfort and an organic traditional style; and is in walking distance to Andersen Elementary School. Bright and airy floorplan leads out to a hillside vegetable garden for the family’s own farm-to-table meals. Builder, Pete Black Construction; interiors, Brooke Wagner Design.

Eastbluff

Catalpa Street. The perfect family home…with an open layout of the entry, family room and kitchen leading directly to an outdoor oasis. The kid-friendly farmhouse style residence accommodates the kids on the main floor and the adults upstairs in a glorious master retreat. The office featured a marlin caught by the 99-year-old grandfather passed down through generations. Builder, United Custom Homes; interiors by Jessica Menlove Design.

Cercis Place. Texas roots meets California beach style. Remnants from the couple’s travels to San Miguel, Mexico can be seen in each of the rooms. The homeowner, a commercial property designer, used her unique style for model properties to channel her home sourcing. Builder, KRS Development, Inc.; interiors, Christa Abraham.

CdMMS Cheer Team

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Corona del Mar Middle School Cheer Team

Mid-day, attendees enjoyed a delicious lunch, courtesy of Pascal of Café Jardin at Sherman Library & Gardens featuring chicken on a baguette, couscous, grapes and iced tea or water. Entertainment was provided by the Corona Del Mar High School jazz musicians led by Val Jamora and the Corona de Mar Middle School Cheer team acted as greeters, servers and informative docents.

CdM Musicians

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CdM High School Jazz Musicians led by Val Jamora

There was boutique shopping at its finest – from jewelry and candles to women’s apparel. I purchased two gold necklaces from g2g Designs and two gemstone bracelets from gina B. Both are local boutiques, which I enjoy supporting, and a generous portion of all boutique sales go back to support the CdM Middle and High schools.

Patricia Fisker

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(L-R): Patricia Fisker and Gianna Riley of g2g Designs

For more information, visit www.cdmhometour.com.


Autumn beckons soup for dinner

Soup

Courtesy of Roger’s Gardens

Soon, the nights will be turning brisk, and there’s no more satisfying meal than soup to warm up the dinner table. Get a head start on comfort food this Sunday, Oct. 29 at 10 a.m., when Chef Richard Mead, owner and chef of Farmhouse at Roger’s Gardens, demonstrates how to make hearty and healthy soups using different types of vegetables and meats.

Chef Mead will share all his tricks and tips on how to make them flavorful and filling. Be inspired by the fresh seasonal ingredient combinations he uses to create these delectable dishes in your own home.

Seats and tastings are limited. The first 100 attendees will receive a ticket for a seat in the amphitheater and a tasting.

Farmhouse at Roger’s Gardens is located at 2301 San Joaquin Hills Road, Corona del Mar. www.farmhouserg.com


Pacific Symphony Youth Orchestra to open season

Youth Symphony

Submitted photo

Once upon a time there was an awesome concert called “Stories and Myths,” held by Pacific Symphony Youth Orchestra (PSYO) to open their 2017-18 season of musical delights. The story behind the outstanding PSYO, comprised of Southern California’s most talented young symphonic musicians, grades 9-12, is impressive, entertaining and worth hearing – especially as they set off on this latest musical journey. 

Each season, Assistant Conductor Roger Kalia designs an opening program that best demonstrates the orchestra’s versatility and talent, as well as highlights the different sections of the orchestra. The three “chapters” for this concert include: Berlioz’s “Carnival Overture,” Austin Wintory’s “Journey Suite,” featuring the outstanding young soprano, Chelsea Chaves, and the mythical marvel, Stravinsky’s “Firebird.”

Talent rules the stage for this diverse concert, which takes place Sunday, Nov. 12 at 7 p.m. in the Renée and Henry Segerstrom Concert Hall. Thanks to the generosity of sponsors, this season’s concerts are free to attend, but tickets are required. To reserve a general admission seat, call the Symphony’s box office at 714.755.5799 or visit www.PacificSymphony.org.


New principal to lead TeWinkle Intermediate School

NMUSD logo

Courtesy of NMUSD

Newport-Mesa Unified School District (NMUSD) has announced the selection of Dr. Dipali Potnis as principal of TeWinkle Intermediate School. Dr. Potnis is known for her strong instructional leadership, ability to create meaningful relationships, and fostering a welcoming school culture.

Dr. Potnis most recently served as assistant principal of Dana Hills High School and prior to that as activities director for San Clemente High School, both in the Capistrano Unified School District (CUSD). She has served as a middle and elementary school teacher, as well as an instructional coach, within the Los Angeles Unified School District.

While serving as an assistant principal in the CUSD, some of Dr. Potnis’ responsibilities included the design and implementation of instructional goals and curriculum development, coordination of interventions for both the academic and behavioral success of students, and management of student discipline, among other responsibilities. She places a strong focus on proven instructional strategies, differentiated instruction for the success of all students, and data driven solutions. 

Though she has a strong instructional background, Dr. Potnis also is known for her ability to build collaborative relationships among staff and parent communities to jointly build a positive school culture that students are excited to be a part of.

“I look forward to collaborating with staff and empowering each other to inspire students to achieve success,” Dr. Potnis said.

A graduate of the University of Southern California, Dr. Potnis obtained a doctorate degree in education, and at the University of California, Riverside, she obtained a master’s degree in education and a bachelor’s degree in political science.

Dr. Potnis’ appointment is scheduled for Board of Education approval at the October 24, 2017 Board of Education meeting.


All treats & no tricks at Lido Marina Village

Girl Witch

Courtesy of Lido Martina Village

On Sunday, Oct. 29, bring the youngsters to Lido Marina Village in costume for trick-or-treating throughout the village form 12 to 3 p.m.

Visit the shops and get sweet treats for the kids, while you shop.

Candy Corn

Lido Marina Village is located at 3434 Via Lido, Newport Beach. For more information, visit www.LidoMarinaVillage.com.


Join in “Fly a Flag” for Brock McCann

Brock McCann

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Submitted photo

The Newport Heights/Cliffhaven Community Association presents the Fly a Flag for Brock McCann Safety Campaign beginning this weekend.

Brock was an 8-year-old heading home after school on a May afternoon in 2016 only to be killed by a trash truck working in the area.

Flags will be available with a very special handwritten note from the McCann Family. The donations collected will go toward a memorial fund in honor of Brock.

Flag donations start at $10 and will be available for sale this Saturday, Oct. 28 at 2223 Cliff Drive, Newport Beach, from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. On Sunday, Oct. 29, flags will also be on sale at the cement tables in Cliff Drive Park, also from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m.

Red Flag

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Submitted photo

Members of the Association hope you’ll come and show your support and proudly fly the flag in front of your home, as a sign of solidarity and safety for our children. Their goal is to have every home in the area fly a flag for Brock, as a reminder to slow down, to stop people from driving and texting, and to not roll through stop signs.

Families can customize their flag with a message and/or picture. Each flag is being hand sewn locally by Nikki’s Flags.

The Newport Heights/Cliffhaven Association is a tax-exempt 501C3 organization.


A ‘note’-worthy achievement: Avanti Music celebrates five years 

Avanti youth

Submitted photo

An Avanti Music youth performance

They play the piccolo, sing solos and even compose their own original songs. They are the dozens of KidWorks students who have participated in Avanti Music, a KidWorks program founded in 2012 by volunteer Joe Cristina, a professional musician with 38 years of experience in composition, arranging, orchestration and production. This year, they are celebrating Avanti’s five-year anniversary with a free concert that showcases the musical talent Christina helps nurture in the students. Called “Celebrating 5!,” the concert is set for Friday, Oct. 27 at 7:30 p.m. in the sanctuary at St. Andrew’s Presbyterian Church, 600 St. Andrews Road, Newport Beach.

 “The concert will feature pop, R&B, classical and world music, plus a selection of traditional Mexican music with a vocal soloist,” Cristina said. “Our students will be performing music that is uplifting and hopeful.”

They are very grateful to St. Andrew’s, a longtime KidWorks partner, who has generously made their sanctuary available for the concert. Kyle Team, a KidWorks board member and classroom volunteer, is also the church’s ministry liaison with KidWorks.

“St. Andrew’s members have served directly with KidWorks students, provided back to school supplies and purchased Christmas gifts for many deserving families in central Santa Ana,” Team said. “At this year’s Serve Day, Saturday, Sept. 23, St. Andrew’s members visited the KidWorks’ Dan Donahue Center to repaint the preschool mural and create college care packages for the recent high school graduates.”

In addition to Team, they also thank these St. Andrew’s congregation members for their help with the concert: Lisa Gels, Dan Wendell, Julie Wood, Dr. James Melton, Brandon Muchow, Robert Cerda and other supporting staff.

Among those performing at the Avanti five-year celebration concert are: Evelyn Torres, vocals; Julie Cons, violin; Yaretzy Hernandez, vocals and guitar; Nancy Cervantes, vocals; Jocelyn Perez; vocals and guitar; Karla Camacho, flute; Yarin Camacho, clarinet; Melisa Luis, keyboards and harp; Evaluz Alvarado, bass; and Emily Barrios, percussion and vocals. Other Avanti music alumni may also join the fun on stage.

Avanti Music’s remarkable positive impact is best told in the words of its students:

Liliana Ledezma is an 18-year-old Avanti alumni now attending the University of California Berkeley’s College of Environmental Design, majoring in urban studies: “I play several instruments, primarily flute and piccolo. I also really like playing the ukulele. A person has to find connections in life. Avanti is like that for me. It’s very precious and full of love. I’m so lucky to have found something like this.”

Lilian Ramirez is a 19-year-old Avanti alumni attending San Francisco State University, where she is majoring in music: “Avanti was the turning point in my life. I was starting fresh at a new school and trying to figure out what I wanted to do with my life. Avanti helped me find my voice and come out of my shell. I want to be a performer, write music and tour. Avanti has helped me have confidence in my dreams.”


Holiday Boutique to open at Harbor High

Holiday packages

Submitted photo

The Newport Harbor High School PTA has just announced the opening of its 2017 Holiday Boutique. It will take place Sunday, Nov. 5 from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. at the Newport Harbor High School Small Gym & Courtyard.

Just in time for your holiday gift giving, peruse a unique collection of gifts, home décor, accessories, sweets and more. Admission is $3 per person.

Proceeds benefit the students of Newport Harbor High School.

For more information, visit www.nhhs.schoolloop.com/Holidayboutique.

Newport Harbor High School is located at 600 Irvine Ave., Newport Beach.


Hoag gets $15 million Pick(me)up

Dr. B

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Courtesy of Cara Uisprapassorn (Hoag)

(L-R): Dr. Michael Brant-Zawadzki and Dick Pickup 

This week at the 10-year anniversary celebration for Hoag Neurosciences Institute, the Pickup Family Foundation announced a $15 million gift to support the nationally recognized Institute and Hoag officials responded by renaming it the Pickup Family Neurosciences Institute. 

“The Pickup family’s extraordinary generosity will enable Hoag to dramatically expand and accelerate clinical research and treatment of the many critical conditions our programs focus on at the Institute,” said Hoag President and Chief Executive Officer Robert T. Braithwaite. “Their gift is further affirmation of Hoag’s growing national leadership in neurosciences. We are deeply grateful to the Pickup family for their support and trust.”

Established in 2007, the newly renamed Pickup Family Neurosciences Institute has steadily expanded over the past decade to offer nationally leading programs exploring causes of and groundbreaking treatments for virtually all aspects of neuroscience-based medical conditions. These range from cognitive disorders, stroke, and epilepsy to and back and spine issues, headache studies and treatment, sleep difficulties and movement disorders. The Institute offers innovative technology such as the county’s only MR/PET imager, Perfexion gamma knife stereotactic brain tumor treatment and surgical procedures using augmented-reality, 3D Surgical Theater. 

In 2018, the Institute will open the Fudge Family Acute Rehabilitation Center, an on-campus residential facility at Hoag Hospital Newport Beach that will enable clinicians to provide uninterrupted follow-up care to patients recovering from strokes and other acute brain traumas.

Richard Pickup, owner of Balboa Bay Resort and Newport Beach Country Club, said the family gift was inspired by two compelling factors: their long-time admiration of and affiliation with Hoag, and the recent loss of a beloved family member to Alzheimer’s disease.

“There have been breakthroughs in cancer and cardiology and other areas of medicine, but there is still so much that is unknown about the brain,” said Pickup. “From Alzheimer’s to addiction and other brain disorders, we have a lot left to learn. I am hoping that in the next 10 years or so we can make significant strides in these areas.”

Pickup added that the family’s gift was made in the hope it will aid in the discovery of new treatments and cures for brain disorders, which afflict millions of people.

“I have found over the years that if you have passionate, educated people dedicated to long-term success like those at Hoag, they make things happen,” said Pickup. “With good management and passion, you can achieve breakthroughs. I’m hoping to be back for the 20th anniversary celebration of the Institute to see what strides we have made in neurosciences.”

Long-time Newport Beach philanthropists, the Pickup family has made numerous gifts to Hoag and other organizations throughout the years, but this is the family’s largest single gift. Richard Pickup, who has made a career of analyzing companies and what makes them successful, said he has long been impressed with the leadership and vision at Hoag. 

Born and raised in Whittier, Richard Pickup moved to Newport Beach in the 1960s and later founded Eagle Four Partners, a private equity firm specializing in hospitality, golf, lifestyle and residential real estate developments. Two of the Pickup children were born at Hoag Hospital in the 1960s, and Richard Pickup was treated at Hoag for a stroke 10 years ago. 

“Most of my life, I’ve been trying to build an estate. But when you reach your 80s, you realize that material things pale in comparison to what mankind can do with these monies,” Pickup said. “For our family, being affiliated with a number of charities in a number of areas, we felt it was time to make a meaningful gift. We investigated Hoag Neurosciences Institute and the breakthroughs being made, and knew we were making the right decision with this gift.”


Stump the Stu

This one proved to be a tough one

Stump the Stu 10.23.17

Click on photo for a larger image

And then, one Ilona Martin came in with the only correct guess: “The photo is on 31st outside the art studio of South of France, wonderful artist Wendy Johnson.”

Thanks Ilona!

If you have a unique spot or icon around town that you think StuNewsNewport readers would enjoy finding out about, please shoot it, send it to us (This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.) and give us the answer, so we can challenge them!


Something Rotten! coming to Segerstrom

Something Rotten

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Photo by Jeremy Daniel

The cast of the “Something Rotten!” National Tour 

The completely original new musical, Something Rotten!, directed and choreographed by Tony Award® winner Casey Nicholaw (The Book of MormonAladdin), with music and lyrics by Grammy Award winner and Tony Award nominee Wayne Kirkpatrick and Golden Globe Award and Tony Award nominee Karey Kirkpatrick, and a book by Tony Award nominees Karey Kirkpatrick and best-selling author John O’Farrell, premieres at Segerstrom Center for the Arts November 7 - 19.

Nominated for 10 Tony Awards, including Best Musical, Something Rotten! comes to Costa Mesa with three principal cast members direct from Broadway: Rob McClure as Nick Bottom, Adam Pascal as Shakespeare and Josh Grisetti as Nigel Bottom. The performance takes place in Segersrrom Hall.

Tickets to Something Rotten! start at $29 and are available online at www.scfta.org, by calling 714.556.2787 and at the Box Office at 600 Town Center Drive in Costa Mesa. For inquiries about group ticket savings for 10 or more, call the Group Services office at 714.755.0236. The 2 p.m. performance on Saturday, Nov. 18 will include audio description, open captioning and sign-language interpretation. The Center offers many services for patrons with disabilities including removable wheelchair locations, binoculars and assistive listening devices. To learn more, visit www.SCFTA.org/accessibilityinformation.


Sculpture Garden III grand opening planned

Burnt Matchstick

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Submitted photos

“Burnt Matchstick” by Karl Unnasch is located at the entrance of the Civic Center

The Newport Beach City Arts Commission invites the community to a grand opening celebration for the third phase of the Sculpture in the Civic Center Park Exhibition on Saturday, Oct. 28 from 1:30 to 4 p.m. at the Newport Beach Civic Center, 100 Civic Center Drive, Newport Beach. 

The event will celebrate the addition of nine new sculptures to the Sculpture in the Civic Center Park Exhibition. A short program will be held in Council Chambers with Mayor Muldoon, Arts Commissioners and Joe Lewis from Arts OC welcoming guest and giving an overview of the sculptures. A reception will follow with music by an ensemble from the Pacific Symphony Youth Orchestra. Some of the artists will be on hand to talk about their artwork, and visitors will be able to take a walking tour of the sculptures. Special art activities for children will be provided by the Chuck Jones Center for Creativity. 

Getting Your Bearings

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“Getting Your Bearings” by David Boyer is a kinetic wind structure

The 14-acre Newport Beach Civic Center Park was specially designed by renowned landscape architect Peter Walker as an intended sculpture garden. Arts Orange County provided professional services for the coordination of the artist selection and installation of the sculptures. The nine new sculptures were selected from submissions received by a national call for entries based on their artistic merit, durability, practicality and site appropriateness. They are being installed October 23 - 26 and will remain at the Civic Center Park until Summer 2019.  

The nine sculptures are as follows: Burnt Matchstick by Karl Unnasch, Flight by Steven Rieman, Popsicles by Craig Gray, Be Still and Know by John Merigian, No Swimming by Oleg Lobykin, Cosmic Glints by Patricia Vader, Getting Your Bearings by David Boyer, Cultural Pedestrians by Sue Quinlan and Life is a Balancing Act by Cindy Debold.

For more information on the event or exhibition, visit www.newportbeachca.gov/culturalarts (under Sculpture in Civic Center Park) or contact the Cultural Arts Services Office at 949.717.3808.


School Notes

District considering shift to collegiate calendar

Newport-Mesa Unified School District (NMUSD) is considering a shift to a collegiate calendar to more closely align with neighboring school districts and local colleges. This shift would start the school year up to three weeks prior to the Labor Day holiday and end the first semester prior to the winter break.

NMUSD is in the process of seeking input from the school community regarding the shift to a collegiate calendar, which most unified districts have adopted.

A traditional calendar for the 2018-19 has already been adopted.

If a collegiate calendar is approved, the earliest it would take effect would be starting with the 2019-20 school year. 

NMUSD invites residents to attend one of the information meetings noted below and to take the Collegiate Calendar Survey between November 1-15, 2017.

 

Newport Harbor High School               Costa Mesa High School

November 1, 2017                               November 2, 2017

3:30 - 5 p.m. or 6:30 - 8 p.m.               4 –5:30 p.m.

Gymnasium                                         Theater

600 Irvine Avenue                               2650 Fairview Road

Newport Beach, CA 92663                 Costa Mesa, CA 92626

 

The calendar is developed by the Calendar Review Committee, which includes certificated and classified staff, parents, district administrators, and employee bargaining units.

The Calendar Review Committee will develop, assess, and evaluate possible calendar options prior to making a recommendation to the negotiation teams. The final decision is determined through the negotiations process and adopted by the Board of Education.

Suicide Education and Prevention Strategies for parent

NMUSD will present Suicide Education and Prevention Strategies at four local high schools in November. This workshop will focus on the principles of suicide prevention, outline NMUSD policies, procedures and provide guidance for parents. The discussion will include the identification of common myths, risk factors and warning signs as well as highlight protective factors, primary prevention, early identification, referral and available resources. Suicide prevention is an on-going, collaborative process and parents’ participation is urged.

 

Corona del Mar High School: Nov. 7, 6 p.m., CdM Theater

Costa Mesa High School: Nov. 21, 6 p.m., CMHS Theater

Estancia High School: Nov. 29, 6 p.m., EHS Theater

Newport Harbor High School: Nov. 15, 6 p.m., NHHS Reading Room

Corona del Mar High School

The Curious Savage is coming to the Seaking Theater

Corona del Mar School’s Backstage and Performing Artists Company will present The Curious Savage Nov. 2 - 4 in the CdMHS Seaking Theater. Curtain times are Thursday, Nov. 2  at 4 p.m., Friday and Saturday, Nov. 3 & 4 at 7 p.m. and a Sunday, Nov. 5 matinee at 2 p.m. 

CdM ORCHESIS DANCE COMPANY presents Dancing with the Teacher on Thursday, Nov. 16 at 7 p.m. in the Big Gym. Tickets only $5 pre-sale and $10 at the door.

Newport Harbor High School

Support the band tonight at CPK

Support the Newport Harbor High School Band tonight, Oct. 26, with their Restaurant Fundraiser at California Pizza Kitchen. Enjoy a meal and 20 percent of the price goes back to the NHHS Band. You can dine anytime between 11 a.m. to 10 p.m.

Friday, Oct. 27 is the Grandparent’s Day Luncheon from 10 a.m. to 12 p.m.


Reading in the Redwoods at ENC 

ENC Reading

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Courtesy of ENC

Valerie Bain will share a tale in the ENC Redwood Forest

On Sunday, Oct. 29 from 9:30 to 11 a.m., spend the morning at the Environmental Nature Center’s for a “Tree Hug Hike,” and relax on a blanket or towel underneath their Redwood Forest canopy as Valerie Bain reads “Pocket Mouse at Crystal Cove.”

Afterwards, children and their adults will make tie-dye ocean creatures. Parents must remain with children at all times. All ages are welcome. Bring your own blanket or towel.

Cost is $5 per child for pre-registered members; $7 per child, pre-registered non-members; and $10 per child, unregistered walk-ins.

To register and pre-pay, visit www.encenter.org.

Environmental Nature Center is located at 1601 E. 16th St., Newport Beach.


Tickets to go on sale for Island Holiday Home Tour

Balboa Island Christmas House

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Submitted photo

Mark your calendar for a seasonal favorite! The 21st Annual Balboa Island Holiday Home Walking Tour will be held on Sunday, Dec. 10 from 11 a.m. to 4 p.m.

One of Orange County’s most loved Holiday Home Walking Tours returns this year with seven uniquely holiday decorated island homes and cottages. These “deck-the-hall houses” are sure to spark holiday cheer!

Tickets are $35 and can be purchased online at www.balboaislandnb.org. They will also be available November 10 at the following Balboa Island stores: etc. etc., Island Home, Persimmon Tree and Toss – all located on Marine Avenue.

Will Call Tickets will be available for pick up at Balboa Island Museum located at 331 Marine Ave. at 9:30 a.m. on the day of the Home Tour. 

The Holiday Home Walking Tour is sponsored by the Balboa Island Improvement Association.


Stump the Stu

Don’t let this Stu get your goat

So, you think you know your Newport Beach. Well, here’s a cute little painting hanging on some lattice work around town. You’ve probably seen it, but the question is: Where is it? 

Take the challenge, and submit your answers to: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.. The correct answers will be in Thursday’s edition.

If you have a unique spot or icon around town that you think StuNewsNewport readers would enjoy finding out about, please shoot it, share it and give us the answer, so we can challenge them!

Stump the Stu 10.23.17

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Letter to the Editor:

Resident doesn’t like new JWA flight patterns

The John Wayne Airport and the flight path are two of the greatest issues impacting the quality of life of Newport Beach residents. Airplanes fly over many of us and the long-term impacts of noise and pollution are known to negatively impact our health. If you live near or under the departing planes, a permanent change will soon impact you and your neighborhood.

The Newport Beach City Council has decided the best departure pattern for their residents. In their litigation and negotiations with the FAA they have used their power of gerrymandering to decide the winners and losers. Since we don’t get to be a party to the Closed Legal Sessions or the negotiations with the FAA, the fate of many Newport residents is wholly in their hands.  

Here is my spin based on the new “S” two turn pattern proposed by the City and the new departures using GPS that keep the planes in one lane in the sky.

If you are under the planes you are doomed, with carcinogenic particulates in your lungs and on your home, cars and patios. The noise will have indirect impacts on your health, too. The City has not proposed any relief for you. When you are outdoors enjoying our outdoor lifestyles with your grandkids or kids, be sure to provide a fine particulate mask to protect their lungs. The City can no longer blame the FAA or airlines since this is their departure plan recommended by their consultants.

The City Council has failed to set policy before they decided to represent our best interests. The resulting gerrymandering does not follow any specific policy. If the Council had set a policy that stated, “The planes fly over the least residents and most water possible” their plan could be better justified. Instead, we received a NIMBI (not in my backyard) plan. In addition to the need for specific policy, the Council should also have developed a plan of relief for those residents suffering from the long-term impacts from the airport. Things would have been different and a defensible plan would be in place instead of a gerrymandered one.

I am hopeful that someday this Council or a future Council will fully understand the impact of the airport on property values, tourism and especially the health of all Newport Beach residents, and decisions will be made with proper planning and sound public policy. 

Lee Pearl 

Newport Beach


Farm to Fork: A Foodie’s Point of View Fork

By LANA JOHNSON

Experience intimate dining at Balboa Bay Resort with two celebrated chefs

Celebrity Chef Richard Blais

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Richard Blais photo by Pasagraphy/

Rachel Haggstrom courtesy of NBW&F

Celebrated chefs Richard Blais and Rachel Haggstrom

On Friday, Oct. 27 from 6 to 10 p.m., Newport Beach Wine & Food in partnership with the Balboa Bay Resort will host a unique dining experience at Waterline Newport Beach at the Balboa Bay Resort.

Enjoy an intimate five-course tasting menu prepared by Bravo’s Top Chef All-Star winner, restaurateur, TV personality and cookbook author Richard Blais and Executive Chef Rachel Haggstrom of Waterline at Balboa Bay Resort, in collaboration with 90+ point pairings from Kessler-Haak Vineyard and Wines.

The Special Menu includes:

Meet & Greet Reception with the Chefs and tray-passed canapes, accompanied by 2015 Kessler-Haak Sparkling Brut Rose

Dungeness Crab “Cake”: Dungeness crab salad with crispy tuille, remoulade, capers, celery, blood orange, avocado, cilantro, accompanied by 2014 Kessler-Haak Stainless Steel Chardonnay

Butternut Squash Soup: Kabocha squash, guanciale, brussels sprouts, nasturtium, pepitas, rye cracker, accompanied by 2013 Kessler-Haak Dry Riesling Lafond Vineyard

Cavatelli Pasta: Sage and walnut Bolognese accompanied by 2012 Kessler-Haak Pinot Noir Pommard Clone

72 Hour Short Ribs: Parsnip puree, braised parsnips, pearl onions accompanied by 2014 Kessler-Haak Syrah Lafond Vineyard

Candy Apple: White Chocolate, caramel, green apple, pan d’epice accompanied by 2012 Kessler-Haak Sparkling Brut

Blais cookbook

There will be a book signing of Richard Blais’ new cookbook, So Good (one cookbook is included per couple).

The cost of the dinner is $250 per guest and tickets are available at www.newportwineandfood.com.

Ciao Vincenza!


Fair Game

By TOM JOHNSON

 Piling snaps under pier and coyotes poised for sea lions

TomJohnson

A piling under Ruby’s at the end of the Balboa Pier snapped last week under heavy surf. The damage was related to the previously reported sewage spill that also closed the beach in that area last week for three days.

Pier piling

On the Newport Beach City Council agenda for tomorrow, Tuesday, Oct. 24, is the potential of awarding an Ocean Piers Maintenance Project contract. Nope, the sky isn’t falling and our piers are safe.

The maintenance of our piers is a regular occurrence in town and good for us. The John S. Meek Company, Inc. is expected to be approved for a repair contract of almost $1.2 million. 

Repairs are expected to take place this winter.

• • •

Most of us have seen sea lions perform at one time or another. At SeaWorld, I was reminded that their sea lions are Clyde & Seamore, and yes, I’ve seen them perform. Anyway, my guess was that sea lions are a smart mammal. After all, they do tricks! Lots of them.

My mind completely changed last week. You see, the City of Newport Beach recently introduced coyotes in the dock areas to keep the sea lions at bay in hopes of reducing damage to docks and boats.

Of course, not real ones, nope, big plastic ones that are mounted on green stands with their teeth drawn and in an attack position. 

Fake Coyote

The good news is that it’s apparently working so far. The sea lions are apparently afraid. And, the damage has been slowed. 

Good thing the sea lions haven’t figured out yet that this “new breed” of coyote has no legs. But I have to tell you, I like the fur tail attached to the plastic body, that’s what had me fooled.

• • •

Last call, the Newport Beach Chamber of Commerce Economic Forecast, featuring the UCLA Anderson Forecast is this Friday, Oct. 28, from 11:15 a.m. - 2 p.m. at the Balboa Bay Resort. Seats are $65 and reservations required, click here.

• • •

In the last issue of StuNewsNewport we reported that one Thomas Lamarr Prince, 40, Anaheim, was found guilty of robbing several marijuana dealers of more than 100 pounds during two drug deals at a resort in Newport Coast

Two things, first, the resort in question was Pelican Hill. Prince apparently lured in multiple drug dealers to meet and eventually took them back to a villa at the resort. Once there, several cohorts jumped out and robbed the dealers.

The second interesting fact is that Prince is the brother of Tayshaun Prince, a longtime NBA player and first-round draft pick back in 2002.

Hey Thomas, I hope you enjoyed your stay!

B-t-w, the next “stay” could be a little longer…he’s looking at up to 25 years in prison and I guarantee it won’t be as nice as the last place.


You Must Remember This: Hang 4

By NANCY GARDNER

When I was growing up, there weren’t children’s sports leagues. When we got home from school, instead of our mothers putting us in the car and taking us off to practice, they simply nodded agreeably as we changed our clothes and scooted outside to amuse ourselves. Talk about neglectful! Instead of an adult-directed workout on a well-maintained field pointing us toward an athletic scholarship in the future, we were left to do whatever we wanted.

Fortunately, today’s parents are far more responsible. They get their children enrolled in organized sports as early as possible and get them specialized as soon as they can, ideally by the age of seven so as to fully develop all potential. Think I’m exaggerating? Pick a sport, go to a game/match/meet and note the intensity of the moms and dads. Tens of thousands of dollars in tuition are at stake, so the pressure starts early, and with each birthday, it only increases. The results, of course, are mixed.

In one instance, a boy had followed the script – focused exclusively on tennis from a young age, had all sorts of private coaching and had gotten good enough to attract attention from colleges – the holy grail. Only problem – by the time he got to high school, he hated the game. His second year he wouldn’t even go out for the team which meant he didn’t attend a practice or participate in a match, until the team qualified for CIF. At that point, the coach with full approval from many of the parents, put him in at No. 1.  The other boy, the one who went to every practice and played in every game and helped his team get to CIF but who was not of the same caliber, got to stay home.  We say that sports teach life lessons. In this case, the lesson was that you can do everything right and still get the shaft, so I guess it’s true.

As someone who has watched her grandchildren play baseball and soccer, water polo and tennis and a few other things thrown in, I think it’s great that so many kids, especially girls, are involved in sports today, and terrific that both fathers and mothers are so supportive. As a council member, I had some interaction with those directing local AYSO and Little League and couldn’t have been more impressed with their devotion. However, when I see kids being home schooled just so they can take more tennis lessons…I question the emphasis. My grandsons tried all sorts of sports well past the period when they were supposed to be specializing, and yet both played first team varsity when they got to high school despite their supposedly late start in choosing their sport. They also got college scholarships – academic scholarships.

Here’s a thought: Maybe a little less emphasis on sports and a little more time with the books might not only get that desired financial help with tuition, but also make for games that are actually fun, particularly for the kids.

~~~~~~~~

Nancy Gardner, former Mayor of Newport Beach, long-time resident and daughter of Judge Robert Gardner, is a regular contributor to StuNewsNewport.


Tree of Life festivities honor organ donors

Tree of Life 1

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Submitted photos

Families of organ donors and community members gathered together on Wednesday, Oct. 18 at Hoag’s “Tree of Life” memorial in an event co-hosted by Hoag Memorial Hospital Presbyterian and OneLegacy, the non-profit organization dedicated to saving lives through organ, eye and tissue donation serving the seven-county Greater Los Angeles area.

“Hoag is honored to recognize the extraordinary donors who have saved countless lives with their generous gifts,” said Karen Linden, chair, Hoag board of directors. “Since its installation in 2011, the Tree of Life has served as a place for families to visit and reflect on the gift their loved ones gave, and we hope it inspires others to become donors as well.”

Dr. Rosemary O’Meeghan, intensivist and chair of the Hoag Organ, Eye and Tissue Donation Program, welcomed the donor families and guests to the event. She affirmed that it takes considerable strength for families to pursue organ donation around a time when there has usually been sudden illness and death of a loved one. The event acknowledged the commitment of both the registered organ donor and donor families, to the noble cause of organ donation and transplantation, to help those in our community in need of life saving organ transplants. 

An organ donor’s last act in this world is to extend the life of someone else – almost always a stranger. John Whalen, a transplant recipient, shared a sentiment about his donor, “This person wasn’t one of my three brothers or a lifelong friend, it was a complete stranger. He gave me a miracle. He gave me back my life.”

To honor that sacred and lifesaving gift, families of recent Hoag organ donors were presented with a certificate and a replica of a leaf bearing the name of their loved one that will hang on the Tree of Life, a metal sculpture created by local artist Tova Rotlevy Cohen. The tree received its newest leaves with the names of 15 organ donors from 2015 through 2016. 

Tree of Life 2

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“I encourage all of our community members to give the ultimate gift,” stated Newport Beach Mayor Kevin Muldoon, who also has witnessed the power of organ donation when his father passed, but was able to donate his organs. “Registering to be a donor is easy and it is the most precious and selfless gift you can give.”

Families in attendance also had the opportunity to handwrite personal messages and dedications to their loved ones onto a rose that will be incorporated into the Donate Life float as part of the 129th Rose Parade® on New Year’s Day, Jan. 1, 2018.  

Lynn Bonas, mother of organ donor Lauren Bonas who passed away at age 17, spoke at the event about the impact of knowing her daughter helped other individuals and families. “From the first letter from the Eye Bank knowing two people could see again, to the letter describing the recipient of her heart, it was incredible knowing they had the gift of life all from our precious daughter.” 

Hoag has a long-standing commitment to saving lives through organ and tissue donation. Between 2006 and 2016, it had 87 organ donors, the largest of any non-trauma hospital in Orange County.


Tonight: A Frank Discussion about Men’s Health

Faysal A. Yafi

Submitted photo

Faysal A. Yafi, M.D.

The popular Newport Beach Library series Medicine in our Backyard featuring internationally known UC Irvine Health physicians will present “A Frank Discussion about Men’s Health Issues” tonight, Monday, Oct. 23. 

Faysal A. Yafi, M.D., Medical Director, Men’s Health Services, UC Irvine Health Center for Urological Care, will lead the discussion.

Dr. Yafi is a board-certified urologist who specializes in men’s health, erectile dysfunction, hypogonadism, Peyronie’s disease, prosthetic surgery, male voiding dysfunction and male infertility. He has an avid interest in both basic and clinical research, and has written more than 70 peer-reviewed publications and book chapters, and has received multiple national and international awards and recognitions.

Doors open at the Central Library at 6:30 p.m., with the lecture and Q&A following from 7 to 8:30 p.m. There is no charge to attend. For more information, go to www.newportbeachlibrary.org, or call 949.717.3818.

The lectures in this series are scheduled for the fourth Monday of each month through May 2018. The library, in conjunction with UCI Irvine, presents lecturers to discuss research and cutting-edge technology in their various fields of expertise.


Stories depicted in paintings on display at JWA

Beach Day

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Courtesy of JWA

“Beach Day” by Iriet Peshkess

From Oct. 18 – Nov. 16, a series of paintings by Iriet Peshkess are on display at John Wayne Airport (JWA) as part of JWA’s Community Focus Space Program. These works can be viewed on the Departure (upper) Level near security screening areas in Terminals A, B and C, and on the Arrival (lower) Level adjacent to Baggage Carousels 1 and 4.

“Ms. Peshkess’ paintings tell a story by describing life in the California sun,” said Board Chairwoman Michelle Steel. “John Wayne Airport guests are able to witness the human stories that have moved the artist.”

Peshkess is a representational artist who was a clinical psychologist for most of her adult life before embarking on her artistic career more than 15 years ago. She is drawn to the non-verbal communication between people that capture her attention, tell a story, and are universal. Her passion is to portray ordinary human situations in a realistic and emotional way.

According to Peshkess, “I try to paint mood and story, not detail. If I can make you stop, look and feel, I have done what I set out to do.”

Peshkess has lived in Orange County with her family since 1981. While moving as a child and young adult she realized the importance of adapting to different cultures and connecting with others quickly. Her art training included the use of traditional media and she found herself gravitating toward the Impressionist style of painting. Upon discovery of painting programs on the computer, she fell in love with the versatility and freedom of expression the medium provided her. She combines this freedom with her Impressionist style and love of people’s stories to create her paintings. Peshkess has paintings in private collections all over the world and her award-winning artwork has been shown in both group and solo gallery exhibitions.

For more information on her work, visit www.irietpeshkess.com, or www.facebook.com/IrietPeshkessArtist.

Upcoming Community Focus Space Program artists include Evalyn Morris (Nov. 16 – Dec. 19, 2017) and Andrea Moni (Dec. 19, 2017 – Jan. 18, 2018).

To learn more about JWA’s Art Programs, visit www.ocair.com/terminal/artexhibits.


Sinclair restores order at Newport Harbor

By STEVE VIRGEN

Ross Sinclair

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Submitted photo

NHHS Water Polo Head Coach Ross Sinclair

Ross Sinclair wasn’t bitter or angry after being turned away from his alma mater eight years ago when he interviewed to become the Newport Harbor High boys’ water polo coach. At the time, he thought he was too young and without head coaching experience he rationalized that Robert Lynn made sense.

However, there was the competitive side to Sinclair, who always displayed that fiery persona while playing water polo for the Sailors and then at UC Santa Barbara.

“I thought I was the right guy at the time,” Sinclair said of when he was first denied the Newport Harbor job. “I understand why they wouldn’t take someone with it being such a high-level program and me with essentially zero head coaching experience. Being competitive I was obviously disappointed but it was a blessing in disguise. The path it took me…it gave me the opportunity to play and learn from some really good coaches. And it led to the CdM (girls’ water polo coach) opportunity and it ultimately led to this opportunity, as it came back around.”

Sinclair always wanted to come back and coach at Newport Harbor. The Sailors, their program perhaps at its lowest point considering its rich history, turned to Sinclair.

Now in his third year, Sinclair has gotten the program on the right track. The wins are there, but most important he restored the culture that had been missing.

There are positive vibes at Newport Harbor for its boys’ water polo program. A great indication of that is the alumni involved with the Sailors’ leadership.

In addition to Sinclair, Andy Hayes, Kimmie Morrison, Chris Whitelegge, Farrel South and Kevin Potter all have coaching roles with the Tars’ aquatics’ program.

Like Sinclair, they all know Newport Harbor is a special place to be, especially when there is winning.

Newport Harbor is 21-4 and fresh off finishing fifth at the Memorial Cup hosted by Bellarmine Prep in San Jose. The Sailors also recently took down rival Corona del Mar for the first time in Sinclair’s time as coach.

It’s been a great season thus far for Sinclair and the Sailors.

Earlier this season, Sinclair was honored with a Coaches of Character award by the CIF Southern Section.

The award is a clock that sits on the desk in his office at Newport Harbor.

“This award is cool but I think it’s a credit to the whole staff,” Sinclair said. “I credit all my coaches and all the coaches I worked with. (Jason) Lynch is a huge mentor. I still talk to (Bill) Barnett three times a week. We are all products of this program. It makes it easy to come out and work.”

Sinclair, 32, said he was fortunate to know what he wanted to do at a young age. Ever since he was in high school he wanted to become a coach and teacher at Newport Harbor. He said he’s working on earning his teaching credential and is a substitute at the school in the meantime. He stays active in the community as a lifeguard during the summer in Newport Beach.

His busy schedule will intensify in a few weeks as he and his wife, Courtney, are expecting a baby girl.

He will need to rely on his coaching experiences and lessons he learned from mentors even more as he balances his life.

When he first played as a freshman at Newport Harbor, Sinclair learned from Barnett and Brian Kreutzkamp, and then Lynch.

If there’s one word that’s synonymous with Barnett it’s fundamentals. Barnett was also known for his rigorous workouts to keep his players in top shape so that they could outlast opponents.

Lynch taught Sinclair the importance of repetition among other lessons.

Sinclair took what he learned and has applied that to his everyday coaching. He also adds his own style. He has a great way of connecting with the players on their level while also maintaining leadership and control of the program.

Sinclair said the traditional culture was missing when he returned to Newport Harbor as head coach three years ago.

“I wouldn’t say it was this dark place, but it wasn’t ultra-positive,” Sinclair said. “I think there’s consistency with leadership now. There was so much outside noise going on it created negativity. Where we are now, there’s vision and belief by the players and they share the same vision. We also see the same end goal. We have a group that’s buying in. We are doing the right thing so it’s natural to have some success from it.”


Salute to Vienna New Year’s Concert announced

Vienna

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Photo by Chris Lee

Celebrate the arrival of 2018 in spectacular style with “Salute to Vienna New Year’s Concert” at Segerstrom Center for the Arts. You’ll be enchanted by the spirited romance of operetta, the glamour of ballroom dance and the delicate beauty of ballet.

Inspired by the tradition of Vienna’s beloved New Year’s Concert, this frothy celebration blends acclaimed European singers and dancers with a full orchestra for a rich cultural experience that will leave you longing to join them on the dance floor. 

Fall in love with a musical program that weaves highlights from The Merry Widow, Die Fledermaus, The Gypsy Princess with energetic overtures, Strauss waltzes (of course, including the Blue Danube) and polkas from Vienna’s Golden Age. 

This will be an all new Salute to Vienna New Year’s Concert, with a fresh cast and program. This holiday season, more than 50,000 concert-goers in 25 North American cities will discover the timeless pleasure of Vienna’s most beautiful music. 

On Friday, Dec. 29, join conductor András Deák and The Strauss Symphony of America performing with soprano Katarzyna Dondalska, Viennese tenor Alexander Kaimbacher, members of the Kiev-Aniko Ballet of Ukraine and International Champion Ballroom Dancers. Experience Salute to Vienna New Year’s Concert: a glorious champagne toast to life itself! 

Single tickets start at $49 and are now on sale and will be available online at www.SCFTA.org, at the Box Office at 600 Town Center Drive in Costa Mesa or by calling 714.556.2787. 


Police Files

What, no escort service permit? Busted

Here’s the type of arrest that catches our attention. Ray Anthony Randall, 21, Hemet, says he’s a music producer, is arrested with Celia Nichole Mendoza, 22, Mission Viejo, a dancer, for failure to have an escort service permit.

Both were charged by the Newport Beach Police on Thursday morning at 2:26 a.m. at E. Coast Highway and Bayside Drive. For Mendoza, it was a simple – $100 bail.

For Randall, his night didn’t go as well. He was also charged with obstruction/resisting a peace officer (never a good thing), driving while license is suspended or revoked and an outstanding warrant. His bail was set at $5,500.

NBPD Scam Alert: Online Dating 

Have you heard about “Online Dating Scams”? Here’s how they work: You meet someone special on a dating website. Soon he/she wants to move off the dating site to email or phone calls. They tell you they love you, but they live far away – maybe for business, or because they’re in the military.

Then they ask for money. They might say it’s for a plane ticket to visit you, or emergency surgery or something else urgent.

Scammers, both male and female, make fake dating profiles, sometimes using photos of other people, even stolen pictures of real military personnel. They build relationships; some even fake wedding plans, before they disappear with your money.

Here’s what you can do: 1. Stop. Don’t send money. Never wire money on a prepaid debit card, or send cash to an online love interest. You won’t get it back.
2. Pass this information on to a friend. You might know that these relationships are fakes, but chances are that you know someone who doesn’t.

Scroll down to Police Beat for all arrests & crime reports


Pet of the Week Dog and Cat print

StuNewsNewport is delighted to be working with the Newport Beach Animal Shelter to help get the word out in search of loving homes for pets that deserve a warm, nurturing environment and a place to call “home.”

Rufus

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Courtesy of Newport Beach 

Animal Shelter

MEET RUFUS

Rufus is a 9-year-old male Ragdoll with flame point markings. He is neutered, microchipped and up to date on all vaccines.

Adoption costs at the shelter:

Dogs - $130

Puppies - $150

Cats - $90

Kittens - $110

At any given time, the shelter can have 4 - 5 dogs and 7 - 8 cats/kittens available for adoption. At times, they receive owner turn-ins that would do best adopted out together. 

If you are interested in finding out more about Rufus, or any other animals up for adoption, the Newport Beach Animal Shelter is located at 20302 Riverside Drive, Newport Beach. It is open daily from 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. Call 949.644.3656. Email Valerie Schomburg at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it..

To find out how you can help support the shelter, visit www.nbpd.org and click on “Our Animal Shelter” to view the wish list. They can always use food & treats; new toys; grooming, hygiene & comfort products; as well as laundry soap, dish soap, paper towels, sponges & scrub pads and lint rollers. If you are interested in volunteering, you can fill out and sign the application on the website.


Locals donate sports equipment to kids

sports balls 2

P&P Imports LLC, the parent company of Santa Ana-based GoSports, has recently gifted more than $3,000 worth of sports balls and equipment to the Boys & Girls Club of Central Orange Coast. 

P&P Imports LLC was founded by Newport Beach locals Peter Tanoury and Peter Engler more than 10 years ago. The duo recently grew their GoSports brand to include a wide range of sports balls and equipment, which prompted the pilot program of donating sports equipment to youth in their nearby communities. 

The donation aims to help supply the Boys & Girls Club with sports balls and equipment they would otherwise have to purchase, and in turn help them further their mission towards supporting educational aptitude, physical fitness and health awareness for local youth.

According to their website, the Boys & Girls Club has brought stability and a healthy learning environment for children in disadvantaged communities since 1954. 

“Playing sports, spending time outside and interacting with one another are some of the foundations that led to GoSports creation,” said co-founder Peter Tanoury. “Helping to provide that same opportunity for kids in the community is our way of giving back.”

GoSports’ donation program, which commits to providing the Boys & Girls Club with the same great equipment its loyal customers have grown to love, is celebrating its first year. Co-founder Peter Engler says this partnership with the community will continue to grow as GoSports continues to grow.


Guest Column

Jon T. Lewis,  Chief of Police Newport Beach

Robert Sharpnack, Chief of Police Costa Mesa

Russell Lee-Sung, Deputy Superintendent of Schools

 

Dear Parents: 

Halloween is the children’s “night” for Trick or Treat and make-believe horrors. Unfortunately, some of the horrors are too real! Each year, many children suffer from automobile accidents, falls, cuts, tampered “treats” and other unnecessary miseries. 

To make this Halloween a safe one, please follow these tips: 

Know Your Child’s Plans 

What will his/her route be so you can find him/her if need be? 

What companions will he/she have? 

What time will he/she be home? 

Tips on Costume Safety 

Makeup is safer than a mask which can obscure vision. 

Costumes and wigs should be flame-resistant. 

Reflective strips and bright clothing will increase visibility along with a flashlight.

Wear comfortable shoes. 

Props or items that children carry should be made of cardboard so they won’t injure your child if he/she should fall down. 

Critical Safety Tips 

Trick or Treat in your own neighborhood. 

Trick or Treat in a group of two or more and only in well-lighted areas. accompanied by a parent or adult. 

Stay on sidewalks and look both ways when crossing the street. Never cross the street between parked cars or mid-block. 

Don’t allow your child to enter ANY house. 

Before any treats are eaten, they must be inspected by you. Discard fruit or any candy in loose or torn wrappings. 

Law Enforcement Tips 

Discuss with your child the importance of respecting the property of others. 

Advise your children that throwing eggs and water balloons, spraying shaving cream, etc. is inappropriate and could be illegal. 

Curfew in Newport Beach and Costa Mesa is 10:00 p.m. 

All fireworks are illegal in Newport Beach and Costa Mesa. 

If you should discover anything wrong with the “treats” brought home, call the police, so other parents can be warned and the people responsible can be caught. Preventive measures, no matter how good they are, are ineffective if not applied by you. 

Jon T. Lewis,  Chief of Police Newport Beach

Robert Sharpnack, Chief of Police Costa Mesa

Russell Lee-Sung, Deputy Superintendent of Schools

Kids trick or treating

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Guest Column

Dave Kiff

An insider’s look at what’s going on in and around City Hall

Dave Kiff

Newport Beach City Manager Dave Kiff

Here’s what might be of interest on the agenda for the Newport Beach City Council meeting planned for Tuesday, October 24, 2017. I don’t summarize every item, so make sure you look at the City Clerk’s agenda page to read the whole agenda if you’d like.

The study session begins at 4 p.m. with a couple of interesting items.

If you’ve ever wondered if traffic system management is going to change with automation, this is a good one for you. Our Public Works staff will discuss new technologies in guiding you and your car (or bike) on your way through town. This includes information such as that gathered by Google and Waze as they use your phone (and how it pings one antenna then another as you travel) to give you timely information about current commute routes and times. 

Crosswalks on the Balboa Peninsula. We didn’t get to it last time, so this is a re-do. Public Works has been working on ways to improve pedestrian visibility at the many crosswalks and intersections along Balboa Boulevard and parts of Newport Boulevard. 

Following closed session items, the evening’s Regular Session will start at 7 p.m. I have to confess that it looks pretty quiet. But here are a few more noteworthy items:

The annual review of the Zoning Agreement between the City and Sober Living by the Sea. This Agreement was entered into in 2009, and settled litigation at the time. The City asked SLBTS to deconcentrate some of its recovery facilities, as well as to agree to a cap on beds citywide and certain protocols associated with doing business in residential areas. SLBTS, in turn, asked for the ability to remain in some places and to have adequate time to de-concentrate. As has been the case in past years, the City has found SLBTS to be generally in compliance with the Agreement.

A fairly large dollar item to support the reconstruction of our ocean piers. We typically remove and replace the piers’ piles and struts on a regular basis, so this is actually a fairly routine item for us. The dollar amount ($1.4M) is a bit larger this time, though, as the piers are showing their age. And the Balboa Pier took a beating or two over the last weekend with the high surf, so we had some emergency work to do.   

Some community notes:

The first involves two programs by the Newport Beach Chamber of Commerce: One is the Chamber’s annual Citizen of the Year dinner, where they will honor former City Manager Homer Bludau. The honor is well-deserved, given Homer’s work as city manager as well as in retirement. Congratulations, Homer. This event is Friday evening, November 3 at the Balboa Bay Resort. 

Second is the Chamber’s annual Economic Forecast. Presenters there will be UCLA’s Jerry Nickelsburg, UCI’s Christopher Schwarz, and the OC Register’s Jonathan Lansner. This event is next Friday, October 27 at lunchtime also at the Balboa Bay Resort. For more information on either event, visit www.newportbeach.com or call 949.729.4400.  

For those of you following the review process for the Koll Center Residences near John Wayne Airport, it’s likely that the project may not be heard before the Planning Commission at least until sometime in January 2018 (versus initial plans for December 2017). A community meeting is planned on the 260-unit project for Monday, October 30 in the Friends Room at the Central Library starting at 6 p.m. More information is here.

I read a story as many did in the OC Business Journal about the land beneath the Newport Beach Tennis Club being sold to a new owner (this is the club near the Ralphs in Eastbluff). Please know that, thus far, the only rumor we have heard is that the new owner may keep the tennis club use there. Any change in the use from something that is recreational in nature would require a General Plan Amendment, a zoning change, and possibly (depending on scope of the change) a vote of the electorate under Greenlight.

Wind and Heat coming. According to the weather, we have some “red flag” days ahead, especially Tuesday. Having just watched (and worried about) the Sonoma and Napa County fires over the past many days, we all worry about our own wildland-urban interface areas during Santa Ana conditions. For those of us on the eastern side of town, near Buck Gully, near Upper Newport Bay or adjacent to any area with dry brush, please be prepared and aware. Some great information about the wildland-urban interface is on our Fire Department’s webpage here. And Cal-Fire’s good information about preparing your home, family and pets for fast evacuation (“Ready, Set, Go!”) is here.

Thank you for reading. Please forward this Guide to family, friends and members of your HOA if you represent one. I always like hearing from you, too, so please don’t hesitate to ask a question or offer a comment.

Sincerely,

Dave Kiff

City Manager

This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

949-644-3001


Shopoff Group to present Koll airport project

City Staff is inviting the applicant, Shopoff Group, to present the Koll Center Residences project to the community on Monday, Oct. 30, at 6 p.m., in the Friends Meeting Room at Newport Beach Central Library, 1000 Avocado Ave.

The Koll Center Residences project is a 260-unit, infill project proposed to be located in the Koll Center Newport Planned Community in the Airport Area. The project site is generally located southeast of the intersection of Von Karman Avenue and Birch Street. 

For more information, contact Associate Planner Rosalinh Ung at 949.644.3208 or This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it..


Sculpture Garden III grand opening planned

Popsicles

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Submitted photo

“Popsicles” by Craig Gray

The Newport Beach City Arts Commission invites the community to a grand opening celebration for the third phase of the Sculpture in the Civic Center Park Exhibition on Saturday, Oct. 28 from 1:30 to 4 p.m. at the Newport Beach Civic Center, 100 Civic Center Drive, Newport Beach. 

The event will celebrate the addition of nine new sculptures to the Sculpture in the Civic Center Park Exhibition. A short program will be held in Council Chambers with a reception following. Some of the artists will be on hand to talk about their artwork and visitors will be able to take a walking tour of the sculptures. Special art activities for children will be presented by the Chuck Jones Center for Creativity.  

The 14-acre Newport Beach Civic Center Park was specially designed by renowned landscape architect Peter Walker as an intended sculpture garden. Arts Orange County provided professional services for the coordination of the artist selection and installation of the sculptures. The nine new sculptures were selected from submissions received by a national call for entries based on their artistic merit, durability, practicality and site appropriateness. They are being installed October 23 - 26 and will remain at the Civic Center Park until Summer 2019.  

The nine sculptures are as follows: Burnt Matchstick by Karl Unnasch, Flight by Steven Rieman, Popsicles by Craig Gray, Be Still and Know by John Merigian, No Swimming by Oleg Lobykin, Cosmic Glints by Patricia Vader, Getting Your Bearings by David Boyer, Cultural Pedestrians by Sue Quinlan and Life is a Balancing Act by Cindy Debold.

For more information on the event or exhibition, visit www.newportbeachca.gov/culturalarts (under Sculpture in Civic Center Park) or contact the Cultural Arts Services Office at 949.717.3808.


ENC to hold native plant sale

Native plant

Courtesy of ENC

The Environmental Nature Center (ENC) will host a Native Plant sale on Nov. 12 from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. Native plants help homeowners save money on water and landscape maintenance, attract butterflies and birds, and eliminate the need for pesticides and fertilizers.

“Native plants have co-evolved with the local climate, soil types, animals, fungi and microbes forming a complex network of relationships and providing a foundation for our native ecosystems,” said ENC Assistant Director Lori Whalen. “By investing in native plants, homeowners can see their gardens flourish with life and vibrancy, while also saving time and money.”

Cindy Berglund of Rain Barrels Intl. will be on hand at the native plant sale to sell rain barrels. For each barrel sold at $85, Rain Barrels Intl. will donate $20 to the ENC. Homeowners can pre-order rain barrels at www.RainBarrelsIntl.com. Under the EVENTS tab, click on Native Plant Sale ENC.

Environmental Nature Center is located at 1601 E. 16th St., Newport Beach. Call 949.645.8489. Visit www.encenter.org.


Community-wide Neighborhood Watch meeting booked

Community Watch

The Newport Beach Police Department will convene a Citywide Neighborhood Watch meeting, Thursday, Nov. 2, at the Civic Center Community Room from 6:30 to 8 p.m.

The NBPD will be discussing current crime trends, Neighborhood Watch and home security. There will also be representatives from the Patrol Division available to answer questions specific to neighborhoods, so come early. A representative from Netgear will be discussing DIY Home Security Cameras.

Email your RSVP to This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. by Tuesday, Oct. 31.


City to host Water Quality and Coastal Resilience program

Upper Back Bay

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Submitted photo

The City of Newport Beach, in collaboration with UCI’s Newkirk Center for Science and Society, the UCI Oceans Initiative and the Environmental Nature Center, is presenting a program on Improving Water Quality and Coastal Resilience in the Greater Newport Harbor.

The event is scheduled for Thursday, Nov. 9 from 7 to 9 p.m. at the OASIS Senior Center, 801 Narcissus Ave., Corona del Mar.

Its focus will be on mitigating the negative impacts of pollution and trash from the headwaters that drain into the Harbor from the inland region and other challenges to water quality and resilience.  

The City of Newport Beach is inviting concerned citizens to begin a process of collaboration with Newport Beach City officials, ocean/water experts from UC Irvine, and environmentalists on long-term regional sustainable solutions.

To register, visit www.newkirkcenter.uci.edu.


Call for Artists: Balboa Island Parade

Balboa Island parade

Submitted photo

The Balboa Island Parade Committee has announced a Call for Artists for the 25th anniversary of the Balboa Island Parade “Parade Poster Contest.” The theme for the parade will be “Silver Bells, Sea Shells and Sandy Beaches.”

The committee wants to see your artwork that celebrates the parade! Artwork should be centered around Balboa Island, the theme and the 25th parade anniversary.

Guidelines:

All artwork must be submitted no later than Jan. 5, 2018 to be considered. Size is 11x16 or 16x24 inches.

Email a picture of your artwork to Gail Vasterling at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.t, and include your name and phone number. The winner will be announced mid-January 2018 by phone.

Artwork will be used on all parade publications including parade posters, newspaper advertisements and T-shirts, plus the winner will be the special guest riding in parade on Jun. 3, 2018.

Participation is open to all local artists.


A new take on a classic tale in “Journey to Oz”

Tin Man

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Photo by John Merrick Photography

In the “Journey to Oz,” the audience is in the middle of the action in this fun, experiential show as Dorothy and her friends battle the Wicked Witch to find the brains, the heart and the courage they never knew they had. 

Inspired by L. Frank Baum’s original stories, this clever adaptation of the classic American tale allows children in the audience to take on key roles, including Munchkins, Winkies and even Dorothy. If you are in the room, you are in the show! Come see Journey to Oz in the intimate Samueli Theater, Nov. 18 - 19, 2017 and find out why there’s no place like home. 

Tickets for Journey to Oz are $20 and are available online at www.SCFTA.org, at the Box Office at 600 Town Center Drive in Costa Mesa or by calling 714.556.2787. 

The Center offers many services for patrons with disabilities including removable wheelchair locations, binoculars and assistive listening devices. 

Audiences are encouraged to arrive one hour before the performance for free creative activities. The Center’s Education Department offers these enriching experiences to provide young people and their families with more opportunities to play together creatively. Studies show that this is critical in helping to develop the ability to think and problem solve. 

Segerstrom Center’s 2017 - 2018 Family Series continues with “Anatomy of the Piano (For Beginners)” (Feb. 17 - 18, 2018); “The Gruffalo” (Mar. 24 - 25, 2018); “Shh! We Have a Plan” (Apr. 14 - 15, 2018); and “Mr. Popper’s Penguins” (Apr. 22, 2018).


Sunday Musicale features female French ensemble, “Playdate”

Playdate ensemble

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Submitted photo

“Playdate,” eight female French horn players, will perform Oct. 22

The Newport Beach Public Library presents a Sunday Musicale with Playdate, a French horn ensemble, on Sunday, Oct. 22 at 3 p.m. in the Central Library Friends Room, 1000 Avocado Ave., Newport Beach.

The unique program features eight talented female French horn players playing a variety of works from classical to movie musicals. Formed for the 47th International Horn Symposium, the group, Playdate, is part of the deep pool of female talent who contribute to today’s horn sound. Musicians performing include Amy Jo Rhine, Stephanie Stetson, Laura Brenes, Amy Sanchez, Emily Reppun, Lizzie Upton, Aija Mattson and Anna Gilpatrick.

Admission to the Sunday Musicales is free. No registration is required. Seating is first-come, first-served, limited by room capacity. Funding is provided by generous donations from the Friends of the Library. For more information, call 949.717.3800, ext. 2 or visit the website at www.newportbeachlibrary.org.


Stump the Stu

This one draws a Blank and a Namesake

Well, two people guessed correctly: The Brown Building is located at 3111 Jasmine, Corona del Mar. One was from Harbor Commissioner Paul Blank. In his attempt to be Don Webb-esque, he added the following: “It’s interesting from an architectural perspective as it occupies a wedge-shaped lot and has mid-century modern lines/elements. I’m going to guess that in the late ‘50s/early ‘60s it was built by a guy named Brown.”

Then we heard from Jeff Brown, who thinks the Brown Building might have been called by another name, perhaps the “Bixby Building.” But we have no proof. We do, however, admire the charming architecture.

If you have a unique spot or icon around town that you think StuNewsNewport readers would enjoy finding out about, please shoot it, send it to us (This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.) and give us the answer, so we can challenge them!

Stump the Stu 1019

   

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Harbor View Homes and the Tang Dynasty

By DUNCAN FORGEY

Aerial view

Courtesy of The Irvine Company

An aerial view of middle-income homes planned for the Harbor View Hills village, 1970s

Developers plan for the future while historians look into the past. Either way, the community of Harbor View Homes has brought thousands of Newport Beach families happiness.

In 1969, Tom and Jean Naughton viewed models at Newport Beachʻs latest real estate development. Still under construction, the young aerospace engineer and his ginger haired bride walked the dusty lots. Jean felt it was too far out in the “sticks.” They were one of the first new residents to pick a home to nest and raise kids. They have remained in the same home to this day.

Locals had to exit Corona del Mar and drive “all the way” out MacArthur Boulevard to empty fields near the site of the old Buffalo Ranch. Most beach residents found it too “hot and remote.” But by 1969, a different breed of Newporters were migrating to the community. They were city folk, white collar professionals with kids. They were not as attached to the sea as those living in the bay- and ocean-oriented communities. These families were looking for a great quality of life. Thanks to an incredibly brilliant design by a young Donald Bren, Harbor View Homes provided exactly that.

Buffalo Ranch flier

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Submitted photo

Brenʻs development created a collection of affordable homes with functional floor plans. Harbor View Homes wrapped streets around a huge greenbelt driving right through the center of the neighborhood. This community-owned area included a community pool and clubhouse, baseball diamonds, athletic fields, tot yards and eventually the often recognized Andersen Elementary School. Having grown up in the days of Ozzie, Harriet, David and Ricky Nelsons, Bren duplicated the fantasy-like environment available on black and white TV during the 1950s.

Why can we say that the neighborhood has been a success providing a place of happiness for many decades? That is where the Tang Dynasty comes in. In the years between 618-907 A.D., the Tang Dynasty ruled much of what is todayʻs China. Feng Shui was the science of choice during the dynastyʻs Golden Era. Throughout Chinese society, important decisions and choices were based upon the Feng Shui readings.

In consultation with a local Feng Shui expert, I was able to “read” and rate Harbor View Homes. This Eastern philosophy teaches that the land is more important than the building, the building is more important than the rooms, and the rooms are more important than the people. According to Feng Shui, Brenʻs design and its “lay of the land” makes it a great place to live. Homes and streets all line up properly.

In theory, Feng Shui concentrates on the placement of objects and the science of quantum physics. Literally, it means “Wind and Water” which helps man live harmoniously with his surroundings. An underlying hypothesis behind Feng Shui believes there is a life force that flows through all things – buildings, hills, rivers, power lines and people. By manipulating objects and orientation of physical structures to complement this force, Feng Shui can enhance a personʻs wealth and good fortune. Some call Feng Shui the most important environmental science of the 21st Century.

In order to evaluate the various neighborhoods of Newport Beach, a Feng Shui reader places a Bagua map over a birdʻs-eye view of the neighborhood. By lining up north, east, south and west, the reader can see which areas of life are well endowed and which are weak. Wealth, prosperity, fame, marriages, luck of children, education, partnerships, relationships and health are all visible to the Feng Shui reader.

Bagua Map

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Submitted photo

Feng Shui Bagua Map

Harbor View Homes is what is known as a “complete Bagua.” A complete Bagua means that all areas of life and fortune are present. Strengths in family, children and the overall sense of community are prevalent. Wealth, business and prosperity, although present, do not overshadow the sense of contentment in homes and marriages. The linear streets indicate very traditional values.

Harbor View Homes is therefore a “10”; especially if you have children. This can be seen by a quick drive down any one of the “Port Streets.” Each and every street is awash in basketball hoops, discarded hockey sticks, big wheels and bicycles. An army of children roam the greenbelt daily. It is arguably Newport Beachʻs premier “family neighborhood.”

Todayʻs Harbor View Homes is not the same as in the earlier years. It has morphed from an affordable neighborhood with a small community feel into three and four million dollar homes. It has become exactly what the rest of Newport Beach has become.

Contemporary Harbor View Home

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Submitted photo

A contemporary Harbor View Home

The original Bren homes were more utilitarian in comparison to those being built with todayʻs upscale standards of living. In contemporary Newport Beach, people raze original houses. In their place, square footages grow exponentially by utilizing every usable inch of lot and land. Construction and architecture in Harbor View Homes now competes with Belcourt, Big Canyon and Newport Coast. Today, both Feng Shui and Harbor View Homes residents give the neighborhood a double thumbs up!

What about the name? Harbor VIEW homes. View? What view? Locals joke about seeing the ocean from their rooftops. There are views of greenbelts and phase three views, but the vast majority simply look upon the door of their neighbor across the street. It does not matter because lifestyle trumps all else in the Port Streets. My favorite explanation comes from Harbor Viewʻs own First Lady, Jean Naughton: “I could see The Broadway in Fashion Island and that was all the view I ever needed.”   

~~~~~~~~

Duncan Forgey, who made his home here in Newport Beach for many years, now resides in Hawaii. He is a monthly contributor to StuNewsNewport.


Collaborative of grantmakers awards $615,000 in grants to 21 regional nonprofits

Newport Beach-based Orange County Community Foundation manages the OC Opportunity Initiative, which recently hosted “Together We Thrive,” an educational forum to discuss the economic impact of Orange County’s immigrant communities. A total of 21 organizations were awarded $615,000 in grants, ranging from $15,000 - $50,000.

“The link between immigrant integration and economic outcomes, measured in mobility and prosperity, is clear,” said Shelley Hoss, president of the Orange County Community Foundation, which manages the OC Opportunity Initiative. “As the speakers confirmed, the continued growth and vitality of our county depends on an engaged, educated and economically stable population that integrates our immigrant communities to build a stronger future for our region.”

To learn more about the OC Opportunity Initiative, visit the website at www.oc-cf.org/ocopportunityinitiative.


Jazz by the Sea features Peter Sprague Quartet

Peter Sprague

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Submitted photo

Guitarist Peter Sprague

Toby Larson’s Jazz by the Sea will showcase the sounds of the Peter Sprague Quartet on Sunday, Oct. 29 at Atlantis Cove, Newport Coast from 1:30 to 5 p.m., with music beginning at 2 p.m.

The Peter Sprague Quartet features vocalist Rebecca Jade; guitar, Peter Sprague; saxophone, Tripp Sprague; bass, Gunnar Biggs; and drums, Duncan Moore.

Donation is $50 per person which includes a buffet lunch, wine and beer. Checks can be sent to: Toby Larson, 1500 Mesa Verde East B301, Costa Mesa, Calif., 92626. For more information, call 949.677.0490 or email This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.. Free valet parking, or you can park on Sidney Bay Drive and walk down.


Kick up your heels at Newport Dunes’ Boots on the Beach Country Pumpkin Patch

Country Pumpkin Patch

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Submitted photo

The pumpkin patch awaits to find that perfect pumpkin turned Jack-O-Lantern

Finding the perfect pumpkins to carve and display is going to get a bit easier this year at the Newport Dunes Waterfront Resort, as it kicks off the fall season with the “Boots on the Beach Country Pumpkin Patch” on Saturday, Oct. 21 and Sunday, Oct. 22.

Bring the family out for a weekend of festive activities including picking the perfect pumpkin at the pumpkin patch, crafts, inflatables, and seasonal treats and drinks. On Saturday evening, there is a free country music concert featuring live performances by Urban Legend with Young Guns and The Kelly Boys line dancing and instruction from 6 - 9 p.m. Refreshing adult beverages and country BBQ will be available for purchase.

On Sunday, come out and enjoy classic cars from movies and TV on display including the Batmobile and Back to the Future Delorean. Adult beverages and country BBQ will be available for purchase as well.

Hours: Saturday, Oct. 21: 11 a.m. - 6 p.m., Pumpkin Patch; 6 - 9 p.m., Free Country Music Concert; Sunday, Oct. 21: 11 a.m. - 5 p.m.; Pumpkin Patch and Classic Car Show.

Newport Dunes Waterfront Resort is located at 1131 Back Bay Drive, Newport Beach. Free admission with food and beverages available for purchase; parking is $10 per car. For more information, call 9498.729.3863 and visit www.NewportDunes.com.


Mesa Water proposes rate increase, looks for public input

Water faucet

Submitted photo

After assessing the financial impacts of rising costs to provide water, as well as the need to invest nearly $36 million in capital improvements, Mesa Water District has proposed adjustments to its water rates and charges. The public can learn more about Mesa Water’s proposed water rate/charge adjustments online at www.MesaWater.org/2017-Rates-Study

“Mesa Water structures its rates and charges based on the cost of providing water service to our customers,” said Mesa Water Board President Jim Atkinson. “This rate structure encourages wise water use by providing a fair, true signal of the water’s cost; it also gives our customers control over their water bills as they can reduce the amount they pay by reducing their water use,” Atkinson said.

Mesa Water plans to hold a public hearing regarding the proposed water rate/charge adjustments during its Board of Directors meeting on Nov. 9 at 6 p.m., when the public is invited to comment on the proposed adjustments. 

Having reviewed several options, Mesa Water is considering an annual increase to its water rates and charges of up to 5 percent over five years, with the first water rate/charge adjustments proposed to take effect on Jan. 1, 2018, and subsequent proposed adjustments on Jan. 1 each year through 2022. In addition to funding an estimated $36 million in capital improvements from 2018 through 2022, the proposed adjustments would allow Mesa Water to keep pace with rising water supply costs which account for approximately one third of Mesa Water’s annual expenses.

“Controlling costs is one of Mesa Water’s highest priorities and, compared to other water agencies throughout Orange County, Mesa Water is among the most cost-efficient with the lowest expenditures per resident served,” said Mesa Water General Manager Paul E. Shoenberger, P.E. “In addition to counterbalancing increased costs charged to the District for our water pumping, the proposed rate and charge adjustments would allow Mesa Water to improve our wells, reservoirs and pipelines district-wide over the next five years,” Shoenberger said.

Public participation is encouraged to attend the Nov. 9 meeting that begins at 6 p.m. in the Mesa Water District Boardroom, 1965 Placentia Ave., Costa Mesa.

Mesa Water is an independent special district that provides water service to 110,000 residents in an 18-square-mile service area that includes most of the City of Costa Mesa, parts of Newport Beach and John Wayne Airport.


Police Files

Man found guilty of robbing marijuana dealers at gunpoint at Newport Coast resort

Thomas Lamarr Prince, 40, Anaheim, was found guilty yesterday (October 18) on four robberies of several marijuana dealers at gunpoint during two large-scale drug deals at a resort in Newport Coast.

On February 19, 2017, and March 21, 2017, Prince met victims in a parking lot in Newport Coast to purchase large quantities of marijuana worth over $100,000.

On each occasion, the defendant drove the victims to a nearby resort to conduct the illegal exchange inside a private hotel villa.

Once inside the room, Prince robbed the victims at gunpoint and stole 60 pounds of marijuana and 90 pounds of marijuana, respectively, as well as the victims’ personal belongings.

NBPD identified Prince as the robbery suspect while investigating a related kidnapping investigation and arrested the defendant on March 29, 2017.

Prince will be sentenced December 15 and faces a maximum sentence of 18 years in state prison. Sentencing enhancements include a prior conviction in Los Angeles for robbery in 2015.

It was an unlucky Friday the 13th for these drivers

Talk about bad luck, David Earl Profant, 45, Newport Coast, was charged with driving under the influence of alcohol on Friday the 13th. That in itself seems to be bad enough.

To further add to it, Elissa Gayle Profant, 40, Newport Coast, was also arrested on the scene for disorderly conduct related to alcohol.

The arrest took place at 11:35 p.m. at San Clemente Drive and Santa Cruz Drive.

Bail was set at $2,500 for him, $500 for her.

Annalyse Valentina Andradesin, 30, Laguna Niguel, was also arrested on Friday the 13th at Jamboree Road and Birch Street for possession of narcotics and a controlled substance.

It’s what came next for Andadesin that was the kicker. Newport Beach Police found out she had four outstanding warrants: first, for being under the influence, the second for possession of unlawful paraphernalia, the third for identity theft and finally, the fourth for possession of a controlled substance.

All tolled, Andradesin was on the hook for a $140,000 bail.

Might be a good reminder to pay those warrants.

Scroll down to Police Beat for all arrests & crime reports


School Notes

NMUSD 

The Newport-Mesa Unified School District will present Suicide Education and Prevention Strategies at four local high schools in November. This workshop will focus on the principles of suicide prevention, outline NMUSD policies, procedures and provide guidance for parents. The discussion will include the identification of common myths, risk factors and warning signs as well as highlight protective factors, primary prevention, early identification, referral and available resources. Suicide prevention is an ongoing, collaborative process and parents’ participation is urged.

Corona del Mar High School: Nov. 7, 6 p.m., CdM Theater

Costa Mesa High School: Nov. 21, 6 p.m., CMHS Theater

Estancia High School: Nov. 29, 6 p.m., EHS Theater

Newport Harbor High School: Nov. 15, 6 p.m., NHHS Reading Room

• • •

On Oct. 24, the Board of Education of the NMUSD at their regular meeting to be held at 6 p.m. at the District’s Board Room, will conduct a public hearing to provide an opportunity for the community to provide oral comment to the Board regarding the proposed new trustee boundaries. Persons seeking information should contact the Superintendent’s Office, 714.424.5031.

Corona del Mar High School 

Corona del Mar School’s Backstage and Performing Artists Company will present The Curious Savage Nov. 2 – 4 in the CdMHS Seaking Theater. Curtain times are Thursday, Nov. 2 - 4 p.m., Friday and Saturday, Nov. 3 & 4 - 7 p.m. and a Sunday, Nov. 5 matinee at 2 p.m. 

Newport Harbor High School

Support the Newport Harbor High School Band next Thursday, Oct. 26, with their Restaurant Fundraiser at California Pizza Kitchen. Enjoy a meal and 20 percent of the price goes back to NHHS Band. You can dine anytime between 11 a.m. - 10 p.m.

Newport El

The 5th Annual Newport El Classic Car Show is this Saturday, Oct. 21 from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Enjoy classic cars on the beach with prizes awarded to Best of Show, Best Luxury/Exotic, Best Volkswagen, Best Hot Rod, Beat Muscle Car, Best Woody, Best Truck, Best Classic and Kids’ Choice. Admission is free with kids’ play and food trucks. Proceeds benefit the students of Newport Elementary School. All vehicle entrants will receive a professional photograph of their car on the beach. To register online, visit www.newportelementary.ejoinme.org. Presented by Rearden Racing, The Thermal Club, Fletcher Jones Motorcars and Billy’s at the Beach. It all takes place at Newport Elementary School, 1327 W. Balboa Blvd.


Sewage spill closes Balboa Pier area

The OC Health Care Agency’s Environmental Health division has closed the ocean water area 1,000 feet up-coast and 1,000 feet down-coast of the Balboa Pier in the City of Newport Beach as of yesterday, Oct. 18. The spill of approximately 300 gallons was caused by a leak in a sewer-pumping tank below the pier. 

Sewage spill

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Map courtesy of OC Health

The affected ocean water area will remain closed to ocean water contact sports for a minimum of three days and until the results of follow-up water quality monitoring meet acceptable standards.

For information regarding Orange County ocean, bay or harbor postings and closures, call 714.433.6400 or visit www.ocbeachinfo.com.


Stories depicted in paintings on display at JWA

Hope by Iriet Peshkess

Courtesy of JWA

"Hope" by Iriet Peshkess

From Oct. 18 to Nov. 16, a series of paintings by Iriet Peshkess are on display at John Wayne Airport (JWA) as part of JWA’s Community Focus Space Program. These works can be viewed on the Departure (upper) Level near security screening areas in Terminals A, B and C, and on the Arrival (lower) Level adjacent to Baggage Carousels 1 and 4.

“Ms. Peshkess’ paintings tell a story by describing life in the California sun,” said Board Chairwoman Michelle Steel. “John Wayne Airport guests are able to witness the human stories that have moved the artist.”

Peshkess is a representational artist who was a clinical psychologist for most of her adult life before embarking on her artistic career more than 15 years ago. She is drawn to the non-verbal communication between people that capture her attention, tell a story, and are universal. Her passion is to portray ordinary human situations in a realistic and emotional way.

According to Peshkess, “I try to paint mood and story, not detail. If I can make you stop, look and feel, I have done what I set out to do.”

Peshkess has lived in Orange County with her family since 1981. While moving as a child and young adult she realized the importance of adapting to different cultures and connecting with others quickly. Her art training included the use of traditional media and she found herself gravitating toward the Impressionist style of painting. Upon discovery of painting programs on the computer, she fell in love with the versatility and freedom of expression the medium provided her. She combines this freedom with her Impressionist style and love of people’s stories to create her paintings. Peshkess has paintings in private collections all over the world and her award-winning artwork has been shown in both group and solo gallery exhibitions.

For more information on her work, visit www.irietpeshkess.com, or

www.facebook.com/IrietPeshkessArtist.

Upcoming Community Focus Space Program artists include Evalyn Morris (Nov. 16 – Dec. 19, 2017) and Andrea Moni (Dec. 19, 2017 – Jan. 18, 2018).

To learn more about JWA’s Art Programs, visit www.ocair.com/terminal/artexhibits.


Aviation Update

Jeff Herdman

An update on JWA takeoffs

Jeff Herdman

Newport Beach City Councilmember Jeff Herdman 

As a follow-up to my last Blog/Newsletter, I asked the City to take a look at our website having to do with aviation issues, specifically the reporting of noise from airplanes taking off from JWA. The City of Costa Mesa recently launched a website where you can report and log excessive noise from fights taking off. The same feature is now available in Newport Beach at the following website:  

www.newoprtbeachca.gov/how-do-i-/learn-more-about/john-wayne-airport.

Aviation Update

It is safe to say that things have really “taken off” in this City when it comes to the John Wayne Airport and the implementation of NextGen flight path procedures. Below is a brief chronology since 2009 of what has taken place with the FAA when it comes to flight takeoff patterns at JWA, and where we are today. For purposes of understanding the timeline of events below, the West Side refers to the Dover Shores area; the East Side refers to the East Bluff area. Terms like STREL, DUKE and NextGen are acronyms for the name of flight paths. Fanning refers to planes spreading out in terms of their takeoff path.  

2009 – The era of Fanning in terms of takeoffs; Then DUKE was set up which more narrowed the flight takeoffs (the FAA got it wrong). The City went to work with the County. It took 18 months working with the FAA to get a revised DUKE implemented, and it still wasn’t good.

2011 – FAA implements the STREL take off pattern and things were pretty good for two years. 

2014 – The FAA moved STREL, and it was too far to the west. The City went to work again with the FAA, but to no avail.

2015 – NextGen nationwide is proposed by the FAA – bad news!

2016 – The City filed litigation against the FAA’s EIR related to NextGen claiming that the EIR was inadequate in terms of the effects of noise and pollution.

March 2017 – NextGen is implemented despite the lawsuit; resulted in planes flying too close to East Bluff.

April 2017 – FAA moved all flights to the same departure path.

May 2017 – FAA did a correction to the West (half of the planes taking off) and that is where we are right now with departures either too close to Eastbluff or Dover Shores. 

October 2017 – A change is coming…40 percent of the takeoffs, those that are too close to Eastbluff, will be moved toward the West. 

December 2017 – Another change is coming…10 percent more flights will shift to the West.

 What is the City doing about all of this?

The City filed a lawsuit against the FAA that got us (the City) a place at the table so that negotiations could take place on behalf of the people of Newport Beach. NextGen represents a large swath of departures, and there is no way that the FAA could have studied the environmental impact of this area. The case is being heard in Washington D.C., however the current status of the case is meditation with the FAA. This will continue until progress stops. The City wants “fanning” reinstated.

The Council passed a Resolution stating its intent to aggressively work toward a solution with the FAA.

The Council will approve the hiring of lobbyists to work with the two Senators from California as well as the airlines.

The City will be forming a community action committee to work with the City and County on this issue.

The City will be bringing in an outside firm to verify decibel readings over the existing sound monitors as well as in other areas where there are not sensors.

What can you do? 

First, encourage Congressman Dana Rohrabacher to put his name on Congressman Stephen Lunch’s recently introduced legislation - H.R. 3938, Air Traffic Noise and Pollution Expert Consensus Act of 2017. Introduced last week, and as of this past Friday, our Congressman had not yet added his name to the list who are supporting this piece of legislation. If you Google Congressman Dana Rohrabacher (Dana Rohrabacher’s e-mail), you will be taken to a form where you can send him a message at www.rohrabacher.house.gov/contact/email-me.

AirFair, Airport Working Group and HOA’s need to activate independently; petitions, letters to our Congressmen, and conduct awareness campaigns that American and United Airlines are not being considerate of residents when it comes to their takeoff practices.

One last note: People are continually asking about planes powering back after takeoff – a practice that used to be in place. The Airport Noise and Capacity Act of 2005 is the reason why the City can’t insist on powering back or introducing this in litigation. It is a thing of the past.

I hope that you have found this informative, and are convinced that the City Council has made this entire issue, and its solution, a very high priority.

As always, I remain at your service, and encourage you to contact me with any questions, concerns and feedback.

Aviation Update Update! 10/17/2017 12:30 pm

As of Oct. 17, the staff’s initial assessment as to the FAA’s recent re-coding of the HHERO flight departure procedure finds that the correction has been made, and it is the correct one!

This was to happen last Thursday, October 12, and it did. All HHERO departures (about 40 percent of the daily departing flights) have been corrected. Flights are now flying away from Eastbluff, and higher. PIGGN and HHERO are now on top of each other and this is correct. HHERO departures moved slightly west and now are appropriately placed in a new NEXTGEN environment.

On December 7, FINNS flights to Las Vegas and Salt Lake City (less than 10 percent of the daily flights), and are somewhat East, will make a correction. The end result will be 98 percent of all flights will be on the correct takeoff course.

Jeff Herdman

Newport Beach City Council - District 5


FIRE 101 at ENC

Join Environmental Nature Center Executive Director Bo Glover for FIRE 101 to learn about the basics of fire starting on Nov. 11 from 2 to 6 p.m.

Building and maintaining a fire is an essential survival skill. It can provide you warmth, dry wet clothes, keep insects away, signal for rescue, boil untreated water and cook food. Along with survival necessities, fire also creates a sense of community. Glover will explain where to build a fire, what materials to use and which type of structure to build. As the sun sets, the pressure will be on to get your friction fire started!

Bo Glover

Courtesy of ENC

ENC Executive Director Bo Glover

Participants will make their own fires to cook with (dinner is included). This program is for individuals, couples and families with kids nine years of age or older. Bring a fixed blade knife and come dressed for the weather – the program will occur outside, and it is rain or shine.

Cost: $20 for ENC members, $30 for non-members. To register and pre-pay, visit www.encenter.org.

Environmental Nature Center is located at 1601 E. 16th St., Newport Beach. Call 949.645.8489.


Fair Game

By TOM JOHNSON

Locals win $200 million Dana Point project

TomJohnsonThe Orange County Supervisors have approved a long-term lease with two local Newport Beach real estate groups to revitalize the Dana Point Harbor.

 Dana Point Harbor Partners LLC, aka Burnham-Ward Properties and R. D. Olson Development, both Newport Beach companies, will develop the $200 million project that will include restaurants, retail, hotels and more.

Scott Burnham, who seems to own everything Bren, Segerstrom and Argyros don’t, and Bob Olson, who of course leads the Lido House hotel project.

Dana Point is in good hands.

It’s a 66-year lease.

A final agreement still needs to be finalized by the County before the deal is actually completed.

• • •

Surprise, surprise, Donald Bren, Chairman of the Irvine Company, was recently ranked 28th on the Forbes 400 billionaires list for the world. His estimated wealth is $16.3 billion. 

Bren is also ranked the richest real estate industry person in the world by Forbes.

So, what does a $16.3 billion portfolio look like, how about 115 million square feet of real estate, 60,000 apartments, more than 40 shopping centers and some 500 office buildings.

That’s a lot. 

Another way to tell, drive south on the 405 and just about any apartments, shopping centers and high rises are his through Irvine.

Developer George Argyros also made the list at No. 340 with a worth of $2.4 billion. His company is Arnel & Affiliates that owns 5,500 apartments and some 2 million square feet of commercial and retail real estate.

If I left any of my friends off, let me know.

• • •

Susie DiGiovanna, Social Services Supervisor at the City, reminded me that OASIS Senior Center is turning 40 and the community is invited to join in the celebration. The event is planned for Saturday, Nov. 4 from 2 - 5 p.m.

It’s $15 and Susie says the tickets go fast.

Here’s what’s planned: the Tijuana Dogs, a ‘70s cover band, will perform from 2:30 - 4:30 p.m. and there’ll be small tasty bites, and beer and wine.

Tickets are $15 and can be purchased by called 949.644.3244 or visiting the administration office at OASIS.

• • •

Happy 91st birthday to my friend Paul Salata. If you don’t know Paul, you’re probably not from Newport Beach. He started Irrelevant Week to honor the last draft pick in the annual National Football League draft. He and his family fly them into Newport Beach and then it’s party on.

Okay, Paul has slowed over the years. But for those that remember when he was on, there was not much better.

Thank you friend for all you’ve done for me.

This photo below is from last week’s USC vs. Utah game at the Los Angeles Coliseum. SC loves Salata as much as Salata loves SC.

Fight on!

Paul Salata

Click on photo for a larger image

Courtesy of Melanie Salata Fitch


Civic Center audit will return $365,000 to the City

The City of Newport Beach and C.W. Driver late yesterday issued the following joint statement related to the now concluded Civic Center Audit:

The Newport Beach Civic Center and Park Project was completed in 2014. As per industry standard, the City conducted an audit to verify that the project costs were within the terms and conditions of the contract.

During the productive discussions that followed, C.W. Driver addressed the City’s concerns regarding certain cost allocations. Despite a good faith basis for their submission, C.W. Driver has agreed to reimburse certain of these costs. 

The City notes that there is no finding of wrongdoing on the part of C.W. Driver, but rather a good faith difference of opinion in the interpretation of a complex construction contract. 

City staff has learned much from this project that will benefit future City projects, and is satisfied that any questions as to the accounting for the project are now fully behind us.

Following the issued statement, StuNewsNewport asked a couple of City Councilmembers for their comments: “Most settlements that will result in news stories include a joint statement provision. In my view, the most important settlement provision was returning $365,000 of taxpayer money to our residents,” said Councilmember Will O’Neill.

Former Mayor and current City Councilmember Diane Dixon said, “I am pleased to put this matter behind us. Mayor Muldoon and I co-sponsored the resolution in 2015 to fund a closeout audit of the $140 million civic center project at a projected cost of $350,000. The audit findings identified certain cost discrepancies and the settlement of $365,000 more than covered the actual $300,000 cost of the audit. This is real money returned to the people of Newport Beach.”


Childrens Halloween Festival at Rogers Garden

trick or treat kids

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Courtesy of Roger’s Gardens

Calling all goblins, ghosts and super heroes! Kids, get ready to wear your favorite costume to the Children’s Halloween Festival at Roger’s Gardens on Monday, Oct. 30 at 4 p.m. Join in the fun at the costume parade, be creative during interactive crafts, discover spooky activities and trick-or-treat throughout the Gardens.

Adults – don’t forget to bring your cameras for unique photo opportunities.

Roger’s Gardens is located at 2301 San Joaquin Hills Road, Corona del Mar. Visit www.rogersgardens.com.


A costume party that’s going to the dogs…all for a great cause

Newport Beach Animal Shelter

Click on photo for a larger image

Friends of Newport Beach Animal Shelter (FONBAS) is hosting its first event – a costume party for dogs. The “Howl-O-Ween” party is Saturday, Oct. 28, from 10 a.m. to noon at Marina Park, 1600 West Balboa Blvd., Newport Beach. The event is free.

Prizes will be awarded for Scariest, Prettiest and Most Newport Beach costumes, Best owner/pet ensemble, Best Trick and Most Personality.  

This free event features Vladae Roypate, the world-famous Russian Dog Wizard, who will offer tips on pet obedience as well as answer owners’ questions. There will also be adoption opportunities on-site featuring dogs from the Newport Beach Animal Shelter as well as a pick-a-prize opportunity drawing.

Money raised by FONBAS goes to augment the city-run shelter, located at 20302 Riverside Drive, Newport Beach. Funds will help make animals more comfortable and adoptable, upgrade cages, and provide additional medical and dental care.

FONBAS is a non-profit organization that raises funds to support the Newport Beach Animal Shelter. For more information, contact Nancy Gardner at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. or 949 673-0706.

About Town HR

By LANA JOHNSON  

Welcome to our new column About Town, which will acquaint you with some of the businesses, restaurants, boutiques, organizations…you name it…that call Newport Beach home. I will take you on a fun, behind-the-scenes look to discover what makes these destinations special and what they offer.

Timree’s Art Studio brings out the artist in all of us

Timree Art Studio

Click on photo for a larger image

Photos by Lana Johnson

Timree Art Studio

I love art, but I’m definitely not an artist, although it would be something I’d like to pursue when I can find the time. So, I joined a Timree painting class, one among many offered each month. Her new studio in Westcliff exudes a welcoming brightness with her custom art, as well as her home and office accessories and personalized gifts. What sets Timree apart is that she is self-taught!

I joined a group of eight other “students,” mostly moms and their daughters. In front of me was an easel with a blank 11” X 14” canvas, a set of brushes, a palette filled with different paints, and if you would like to add it in – glitter. Checking out her monthly calendar online, I chose the Candy Pumpkin – it didn’t look too intricate, but the playful element was definitely there.

Katie Holland

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Instructor Katie Holland leads our paint class

One of her team of artists, Katie Holland, led the two-hour class. She was cheerful, patient and alleviated my fears. (Sitting in front of a blank canvas can make you a bit nervous!)

Holland began by mixing a light-colored paint, which we outlined the large shapes in, then proceeded to instruct us on how to bring in each of the elements. What’s fun is that each artist can use their own color combinations and be as creative as their imaginations allow.

Emily Grey

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A work of art by Emily Grey, age 10

I have to admit, I fell a bit behind, but looked up at her painting as she worked to pick up some of the nuances. What I didn’t expect was how relaxed I was, and I became an artist in front of my own eyes!

Kamme Hodge

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Kammee Hodge of Dover Shores, with her Sparklemania green pumpkin

Classes are offered at a variety of times with some targeted specifically for adults, such as Girls Night Out, while most cater to ages 6 and up. In addition, you can hold a private paint party there to celebrate that special occasion. Classes are extremely affordable and start at $40, with all supplies included. Timree is sought after for her personalized gifts, so you can check those out in her studio or on her website, as well as her live event painting – she’ll paint your special event, live.

I would encourage anyone who hasn’t checked out her studio to do so and sign up for a class. I have included some of her upcoming classes in today’s “Best Bets.”

Timree’s Art Studio is located at 1651 Westcliff Drive, Newport Beach. Call 949.723.1300, email This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it., or visit her website at www.timree.com.

My Masterpiece

My “masterpiece” awaits Halloween with a smile

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Editor’s Note: If you or someone you know operates a Newport Beach-based business that you would like to see featured in About Town, please send the information to This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it..


Water Study Issues Group event this Saturday 

Mesa Water

Submitted photo

Mesa Water District will host a half-day Water Issues Study Group (WISG) water education program for adults on Saturday, Oct. 21, from 10:30 a.m. to 1 p.m. 

Offered at no cost to participants, WISG is open to Mesa Water® customers and community members, including residents and individuals from local businesses, public agencies, and high schools, as well as elected officials, media, industry colleagues, and others interested in learning about Mesa Water and water in general. 

For the public’s convenience, and based on feedback from past participants, this year’s WISG is reformatted to take place in one half-day at the Mesa Water Reliability Facility (MWRF).

“Since 1986, the Water Issues Study Group program has provided abundant water knowledge through group discussions about our 100 percent local, reliable water supplies, their sources, how they are treated, tested and distributed, and the importance of being efficient with our water use,” said Mesa Water Board President Jim Atkinson. “We’ve seen a lot of changes over the past 30+ years and value the time that our customers and community members are able to share with us to learn about water…a resource that none of us can live without,” Atkinson shared.

WISG teaches participants about Mesa Water’s local water supplies and reliability, water use efficiency, and water quality, and includes a tour of the MWRF’s water-wise gardens and nanofiltration technology. 

The MWRF is located at 1350 Gisler Ave., Costa Mesa. Flat, closed-toe shoes are required for the tour. 

At this year’s WISG, former Mesa Water Director and Orange Coast College History Professor, Hank Panian will receive a WISG Professor Emeritus designation for his 30 years of teaching WISG classes about the history and geography of our water supplies.

Those interested in attending WISG can call Mesa Water’s Public Affairs Department at 949.631.1201 or sign up online at www.MesaWater.org/WISG where more information is also available.

Mesa Water is an independent special district that provides water service to 110,000 residents in an 18-square-mile service area that includes most of the City of Costa Mesa, parts of Newport Beach and John Wayne Airport.


Pop Season celebrates Ella’s 100th with celebration 

Ella Fitzgerald

Courtesy of scfta.org

It’s definitely got that swing! Pacific Symphony Pops 2017-18 season roars on with a celebration of one of the 20th century’s most iconic singers, Ella Fitzgerald, whose legacy and influence defined a classic era of jazz singing – on what would have been her 100th birthday. 

Discovered as a 17-year-old during a talent show at the famous Apollo Theatre in Harlem, Fitzgerald’s life in song has been captured through the bounty of her musical hits, innumerable recordings and performances made during the Big Band era. Dubbed “The First Lady of Song,” the incomparable singer was the most popular female jazz vocalist in the United States for more than half a century. In her lifetime, she won 13 Grammy awards and sold more than 40 million albums. 

George Gershwin once said: “I never knew how good our songs were until I heard Ella Fitzgerald sing them.”

“In the dictionary under ‘singer’, it could simply say one word: Ella,” said Richard Kaufman, Pacific Symphony’s principal pops conductor. “There’s no one like her, and this show, as created by conductor Larry Blank, will bring all the brilliance of this legendary performer to the Pacific Symphony audience. Combine our orchestra with the music of Ella and the skill of this conductor/arranger, and you’ve got a magical night of music not to be missed.”

This very special centennial celebration – “Tribute to Ella!” – created and led by guest conductor Blank, takes place Friday and Saturday, Nov. 3 - 4, at 8 p.m., in the Renée and Henry Segerstrom Concert Hall. Single tickets are $35-$139.

For more information or to purchase tickets, call 714.755.5799 or visit www.PacificSymphony.org.


Spooky season for kids comes to Library

Halloween witch

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Submitted photo

The Newport Beach Public Library will present a variety of free Halloween programs at library locations throughout Newport Beach with crafts, stories and other fun activities. Children are encouraged to wear their costumes during the week of October 24 - 31 to story hours and special programs.

Events at the branch libraries will begin with Halloween Crafts at the Mariners Branch on Tuesday, Oct. 24 at 4 p.m.; Creepy Crafts will keep kids busy at the Balboa Branch on Wednesday, Oct. 25 at 3:30 p.m.; and children 3 - 8 can enjoy friendly Ghostly Crafts at the Corona del Mar Branch on Thursday, Oct. 26 beginning at 3 p.m.  

All programs will focus on fun, not scary, Halloween activities that delight young children during the spooky season.

On Halloween, the Central Library will host a Halloween Extravaganza beginning at 4 p.m. in the Children’s Room with not-so-scary stories, crafts and snacks. Kids will take a trick-or-treat tour of the library to cap off the celebration.

The Newport Beach Public Library presents a variety of programs that foster cultural arts enrichment. For more information, contact the Library at 949.717.3800, option 2, or visit the website at www.newportbeachlibrary.org.


Letter to the Editor:

Peotter’s misguided efforts

While recent headlines have focused on Scott Peotter’s misguided efforts to refuse Newport’s gas tax revenues, and ridiculous charges by Peotter supporter Bob Rush regarding an imaginary “enemies list”, it is important not to forget that Peotter provides a clear and present danger to the quality of life in Newport Beach due to his full throttled support of high rise development.

Peotter attempted to undermine the people’s right to petition their government by putting thousands of unnecessary pages in the Museum House referendum petitions. These petitions weighed more than ten pounds and cost thousands to print. He failed in this effort when 14,000 residents opposed this project. Even with this, Peotter opposed rescinding the project approval and sought a special election (now he wails crocodile tears about the cost of a special election but he was all for it in February).

Peotter has advocated raising the height limits on Lido, and the new General Plan will allow him the opportunity to fix his high-rise vision on our city for a generation.

We need public officials that will focus on reducing traffic, improving our streets, protecting our quality of life and keeping our city safe. Peotter would rather address state and national issues to the detriment of Newport Beach taxpayers.  

It’s time for a change. Go to www.recallscottpeotter.com for more information.

Georgia Foell

Big Canyon


Newport Beach Women’s Democratic Club Monthly Meeting: Voter Outreach Workshop

The Newport Beach Women’s Democratic Club (NBWDC) will hold its monthly meeting on Tuesday, Oct. 17, at the Newport Beach Yacht Club, 1099 Bayside Drive, Newport Beach. Doors open at 5:30 p.m. for a networking social. The meeting begins at 6 p.m. 

This month NBWDC will present an energetic and informative workshop on voter outreach in preparation for the upcoming 2018 local, state and federal elections. Guest speakers will include Sara Holland and Cate Hardesty.

Sara Holland worked as the assistant to the state field director for Obama For America in 2008. She interned in Senator Feinstein’s office, and worked on democracy and peace building issues at the Washington Institute for Near East Policy. It is her belief that “democracy lives and dies in the field of every campaign.” 

Cate Hardesty has been actively involved in the Indivisible Movement that sprang up following the 2016 election. She is Congressional District 48’s Captain for Code Blue and the Coordinator for the 48th Action Council. She is also an active member of NBWDC, and works tirelessly to promote voter registration and voter education. 

The meeting is free for NBWDC members and $15 admission for non-members. Seating is limited, so RSVPs are required. Visit www.NBWDC.org to RSVP and for additional information.


NMUSD approves 2018/19 Calendar 

NMUSD logo

Newport-Mesa Unified School District Board of Education has approved their 2018/19 School Calendar and Schedule of Activities.

Some of the highlights: first day of school is Tuesday, Sept. 4, 2018; the school year will end on Thursday, June 20, 2019 for grades 7-12 and Friday, June 21, 2019, for K-6.

Winter Vacation begins with an early release on Dec. 21, 2018 with students returning on Monday, Jan. 7, 2019.

For a complete view of the calendar click School Calendar 2018/19.

Maybe it’s time to book your 2018/19 travel.


On the Harbor: Fall is here and reminiscing about sailing

By LEN BOSE

Fall is here, the leaves change color and the activity around the harbor cools down a little, so I thought I would take a cruise and report my observations.

October started off with a loud roar from the Huntington Beach Air Show. Activity on the harbor felt more like the 4th of July, let me take that back, the air show seemed to have broken the sound barrier in more ways than one. According to Dave Beek, owner of Island Marine Fuel, “The air show is one of the busiest days of the year for us.” Countless marine industry people were too busy to smile and just had their heads down…working. Marina Park was full and the Dunes launch ramp appeared to be close to capacity. The most common quote I heard was, “I have never seen so many boats out on the Huntington Beach flats at one time.”

Most of the boaters would be heading out of the harbor between 10:00 and 11:00 a.m. then returning around 4:00 or 5:00 p.m. The fog was clearing up early, the sun was out and there was only a light southerly breeze rolling across the water. It does not get much better than that and the timing could not have been better for all the different harbor users that weekend. Everyone I talked to on the water planned on returning to the air show next year.

As the airshow left with a boom, just the way it came in, people seemed to take in a big sigh, sit back and relax before the next tide change of the holidays approaches. From my cruise around the harbor, the shipyards appeared busy, the repo marina looked empty which I assume is a good indication on our economy. The fishing charter boats looked to be shifting over to more whale watching charters. A pod of Orca whales passed by our coastline this month which has kept the sea lions in the harbor.

Sea LionsJPG 1016

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Photo by Len Bose

As I mentioned in my last column the sea lion population has been a constant irritation to the boats located in A and B mooring fields close to the harbor entrance. The model coyotes are still the leading deterrent to keep the sea lions off your boats and docks. The Coast Guard dock became a target early this month with some great effort, as the sea lion barking moved up the bay.

While walking the docks, it appears most of the marinas are full again along with an increase in brand new boats, which is always good for me and adds a giddyup in my step.

Newport Harbor Yacht Club’s new clubhouse is starting to take shape and there are loud noises that Balboa Yacht Club is moving forward in renovating their clubhouse too. Slips are getting bigger around the harbor, as yacht clubs seem to be adjusting and renovating their clubhouses. My gut tells me it will not be much longer before more condominiums will enclose our harbor.

This thought frightens me: We only have one launch ramp in town and the commercial pier is a third of its size 10 years ago. Accessibility to our moorings is becoming more and more difficult, so where can beginning boaters go to launch their boats? Like I said in my last column “What are you gonna do?”

I guess I’m going to show my age and dream of the past. Rather than wish on my youth returning, I will wish for the small boating clubs to return. I long for the days where we returned from the water, threw burgers on the BBQ, sat down to a simple picnic bench and told sea stories of the day. No big deal that my hat is on, pants are wet, or that the kids are throwing rocks into the water for the longest skip or running around and hiding from each other.

For me and the sport of sailing it appears my bubble has popped and I will have to take my hat off, waddle on up to the bar and order a 10 dollar draft beer and consider that 25 dollar hamburger. Ya ya…I know poor me. But I still like to dream of simpler days and the thought that I am turning into my Dad does not bother me one bit.

Sea ya.

~~~~~~~~

Len Bose is a yachting enthusiast, yacht broker and harbor columnist for StuNewsNewport.


Pet of the WeekDog and Cat print

StuNewsNewport is delighted to be working with the Newport Beach Animal Shelter to help get the word out in search of loving homes for pets that deserve a warm, nurturing environment and a place to call “home.”

Nicky

Courtesy of Newport Beach 

Animal Shelter

MEET NICKY

Adorable Nicky is seeking a loving home

Nicky is a 6-year-old Terrier mix. She is sweet and loves to go on walks. She is spayed, microchipped and up to date on vaccines.

Adoption costs at the shelter:

Dogs - $130

Puppies - $150

Cats - $90

Kittens - $110

At any given time, the shelter can have 4 - 5 dogs and 7 - 8 cats/kittens available for adoption. At times, they receive owner turn-ins that would do best adopted out together. 

If you are interested in finding out more about Nicky, or any other animals up for adoption, the Newport Beach Animal Shelter is located at 20302 Riverside Drive, Newport Beach. It is open daily from 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. Call 949.644.3656. Email Valerie Schomburg at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it..

To find out how you can help support the shelter, visit www.nbpd.org and click on “Our Animal Shelter” to view the wish list. They can always use food & treats; new toys; grooming, hygiene & comfort products; as well as laundry soap, dish soap, paper towels, sponges & scrub pads and lint rollers. If you are interested in volunteering, you can fill out and sign the application on the website.


Interfaith Council to hold Resource Fair 

The Newport Mesa Irvine Interfaith Council will host its annual Resource Fair on Wednesday, Oct. 18 at Hoag Hospital in the Hoag Conference Center, 3900 Pacific Coast Highway, Newport Beach.

The Interfaith Council brings together non-profits that work to alleviate poverty, homelessness, hunger and also works with issues such as aging and mental health. 

Participants this year include Alzheimer’s Orange County, the Council on Aging Orange County, the Orange County Food Bank, Big Brothers Big Sisters, Human Options, Mercy House, Families Forward, Share Our Selves and Hoag.

The meeting begins at 11:45 a.m. with lunch at noon and the program immediately following. 

Lunch is $12 with reservations (This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.) and $15 at the door. 

The Interfaith Council is a spiritual and ethical force of faith community representatives that enable inter-religious dialogue and service in an attempt to build a community that honors and respects many voices. www.ocinterfaith.org.


Full Moon Walk at ENC 

Full Moon Hike

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Join Environmental Nature Center naturalist Fiorella Gardella for a nocturnal hike in the Center to learn about the full moon on Friday, Nov. 3 at 6 p.m. Flashlights are discouraged.

This program is for humans age 6 and up. Cost is $6 per participant ($5 for ENC members). Reservations are required, so visit www.encenter.org to sign up.

Environmental Nature Center is located at 1601 E. 16th St., Newport Beach.


Fall Mixer planned by CdM Chamber

Fall Networking

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The Corona del Mar Chamber of Commerce invites the community to their Fall Networking Mixer & Pop-Up Shop on Tuesday, Oct. 24, from 5:30 to 7:30 p.m. The Mixer will take place in the “swanky” offices of the Boutique Real Estate Group, 3653 E. Coast Highway, Corona del Mar.

The evening will include food and beverages, a trendy pop-up shopping experience and a chance to meet new business and social contacts.

RVSPs are not required, but are preferred. The event is free to Chamber members and $20 for non-members. For more information on the Mixer or other CdM Chamber events go to www.CdMChamber.com or call 949.673.4050.


Fair Game

By TOM JOHNSON

Former Daily Pilot Ad Director murdered

TomJohnsonLast Friday started off like any other day, I woke up. Don’t laugh, a close former associate of mine didn’t. My phone rang in the eight o’clock hour, it was my daughter Ashley, she said, “Dad, did you hear the woman shot and killed in Aliso Viejo yesterday was Lisa Cosenza?”

I was shocked.

Lisa was my Ad Director at the Daily Pilot for a number of years, a real part of the team.

Apparently, Thursday afternoon (October 12) an issue erupted at Lisa’s home that she shared with her boyfriend Doug Ferguson. Doug’s son apparently grabbed a gun, shot and killed Lisa and Doug and wounded two others.

Police arrested Luke William Ferguson, 26, the next day in Inglewood.

One report said that Luke was upset because “his dad wanted him to stop drinking beer and get a job.”

So you shoot your dad and the woman who’s letting you stay in her house? Unfathomable.

Lisa began working in the Daily Pilot real estate department selling advertising in 1996. She came from a highly respected Orange County real estate family, and she did very well. 

Eight years later I was looking for an Advertising Director. I actually approached Lisa and urged her to apply for the job. She did and the rest was history. She had a toughness and an edge to her personality that I figured would serve her well leading the department. For the most part it did. 

She remained at the Pilot until 2013.

At the Daily Pilot everyone was close, we had an us-against-them attitude as we battled to keep our ownership, the Los Angeles Times, from ruining our business model and fought the Orange County Register for advertising share. 

Those days were fun and I like to think of them fondly as the heyday of the Daily Pilot.

The sad part is that the group loses Lisa, who now becomes the second staff member to be murdered. Donna Jacobsen, our much beloved Credit Manager, was stabbed to death upon arriving home following an evening church service in December of 1996.

As close as Lisa and I were in our days working together, we had not communicated for the last number of years. Now, that window of opportunity is forever closed. 

It’s a good reminder for me and everyone else on staying connected.

Godspeed Lisa, Godspeed.


CosmetiCare hosts BeautyLand event

BeautyLand

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Newport Beach-based CosmetiCare, Orange County’s leading cosmetic surgery center and medspa, will host its third annual BeautyLand event on Thursday, Oct. 26 from 5 to 8 p.m., to help answer questions the community might have about aesthetic technology, lasers, body sculpting and other cosmetic procedures. This free event offers an opportunity for guests to interact with CosmetiCare’s experts in a no-pressure, fun atmosphere overlooking the Balboa Harbor. Complimentary hors d’oeuvres and wine will be served.

The intimate experience will give attendees an insider’s look into CosmetiCare’s signature rooms, where they can learn more about non-invasive beauty treatments through demonstrations of techniques to correct wrinkles, loose and sagging skin, uneven tone and pigmentation, rosacea and more.

BeautyLand stops include: Skin Care and Glow Room, Fat Melting Room, Laser Room, Freeze & Fill Room, Nip Tuck Room and Weight Loss Room.

In addition, exclusive day-of specials and giveaways will be offered on many of CosmetiCare’s most popular preventative beauty treatments including; Voluma, Juvederm, Botox, TruSculpt and others. Guests will enjoy live demonstrations of CoolSculpting – a noninvasive procedure that targets stubborn areas of fat. As an added bonus, guests will have the opportunity to “try on” treatments using the New Look Now® aesthetic treatment visualizers. Upon arriving, guests will have the option to have their photos taken and receive a photo simulation of cosmetic treatments to their problem areas before leaving.

Space is limited and RSVP is required. Call 949.718.6900 or email This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.. CosmetiCare will offer 10 free units of Botox to RSVP’d guests who bring a friend to the event.

CosmetiCare is located at 1101 Bayside Drive, Suite 200, Newport Beach. For more information about BeautyLand, visit www.cosmeticare.com.


Childhelp to host Studio 54 gala

Studio 54

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The OC Chapter of Childhelp is hosting its Studio 54 Fall Gala on Saturday, Oct. 28 from 6 to 11 p.m. at the Balboa Bay Resort. The evening’s festivities include dinner, gambling and boogie dancing. Bidding is automated so have your Smartphone charged.

Co-chairs of the event are Shan Vincent, Joy Estrada and Julie Thornton-Adams. Disco attire is encouraged. Tickets are $250 per person.

For event and ticket information, visit www.bidpal.net/childhelpocgala2017. For each dollar expended, over 92 cents is invested into serving the children in need of Childhelp’s program services.

For additional details, contact Pam Pharris at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it..

Balboa Bay Resort is located at 1221 W. Coast Highway, Newport Beach.


St. Lawrence String Quartet to perform at Segerstrom Center, replaces Pavel Haas Quartet

St Lawrence String Quartet

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Photo by Marco Borggreve

The previously announced chamber concert by the Pavel Haas Quartet scheduled for Oct. 20, 2017 has been canceled due to illness. The St. Lawrence String Quartet will now perform at Segerstrom Center in a program featuring works by Haydn and Brahms.

Members of the St. Lawrence String Quartet include Geoff Nuttall and Owen Dalby, violin; Lesley Robertson, viola; and Christopher Costanza, cello. The concert also welcomes pianist Stephen Prutsman who will join the quartet to perform Brahms’ Quintet for Piano and Strings in F Minor, Op. 34.

Subscribers and ticket holders are being contacted by the Center Box Office with further details. Ticket holders can also reach the Box Office directly at 714.556.2787 with questions. Single tickets start at $29 and are available online at www.SCFTA.org, at the Box Office at 600 Town Center Drive in Costa Mesa or by calling 714.556.2787. Patrons are invited to the free Preview Talk that will be held at 7:15 p.m., prior to the performance.


Chamber plans for upcoming Economic Forecast luncheon

Economic Forecast

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The Newport Beach Chamber of Commerce will present their 2018 Economic Forecast featuring the UCLA Anderson Forecast on Friday, Oct. 27 from 11:15 a.m. to 2 p.m. at the Balboa Bay Resort.

The Forecast is an annual event that attracts hundreds of Orange County business leaders, media and government officials and promises to deliver a powerful program presented by an esteemed and unprecedented panel of experts.

This year’s panel includes Jerry Nickelsburg, Ph.D., an Adjunct Professor of Economics at the Anderson School of Management, UCLA (his talk is titled “Prospects for the U.S. and California Economies in 2018”); Christopher Schwarz, an Associate Professor in Finance from the UCI Paul Merage School of Business (his talk is titled “Investment Strategies for 2018”); and Jonathan Lansner, a business columnist for the Orange County Register (he will discuss the “2018 Real Estate Outlook”).

Orange County Business Journal Publisher & CEO Richard Reisman will moderate.

Balboa Bay Resort is located at 1221 W. Coast Highway, Newport Beach.

For tickets and more information, visit www.newportbeach.com.


Stump the Stu

Why is this gray building called Brown?

Okay, here’s the challenge. Where is this Brown Building? A better question might be why do they call this gray building “brown.” Good luck.

Take the challenge, and submit your answers to: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.. The correct answers will be in Thursday’s edition.

If you have a unique spot or icon around town that you think StuNewsNewport readers would enjoy finding out about, please shoot it, share it and give us the answer, so we can challenge them!

Stump the Stu 1016

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Balboa Island Museum and NB Public Library present Tom Stillwell

Car with Surfboards

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Courtesy of Balboa Island Museum

On Wednesday, Nov. 8, the Balboa Island Museum and Newport Beach Public Library are enthused to present Tom Stillwell, the creator of “I grew up in Newport Beach BEFORE it was the OC.” 

The event takes place from 7 to 8 p.m. with a reception beginning at 6 p.m. at the Newport Beach Central Library’s Friends Room, 1000 Avocado Ave., Newport Beach.

“I grew up in Newport Beach BEFORE it was the OC, or NBB4OC, is a Facebook group of more than 14,000 people,” Stillwell said. “A few still live in Newport Beach, but the vast majority are spread across the United States and around the world. There are members on every continent except Antarctica.”

“The one thing that binds this group together is that they all grew up in Newport as it made its transition from a sleepy little beach town at the end of the Red Car Line to being the center of wealth and commerce. They remember when you told people you were from Newport Beach they said, “Where’s that?” not “Ohhhh! You’re from the OC.”

If you would like to journey back – just for an evening – to the Newport Beach of days gone by, where you could visit the Buffalo Farm, ride a horse on the beach, eat ice cream at Wil Wrights, or go waterskiing in the Back Bay, don’t miss this Balboa Island Museum’s Speaker Event. Stillwell will present a lively collection of photographs, videos, and stories and lead a discussion that will transport you back to those wonderful days.

Seating is limited and a $10 donation is requested. To reserve your spot, visit www.balboaislandmuseum.org/stillwell.


Grand Opening of Phase III of Sculpture at Civic Center Park 

Cosmic Glints with yellow tower base

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Courtesy of Newport Beach Public Library/

Newport Beach City Arts Commission

The Newport Beach City Arts Commission will hold a grand opening celebration for the third phase of the Sculpture in the Civic Center Park Exhibition on Saturday, Oct. 28 from 1:30 to 4 p.m. at the Newport Beach Civic Center, 100 Civic Center Drive, Newport Beach.

The event will celebrate the addition of nine new sculptures to the Sculpture in the Civic Center Park Exhibition. A short program will be held in Council Chambers beginning at 2 p.m., with a reception following. Some of the artists will be on hand to talk about their artwork and visitors will be able to take a walking tour of the sculptures. Special art activities for children will be presented by the Chuck Jones Center for Creativity.

The 14-acre Newport Beach Civic Center Park was specially designed by renowned landscape architect Peter Walker as an intended sculpture garden. Arts Orange County provided professional services for the coordination of the artist selection and installation of the sculptures. The nine new sculptures were selected from submissions received by a national call for entries based on their artistic merit, durability, practicality and site appropriateness. They are being installed October 23 - 26 and will remain at the Civic Center Park until Summer 2019. The nine sculptures are as follows: Burnt Matchstick by Karl Unnasch, Flight by Steven Rieman, Popsicles by Craig Gray, Be Still and Know by John Merigian, No Swimming by Oleg Lobykin, Cosmic Glints by Patricia Vader, Getting Your Bearings by David Boyer, Cultural Pedestrians by Sue Quinlan, and Life is a Balancing Act by Cindy Debold.

For more information on the event or exhibition, go to www.newportbeachca.gov/culturalarts (under Sculpture in Civic Center Park) or contact the Cultural Arts Services Office at 949.717.3808.

Art and Artists:

Burnt Matchstick

Artist: Karl Unnasch

Physically inspired by radio tower design, this 40-foot sculpture, with its soft-glowing beacon and slow flicker, captures a fleeting moment in time: the split-second after a burning wooden matchstick has been extinguished by a gust of air. Varying combinations of amber, black, blue and white domestic opalescent glass aggregate in a multi-planar fashion in the construction of this larger-than-life, seemingly innocuous object.

Flight

Artist: Steven Rieman

The engaging stainless steel and bronze sculpture, Flight, captures an idea not a moment in time. According to the artist, the symbolic bird soaring through a ring of the sun represents a future of wonder with the random letters that cover its form questioning the human experience and how we impact our future.

Popsicles

Artist: Craig Gray

This whimsical sculpture stacks three giant colorful popsicles in a pop art creation with a “feel good” attitude that fulfills the artist’s goal, “to warm the creative soul and bring happiness to the heart.” Chosen as the favorite in a community survey, the steel, wood and stucco sculpture is covered in colorful epoxy that appears to be melting as it hits the warm concrete base.

Be Still and Know

Artist: John Merigian

The simplicity of this giant welded steel figure invites viewers to pause and reflect. It exudes a contemplative, soulful emotion that fits well with the peaceful surroundings of the park. Its complexity of form lies in the relationship between space, lines, shadows and silhouettes as the movement of the crossing sun through the day reveals constantly changing shadows and linear components.

No Swimming

Artist: Oleg Lobykin

This work was first seen at Burning Man 2008. According to the artist, this conceptual artwork represents deep concern about the impact of human activity and progress on nature. The massive shark’s dorsal fin is covered in shiny aluminum leaf and rises 12 feet out of the park landscape.

Cosmic Glints

Artist: Patricia Vader

This kinetic wind-driven metal sculpture utilizes mostly upcycled materiaIs in its structure, including bicycle wheels and reflectors. The wheel circle is held together by compression and the largest wheels are bolted to the central motorcycle rim. The smaller wheels spin freely. The colorful, playful sculpture captures the elements of its environment, utilizing the ocean breezes for movement and sparkling sunlight to create glints of light that bounce off the moving aluminum disks.

Cosmic Glints closeup

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Cosmic Glints by Patricia Vader

Getting Your Bearings

Artist: David Boyer

Inspired by antique industrial artifacts that can be found in the historic areas of the Western United States, Getting Your Bearings is a kinetic wind sculpture that is monumental in size, whimsical in style and antique in appearance. Three steel and stainless steel paddle wheels sit atop a massive steel base, trunk and branches, turn effortlessly to create an overhead kaleidoscope of light and shadow.

Getting Your Bearings

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Getting Your Bearings by David Boyer

Cultural Pedestrians

Artist: Sue Quinlan

Cultural Pedestrians is a series of freestanding concrete and steel pieces that visually represent different cultures of past and present people from our society and others. The pieces are human-sized, with diverse faces, hands and artifactual jewelry, illustrating the multifaceted compilation of smaller fragments of thoughts, experiences and aspirations.

Cultural Pedestrians

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Cultural Pedestrians by Sue Quinlan

Life is a Balancing Act

Artist: Cindy Debold

Life is a Balancing Act, is a life-size bronze sculpture of a young girl balancing on one foot, with her eyes closed. Standing on a rock is symbolic of a solid foundation and the closed eyes convey that life continually demands a degree of trust for it is always changing and we need to readjust to keep our balance.

For more information on the event or exhibition, visit www.newportbeachca.gov/culturalarts, under Public Art, or contact the Newport Beach Cultural Arts Services office at 949.717.3801.


Spots still available at Newport Bay Conservancy Golf Tournament

Newport Bay

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Upper Newport Bay, one of the largest natural estuaries in Southern California

Spots are still available at the Newport Bay Conservancy’s (NBC) inaugural golf tournament, the Newport Bay Conservancy Classic, taking place this Saturday, Oct. 14, at Newport Beach Golf Course. 

This event is part of the grand re-opening of the Newport Beach Golf Course and debut of the adjacent restaurant, The Emerald Kitchen. 

Charity Tournament Chairman and Volunteer Naturalist David Waller, along with a group of local naturalists and volunteers, are looking to create an experience that is both fun and educational for the players. Waller explains, “Funds raised by the tournament will benefit the Conservancy’s ongoing efforts in education, restoration, research and advocacy. This year’s fundraising goal will help expand the Conservancy’s educational programs to schools that would otherwise not be able to afford them.” 

The fundraising event begins at 3:30 p.m. with tee-off at 4 p.m. Players will enjoy “Nine 4 Nature” on the back half of the course. Prizes for a hole-in-one, longest drive and closest to the pin, in addition to other contests, entertainment and drinks/snacks will be at various holes. 

Dinner, silent auction & awards at the Emerald Kitchen is open to the golfers, guests and anyone else interested in attending following play (approximately 7:30 p.m.).

Registration: Individual, $125; Foursome, $400; Dinner, silent auction and awards banquet only, $50.

The Conservancy welcomes any and all businesses and organizations to participate and sponsor the event. For more details visit www.newportbay.org or call 949.640.1751. Newport Bay Conservancy (NBC) is a non-profit 501 (c) (3) organization, Federal Tax ID # 33-0545786, dedicated to the protection and preservation of the Upper Newport Bay, one of the largest natural remaining estuaries in Southern California.

Newport Beach Golf Course is located at 3100 Irvine Ave., Newport Beach.


Shop TalkShopping Bag

By LANA JOHNSON

Come celebrate the Grand Opening of Scout & Molly’s in Westcliff Plaza

Charity Genaw 

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Submitted photo

Charity Genaw is among the helpful staff to assist in putting together a great look

Scout & Molly’s Boutique in Westcliff Plaza is holding their grand opening celebration on Saturday, Oct. 14 from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. Check out their fashionable digs while enjoying opportunity drawings, gift cards, photo ops, and sips & snacks.

Scout & Molly’s is a women’s fashion boutique created by brother-sister duo Heather Halterman Wharton and Michael Halterman. Shop their array of stylish clothing and accessories with brands including Cupcakes and Cashmere, Sanctuary, Laila Jayde, and more.

Stop by for a unique personal shopping experience and meet their team who is ready to assist you in selecting apparel and accents that complement your individual style.

Scout & Molly’s is located at 1130 Irvine Ave., Newport Beach. Call 949.612.7599. www.shopirvinecompany.com.

Editor’s Note: If you or someone you know operates a Newport Beach-based business that you would like to see featured in Shop Talk, please send the information to This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it..


Farm to Fork: A Foodie’s Point of ViewFork

By LANA JOHNSON

Farmhouse Owner, Executive chef and Author Rich Mead to host Amelia Saltsman

Amelia Saltsman

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Photo by Patricia Williams

Amelia Saltsman

On Thursday, Oct. 26 from 6 to 9 p.m., you’re invited to enjoy a special Autumn Harvest Dinner, presented by Farmhouse owner and Executive Chef Rich Mead. He will be collaborating with longtime friend and fellow farmers market lover, Amelia Saltsman, to celebrate her newest cookbook, The Seasonal Jewish Kitchen: A Fresh Take on Tradition.

The evening’s menu will feature inspiring dishes from Saltsman’s cookbook beginning with passed appetizers. The coursed dinner will feature dishes made with the freshest seasonal produce and locally sourced proteins, followed by a selection of desserts. Wine will be poured throughout.

Event proceeds will be donated to the Red Cross benefitting the tens of thousands of people still in need in the wake of all the hurricanes.

The Autumn Harvest Dinner Menu:

APPETIZERS

Green Olives with Za’atar and Citrus

Israeli Eggplant Caviar Wraps

Yemenite Pumpkin and Carrot Soup Shooter with cilantro pesto

SALAD

Arugula with golden Barhi dates, dried apricots, nectarines and sumac

ENTREES

Grilled Fish Three Ways with autumn slaw – beets, carrots, kohlrabi

Roasted Chicken with tangerines, green olives, and silan

Braised Lamb Shanks with Tehachapi Grain Project red fife and sonora, kale, butternut squash, cipollini onions and smoked salt

DESSERT

Roasted Autumn Fruit

Apple Pear Galette with Rye Pastry

Amelia Saltsman cookbook

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Submitted photo

The cost of the dinner is $150 per person, and each ticket purchase includes a copy of Amelia Saltsman’s newest cookbook. Dinner, wine, tax and gratuity are included. Space is limited. Visit www.farmhouserg.com/autumn-harvest-dinner or call 949.640.1415 to reserve your spot.

Ciao Vincenza!


Kick up your heels at Newport Dunes’ Boots on the Beach Country Pumpkin Patch

kids with pumpkin

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Submitted photo

These kids found their favorite giant pumpkins

Finding the perfect pumpkins to carve and display is going to get a bit easier this year at the Newport Dunes Waterfront Resort, as it kicks off the fall season with the “Boots on the Beach Country Pumpkin Patch” on Saturday, Oct. 21 and Sunday, Oct. 22.

Bring the family out for a weekend of festive activities including picking the perfect pumpkin at the pumpkin patch, crafts, inflatables, and seasonal treats and drinks. On Saturday evening, there is a free country music concert featuring live performances by Urban Legend with Young Guns and The Kelly Boys line dancing and instruction. A full bar and country BBQ will be available for purchase.

On Sunday, come out and enjoy classic cars from movies and TV on display including the Batmobile and Back to the Future Delorean. A full bar and country BBQ will be available for purchase as well.

Hours: Saturday, Oct. 21: 11 a.m. - 6 p.m., Pumpkin Patch; 6 - 9 p.m., Free Country Music Concert; Sunday, Oct. 21: 11 a.m. - 5 p.m.; Pumpkin Patch and Classic Car Show.

Newport Dunes Waterfront Resort is located at 1131 Back Bay Drive, Newport Beach. Free admission with food and beverages available for purchase; parking is $10 per car. For more information, call 949.729.3863 and visit www.NewportDunes.com.


Prescription drug take-back day coming up

Pills

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On Saturday, Oct. 28 from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m., the Newport Beach Police Department will be partnering with the Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA) for National Prescription Drug Take-Back Day at two locations: OASIS Senior Center: 801 Narcissus Avenue, Corona del Mar (Main Entrance) and Hoag Hospital, Sunset View Parking Lot (lower campus, first left when entering from PCH), 1 Hoag Road, Newport Beach.

This event gives the public an opportunity to prevent pill abuse and theft by removing potentially dangerous expired, unused and unwanted prescription drugs from their homes. Anyone with medications to dispose of can bring them to either of the designated locations for quick and easy drop-off. The service is free and anonymous; no questions asked.

Medicines that are languishing in your cabinets are highly susceptible to diversion, misuse and abuse. The traditional methods of disposing of unused medicines – like flushing them down the toilet or throwing them in the trash – pose potential safety and health hazards, but National Prescription Drug Take-Back Day is a safe and straightforward solution.


School Notes

NMUSD 

The Newport-Mesa Unified School District will present Next Steps College & Career Night on Wednesday, Oct. 18 at the Orange County Fair & Events Center.

The event is open to students from 7 - 12th grades, who are encouraged to “start planning their future.” 

More than 200 colleges will be represented, with hands-on career technical demonstrations, along with college- and career-related workshops.

The event runs from 6:30 to 9 p.m. in the Costa Mesa Building at the OC Fair & Events Center located at 88 Fair Drive, Costa Mesa.

• • •

On Oct. 24, the Board of Education of the NMUSD at their regular meeting to be held at 6 p.m. at the District’s Board Room, will conduct a public hearing to provide an opportunity for the community to provide oral comment to the Board regarding the proposed new trustee boundaries. Persons seeking information should contact the Superintendent’s Office, 714.424.5031.

Newport Harbor High School

The Newport Harbor High School Drama Department presents “Deception, Deceit & Dessert” – three one-act plays to whet your appetite – in the NHHS Blackbox Theater tonight (Oct.12), Friday (Oct. 13) and Sunday (Oct. 15). Curtain time is 6 p.m. Thursday and Friday, and 2 p.m. Sunday.

Ticket prices are $15/students and $25 for adults 21+ and are available online at www.NHHSdrama.com.


Fair Game

By TOM JOHNSON

 Recall is on; local church still can’t go home

TomJohnsonReading between the lines, the recall of City Councilmember Scott Peotter is on.

Yesterday, Joy Brenner, a community activist and a key part of the Recall Scott Peotter effort, announced her plans to run for Peotter’s seat (see Letter to the Editor in today’s edition).

She obviously knows the signature count in the recall effort otherwise it wouldn’t make sense for her to announce her candidacy plans.

Another claim made in her announcement is a “November validation” of the signatures.

Once validated the City Council then has a pre-determined window of dates to work with to call a special election.

In the election, registered Newport Beach voters would vote for or against the recall and then separately there would a candidate or candidates to select from in the event he is recalled.

So Brenner’s in, who else? I reached out to Mike Toerge to confirm his interest and he replied, “I’ve never gone out, unlike Joy. I’m all in.” 

The “unlike Joy” reference was a comment made by Brenner where she initially vacillated on whether she should run or not. Again, see her letter.

Toerge ran against Peotter in 2014.

• • •

The second sale attempt of St. James the Great Church fell through this week according to The Rev. Canon John H. Taylor of the Diocese of Los Angeles.

Good news you might say for the Church’s previously displaced congregation. Not so.

Bishop Taylor wants the Church to be a “bishop’s chapel, with supply, or guest clergy invited to conduct Sunday services.” 

That basically means no local lay people, hence, little connection to the community and probably no Sunday school and things like that.

The existing St. James the Great congregation, which by the way meets at the Newport Beach Civic Center on Sundays, wants to move home, as you might imagine. And, the national Episcopal Church also recommended the same to the Diocese of Los Angeles.

So far, however, absolutely no cooperation between the two sides.

Remember though, every time this story seems over it somehow seems to “rise from the dead” so to speak.

• • •

This is from Julie Hamilton, Balboa Island, “Just letting the (Balboa) Island know of the passing of Alex Kojoumjian last night (Tuesday, October 10). Alex passed away peacefully in his sleep. Alex and Rachael have owned Alex’s Fashion Center for nearly 50 years on the Island.”


ENC to hold Fall Faire this Sunday, Oct. 15

Fall Faire

Courtesy of ENC

Youngsters check out the pumpkins waiting to be turned into jack-o-lanterns

Join ENC for the 42nd Annual Fall Faire & Pumpkin Patch this Sunday, Oct. 15 from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. 

Pumpkins of all shapes and sizes will be available for sale. Children will participate in a variety of fun crafts and games. Face painters will paint spiders, bats and pumpkins on faces and Henna tattoo artists will create designs on hands and feet. The Fall Faire will also feature pony rides and a petting zoo. Laguna Beach DJs will provide lively music for guests to dance to. The OC Bird of Prey Center, the Young Singers of Orange County and Angela Vincent of Queen Green will also provide entertainment.

Food and beverages will be available for purchase at Savor OC, the ENC’s restaurant showcase. This year’s restaurant sponsors include Saltwater Catering, Bluewater Grill, Sensitive Sweets and The Pizza Bakery. The Newport Beach Fire Department will also be on hand grilling up hamburgers and hotdogs.

Editor’s Note: ENC needs your help to make this event successful! They are collecting the following items for the Fall Faire Craft Walk: toothpaste tubes, bottle caps, black buttons and corks. If you have any of these items, you can drop them off at the ENC this week. They are also seeking volunteers to help out at the Fall Faire. If you’d like to volunteer on Oct. 15, visit the website at www.encenter.org. If you can help them toss pumpkins on Oct.13, sometime between 9 a.m. - 12 p.m., email Lori Whalen at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it..

Environmental Nature Center is located at 1601 E. 16th St., Newport Beach.


Christmas Boutique rings in the holidays at Roger’s Gardens

trees and ornaments

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Photos by Aimee Goodwin

Roger’s Gardens’ talented Creative Director Eric Cortina, Holiday Buyer Hedda Staines, and their Visual Design team have outdone themselves again this year by curating an elegant and beautiful Christmas boutique that’s open now.

All that is merry and bright sparkles in their Joyeux Noël Christmas Boutique. It celebrates the diversity and richness of European Christmas traditions while enhancing them with modern influences and themes.

Buyers have traveled over rooftops to bring you curated holiday gifts and decorations that showcase some of the oldest European craftsmanship, where families pass down traditional art forms from generation to generation. Glass ornaments are hand blown and hand decorated in family workshops in Poland and Nutcrackers made in Germany accompany seasonal dinnerware from Portugal and Italy.

Browse the 20 trees – with names such as Pinecones & Ice and Retro Santa – adorned with more than 600 different ornaments.

collectibles

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Whether you stay up to watch the first star in the night sky on Christmas Eve or leave a stocking for Santa or a shoe for St. Nicholas, Christmas is a time to celebrate traditions and create new memories – so come experience the magic that’s a bit closer than going to the North Pole.

Roger’s Gardens is located at 2301 San Joaquin Hills Road, Corona del Mar. Visit www.rogersgardens.com.


Children’s Halloween Festival at Roger’s Gardens

trick or treat kids

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Courtesy of Roger’s Gardens

Calling all goblins, ghosts and super heroes! Kids, get ready to wear your favorite costume to the Children’s Halloween Festival at Roger’s Gardens on Monday, Oct. 30 at 4 p.m. Join in the fun at the costume parade, be creative during interactive crafts, discover spooky activities and trick-or-treat throughout the Gardens.

Adults – don’t forget to bring your cameras for unique photo opportunities.

Roger’s Gardens is located at 2301 San Joaquin Hills Road, Corona del Mar. Visit www.rogersgardens.com.

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